OCR Interpretation


Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, April 02, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1910-04-02/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

1
I
I
V*
SNi
Vv*
1
-4 t,
jLr
'toif
Hlfll JWBi
YOLVWE
62
AND OPERATORS
GETTOGETHER
JOINT CONVENTION AT DES
MOINES RESULTS IN CONCES-
•IONS BEING GIVEN DURING
IDLENESS OF MINES.
SUSPENSION 0
WORK BEGINS TOD A
BOTH BODIES WILL MEET TO DE
CIDE UPON WAGE SCALE APRIL
11—NO AGREEMENT LOOKED
FOR UNTIL MAY 1.
Des'Moines, April 1.—The Iowa
mine workers claim a victory as
th.e result of the first Joint wage
conference at which the operators
agreed to pay the Increase of 5.55
for men to man the mines during
the suspension.. The Joint confer
ence afljourned until April 11. The
old officers of the. Mine Workers
were today re-elected with the ex
ception of Auditor Harry Howe of
Hiteman, who is succeeded by
Harry Barber of Everist.
While- the coal mines of Iowa axe
Idle, pending the settlement of a wage
scale effective for the next two years,
the miners fo the state yesterday
agreed to furnish sufficient men to pro
tect their property from damage and
to make necessary repairs and im
provements during the suspension.
This, however, was not granted until
the operators agreed to pay these men
an increase of 5.55 per cent over the
old wage scale for day work. This was
the principal action of the joint con
vention between the miners and opera
tors yesterday in des .Moines at wttlch
H. 1m Waterman, L. L. "Lodwick, Henry
Phillips, Edward Fowler and Samuel
Hawks of the city were present.
No coal will he mined within the
borders of the staite by the 16,000 union
coal miners for an indefinite period,
pending the settlement of anew wage
scale for the biennial period beginning
today.
Negotiations for a-wag.' ncale will be
opened at a joint convention of the
miners and operators to he held at
the I. O. O. F. hall in Dee Moines on
Monday "afternoon, April 11. Judging
from experience in the past an agree
ment will not he effected for at least
three weeks.
The Joint convention opened yester
lay afternoon at 2 o'clpck at the Odd
Fellows' halL Upon a unanimous vote
of the two sides, H. H. Canfleld, an
operator, was elected chairman of the
convention, and Frank Cameron, a
miner delegate, was elected secretary.
John P. White, president of the
miners, made the opening address, ex
pressing regret that the Joint conven
tion had not occurred at an earlier
date and that the wage scale had not
been negotiated in time to preclude
the suspension of work which begins
today.
His address was followed by one by
President John P. Reese of the opera
tors, who stated that the delay in ne
gotiations had put the operators in a
peculiar position. He asserted that
those connected with the coal mining
Industry owe it to the state of Iowa to
continue the work at producing coal at
all times and expressed the hope that
in the future contract between the
operators and miners may be effected
prior to the dates when old contracts
expire and make a suspension of work
unnecessary. He followed his ad
dress by presenting a resolution which
called for the furnishing of men by the
miners to protect the mines and keep
them in order during the period of
idleness.' The resolution provided for
the paying of the men furnished by the
miners under the scale now in effect.
Outlines Conditions.
President White took the floor and
In a brief speech outlined the condi
tions under which the miners would
furniBh the necessary men. He stated
that the action recently taken by the
United Mine Workers of America in
convention at Cincinnati made it im
perative that the operators must make
two concessions before any help could
be given them by the union. The con
cessions he named were the paving of
the men an advance of 5.55 per cent
over the old scale on the day wages
and the significance of the operators
of their willingness to negotiate a fav
orable permanent wage scale.
The second concession demanded by
the miners fairly took the breath away
from the operators fqr a time.- They
took It as meaning that they must
agree to grant the miners any advance
In wages that they should propose and
must submit to having their hands
tied, if they secured labor to keep their
mines in working order during the
period of idleness pending an agree
ment. It called forth vehement and
Impassioned speeches on the part of
Senator Waterman of Ottumwa and
President Reese.
Senator Waterman took the floor
first and stated that the operators were
willing to agree to the first demand of
the miners which provided for Un in-
(Continued on Page 8.)
fc
mil
COMMITTEE
SPLIT ALONG
PARTY LINES
BELIEVED CERTAIN THAT &AL
LINGER-PINCHOT INVESTIGA­
TIONS CANNOT TURN IN A
UNANIMOUS REPORT.
Washington, April 1.—The Ballin
ger-Pinchot hearing was resumed to
day with Secretary Ballinger's counsel
in charge of the presentation of evi
dence. As the hearing progresses in
dications multiply that the congres
sional committee is so seriously split
along party lines that a unanimous re
port is beyond the bounds of possibil
ity. The Democratic members have
notified their Republican colleagues
that they will participate in the execu
tive sessions of the committee only
upon the understanding that they
shall be free to announce their vofe|
and contentions during the public sit
tings. The executive sessions have
not been very harmonious.
r^elson and Brandeis Clash.
The taking of testimony was Inter
rupted today by a serious clash among
the members. Chairman Nelson ac
cused Attorney Brandeis of conceal
ing .certain facts and brought from the
latter a demand that the remarks be.
stricken from the record, together
with the intimation that if the chair
man followed the proceedings more
closely he would see where his remark
was unjust. Some of the Democratic
members moved to direct the chair
man to withdraw his remains and it
was this motion that brought on a
quarrel which lasted nearly an hour.
Nelson refused to withdraw his state
ment. A motion to lay the whole mat
ter on the table was finally adopted.
ATE POISONED CANDY
Mrs. George Stewart is Dangerously
III and Her Friend Miss Mat
tie V. Newton is Recovering
Des Moines, April 1.—(Special.)
Mrs. George Stewart is dangerously
ill and her friend Miss Mattle V. New
ton is recovering from eating poisoned
candy sent to them through a messen
ger by some unknown person last
night. The candy was in a plain box
and addressed to Mrs. Stewart. She
says she does not know who sent It,
bnt the police are looking for the man
who paid her attention, but who was
repulsed. The candy has been turned
over to chemists at the Drake univer
sity.
WAS TO BE MARRIED
It is Learned That Florence Winn of
Waterloo, Victim of Wreck,
Was to Wed Soon.
Waterloo, April 1.—(Special.)— It
has just been learned here that Miss
Florence Winn of Waterloo, one of the
victims of the Green Mountain wreck
on the Rock Island, and now in a Mar
shalltown hospital, was to have been
married eprly this morning to Lee For
han of St. Paul. The wedding will have
to be postponed a short tiine. Miss
Winn is improving and will be able to
return home soon.
FIVE TICKETS FOR QUARTER
Des Moines Street Railway Raises the
Rate on Pasteboards—May
Abolish Transfers.
Des Moines, April 1.—(Special)—
The Des Moines City Railway com
pany today discontinued sellihg six
tickets for a quarter and it is intimat
ed that it will follow this up with thp
refusal to give universal transfers.
The company has no franchise and is
therefore not under the control of the
council. The move is supposed to be
for' the purpose of forcing the city to
grant a new franchise on the com
pany's own terms.
ELDON VETERIAN DIES
Samuel E. Crow Passes Away at Ad
vanced Age of 70 Years
Funeral Sunday.
Eldon, April 1.—(Special.)—Samuel
E. Crow, aged 70 years, brother of
William G. Crow of this city .died last
night at 12 o'clock. He was an old
stldier, a member of the Sixth Iowa
infantry. He is survived by a wife and
two children, Mrs. Kate Whistler of
Kansas City, and George Crow, who is
in the regular army in Maine. The fu
neral will be held Sunday afternoon at
2 o'clock, and Vorhis post No. 73, G. A.
R.. will be in charge. Interment will
be in the Eldon cemetery.
WILL PASS THROUGH IOWA.
Glidden Tour Pathfinder Will Visit
Several Cities in Inspecting
Route.
Iowa City, April 1.—(Special)—A
message from good roads headquar
ters at Des Moines to F. C. Carson
of the Iowa City Auto club states that
the Glidden tour "Pathfinder" left
Omaha today en route to Iowa City,
Davenport and Muscatine to inspect
the proposed auto route.
TAFT'S RAIL
BILL REPORTED
TOTHE HOUSE
MEASURE AS REPORTED H'AS
MANY ORIGINAL FEATURES
ELIMINATED, BUT COMMERCE
COURT PROVISION IS RETAINED
MINORITY REPORT
ALSO PRESENTED
MORE DRASTIC PROVISIONS ARE
SOUGHT SENATOR BAILEY IN­
TRODUCES BILL FOR CAM­
PAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS.
Washington, D. C., April 1.—The ad
ministration's railroad bill was report
ed to the house today. Many of its
original features are eliminated, but
it still has provisions for a commerce
court, the regulation of railway agree
ments, the consolidating, securities,
rates and routes.
The majority report cites the Im
provement in regulating railroads pro
vided by the Hepburn law, but says
experience shows some important mat
ters which should be the subject of
government control are not now with
in the scope of the commission's au
thority. Various subjects coming un
der this head are discussed and th«
necessity of embracing them within
the law pointed out.
The minority report opposes the
commerce court, the change in the law
requiring notice and hearings on re
straining orders, and the provisions
legalizing agreements among carriers
if filed, even if not approved by the
commission.
The minority object to the com
merce court's being authorized, to leg3&
lie consolidation by permitting the
acquisition of one competing line by
another. They also object to the re
peal of the proviso which forbids the
^application of the act to interstate
transportation.
With the exception of Sims and Rus
sell, the minority condemn the pro
visions as to competing lines and
stocks and bonds as unwarranted in
terference with local authority, as cal
culated to favor established lines, to
discourage new lines and prevent
further development in the sections
which need more facilities.
Introduces Publicity Bill.
Sen. Bailey introduced a bill provid
ing for the publication of campaign
contributions. A similar measure has
been ordered favorably reported by
the committee on election of president,
vice president and members of con
gress, but Chairman Gaines has not
yet presented the report.
An Immigration Report.
Senator Dillingham, chairman of the
joint immigration commission, sub
mitted a report to congress today.
The most important statement relates
to the situation in Canada, where the
report shows the policy is to encour
age Immigrants, whose purpose is to
enter agricultural pursuits and keep
out those whose presence tends to
congestion of cities and towns. The re
port also ^hows that 70 per cent of
Canada's immigrants during the past
decade came from northern and west
ern Europe and only thirty per cent
from southern and eastern Europe
The reverse is true as to the United
States.
Brief Filed in Rate Case.
The biggest freight rate fight since
the passage of the Hepburn rate bill
entered upon its first stages when the
government filed in the supreme court
of the United States a brief in the so
called Missouri river rate cases. They
involve interests of manufacturers,
jobbers, merchants and railroads from
the Atlantic seaboard to the Rocky
mountains.
May Name Hamilton.
Des Moines, April 1.—(Special.)
At the Iowa Constitutional Prohibi
tion Amendment association meeting
here Tuesday It is expected that John
J. Hamilton formerly editor of the
News and candidate for governor two
years ago, will be elected manager of
the campaign, vice A." M. Cotes, re
signed.
Celebrates 99th Birthday.
Grinnell, April 1.—(Special)—John
T. Rose is today celebrating his nine
ty-ninth birthday, the oldest person In
the county. He is hale and hearty
and was able to do manual labor at
the age of ninety-five.
Topeka Man Gets Place.
Cedar Rapids, April 1.—(Special.)—
F. W. Williams of Topeka, Kansas,
has been appointed to the position of
superintendent of motive power of the
northern division of the Rock Island
with headquarters in this city. He
succeeds W. I. Harrison, resigned.
Freight Handlers Strike.
Cedar Rapids, April 1.—(Special.)—
Freight handlers at the Chicago,
Northwestern freight depot struck to
d?- for an increase in wages. The
company put in Greeks to take their
places. The checkers walked out also,
refusing to work with the foreigners.
3
J"
mm
X'« &?F$
OTTpiiWA. "VVAPEIiliQ COUNTY, IQWA^ SATURDAY, APRII* 2, 1910
PRESIDENT FOR
LONGER SERVICE
SAYS WEST LOSES INFLUENCE
BY CHANGING ITS REP
RESENTATIVES.
Washington, D. C., April 1.—Presi
dent Taft in an address before the
Ohio society of Washington last night
pointed out that the dominating power
of the eastern states ii* congress lies
in the fact that they keep men in of
fice .when they place them there. His
words created a mild sensation. He
contrasted the influence of the east in
legislative affairs with the west and
attributed the supremacy of the for
mer to continuous service as legislat
ive representatives. He said:
"When 'the eastern states get a good
representative they keep him as long
as he lives and then he has an influ
ence that vastly exceeds a mere
numerical representation of popula
tion."
The president was the guest of hon
or at a meeting called for the purpose
of organizing the Ohio Society of
Washington. Justice William R. Day
was elected president.
"There is only one thing I want to
say about Ohio that is of a
political tinge," said President Taft.
"I think a mistake has been made in
recent years in Ohio in failing to con
tinue as our representatives the same
people term after term. Length of
service is what gives influence."
PAVING AT CENTERVILLE.
Two Miles of Streets to Be Improved
This Summer Makes Eight
Miles In All.
Centerville, April 1.—Two more
miles of paved streets were ordered
in by the city council today. This fol
lowed publication of the resolution of
necessity and the hearing of remon
strances, which were very few. On
some streets not a single objection
was made. This will make eight miles
of brick paving with concrete base all
told when completed. The paving will
be carried out almost to the city lim
its on the south, west and north.
NEIBERT IS EULOGIZED.
Witnesses in the Davenport Murder
Case Speak Hinhly of the
Defendant.
Davenport, April 1.—(Special.)—
Character witnesses in the case of Gus
Nelbert who killed his father-in-law,
Dan Gilbert after learning that the lat
ter was the father of a child by his
own daughter, Neibert's wife, all testi
fied this morning to Neibert's good
character claiming that he was a
peaceable honest man. It is probable
that the evidence will be finished this
evening.
NEW MAJOR FOR 54TH.
G. C. Haynes of Centerville is Elected
to Office—Estherville Company
Mustered Out.
Des Moines, April 1.—(Specials
Adjutant General Logan today an
nounced that G. C. Haines of Center
ville has been elected mpjor of the 54th
regiment and the EstMrville company
ordered mustered out on acoounf of in
efficiency and "lack of a good armory.
BOONE FIRM WIN3 CASE.
Railroad Commission Moves That
Hauling Between Factories and
Mine is Not Short Haul.
Des Moines, April 1.—(Special.)—
Tbe railroad commissioners today de
cided the Boone switching: case moving
that hauling of cars between factories
and mines is a switching charge worth
$5 and not a short haul of $14 which
the railroads have been charging. ,~
I*
—ii ill mm attii'iiii
A|LL FOOLS DAY
March Was Rare
Month for First
of Spring Period
Remarkable for the absence
of blustery weather, to say
nothing of the many days that
were no less than delightful,
March this year has gained an
enviable reputation for itself.
The month was never colder
than 15 degrees above zero
and on one day the thermom
eto.r reached 88 degrees above.
Rain was noticeable on only
two days, the 26th and 30th.
There were twenty-four clear
days, three cloudy and four
fair.
COUNCIL HOLDS
STRENUOUS MEET
CITY FATHERS RECOMMEND THE
PASSAGE FOR MAYOR PHILLIP'S
STREET ORDINANCE.
After a three hours' strenuous ses
sion in which many important matters
were up, the city council last evening
as a committee of the whole recom
mended the passage of Mayor Phil
lips' ordinance regarding the blockad
ing of the streets by carriages, wagons,
etc. The recommendation of the coun
cil for the passage of the mayor's ordi
nance ends.the strife between the city
fathers and the city executive. Mayor
Phillips recommended the ordinance
some time ago, but the committee of
the whole deferred action on It, until
the mayor In a fiery speech to the city
couacil at the adjourned meeting Tues
day evening scored them for their ac
tion. But the council did not pass the
ordinance without some changes. The
changes made Include the allowing of
farmers to leave their wagons or car
riages on the street while they have
their horses In a blacksmith shop or
in a feed stable.
The committee of the whole last
light also recommended the paving of
North Holt street These two Import
ant matters will be brought up at the
council meeting Monday night and
passed accordingly. Special Poll Tax
Collector B. C. Koons appeared be
fore the committee of the whole re
lative to some poll tax softs. The
hands in the town clock was nearing
the hour of eleven when the meeting
adjourned.
Peary to Quit Exploration.
Chicago, April 1.—Commander
Peary, who arrived In Chicago today,
in an interview declared he was pos
itively through with polar explora
tions for all time.
Thousand Painters Strike.
Chicago, April 1.—One thonsand
painters and decorators who demand a
wage increase of 5 cents an hoar
struck here today. It is believed that
by night 4,000 will be out.
King Menellk Still Alive.
Berlin, April 1.—•A special to the
Tageblatt from Addis Abeba indicates
that King Menelik was still alive yes
terday.
Bank Call Issued.
Washington, April 1.—The comptrol
ler of the currency today lBsued a call
for the condition of National banks as
at the close of business March 29.
New Burlington Postmaster.
Washington, April 1.—William W.
Copeland was today nominated as post
master at Burlington, Iowa.
-t i1
is
vx
MISSOURI RIVER
CONGRESS ENDS
STREAM IS HELD TO BE A FREIGHT
REGULATOR BY STEAM­
BOAT CAPTAIN.
Pierre, S. D., April 1.—The Missouri
river congress closed its Bession yes
terday after the adoption of resolu
tiens indorsing the general im]prave
ment of the waterways of the country,'
urging the states to assist in the work
and recommending liberal material ap
propriations for the Missouri river.
The principal feature was the show
ing of what can be done in the way of
brlquetting lignite coal in the upper
Missouri country to make it a remark
able product all the year- around, thus
making the Missouri river traffic com
mercially successful.
Captain Baker of the Bismark Steam
boat line declared the Missouri river
as it is at present is a freight regu
lator and that a small amount of im
provement will mean an immense sav
ing to the people of the northwest in
freight rates, even if the stream is not
extensively used for navigation. He
said the government is the worst ene
my the river has today and gave as an
example the requirements of a federal
license for any one operating a boat
while making no such provision for a
railway engineer.
LAYMEN AT DAVENPORT
Big Missionary Convention Will
Opened There Tonight With
a Banquet.
FICIALS.
Be
Davenport, April 1.—(Special.)—The
Laymen Missionary's convention which
will open at Coliseum in Davenport at
6:30 o'clock this evening with a big
banquet with George MacLean,. presi
dent of the State university of Iowa
will be toastmaster. Missionaries to
the orient and other well known men
in missionary work will be the speak
ers at the convention which will con
tinue through Saturday and Sunday,
closing Sunday evening. Delegates are
arriving here from Des Moines, Iowa
City, Cedar Rapids, Muscatine, Water
loo, Iowa Falls, Dubuque and Clinton
and from all parts of the eastern half
of Iowa.
RIOTING IN BOGOTA
Posting of Telegram From Ecuadorian
President Causes Raid on
Peruvians.
Bogota, Colombia, April 1.— A mob
attacked and forced an entrance into
the Peruvian legation yesterday, but
the police prevented serious damage
being done. The rioting was provoked
through the posting about the city of
copies of a telegram addressed to Co
lombians by President Alfara of Ecua
dor, and in which the executive ex
pressed the hope that Ecuadorians and
Colombians would stand together in
defense of the- frontiers of the old
fatherland.
FIGHT DUEL IN STREETS
Two Frenchmen In New York Settle
iff ere
noes—One Killed,
Other Escapes,
New York, April 1.—Two Frenchmen
fought a duel early this morning in
a New York street, not far from the
East Side water front. One was kill
ed by a shot flred through the head.
His adversary escaped, leaving no
clue to his identity. Nothing is known
of the cause of the duel, nor has tho
dead man been Identified,
1
»tTa -p
JSTUMBER 96
MINES IDLE
MEN
SETTLEMENT OF WAGE DIFFICUU
TIES MAY BE MATTER OF DAY8
OR WEEKS, ACCORDING TO OF
ONE DISTRICT IN
INDIANA WORKING
OPERATOR IN BRAZIL BLOCK:,
COAL FIELD MEET DEMAND®—|r
MAY BE LONG DELAY IN ILLlif
NOIS AND PENNSYLVANIA. .£vj
Indianapolis, Ind., April 1. —Cel*»
brating today the anniversary of thAf
inauguration of the eight hoar day.
300,000 bituminous coal miners faoe(£
an enforced holiday of fax greater du&<
ration. In many states the mlners&W
two year wage contract with the opera^f
tors expired last night at midnight andpl
the men quit the coal pits, demanding!^
that their new contract must providq^
for a wage increase of 5.55 per cent
ton on screened coal and an equlva'
lent increase on "run of mine" coal
The adjustment of the difficulty maj
be a matter of weeks or days
ik
1
it
In the Brazil block coal district [email protected]^
Indiana there will be no suspension of^i
work for late yesterday the operator*,
conceded the wage demand of thei ,•
miners. On the other hand in Illinoii''
and western Pennsylvania where th«
powder question and which side Bhalp
pay the shot flrers enter the contro^
versy, there probably will be a prqft/i
longed contest. &•'
In hundreds of meetings in min«r*«
communities where* the people depena
on the industry, assembled to listen
to speeches of their union leaders, thfl
"strike" was the sole subjeot of dii"
cusslon today. President Lewis spok
at Belleville this afternoon and will
visit various points in the affected ter
ritory. Secretary and Treasurer Perry
went to Des Moines to participate in
the joint conference of the miners and
operators.
Lewis Gives Out Figure*.
Three hundred thousand miners in
the coal fields of the United States
suspended work and demanded higher
wages last night, according to an
official statement given out by the
headquarters here of the United Mine
Workers of America. Co-incldentally
the national officers' organization,
which had been In secret session here
for two days, departed for their re
spective states to advise the miner!
in district conferences with the mine
operators, in which it is hoped, settle*
irents will be speedily reached. Presi
dent Thomas L. Lewis before leaving
to visit the centers of the different min
ing fields, made the following estimate
of tbe number of miners affected by
the suspension of work:
Western and Central Pennsylva
nia 1 100,000
Ohio
Indiana
West Virginia
Illinois
Iowa
Kansas, Arkansas, Texas and
47,000
18,000
10,000
72,000
15,000
Oklahoma 25,000
Michigan 3,000
Colorado 5,000
Western Kentucky 6,000
Total 300,000
Lewis Reviews Situation.
Reviewing the situation, President
Lewis said: "When the national
executive board adjourned last night
we feltt that the prospect was very
satisfactory for the miners. In many
districts It is now only a question o£
the miners and operators sitting down
together and talking over the busi
ness.
"In eastern Ohio, where we expected
strong opposition, it is reported to us
that three of the largest companies
are ready to sign tho contract we
formulated at the recent meeting in
Cincinnati.
"In Indiana and the Hocking dis
trict of Ohio, we will reach a settle
ment next week. Probably it will be
more difficult In western Pennsyl
vania and Illinois, where powder and
shot flrers' wage questions are Is
Tolvod.**
Old 8eate Expired In March.
The miners declare the walkout is
not a strike, but merely a suspension
of work pending an arrangement be
tween themselves and the operators of
a wage scale for another year, the old
scale having expired In March. The
men demand an Increase In pay In
some Instances of five cents a ton and
in other Instances more and certain
changes in working conditions.
The first victory for the men came
fn an announcement from Brazil, Ind.,
the center of the Indiana block coal
district, where the men's demands for
5 cents Increase is to be granted.
Option Law Constitutional.
Indianapolis, April l.—The supreme
court of Indiana today decided th*
county option law to he constitutional.
"^1
v-'ls-
ito'"

xml | txt