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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, September 06, 1910, Image 7

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1910-09-06/ed-1/seq-7/

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Old Phone 251-Red
New Phone 664.
No. 209-211, West Main Street.
Hogs, 120(g)180
Hogs. 180 @200
Hogs,
200,®
Grain and
Poultry.
(These prlcca are paid to the pro
ducer.)
Hens
Cocks
Ducks white feathered ....
Ducks,
dark
v.:*. F|our and Peed.
Watercress, per bunch
Cucumbers, each ... .••••
Tomatoes, bu ... ... .......
Parsley, bunch
t* Mint bunch .....*. •, ^.
Okra, doz ...... .••••••••
Butter, Egga and Cheese.
Country butter, lb ...
Sept. creamery butter, lb ....
Eggs per doz
Cheese, ...
If you need repairs for any kind of a hay baler see" what I can do
for you. I keep in stock springs to pull-back plunger, lifting jacks,
low priced axle grease and. oil for all balers and furnish repairs for
nearly all makes. If you want a new baler see me.
markkt*
LOCAL
HOGS SHOW INCREASE
creaseqOshrdlucmfwyp amf aww
Porkers Are Quoted at a Ten Cent Ad
kance
This Morning. Other
Markets Unchanged.
Hogs are shown this morning at a
ten cent insrease. No change in local
retail markets.
(2 p. m., Sept. 5.)
.. 9-20
9.10
8.85
8.80
250 ...
Hogs, [email protected] ...
Hogs, 300 and over
Sowe and stags
'.'.'.'.WW. 8.65
sowe ana smso i'mwI'oO
Choice corn fed heifers 4-60^5.00
Good heifers .3.2604.00
Choice corn fed cov/s
8.50®4.25
G-od
cows ...
Choice light calves 6.5006.00
Oood light calves -»o®5.50
Heavy calves .....4.0005.00
Hay—Street
Prices.
New oats ...
Ry^ ....
Corn
Barley
Wheat i.
H&y. to:i
Straw .....
Grade No. 1 cream
Grade No. 2 cream
Butter and Eggs.
Butter, packers pay
Eggs packers pay case count
[email protected]
«0(ffl63
60
@6
JAMES H. SHEPHERD,
TODAY'S MARKET NEWS
2
[email protected]
12*514'
[email protected]«
Hides. Wool and Tallow,
Hljjes, No. 1 cured
No. 2 cured
Hides, green No. 1
Hides, green No. 2
Wool, tub washed
Medium unwashed .... ..
Coarse unwashed
Beeswax No. 1
Beeswax No. 2
Tallow, No.
Tallow -No. 2
8
28(930
2t
20
Stt
Butter. Pat.

24
21
18
10
5
S
7
IS
4
15
11
feathered ..
Turkeys
Geese, lb
Gvineas. each
Spring chickens .....
RETAIL MARKETS
... •'"& 80
... J.75
...
..... =•. i.50
so
Graham flour, per sack ...
Com chops, per cwt
Shorts, per cwt ... ...
Bran, per ewt
Ear corn, per bu
Shelled corn, per bu
Bay, per ewt ...
Straw, per ewt ... ......
Oats bu
C'-lcken feed ground 30 lbs
Oyster shell, per cwt
Cfetn shell, per cwt
Flour, "per sack
Com meal, 10 lb sack
Corn and oat chop., per cwt..
Oat straw, bale
Barley ... ... ...
OH meal, pel- cwt ....,.......
... Prult*
Apples, .pk ... ......
Lemons, doss
Oranges, per do*
Bananas, per doa ...
V'. »0
... 78
E0
... 80
40
... 1.00
i«0
..1.40® 2.00
20
'il.78
50
85
2.00
20025
Shipped Vegetables.
[email protected]
5
@10
55
5
5
10
30
35
23
22
Poultry.
Turkeys
Geese, lb
fclve springs, lb
Dressed springs, lb
Old hens, dressed, lb
Ducks, dressed, lb ..... ......
•-•dais.
TW»tstoes, pk
BURST, 17 lbs. gran.
Grape fruit, dos
Radishes, 3 bunches for
Green onions,^2 for ...
Egg plant
Salsify, bunch
Watermelons
Peaches, bu
Pineapples, each
New apples, peck
Cucumbers, 2 for
Egg plant
Head lettuce
Green Corn, doz
Grapes, basket
37
22%
17%
20
II
17 »i
25
rtmnges doz
Calif grapes
Cocd£.nuts, each ......
New honey, comb
Home onions, bunch ...
Rhubarb. 2 bunches for
Pineapples, each
Texas peaches, basket
Cauliflower head
Peas, qt
Beets, 2 bunches .....
California Gems
Plums, doz ... ... ...
Beans, lb ... ...
Lima beans
New onions ... ...
Cabbage
Carrots, bunches for
Onions peck
Ccffee, In ... ... ... 1IJ4®40
Tea, lb 15075
80-40-50
12^
[email protected]
20
I
8
SS
20(S'25
5
8
10
15
10
20
5
5
S
40
1.00
95
10
8
10
7t4
[email protected]
A00
25
40 @60
5
10
15
10
85
'i Chicago Live Stock Market.
CATTLE—Market ten to fifteen
higher beeves ?4.8088.25: stockers
feeders not quoted: cows heifers $2.40
r®$6.n0 westerns, [email protected] receipts,
29,000.
HOGS—Market five to ten higher
receipts, 24.000 light, $0.40(®9.95:
mixed, $8.80(S)9.85 heavy. [email protected]
rough, 8.70^8.95 bulk of sales, $9.10
^9.40.
SHEEP—Market ten higher: re
ceipts, 18,000 natives, 52.95© 4
lambs, [email protected]
"New Shepherd's Ranche."
„n, if',,
Ottumwa, Iowa.
.. RANGE OF HOG PRfCES§^
Range of hog values at Chicago Ml
the past week with comparisons:
Mixed and Light
[email protected] 132g)2»5
butchers. •«. grades.
... [email protected]'*f [email protected]'.50
... 8.65(^9.45'. 9.05®9.65
... 8.55fftfl.40
... [email protected],
... [email protected]'
... [email protected]
Aug. 30.
Aug. 31.
Sept. 1.
Sept 2.
Sept 3.
Sept. 5,
KEOSAUQUA.
John Swiers a former Van Buren
county pioneer died at his home at
Portland. Ore., Sunday Aug. 21. He
was bornjn Yorkshire, England. March
26. 1829 and came with his parents to
Ohio when 3 years of age. JTsn years
later they came to Iowa and here Mr.
Swires made his home until five years
ago when he moved with his daughter
to Oregon. He was a just and nSble
man and one of this county's best cit
izens.
Miss Maglge Vance returned Mon
day from St. Louis where has has been
on business.
Mrs. George Savage and two sist^s
Misses Elisabeth and Nellie Breen left
Friday morning for Beloit, Wis.,- to
visit their mother.
Mr. and Mrs. Howell Elder and chil
dren of Des Moines are visiting their
parents Mr. and Mrs. A. Elder,, south
of town.
The Keosauqua schools opened this
morning for a term of nine .months.
Mr. and Mrs. John Clemens, and
mother, Mrs. Eugene Masson and D. C.
Clemens departed Thursday for Fort
Collins. Colo., where they will spend
the winter. Mrs. C. P. Whitney and
daughter Marguerite accompanied
them as far as Ottumwa.
Mrs. B. B. Gushing and baby have,
been visiting friends.^ in Keosauqua'
her former .home.
Miss Pearl Harris- departed Friday
for Bluehili.jNebr., where she has. been
principal.Sf .the school for several
years.
Mr. and Mrs. Alva Hoskins and
Millie White ajfe guests of their sister
ia Ottumwa. U'-a
Mrs. David Williams And two'
daughters Olive and Dora^WiHiams
and Miss txna Maltbie went to Ot
tumwa Friday to visit. Mies Olive go
ing on to Afton where'hse will ,teaclij
in the high school the coming year.
Mrs. Mattiei Storks left .FrPlay for
her home In C^dar Rapids after Tilsit-'
ing- her mother 'Mrs. Fannie M[artih
and brother H&nry for the paist..three
weeks.
f.
N
Mrs. Qrpha Evans. who has been a
guest the past week of Mrs. 'Alice
Howell left for hdr home in Falrfleld
Friday morning.
Mrs. Dick Therme arrived home on
Sunday from a visit with relatives at
Granger, Mo.
Fred Peil of Golden, 111., came Sat
urday to visit his sister tyrs. L. Weiss
er\gerber and falmly. He left for his
home Monday accompanied by his
family who have been spending a week
in Keosauqua with relatives.
Miss Cyrene Gorman left Thursday
for San Francisco, Calif., where she
will join her father and attend school
there this winter.
Miss Mary McPherln l®ft Saturday
for her 'home in Des Moines after a
week spentf in. Keosauqua with rela
tives. ...
Mr. and Mrs. J. iJf. Overman
vwent
ti)
Des Moines Tuesday to visit relative^
and attend the .fjlir.
George Seigle and little son,of Bona
parte have been recent guests of rela
tives at this place.
Mrs. Mattie Willf&ms- who has been
visiting relatives here left. Monday for
her home in Chicago.' Tvjj.
Dee Barnett departed" '3Monday for
Emerson. la., after visitng his mother
Mrs. John Lowe of this place-
Andy Patten returned Saturday
from Kansas Ctiy wherte he went on
business.
EODYVILLE.
A large number of the people living
in the vicinity of Hayden chapel sur
prised their pastor Rev* Seeds by com
ing in Friday and spending the day at
the parsonage. They brought witli
them well filled baskets and all spent
a very pleasant day.
Roy Sipes of Muskogee, Okla., who
has been in Des Moines attending the
fair stopped in Eddyville on his way
home for a visit with his aunt Mrs.
Watkins,.
Amos Gray was transacting business
in Grinnell Friday.
Mrs. Dennis Hedrick of Kansas City,
who has been visiting her sister, Mrs.
Fred Herd In Chicago and her mother
Mrs. Jas Watkins in Eddyville re„
turned home Fridny. She %vas accom
panied as far as Ottumwa by her par
ents Mr. and Mrs. .Tas. Watkins.
Mr. and Mrs. George Chord are in
Des Moines this week attending the
fair.
Mr. and Mrs. D. P. Guy Iteft for an
extended trip through the west.
Dr. Allen of Oskaloosa gave a lec
ture in the Methodist church Friday
night. His subject was "The Real Lin
coln."
Miss Fay Watkins is visiting this
week in Beacon. Seersboro and Grin
nell.
Geo. Davis of Oskaloosa was trans
acting business in Eddyville Friday.
Is
enrollme-nt
large.
.High School This Fall Will be Packed
With No Less Than 386
Students.
The enrollment, of students in the
Ottumwa high school for the fall term
is larger than at. any previous time.
No less than 386 students appeared at
the institution this morning and were
assigned to certain studies. The after
noon session was dispensed with, and
the actuaKwork of the term will com
mcnce in earnest tomorrow morning.
EH
iff FARGO N.D.
\'t-
of
i. WMM
[email protected]
[email protected]
9.15(8)9.75
[email protected]
t~"—
FORMER PRESIDENT EXPRESSES
CONVICTIONS/^FOR PROGRES­
SIVE' LEGISLATj^H ICI ^pALF
Workers.
•V..W,
(Continued' From Page 1.)
gatjtiered: at Fargb to observe Labor
day! Rodsevelt's speech follows
It is.trop.of wa^workers, as of all
other cit.ijteps, that /most of the prog
rese must depend i^P9h their own ini
tiative £nd their otfn efforts. Never
theless, t$gr« are three different fac
tors in thip':progress. There is, first,
the,share which the man's own indi
vidual qualities must determine. This
is the most important of all, for noth
ing can supply the phoe of individual
capacity. Yet. the^e are two other fac
tors also of prime importance name
ly, what can be done by the wage
workers in cooperation with one an
other, and what c^n be done by gov
ernment—that is, by the instrument
through which all -the people work
collectively., Wages ^t(d other most
important conditions of employment
must refhain largely Outside of gov
ernment control must be left for ad
justment liy, •'free contract between
employers and wflge earners, subject
to legislation which will prevent con
ditions which compel man, or woman
to accept wages representing less, than
will ensure deceqt living.
Collective Bargaining.
vBut
to attempt to leave this merely
to individual action means the abso-*
lute destruction^ Of individualsim for
where the individual ic so weak that
he, perforce, has to accept whatever
a strongly organized body chooses to
give hini, .his individual liberty be
comes a mere sham and mockery. It
id indispensably necessary, in order to
pr^erve to the largest degree oui sys
tem of individualism, that t^tere should
be effective/and. orgaftizeid collective
Action. The wage earners must ^ct
jointly, through ,'the process of col
lectivebargainlng.ln .great industrial
enterprises. Only thus can they t»e put
upon a! plane of economic equality with
their oobporate etaployers. Only thus
is freedom of contract cmade. real
thing 'ancl' hot a mere legal fiction.
Th^re laria occasioifaL occupations
where this is not. necessary but
speaking broadly, it is necessary
throughout* the great 'world Of organ
ized industry, i' believe this, practice:of
Collectively bargaining, effective only
through shch organizations as the
trade unipns, to have, iffen one of the
most pb'tent forces iik.tbe past century
in^om^tttg th« progress of the wage
earners and in securing larger sOcisl
progress for humanity.' I- believe in
the principle of organized labor
and in the praeti.ee of collective
-bargaining, not merely as a desirable
thing for the $age earners, but as
something, which has been demon-"'
etrated. to%e essential In the long run
tojth'efr permanent progress.
T.abor Organizations Necessary.
This does n^t mean tbat unequiv
ocally indorse any or alk-practices that
labor 'Organizations may happen to
adopt, or any or ail principles, that
they may choose to enunciate. Labor
organisations have the- weaknesses
and defects common to all other forms
of human organizations, fiometimes
they act very well, and* sometimes
they act very badly and I am for
them, when iliey act well,\and I am
against them when" they act badly. I
believe that their existence is a ne
cessity 1 believe that their aims and
purposes are generally good and I
believe thai ali of them have occa
sionally miide mistakes, and that some
of them have been guilty of wrong
doing. Jtist in so far as they are
strong and effective they tempt de
signing men who seek to control them
for their own interests, and stimulate
the desires of ambitious leaders who
may be clever, crooked men, or who
may be honest but visionary and fool
ish. In other words, in treating of
labor unions, as in treating of corpor
ations. oi*' of hmanity generally, we
will do v^ell to remember Abraham
Lincoln's saying that "there is a deal
of human nature in mankind."
Labor, Should Heed Criticism.
Outside critics should appreciate
the necessity of organized labor, and
understand'and sympathize with what
is good in it. instead of condemning
it indiscriminately. On the other
hand, those within its ranks saouu.
fearlessly analyze the criticisms di
rected against it and ruthlessly elimi
nate from the practices bf its organi
zation those things which justify such
criticism and attack. This is the path
not. only of right, but of wisdom and
safety.' Public opinion in the United
States is daily becoming more alert
and more intelligent and more force
ful: and, no organization, whether
trades union or corporation, whether
industrial or non-indtistrial, can en
dure or permanently amount to a so
cial force if it does not harmonize
with a wise and enlightened public
opinion. Hitherto we Americans have
been over-occupied with materiat
things, and have, neglected to watch
the play of the social forces about us.
But now we are awakening from that
indifference and every form\of or
ganization representing an important
economic, political or social force
must undergo ,a closer scrutiny tnan
ever before. viL.-/
The Strike" Question.
I think that the next quarter of a
century will be Important politically
in many ways: and in none more so
tban in the labor »movement. Not only
are the benefits of labor organizations
more clearly understood than ever be
fore, but any shortcoming or vice dis
played.in connection therewith is also
more Clearly understood and more
quickly resented. The public is grow
ing mojre and more to understand
that, in a contest between employer
and employe—a corporation and a
trades union—not only the interests
of the contestants, but the interests "pf
the third party—the public—must be
considered./ Anything like levity in
provoking a strike, on the one hand or
on the other, is certain more and
more to be resentod by the public.
Strikes are sometimes necessary and
proper sometimes they represent the
only way in which, after all other
.methods have been exhausted,, it is
possible for the laboring man to* stand
for his rights but it must be clearly
understood that a strike is a matter
of last resort, and of course, violence,
lawlessness and mob rule must be
promptly and sternly dealth with, no
matter what £he cause may be that
excites them.
Public Sympathy and Strikes.
Our social organization is too com
plex for us to fall quickly J0 condemn
those who, with levity or In a spirit of
wanton brutality, bring about Mr
reaching and disastrous interference
with its normal processes. The public
sympathizes cordially with any move
ment for a good standard of living and
for pioderate hours of employment. (I
personally, for instance, cordially be
lieve in an eight-hour day, and in one
day in seven for complete rest.)
Where men and women are worked
under harsh and intolerable conditons,
and can secure no relief without a
strike, or, indeed, where the strike is
clearly undertaken for things which
are vitally necessary—and then only
as a last resort—the public sympathy
will favor the wage workers but it
will not favor them unless such condi
tions as these are fulfilled. Therefore
it is becoming more than ever import
ant. that the labor movement should
combine steady, far-seeing leadership
with discipline and control in its ranks.
Dishonest leadership is a curse any
where in American life, and nowhere is
it a greater curse than inlp.bor move
ment. If there is one lesion which I
would rather teach to my fellow Amer
icans than any other, it is to hound
down the dishonest man—no matter
what his condition—and to brush aside
with impatient contempt the creature
who only denounces dishonesty when it
is found in some special social stratum.
There are dishonest capitalists, dis
honest la.bor leaders, dishonest law
yers,, and dishonest business 'men
dishonest men of great wealth and dis
honest .poor men: and the man _whp is
a genuine reformer will decline to
single out any one type for exclusive
denunciation, but will fearlessly attack
the dishonest man as such, whenever
and wherever he is to be found.
AH that can.properly be done should
be done by all of us to help upward
the standard of living and, to. improve
the ability of the average man to reach
that standard. There are still in the
United States great masses of skilled
and unorganized labor, whose condi
tions of work and living are harsh
and pitiable.
Protection for Workman.
It is not merely the duty of the
wage earner, but it is also the duty of
the general public, to see that he has
safe and healthy conditions undei1
which to carry on, his work. No worker
shpuld. be compelled, as a condition of
earning his dally bread, to risk his life
and limb, or be deprived of his health,
or have to workvunder dangerous and
bad surroundings. Society owes the
worker this because It owes as much
to itself. He should not be compelled
to make .this* a matter of contract he
oqght not to«be left to-fight alone for
decent1conditions? In this respect His
protection in the plfa.ee where he .works
should be guaranteed by the law of the
land. In other words, he should be pro
tected .during his working hours
against greed and carelessness on the
part of unscrupulous and thoughtless
employers, just as outside of those
working hours both ne,-and his em
ployer are' protected in their lives and
property against the*, murderer and
thief.
^Thls opens a vitally important field
of legislation to the national govern
ment and tol the state alike..
Eptployor's Liabilit.y
In what Is called ''employer's liabil
ity" -legislation' other ind'ustntalcoun
tries have accepted the principle that
the industry must near the monetary
burden of its human sacrifices, and
that th"e employe who is injured shall
have a fixed and definite sum. The
United States still proceeds on an out
worn and. curiously improper principle,
in accordance with which it has too
often been held by the courts that the
frightful burden of the accident shall be
borne in its entirety by the very per
son least able to bear it. Fortunately,
in a number of states—in Wisconsin
and in New York, for instance—these
defects in our industrial life are either
being: remedied or else are being made
a subject of intelligent study with a
vitew to their remedy. In New York a
bill embodying moderate compensa
tion for accidents 'has already been
passed. Other states. will undoubtedly
follow in the same path.
Women and Children.
Women and children should, beyond
all ciuestion. be protected and in their
cases there can be no question that
the (government should act. They
should be particular objects of'our so
licitude and they should be guarded in
an effective fashion against the de
mands of a too greedy commercialism.
On my recent trip in the neighborhood
of Scranton and Wllkes-Barre every
one I apoke to agreed as to the im-.
mense improvement that had been
wrought by the effective enforcement
of the laws prohibiting children under
the age of fourteen years from work
ing. and prohibiting women from
working more tban ten hours a day.
Personally. I think ten hours too long,
but, be this as it may, ten hours a daj*
was a great advance.
Approves Labor Planks.
Among fhe planks in the platform of
the American Federation of Labor
there are some to which I very
strongly subscribe. They are:
.1. Free schools free textbooks, and
compulsory education.
2. A work-day of not more than
eight hours.
3. Release from employment one
day in seven.
4. The abolition of the sweat-shop
system.
5. Sanitary inspection of factory,
workshop, mine and home.
6. Liability of employers for injury
to body or loss of life.
(T regard the demand in this form
as Inadequate. What, we need is An
automatically fixed compensation for
all injuries received by the employe
in the course of his duty, this being
infinitely better for the employe, and
more just to .the employer. Thje only
sufferers will be^lawyers of that unde-.
sirable class which exists chiefly by
carrying on lawsuits of this nature.)
7. The passage and enforcement of
rigid anti-child labor laws which will
cover every portion of this country.
Similar laws limiting women's labor
should be enacted.%
Suitable and plentiful playgrounds
for children in all -the cities.
Inasmuch as prevention is always
best, especial attention should be paid
to the prevention of industrial acci
dents by passing laws requiring the
iiba
of safetv devices. At
4
npM«»
Morris Williams
LARGEST* AND BEST DRAFT
^HORSi* MARKET WEST OF"
THE MI88ISSIPPI.
HORSES SOLD AT PRIVATE SALE
ON APPROVAL.
BIO CIRCUS SPECIAL—TWO DAY
r'-'
SOLD $28,250 WORTH LAST WEEK.
Had car lots of horses from the fol
lowing places: One load from Wash
ington, one from Abingdon, one from
Fairfield, one from Bloomfleld, one
load from Albin, and one
from Oskaloosa, one from Sigourney,
one from Parnell, one from Williams
burg, one from South Aniana, and a lot
of horses led in by farmers and others
from the surrounding counties. It was
more than double the size of our sale
at the same date last year. I had ad
vertised it in a dozen different papers.
This costs us a lot of money, but we
think we owe it to our customers to
use a liberal share of the commission
money they pay us in building up for
tnem the best market in the west and
we will follow this advertising cam
paign iip all fall.
Every sale will be big and it will be
good.
On Thursday and Friday Sept. 15
and Ifi we will hold a Big Special
Southern Horse Sale, and I hereby no
tify all of you to come with a liberal
sprinkling of horses and mules of the
southern type in your loads. It is con
ceded, that "it pays to advertise" and
I fully believe, in the horse business at
least, that it pays to specialize.
You bring together the greatest
possible amount of buyers for certain
classes and the greatest possible sup
ply of those certain class, at the spec
ial sale, nadthe results are more satis
factory to both the seller and the buy
er. I have a letter this morning from
Mitchell Bros., of Kinston, N. C., want
ing our next sale date and stating that
they will want some 15 loads of south
ern horses for their fall trade.
There will not be a southern buyer
of prominence in the land that I will
not notify of this big southern horse
special. And they'll be here. And lam
now notifying you, all of you. .to gather
in the horses for them. We will need
200 or 300 head. While It will'be widely
advertised as a special, at the same
time we
Avill
loss of life and Iamb among the indus
trial workers of the United States is
simply appalling. and every year
equals in magnitude the killed arul
wounded in a fair sized war. Most of
these casualties are preventable and
our legislative policy should shaped
accordingly. It would be a good idea
to establish in every city a museum of
safety devices from which the workers
could get drawings of them and Infor
mation as to hdw they could be ob
tained and used.
Two Liability Bills.
The matter of compensation for in
juries to employees is, perhaps more
immediately vital than any other. The
report of the commission which has
begun to look into this matter on be
half of the New York legislature is
well worth reading. The bill presented
by the Federatlpn of Labor in .Wiscon
sin on this subject seems excellent. In
all dangerous trades the employer
should be forced to share the burden of
the accident so that,the shock may be
born by the community as a whole.
This would be a measure of Justice in
itself and would do away with a fruit
ful source of antagonism between em
ployer and employed.
Our ideal should be a rate of
Con Solve Ali Problems.
Then action can be taken at once on
thtf particular subject concerned, while
the commission immediately proceeds
to investigate another. By these means
log rolling would be avoided and each
subject treated on its merits, while
there would be no such shock to gen
eral industry as is implied in the pres
ent custom of making sweeping
changes in the whole tariff at once.
'Finally it should be the duty of
some governmental department, or
bureau to investigate .the conditions in
the various protected Industries and
see that the laborers really are getting
thte benefit of the tariff supposed to be
enacted In their interest. Moreover, to
insure good treatment abroad wo
should keep the mixlmum and mini
mum provision.
CHA1ITON
Albert A. Aldrich and Miss Flora
Rhoades were united in marriage 5n
this city on Thursday evening, Sept. 1,
1910. at 9 o'clock at the M. E- parson
age, the ceremony being performed by
Rev. Dr. Lathrop. Only a few friends
were present. Mr. and Mrs. Aldrich left
the same night for a short visit with
friends In ('reston, after which they
wijl go to Shenandoah where the
groom is employed with a produce
company, and where they wilr reside.
The bride has made her home in this
city for a number of years, and Is one
of our best young ladles. She numbers
her friends by her acquaintances and
all join in extending congratulations
and hearty good wishes.
Mrs. Moses Pettyjohn left Friday for
a visit In Coffeen, 111., with her mother.
$Ps
6
-V
.SALE..
have a lot of buyers for
the best big horses that grow. "Nuff
Said."
Now get busy and send me word
how many.
MORRIS WILLIAMS,
Ottumwa, Iowa. .V
^2
Kansas.
Mages
sufficiently high to enable workmen to
live in a manner comfortable to Amer
ican ideals and standards to educate
their children and to provide for sick
ness and old age the abolition of child
labor safety device legislation to pre
vent industrial accidents and auto
matic" compensation for Josses caused
by these industrial accidents.
Sioux Falls Tariff Speech.
Col. Roosevelt in his tariff speech at
Sioux Falls, said:
As a means toward the attainment
of its end In view we have as yet de
vised nothing in any way as effective
as a tariff commission. There should
bte a commission of well paid experts,
men who should not represent any in
dustry, who should be masters of their
subjects, of the highest character, and
who should approach the matter with
absolute disregard of every outside
consideration. These men should take
up in'succession each subject with
which the tariff deals and investigate
the conditions of production here and
abroad: they should find out the facts,
not merely accept the statements of in
terested parties, and they should re
port to congress on each subject as
soon as that subject has been covered.
1
Lost
LOST—TUESDAY, IN WEST END,
calf, black with white mark in fore
head—no horns. Finder notify T. T.
Funk R. No. 5 Highland Center
phone. Reward.
LOST—AT UNION DEPOT AUG. 17,
an open face silver watch half back
engraved. Return to Courier office.
Reward.
Wanted
WANTED—TO RENT A FARM OR
share in stock. H. 55. Turner, FloriS,
la., R. No. 2.
WANTED—BY A MARRIED MAN, A
position in dairy. Can give good
reference. Address S-l-A, care of
Courier.
WANTED—TO BUY 100 HEAD OF
good cows and heifers. J. F. Clark,
R. No. 3 new phono 824-A, Ottumwa..
For Sale
FOR SALE—160 ACRE FARM FOR
$7,000. Good 5 room house. Bank
barn. 40x50. C. L. Smith, Bloomfleld,
Ia„ R. No. 5.
GOOD FEED BARN TO EXCHANGE
for Iowa farm. Good dairy fafcm to
exchange. Other exchanges. Large
list of For Sale Cheap or Rents. Good
terms for Iowa, Minnesota, North
and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kan
sas, Colorado, Missouri, Texas, Illi
nois, Ok'ahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana.
FOR SALE—A JOB PRINTING OUT
•fit, consisting of two job presses,
paper cutter, type, racks, cases, etc.
&
Addresis Lock Box 153 Perry, la., for
genuine bargains In farms.
FOR SALE BY OWNER—LYMAN
county, South ^Dakota wheat and
corn land wheat, 20 bushels per acre
and corn, 40 to 60 bushels per acre.
For further information, call on or
write, F. A. Martin, Oacoma, S. D.
FOR SALE—160 ACRES 6 MILES
from town. 75 acres of good bottom
land: timber for use of farm new
6-room house small barn: price $Ss
per acre, $2,000 cash, balance time to
sult~"purchaser. T. W. Scott, Heplev,
Will sell at a bargain for cash, or on
payments. Address S-5-C car.e the
Courier. -4-a ..
WANTED— A COMPETENT COOK.
No washing. $6 per week. Apply Mrs.
T. D. Foster, corner Fifth and Mar
ket streets.
DEATH ENDS TWO.
MONTHS'
MRS. JOHN PEPPERS ANSWERS!
FINAL SUMMONS—WAS WELL
KNOWN SOUTH OTTUMWAN
•An illness which compelled the
patient to be bedfast for the past
two months ended Sunday morning
at 9:30 o'clock, when death called
Mrs. Mary Ellen Peppers, wife or
John Peppers, at the family home,
corner Chester and Quincy avenues.
Mrs. Peppers was 75 years, 3 months
and 24 days old, and bad ltved in Ot
tumwa for the past ten years. Sur
viving are her husband and nine chil
dren and one sister, together with
numerous other relatives and friends.
Death was not unexpected, and tne
last hours of life were made very
peaceful by the presence of most of
the children.
The funeral will be held from the
familv residence, corner Chester and
Quincv avenues, Tuesday afternoon at
2 o'clock. Rev. D. C. Smith will con
duct. the services, and a
tet will sing. Interment will be made
in Shaul cemetery.
Mary Ellen Peppers was a native
of Illinois, being born May 10. 183a.
She was a sister of the late Benjamin
Prettyman, a well
known
~~u.i'
The Second Planting
One morning Jenkins looked over his garden wall and aaidw mm.?
his neighbor: "Hey, what are you burying in that hole?" anc
"Oh," he said, "I'm just replanting some of my seeds that's
all."
"Seeds!" shouted Jenkins angrily. "It looks more like one of
my hens."
"That's all right. The SeedB are inside."
You have something around your homo that you are not us
ing. Do not let it go to waste—some one would like to use it and
you ought to put in a Want Ad and sell it to the party who can
use it and get some good from it.
A
Eldon, la.
attorney and
politician of Pekin. 111. She had lived
in Iowa since 1865, locating In Davis
and Appanoose counties before com
itig to this city. She was a member
of the Methodist faith, a devoted wife
and a much beloved mother.
The survivors are her husband, Jonn
Peppers, and one sister, Mrs. Lyd.a
Gay of Gainsville, Texas, and the fol
lowing children: Mrs. Myra P. Wel
ler of Mitchell. S. D., Ben S. Pep
pers of Ottumwa. Ia.. Mrs. Harriett
Minthorn of Woodville, Oregon, Mrs.
Alice Harbough of Kansas City, Mo.,
Edward L. Peppers of Milton, Kas,,
Mrs Nell P. Liden of Goldfleld, la.,
or. John L. Peppers of Goldfleld, la.,
Mrs Bertha Pratt of Kansas City,
Mo., and Irvin S. Peppers of Musca
tine, la.
William Q. Reynolds Dead.
A stroke of paralysis suffered Sat
urday night claimed William G. Rey
nolds. 321 South Moore street, this
morning at 3:15 o'clock. The decedent
was 60 years of age. He is survived by
a wife^one son and one daughter.
The funeral will he held from the
Plymouth Congregational church, al
though the time and date has not yet
been announced.
--.
Mrs. Ed Clark of Ottumwa, formerly
of Charlton, has be»n spending a
few days with Mrs. Beagley and
other friends while on her way home
from
Cainsville. Mo.
1
sSltii*
JFor Sale
76 ACRES FOR SALE—I HAVE FOB
sale a 76 acre farm near Eldon, Iowa.
House, barn and sheds. Price is $61
per acre if taken soon. 50 acres level
and under plow. William ..Wllbum
FOR SALE—I HAVE 32 HEAD OF
Black Angus yearling steers for sale.
E. J. Hall, Stockport, la. No. 2.
I HAVE FARMS THAT ARE FOR
sale. Prices are right. Write me fo*
description and prices. Austin Jay,
Mdravia, Iowa.
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE—EIGHT
paSsenger bus, plate glass window*
Mclntlrb Real Estate Co, Blakesburi
FOR SALE—IOWA FARMS IN AP
panoose and Davis counties, from 20
acres up. Price and terms to suit
Send for 1910 list. Baldwin A Nelt
Unlonvllle, la.
ANCHOR WATERPROOF cSn
crete blocks made a house absolute
ly dry and free from repairs. Guar
anteed. Everything tin concrete. Ot
tumwa Concrete Tile Co., Madison
Ave.
240 ACRES FOR SALE BY OWNERS.
Northwest corner Texas county. Mo.
Some improvements, best saw timber
in south Missouri. $2,000 no trade.
John Kelly, Bendena, Kans.
CANADIAN HOME FOR SALE—16ft
acres 3 miles from good town. 70.
acres broke. Good house and barn.
Good well. Will sell at a bargain.
Address the owner, J. A. Nixon,
Dayton la.
80 ACRE FARM $1250 1600 ACRES
timber land $4.50 per acre. McGratl*
Moijntain View Mo.
THE GULF COAST COUNTRY OF
Texas offers the homeseeker the
cheapest And most fertile lands, the
finest climate and the greatest op
portunities to be found in the world.
It is a land ripe with future prom
isetf, land where wealth untold can
be taken from the fertile soil. It is a
land that is being settled very rap
idly and wherein thousands of home$
have been made within the last few
months. Level prairie land, black soil
with clay subsoil. Bluestem the na»
tlve grass. The crops are corn, cot*
ton, alfalfa, sugar cane, rice, vege
tables Und citrus fruit. Next excum
sion Sept. 6, fare $30 fare refunded
to all purchasers of 80 .aQies upv
-AVaters Espy, Strouds. 'Balter BIl&y»
new phqne 1366-X. ..
FOR SALE—YEARLING DELAINE-'
Merino. bucksi Can be registered.
Geo. H. Tuller, R. R. No. 2.
FARM NEEDS
We have the Tigei\ Disc Drill," Corn
King Manure Spreader and Pittsburg
Field Fence, old time iron. We have
everything in repairs needed and
would like a chaqce of selling to you,
a «,.
Specialist
r.J
Wilson Carriage Co.
New Masonic Bldg. 110 W. Second.
DR. D. H. LEWIS
Hours, 9 to 12 a. m. 1 to 6 p. m.
Sundays, 9 to 12 a. m. 3 to 5 p. m.
EYE, EAR, NOSE, THROAT
Glasses Fitted. Ottumwa, la,
ENNIS OFFICE BUILDING.
GOOD PROGRAM
ARRANGED FOR
WAPELLO COUNTY FARMERS' IN
STITUTE PROMISES TO BE
BETTER THAN EVER,
TRe program committee of the Wa-,
pello County Farmers' Institute ha*
gotten its work into such condition a#
to be able to outline the most of the
program that will feature the annual
gathering and exhibition of the agri
culturists, which is held in Ottumwa
each year. An excellent class of in
structive subjects will be a feature of
the lectures given during the institute
and this, with the exhibition of prod
ucts of the farms of Wapello county,
both of the growing kind and dairy
products, promises to make the com
ing instiute the best ever held. The
themes of the lecturers that have been
selected tend to a greater knowledge
of practical farming. The institute
opens December 1 and continues for
three days.
The first day will be ladies' day and
the feature of the occasion will be an
address by Miss Phillips of the state
agricultural.college at Ames. Her sub
ject will be "Agricultural Education in
the Public Schools."
The chief event of th^ second day
will be an address by Prof. H. A. Hau
ser of the extension department of
Ames. Prof. Hahser will ^be remem
bered by inany as having previously
appeared in the cityvAsiaB from his
lecture, he will judge the exhibits and*
conduct the boys' judging dbntest.
.Among the other useful Subjects to
be discussed at the institute are.
"Practical Farm Dairying," jj'Sllos and
Ensilage," "Improved M&hods in
Farpi Fencing," "Soil Buifting" and
"Art Hogb or Sheep More^profltable
to Wapello County Parmer

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