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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, April 07, 1908, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1908-04-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOjltjme 60
FIRST ACT OF NEW ADMINISTRA
TION 1S TO DISCHARGE CHIEF
OP POLICE, CAPTAIN AND TWO
DETECTIVES.
THE CASE WILL BE
FOUGHT IN COURT
INCOMPETENCY IS CHARGE MADE
BY COMMISSIONER HAMERY—
MAYOR MATH18 SWORN IN A8
HEAD OF COMMISION.
Des Moines, April 6.—(Special)—
The new Des Moines plan aozhmis
Bloners wept into office this morning
and confirmed the caucus nominees
of the city officials. Commissioner
Hamery of the department of public
safety immediately discharged Chief
of Police Jones, Capt. W. W. Pattee
and Detectives Sims and Sinon, charg
ing incompetency. The two detec
tives will flght the case in court under
the civil service law.
,J,, Last Meeting Thi6 Morning.
The last, meeting of a Des Moines
city council, composed of nine alder
men, representing seven wards and
two townships was held this morning
J' at 9:80 o'clock. The business of the
year was brought to a close and the
affairs formally turned over to the
five men who were elected a week
y, ago today to manage the municipality.
G, W. Mattern, the last mayor under
the old form of government, admlnis
tered the oath of office to ivlayor A. J.
Mathis, who neads the first commis
sion under the Des Moines plan.
JIT C'~ Mayor Mathis then administered the
oat^
t0
^e four commissioners.
svls -men who are first to. manage
'Des Moines under "the new system "of
^government are: Mayor, A. J. Math
commissioners, Wesley Ash, John
Hamery, John Mac
Vicar and Charles
Schramm.
The last council under the ward
•-jgsystem of government, which dies to
-day, is composed of the following
men:
gM
Mayor, G. W. Mattern aldermen,
iijt Eugene W. Waterbury, William H.
Brereton, C. C. Christy, Jerry Dono
.i0 van, W. S. Fraley, John L. Hamery,
Ream C. Johnson, Dan O'Grady and
W. O. Staly.
GIRL SHOT BY
MED ADMIRER
PROMINENT PITTSBURG MAN
SLAYS' CHILD WITH WHOM
HE WAS INFATUATED.
Pittsburg, April 6.—Samuel L. Gard
ner, aged 59, a civil engineer add
prominent citizen of McKees Rocks, a
suburb of the city, shot and instantly
killed Dorothy Bradney, aged 16, and
then shot himself through the mouth,
dying at the hospital later. Gardner
has a wife and several grown up chil
dren. The prominence of both fam
ilies and the youth of Miss Bradney
served to make the shooting a sen
sation. It is alleged Gardner has been
infatuated with the young girl for a
long time.
BECKY YOUNG DEAD
Famous Civil War Nurse Expires
Des Moines Today of
Old Age.
3000
at
Des Moines, April 6.—(fepepial)
Aunt Becky Young, famous the coun
try over as a nurse during the civil
war, died at 3 o'clock this morning
at her home here of old age.
Major J. J. Stuckey, a well known
pension attorney and prominent G. A
R. man, also died this morning.
His Heroism Is Fatal.
Maf-shalltown, April 6.—John Berg,
quartermaster's clerk at the Iowa Sol
diers' home, died from the effects of
his exposure and over exhaustion in
recovering the body of Beulah Ban.i
fleld of Fraser, the soldiers' home
waitress, who was drowned in th*
Iowa river on March 11. Berg has
been sick in the home hospital since
a few days after his cold plunge into
the river. Cerebro spinal fever was
the cause of his death.
Establishes Quarantine.
Washington. April 6.—The marine
hospital and public health service to
|s day issued: an order establishing
quarantine beginning today against
Cuba, with the exception of the met-
lopolitan district of, Havana.
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Children
Parade Streets in
Anti-Saloon War
O
Bloomlngton, III., April 6.—
One thousand women and three
thousand children waving flags
and banners naraded the streets
of Bloomlngton today, appeal
ing to the voters to drive out
the saloons. The procession
was a final demonstration of a
spectacular campaign for local
option. All day tomorrow wom
en and children will serve hot
coffee and sandwiches to men at
the polls. Both sides today de
clared the fight to be won.
PANIC CLAIMS
MANY VICTIMS
NEARLY EVERT HOME IN ELLS
WORTH, ILL., HAS MEMBER
ON INJURED THRONG.
Ellsworth, 111., April 6.— Nearly ev
ery home in Ellsworth haB one or
more victims of the explosion and
panic in the hall of the Modern Wood
men Saturday night, are a result of
which two women are fatally hurt
and more than a score seriously in
jured. The number of victims is great
er than at first supposed.
The panic, which followed the ex
plosion of a gasoline lamp, came just
at the close of a program arranged by
the women's society of the MethodlBt
church. There was music and speak
ing, then supper was served. Toward
the close of the supper a lamp sus
pended from the ceiling exploded and
scattered the burning fluid in all di
rections and ignited the scenery on
the stage. The audience rushed for the
exit and many were knocked down
and trampled upon.
Those Fatally Injured.
The fatally hurt are:
DAWSON, MRS. JOHN W.
STANGER, MRS. PARIS.
The other victims include:
Fry, Mrs. Irwin, leg dislocated,
badly cut and bruised.
Stanger, Frank, shoulder dislocated.
Spain, Mrs. Washington, head in
jured and eye gouged.
Reid, William.
Van Gundy, Mrs. Frank, ankle dis
located, leg injures- and-bruised. xr
It Is regarded, remarkable that
no children were, numbered among
-the seriously injured, as a number of
them were in the hall.
The gasoline lighting system used
was made by a Chicago concern.. A
new pipe connection had been hur
riedly made the preceding day, and
the work, it is claimed, was improp
erly done, allowing gasoline vapor to
escape and causing the explosion.
Only Two Exits.
There were only two exits, one In
front and a narrow outside stairway
In the rear. Down the front stairway
poured nearly one-half of the people
present. These escaped in. safety,
though some were bruised. Frightened
by flames at the end of the hall, more
than half the people rushed back to
wards the narrow door In the rear
and crowded their way through. This
stairway was open, the handrail hav
ing been broken away some time ago.
It was used only for such purposes as
carrying coal and supplies to the hall
npstairs and when many tried to de
scend that way they were quickly
crowded off.
The stream of people from the small
doorway came so rapidly that many
were pushed off the landing at the top
before they could attempt to descend.
It was a drop of 20 feet. Mrs. J. W.
Dawson was one of the first to be
pushed off the narrow platform, and
she was followed quickly by others,
all of whom piled upon each other in
a struggling mass on the ground be
low. Others fell from the stairway at
varying heights and were trampled
upon by others.
EVANS TAKES CARRIAGE RIDE.
Rear Admiral Gains Strength Rapidly
and Has Mud Bath in
the Kurhaus.
Paso Robles Hot Springs, Cal., April
6.—Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans
was strong enough to take a two
hours' carriage ride yesterday through
the hills surrounding the springs.
Yesterday morning the admiral was
given his first mud bath in the Kur
haus since his arrival here.
This was followed by massage treat
ment for an hour, AS he looked at
the hot, black cozy mass in which he
was being acked and the sulphurious
steam rising from it, he remarked
jocularly: "This is nearer h—1 than
I ever was before."
He not only enjoyed the novel ex
perience, but declared himself a^
wonderfully benefitted by the treat
ment.
Wife in Ft. Madison.
Ft. Madison, April 6.—(Special)
Mrs. Robley Evans and daughter pass
ed through here this morning on the
Santa Fe enroute to join Admiral
Evans at Paso Robles, Hot Springs.
Cal..
Bryan at Denver.
Denver, Co'.o., April 6.—Accompan
ied from Colorado Springs by a re
ception committee headed by Former
oenator Patterson, William J. Bryan
arrived in Denver at 10:30 o'clock to
day He was driven in an automobile
to Denver university and made a non
partisan .address to the students.
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1
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"aw***
mm
E PEACE IS
BE IN SICHT
OPERATORS AND MINERS OF CEN­
TRAL COMPETITIVE FIELD ARE
NOW HOLDING CONFERENCE
AT INDIANAPOLIS. fyg
]jj2T
IOWA MINES MAY
SOON BE OPENED
SLIGHT DIFFICULTY MET IN SET
TLING SCALE FO RFIRST DIS
TRICT LEADS MEN TO LOOK
FOR EARLY REDUCTION
Indianapolis, Ind., April 6.—The
coal operators of the Central competi
tive field, consisting of western Penn
sylvania, Ohio, Illinois and Indiana are
today holding a conference with repre
sentatives of the United Mine Work
ers of America to take the Initial
steps looking to the Issuing of a call
for a joint convention to fix a wage
scale.
Illinois Refuses to Confer.
While several of the Illinois opera
tors are here It was stated they would
not go into the conference offiotally
with the miners of the four states and
the operators of the other three. The
officials of the miners express confi
dence that the conference will result
in the resumption of mining opera
tions generally at the old wage scale.
The Situation in Iowa.
Des Moines, April 6.—The Iowa
miners and operators are get
ting together and their slight difficul
ties over a new wage Bcale will soon
be over, and the mines of Iowa will
doubtless open by the 10th of the pres
ent month.
By adopting the scale paid in dis
trict No. 1 under-the old agreement
the.scale committees of, the mine.own
ers and workers yesterday indicated
that an early adjustment of their dif
ferences^will be made and that prac
tically the same scale paid last year
will be continued in the new one-year
agreement' The committees at their
joint meetings have already made a
record for progress and prominent
members of the two organizations
give the encouraging assurance that
peaceful conditions will prevail with
in a week.
The members of the scale commit
tee of the United Mine Workers of
America dropped any hostility they
may have felt toward the employers
when the latter early in the negotia
tions tentatively agreed not to argue
for a reduction of the scale paid tin
der the agreement which expired
March 31. The operator will be will
ing to pay a material or general in
crease in wages. From the action of
the scale committees In two other
states who hare adopted the old scale,
it would look as though the miners
are in favOr of accepting the scale
they have been getting.
The scale adopted for sub-district
No. 1 indicates the miners and day la
borers, and this class of labor is the
most largely employed. Following Is
the scale:
Mine run coal, per ton $ .91
Hand picked coal, per ton 1.05
Screen lump coal, per ton 1.05
foot entry, per yard 1.72
12-foot entry, per yard 1.35
14-foot entry, per yard 1.30
Room turning 12 to 14-foot door
way 2.25
Double shifting entries, 25 cents per
yard extra.
There are four sub^istrlcts in Iowa
and they will be taken up ah1 dealt
with separately. But the disposition
of the first district at the old scale,
without much debate. for either party,
is a good omen. This district includes
the mines near Centerville.
There is no doubt but what the
classification of the men who operate
the mine machinery will be changed
and this revision will necessitate a
change in scale paid such' workers.
The classification under t.he old agree
ment has not proven satisfactory and
has brought much complaint from the
men. It is not thought that tnere will
be any hitch in the progress, as the
operators will consent to some con
cessions.
Refusal to Reveal Age Causes Strike.
South Norwalk, Conn., April 6.—
Two hundred women employes of the
C. & K. hat shop, went on a strike be
cause their employers wanted to know
their ages.
The trouble arose over the promo
tion of three young operators to be in
spectors. The employes voted 120 to
76 not to work under the girls named.
Their committee waited on the fitm
and presented an ultimation. The em
ployers considered their protest and
told the committee to have the em^
ployes submit tbeir ages and they
would pick out the three oldest for in
spectors.
The committee reported, but one
half pf the women positively refused
to-give their tyj.es, and a strike fol
lowed,
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QTTD3TWA, ¥AfmO OOTOTY, IOWA, TTOijSi)AT APB-IL 7, 190S
LISBON STREETS
RUN WITH BLOOD
TROOPS. FIRE. IIJTO
LOWING
.. MOBS' FOL-
ELECTION" MON­
ARCHISTS WIN AT P.OLLS.
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Lisbon, April 6. —This city is in a
state of intense excitement over the
election riots of last night. No official
statement of the killed antjr wounded
has yet been issued but op,e observer
says the streets were lltefcally red
with blood. The counting ^f the bal
lots proceeds slowly. Thus far not a
single republican candidate has been
declared elected.
With the exception of a few minor
disorders in disaffected 'districts, •the
election* were conduced peaceably.
Last night, however, rioting broke out
in different parts of the city as
though by a preconcerted plan.
Troops which had been patrolling
the streets and otiers bold in reserve
were called out at once. Repeated
charges into mobs, which filled the
streets, had no effect. Persons Ip the
mob used sticks and stones aid what
ever weapons were at hand.
Troops Finally Ordered to Fire.
Finally the troops were ordered to
fire, with the result that several were
Milled, and wounded. The exact num
ber is not known as the rioters carried
the dead and wounded away.
This determined action on the part
of the authorities seemed to have the
desired effect and the mobs soon
were well dispersed. At a late hour
most of the republican voters had
gone to their homes, but bands of
youths continued to demonstrate be
fore the churches. They confined their
disorders to shouting.
Judge J. E. Cantril Is Dead,
Frankfort, Ky., April 6.—Judge Jas.
E. Cantrill of Georgetown, Ky., died
yesterday after a lengthy illness.
Judge Cantrill was the presiding judge
in the first two trials of Caleb Power?,
who war, charged with complicity in
the assassination of William Goebel.
Three years, ago Judge Cantrill was
elected judge of the court of appeals
for the state of Kentucky, but resign
ed several months ago.
Roosevelt Family Back From 8outh.
Washington, April 6.—Mrs. Roose
velt and her children. Miss Roosevelt,
Kermit, Archie and Quentin and Mi3S
Hagner and Miss Landon of New York
arrived in Washington Sunday, hav
ing spent ten days in the south. Part
of the tour was made on the Mayflow
er. The party arrived in Washington
on the Southern railway from Atlanta,
Ga.
INSTITUTE PLANNED
Rules and Regulations Were Alopted
for the Corn Growing Contest
to be Held Thi3 Summer.
The executive board of the Wapello
County Farmers' institute met Satur
day afternoon in the committee room
of the (Courier building and discussed
plans for the coming institute., Rules
and regulations wefe adopted" for the
coming corn gro'vtfftg' contest', which
will be held this .summer Further
eanouncements will be made' later.
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THE EARTH'S.NEW EASTER HAT
Evelyn Thaw Files
Suit to Annul Her
Marriage Today
New York- April 6.—-Counsel
for Evelyn -Thaw today filed, In
thS supreme court a suit for an-'
nulment, asked on the ground
that
Thaw
war Insane at the
time of the 'mariiUge.
Justice Hendricks appointed
Robt. E. Doyo aa referee to take
the evidence In the annulment
suit and stipulated that the tak
ing of testimony proceed within
three day*.
Evelyn Thaw Is said to be
preparing to go to California as
soon as tne suit for the! annul
ment of' her mariage with
White's slayer is concluded.
Chicago, April 6.—Milwaukee's "boy
Mayor," Sherburn M. Becker, will cam
paign for Governor of Wisconsin in
si balloon. He has placed -aix,order for
a duplicate of the largest balloon in the
world with the Bumbaugh-Helmann
campany of St. Louis. His plan is to
use the" great gas bag for quiok trans
portation from town -to town in north
ern Wisconsin, where tb,e roads are
muddy and bard to travel in the late
spring and early summer.
Mayor Becker is now at the Annex
aud yesterday
waB
busy going over the
plans and specifications for his new
speed bubble. He will build a wonder
ful basket that will furnish comfort
and convenience of all kinds while he
is above the pine woods.
"No doubt my enemies will say this
is done for sensation," said Mayor
Becker, "but the truth is that I am
looking for safety and qui6lc travel ip
a country difficult of. access. I have,
stumped Northern Wisconsin for good
roads and I know, how much the peo
ple up there need them.
"In a balloon I can go over all ob
stacles. I can choose my direction by
finding the right air circuits.
"I think in most towns I shall speak
from the basket of the balloon while
anchored twenty-feet or so from the
ground. When I want to leave all
I'll have to do is to let go .and rise
until I strike a current, that will carry
me over to my next town. I can find
and current I desire within an alti
tude of 1,200 feet.
Mayor Becker 3ays he will surely be
a candidate for Governor "if he listens
to the call of his friends." Although
in these wordB is a hint of hesitancy,
nothing but positjveness is to be seen
In Mayor Becker's face.
Torpedo Boats Arrive.
Magdalena Bay, April 6.—The fifth
of the six torpedo boats arrived at
Sundown today one day ahead of the
scheduled time., The Arethns has not
yet arrived-
fy
fe
i5-
MILWAUKEE'S BOY MAYOR WILL
STUMP THE! STATE IN NEW
STYLE."
BALLOON TO BE
USED BY BECKER BIG INCREASE
IN PENSIONS
~'5
Aiejoog n!Di.iois|H o|U)S y"
SENATE AGREES
ON LIQUOR BILL
PRACTICE OF HAVING EXPRESS
v" COMPANIES ACT AS AGENTS'
DEALERS STOPPED. W
Washington, d7c7 April 6. The
army appropriation bill as reported
to the senate today canto* $98,820,
000, a net increase of $14,618,000 over
the amount of the bill as It passed
the house. Among the items of In
crease is-the increased pay of offieera
and enlisted men, which amounts to
$7,000,000.
The democrats in the house today
continued their tactics of forcing a
roll call on the approval of the jour
nal and then turning in and voting for
it with the republicans.
The house later today unanimously
passed the Sterling employers' liabil
ity bill.
In deciding the.case of Longicar vs.
Toolan and McMillan against Longi
car. the supreme court of the United
States today upheld the Michigan law.
authorizing the sale of property to pay
delinquent taxes.
The President today sent the name
of John S. Leech of Illinois to be
public printer.
D'Abruzzi Reaches Rome.
Rome, April 6.—The duke of Abruz
zi arrived here yesterday morning and
went to the quirlnal where he was
greeted warmly by the royal family.
He had a long conference with King
Victor, but the result of the meeting
has not been learned.
All the papers yesterday published
the picture of Miss Elkins.
Jajjs Attack Americans.
Mukden, April 6. Four Japanese
entered the American consulate today
and brutally attacked the native staff
in revenge for a private spite. The
Japanese were arrested. No apology
has yet been offered and probably the
matter will be made the subsject of
diplomatic action.
&&PCS.&.
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STRIKERS ARE
4
1
Washington, D. C., Aprtl 8.— The
senate judiciary committee today
agreed upon a bill dealing with the
shipments of liquors from one Mate or
territory to another. The measure pro
vides there Bhall be no "collect on
delivery" packages of liquor shipped
in Interstate commerce where fic
titious names are used and that the
name of the consignor and consignee
shall be stated plainly. The provision
is designed to eliminate the practice
of railroad and express agents acting
as agents for liquor houses.
SENATE REPORTS BILL WITH
FOURTEEN MILLION MORE
THAN HOUSE GAVE.
The press committee of the Iroa
Worker's union gave out the following
statement relative to the granting o£
the injunction:
Strikers Position.
Ruhrup, Wm. Miller, O.
II
r-Tnit-$8©
V*'' H,T*''*
3*
XFT&'jLM
ED BY BOX CAR LOADER COM
PANY FROM JUDGE ANDER8ON I
AT ALBIA LATEST STRIKE MOVft
A 5 4
NTTMBJSB. 96
E
COERCING MEN
TEMPORARY INJUNCTION SECUItt*
7 $r'J
CONGREGATING AT S
PLANT PREVENTED
COMPANY IN APPLICATION
WRIT CLAIMS WORKER8 HAVE
BEEN INTIMIDATED BY PICK}
ETS ARMED WITH BRICK8 ETC.
The Ottumwa Box Car
has secured a temporary writ ot in
junction through Judge D. M. Ander
son sitting at Albla, against the
national association of bridge aadT''?l
Structural Iron Workers and forty-two'i'
of the strikers enjoining them owpfey
molesting the men through threats
intimidation or otherwise, who may bai1?J|
in the employe of the company at
'present time. The text of the
injunc-'
tion even prevents members of
union from congregating or loitering
about the plant of the plaintiff, or at
any other place for the purpose
of lu*
terfering with the employes of
th«
plaintiff, or with the prosecuting
of
plaintiff's work, or to interfere
with'
or intimidate the employes of plain*
tiff or in any manner interfering witli
the prosecuting of plaintiff's buslnesa.
"We have used no force whatever !&' ~iJ
the prosecuting of our strike. We have
used no force either through out
pickets or otherwise, other than peace
able and honorably means of acquaint
ing those who" may, seek the' employe
of the company, With the true situa
tion or affairs at the plant.
"The unpleasantness between Mr.
Steele and two of the strikers last
week has been dismissed at. the sug
gestion of the plaintiff which show*
that our men did not begin the trou
ble in which a scrimmage took plaoe.
"The Injunction issued against UV
will be fought to the last ditch.
an answer to the injunction
to get the case up before
Smith,
Gee, Otto Lindell, Ira Berry,
Jordan, Jr., Paul Peck, H.
J.
R. Hayes,
ler, John Park,, Bert Overturt,
Brown H. Brown, Jas. Bawn,
Buchell, Ike McNabb,
M. Anderson, judge of said
court of said county, for the
said petition and whereas
writ of injunction to issue,
1
Loader Co*#,
~jji
It 1*
not applicable to our case. Our attor
ney, Walter Coen, will endeavor
to
die
bill
so^aa
JVidge Ot Wt
Vermilion tomorrow." 1
S. '4
Injunction Order. |j
The full text of the injunction ordetf
follows:
Writ of Injunction. State of Iowa,
ss:—The State of Iowa to The Inter- Mi
national Association of Bridge ank Xf
Structural Iron Workers, Fred Dan- -If
iels, Vic Ecksall, Oscar Kckwa.ll. 1^11^
sell Smith, V, M. Franklin, J. "W.
Freed, J. W. Miller, A. W. Mtiior.
Fred Vermillion, R. A. Witham*
Melcher, W. H. Stone, Chaa. Smith.
Jeff Horn, E. E. Higgins, Bert
sell, C. H. Smith, Andrew
Mun-
Snook.
Mart Albertson, W. L. Sutton,
Fred1
JOB
Klnse*
Crirnmona,
J.
E. Solomon,
Fred
litt­
Roy
Fred $$
Jesse Caster.
B. H. Gee, CL N. Lewis, defendants:'
Whereas—the Ottumwa. Box Cai»
Loader company as plaintiff ha^thia
day filed in the office of the
clerk* of *.
the district court of Wapello county* U'g's
State of Iowa, a certain petition,
un- 'mi,'
der oath, making the above
named,
persons defendants therein,1
whereas, also, the Baid petition
haa
been duly presented to the
Hon. T).
district
allowance*
of a writ of injunction, as prayed
in
the said
judge made an order allowln'g
said
restraining
Bald defendants In manner and forn»
hereinafter stated, upon filing
a bond
with sureties, pursuant to said
order*
and whereas the said order
has been
complied with, and said bond flled
and approved, now therefore, you,
the'
said. The International Association,
of
Bridge and Structural Iron
Workers,
Fred McDaniels, Vic. Ecksall., Oscar'
Eckwall, Russell Smith, V. M. Frank
lin, J. W. Freed, J. W. Miller, A. 20U.
Minpr, Fred Vermillion, R. A. Witham
Andy Melcher, W. H. Stone, Chas,
Stnlth, Jeff Horn, E. E. Higgins, Bert
Munsell, C. H. Smith, Andrew Snpok.
Mart Albertson, W. L. Sutton, FrM
Ruhrup, Wm. Miller, O. Smith, Joe,
3ee. Otto Lindell, Ira Berry,
Jordan, Jr., Paul Peck, H.
aforesaid, in the name
by
Kinsey
Crlinmons,
J. R. Hayes. J. E. Solomon,
Fred
ler, John Park, Bert Overturt,
|B1-
Roy
Brown. H. Brown, Jas. Bawn, Fred
Buchell, Ike McNabb, Jesse
Carter,
H. Gee, C. N. LewlB, defendants
B.
a®'
and
strictly
by
thority of the State of
employes, members
the to-
Iowa, are here­
enjoined and restrained
from, either by yourselves,
agents,
or attorney*, o?
)Continued on page t)
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