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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, November 03, 1910, Image 2

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THURSDAY, November 3, 1910.
1
'209-211 E.
MAIN ST.
FAHMINGTON.
i"
The Kensington club was delightful­
entertained Monday evening at the
homi of Mrs. Minnie Wescott. de
licious refreshments were served. Mrs.
Lina. Bradshaw of Milton was an out
of town guest.
Mrs. H. H. Turner has returned from
Boone where she was a delegate to
the Eastern Star Grand Chapter.
Mrs.
P. C. Folker returned Friday
from Drury's Lane,~ Va„ where she was
the guest of relatives.
IV H. Pyle has returned from Rock
Island, where he has had employment
dtlrtns the summer months.
Mrs. Henrv Pastofer and daughter
Gertrude and son Neal have, returned
froito a" visit with friends
in
Mo.
W. F. Thero of Kansas City waq, a
business visitor Friday and Saturday.
Mrs. Emma Fichtenmueller and Mrs.
Fred Wire visited Moyday with Mrs.
Johanna
Noske in Bonaparte.
Mr. and Mrs. Chaiincey Booth were elbow
Ottoinwa. visitors Monday.'
mi
'v.V--v^.v
We Feature
Ready
•sm-
HTHE fact that we are
the exclusive repre'
sentatives of this nation
slly-known line of style
clothes is the best rea
son for you to inspect
ourefferings before you
buy a fall and winter
/Suit or Overcoat.
If you are looking for
style garments at rea
sonable prices, which
can be depended upon to
give good service, we do
not believe you can se
cure as good values,
even in the great stores
of the bigger cities. In
fact, we know you can't.
Our stock gives the
widest possible choice
in shades, fabrics, pat
tern and styles, so any
man can find a suit or
oVercoat becoming, and
in good taste. ,,
You will serve your
own interests by inspect
ing this line before mak
ing a purchase.
MANAGER
OTTUMWA IOWA
Miss Ruth White has gone to War
saw, 111., for a month's visit with rela
tives.
Dan Storms and family of Hartley
are visiting relatives at this place.
for
Purdin,
Ten Days
$1.50,Cand1e
Lamps $1.19
$1.75 Candle
Lamps $1.39
Mothers
The Candle Lamp is the newest and latest novelty for
table decoration. Just the thing for.church suppers and
banquets. A Candle Stick that is perfectly safe and does
not ruin your table linen by dripping of hot tallow.
We have four dozen of these Candle Lamps which we
wiii place on saie tomorrow and lasting for 10 days, at
these very low prices.
A perfectly plain Colonial Shape Candle Stick, complete
with chimney, candle
land shade
Two styles of Etched Candle
Sticks, complete
J*
Come early while our assortment is complete.
ARNOLDMUSICCO.
113 East Main Street
'V
Mi
and
Amputates
Teachers
Des Moines, Nov. 1.—The hotels are
already commencing to fill with dele
gates to the Iowa Conference of
Mothers which opens here today, and
teachers from all over the state who
come to attend the annual meeting
which opens Wednesday. Many teach
ers will come through on a special
train on the Rock Island with Colonel
Roosevelt Friday from Davenport.
Arm Below Elbow.
Humestcn, Nov. 1 —While operating
a corn sheller here M. L. Brittain ha.it
his left arm so badly lacerated that
amputation was necessary, the fore
arm being removed one inch below the
51.19
$1.39
yi'
'. V, A ». i.'. a -.v. .Vji,..
-mm
TEACHERS ARE
90IN6 TO MEET
1
vr
to)
TWENTY-TWO OTTUMWA EDUCAT
F'v.TO
OR8 WILL ATTENO STATEo^
^CONVENTION.
Headed by Superintendent A. W.
Stuart, a party, of twenty-one teachers
in the Ottumwa public schools will go
to Des Moines to attend the Iowa State
Teachers' convention which opens on
!Thursday. The convention, this year
'promises to be the largest in the his
tory of the association. Prominent lec
turers and educators will appear on the
program. Miss Helen Lambert of the
Douglas school will be secretary,of the
kindergarten round table. Professor
Lewis Mull of the high school faculty,
/will read a paper at the physics round
table. His subject will be "The Value
of Illustrations and Applications in the
Teaching of Physics," The list of Ot
tumwa teachers going to the conven
tion is as follows:
Lincoln school—Misses Lina Metz
and Augusta Anderson.
Agassiz school—Misses Ruth Smith
and Martha Berry.
Orchard school—Miss Ccfcilia Van
Gent.
Irving school—Misses Gertrude Rear
don and Alice Peterson.
Pairview school—Miss Rachel Lums
don.
Douglas school—Misses Mabel Kit
terman and Helen Lambert.
•Jefferson school—Missep Marguerite
Smith and Josie Empie.
Adams school—Miss Emma Fiedler.
Froebel school—Miss Julia Mahoney.
Hedrick school—Misses Katherine
Weirsmith and Mary Whalen.
Garfield school—Misses Amy O'Mal
ley and Katie Rhoades.
High school—F. M. Hammitt, L. B.
Mull, Robert Shepherd.
BELKNAP.
The Misses Hattle and Ella Miller
of Bloomfleld, left this place for Okla
home and California Tuesday to spend
the winter.
Mr. and Mrs. I. Ware left yesterday'
for their new home in Eldon. The
best wishes of their many friends fol
low them.
Mrs. T. D. Munn returned home
Tuesday night from Chicago, where
she visited her sister Mrs. Maude
Crandall.
Clyde Downing of Cherokee, Okla.,
is visiting here with his uncles R. H.,
and J. W. Kneedler.
Mrs. Robert McManis of Jewell
county, Kansas, is the guest of her
sister-in-law Mrs. Maggie McManis.
Mrs. Sarah McGee spent Saturday
and Sunday in Blocmfleld with friends.
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Schlotter of
Selma were guests Thursday of Mr.
and Mrs. David Munn, as was also Al
ber Munn of Drakeville.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Shiereck of Deigh
ton, Kas., are visiting Mr. and Mrs.
Osa Dunlavy. Mrs. Shiereck is Mrs.
Dunlavy's oldest sister.
Master Ralph Kneedler was quite ill
with croup last week.
Mrs. G. E. Listor and Miss Mabel
Middleton were quite ill last week but
are better again.
Mr. and Irs. W. A. Wishard of near
Bloomfleld and Mr. and Mr?. J. B.
McCormick were entertained at din
ner Sunday at the Mrp. Ida Jennings
home.
J. F. Munn and Mr. and Mrs. W. E.
Munn of Dunville spent Sunday with
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Munn.
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Hancock are
moving to the .A. Conner property
just vacated by Mr. and Mrs. Ware.
Mrs. Ola Althride, owing to illness
in her family was unable t* fill her
appointment at the Congregational
church.
Miss Lucile Ziegler was on the sick
Hgt Jagt week
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson returned
yesterday to their home at Charlton
from a visit with Mr. and Mrs. C. F.
Eberline and Mr, and Mrs. M. I. Pence.
Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Munn visited
last week near Carbon at the Calvin
Munn home.
Miss Beryl Logman entertained a
number of the young people at a mas
querade Hallowe'en party Saturday
night for which very unique invita
tions had been issued. A very en
joyable time was spent.
Mr. and Mrs. Will Louderback of
Stockport, are spending some time
with the latter's parents while look
ing after business interests.
Stiles Putrnan who was quite ill last
week is some better. ,r
BABY CLIMBS 30 FOOT LADDER
Griswold, Nov. 1.—The sight of his
little son, Glendon, aged 2% years,
etanding on the top rung of a thirty
foot ladder, with his head Just above
the roof cf the fire department build
1 ing. was the terrifying experience of
George Milholin. Mr. Millholin and
Mark Adams, who are members of the
paid fire department, were on the
roof to do some repairing and ^rere
busy with their work when thew heard
the boy crying and on looking around
saw the little fellow's head above the
edge of the roof. He was frightened,
probably from having looked down,
but he clung to the ladder in manly
style until Mr. Millholin rescued him
from the danger of a frightful fall.
5%
RY&
1
Discount
50c on $10.00
On each cash purchase we give yoa
Isn't it worth your while?
'The New Grocery."
D. Teichman
121 Ea** •**„ond.,™Next to Courier.
a ticket for the amountWhen y°ubave large class ^as^xcel
tickets amounting to $10 you get 50c. ,jent
HIRES A HORSE
TRIES TO SELL IT
STRANGER AT RICHLAND GETS
ANIMAL „BUT IS LOCATED
AT MT. PLEASANT.
PARENTS AND
TEACHERS MEET
SIDNEY WOMEN HAVE ORGANIZA
TIONS THAT WORKS WITH
.. .. SCHOOLS. ...
Sidney, Nov. 1.—The Parents' and
Teachers' union of Sidney, hold inter
esting meetings in the high school
room every third Friday of five months
in the school year.
This organization is affiliated with
the congress of mothers, whose motto
is "The Welfare of the Child." At the
last meeting the subject of "Physical
Care of the Child," was discussed.
Mrs C. J. Esden read a portion of Dr.
Emmett Holt's lecture showing that
it is important that parents should
know the signs of health and study
the conditions by which it 1b secured
and maintained during the period of
growth. It is not more knowledge that
is necessary, but better and more ac
curate knowledge.
Mrs. E. S. Murphy told how adenoid
growths are fornied and some of the
causes. Mrs. Lewis Hills, then gave
an accurate account of the effects of
adenoid growths—the Hstlessness.
half-open mouth, vacant expression
and impaired hearing. Also the bene
ficial results of having them removed,
both in the facial expression and man
ner, in a few weeks' time.
Some informal talks in regard to
ventilation were given by Mrs. C. W.
Mitchell, Rev. Jacobs and Superintend
ent Stone.
Last year this organization secured
over $100 tor the school library. The
utility and entertainment committees
are now planning arrangements to ob
tain some pictures for the high
school room.
WANTS $5,000 FOR SCRATCH.
Mabel Qretchen of Des Moines Lost
Her Finger—Joseph Wright Was
heart's finger after a lover's quarrel,
may cost Joseph.. Wright 5,000 hard
dollars. "1
Mabel declares that blood poison
in the district court in which she asks
that Joseph be compelled by court to
pay her that sum for the loss of a
finger.*
Things had progressed so far witn
I Jcseph and Mabel that Mabel was
wearing a fine two caret diamond
ring on the engagement finger of the
left hand. The petition does not set
forth the details of the quarrel, but it
does sav that they did quarrel and
that Joseph jerked the ring off his
lady's finger and that in so dcing he
tore the skin with his linger nail.
Mabel declares that blood poison
ing resulted from the wound and with
in two weeks after the quarrel it was
necessary for her to have the finger
amputated.
DRAKESVILLE.
On Friday night a Hallowe'en party
was given at the parsonage. The rooms
were lighted with Jack o* lanterns. The
guests were met at the door by ghosts.
"i
OTTIMWA. OOUEIMB
YOURSELF
INJUSTICE
elsewhere
Glasgow Tailors
•mm
Richland, Nov. l.—fSpecial)— A
man giving his name aa Adams and
residence in Ohio, went to the livery
barn here Sunday and hired a horse
and buggy, presumably to drive out a
short distance in the country and
would return by noon. As the, time ar
rived the livery man, Jesse Smith, be
came uneasy and telephoned out to
Mr. Holgate (the place he named), but
the man had not been there. Mr.
Smith then telephoned to all the near
by towns and finally located him at
Mt Pleasant, where he had offered the
horse and buggy for less than half
they were worth. Mr. Smith and John
Kent went down in their apto and
brought him here. He' confessed he
was trying to sell the horse as he
needed the money.
Des Moines° Nov. l"—His zeal to I are not likely to make the same mis
get the engagement ring off his sweet- take this year.
Dale Russell spent Sunday with
IrMrsBTom
Huff and Mrs. Alvah Huff
and children took dinner Saturday at
the E. J. Goodlander home. Rev. HufI
has recovered his health sufficient to
take up the pastoral woork at Jerome,
for which place he left Friday The
family left this week.
Charlie Tomlin and family from near
Mark spent Sunday at the Frank Har
bour home.
Prof. Dunham will continue his
musical convention for 'ten nights. A
an(j enjoyed
Mr.
by all present.
Splllman of Bloomfleld was the
Sp
guest of Miss Sylvia Fleming last
Friday.
Miss Blanche Lindley of Des Moines
is visiting her grandparents Mr. and
Mrs. J. W. Housley.
Mr. and Mrs. Horace Piper left Sat
urday f«r Trenton where M,
in the Rock Island employ*.
CENTER BOASTS
A GOOD TICKET
iSH
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES ttR
TOWNSHIP OFFICERS ARB A
WORTHY SELECTION, /v.,
W I S E O I E
,-7
The Election of the Men Nominated In
This Branch of the County Serv
Ice la Made a Duty for the
Thoughtful Citizen,
—...
In the makeup of the republican
ticket for Center township, the voters
have a list of candidates that will grace
the positions to which they aspire and
it is a list that makes a bid for support
which should be given heed by every
thinking voter. There are nine men on
the township ticket, who, if elected,
will carry out the wishes of the voters
to the entire satisfaction of the major
ity of the electors of the township.
The oflfces comprise two justices of the
peace, two constables, three trustees,
clerk and assessor.
Berry is Good Material.
The candidates for the post of jus
tice of the
jpeace
are William Berry and
Edgar F. Johnson. The former, William
Berry, is no stranger to the voters of
the township and has held the post on
a farmer occasion with credit to the
party and dignity to the office. Mr.
Berry has lived in Ottumwa for the
past twenty years, coming here from
Davis county, where he saw the light
of day for the first time in 1861. Two
years ago he held the office of justice
of the peace and since then has been
engaged in real estate and insurance
business. For twelve years he worked
as a cooper in the establishment of
Jerry Seymour and is a resident of
South Ottumwa. The voter can make
no mistake in voting for "Bill" Berry.
Johnson a
Safe
Man.
With a claim of pioneer in the com
munity and likewise a record as a
peace officer to be envied, Edgar F.
Johnson makes his appeal for the sup
port of the voters of Center township.
Mr. Johnson was born in Ohio away
back in 1852, beginning life with the
new year, and has the optimism to feel
that his next birthday will witness his
being ushered Into the post of Justice
of the' peace. For the past thirty-five
year Ed Johnson has lived In Ottumwa
and eight years of that time was spent
in the service of the city as one of its
peace officers. For two years of his po
lice career he was night captain and
the remaining six years a patrolman.
Since 1896 Ed Johnson has been a fa»
miliar figure about Ottumwa as mer
chants police or watchman of the var
ious stores about the business district.
With the exception of two years of
this time, during which he was ser
iously ill, he has been continually in
the service of the merchants. Mr. John
son was raised on a farm in Poweshiek
county, having come back to Iowa
when 13 years of age, for he had dur
ing 1854 lived in Agency. For twenty
years Mr. Johnson mined coal, having
been employed as a miner in Iowa, In
diana and Illinois. Ed Johnson should
make a conservative and safe man to
preside as justice of the peace.. ,.....
Derby In the Race.
Coming from -a line of republicans
that have been consistent members of
the party in Wapello county since 1840,
W. A. Derby has entered the race for.
the position of constable with the de
termination to be still in the game
when the race finishes. Candidate Der
by is at present serving in the capac
ity of constable and there is no wis
dom in making a change, for "Bill" de
livers the goods. He comes from a line
of Iowa pioneers, for his grandfather,
Charles W. Derby, came to Iowa nearly
seventy years ago. His father, Nelson
Derby, has been a farmer in Adams
township, for many years. Mr. Derby
is a native of Monroe county, but saw
the wisdom of migrating to Wapello
county when four years of age, and
never regretted it. Those who failed to
vote for W. A. Derby two years ago.
Crawley Has Experience.
Clarence Crawley, candidate for the
post of constable, is no raw recruit in
the role of peace officer. Mr. Crawley
is an old policeman of Ottumwa and
has seen eight years' service as a pa
trolman in Ottumwa. Clarence Crawley
came to Ottumwa away back In
1874
and is well known about the city. Since
that time, with the exception of five
years spent in railroading in Minneapo
lis, he* has made Ottumwa his home.
He comes from the ranks of the men
who toil and is a carpenter by trade.
His present incumbency of the office
has been prolific of results that be
speak his re-election to the position.
The voter will make no better choice
for a constable than by
ence Crawley.
a
voting
for Clar­
Worthy Trio.
The election of the republican candi
dates for trustees in Center township.
will be the wisest move the voter can
make. The candidates for this office'
come from both city and country. G.
M. Bissell hails from the country and
is among the sturdy agricultural class
that make Wapello county a desirable
locality in which to live and invest. His
colleagues come from both sides of the
river in Ottumwa and are both from
the business walks of life. C. Y. Smith
Is a well known lumber merchant and
manager of the M. B. Hutchison Lum
ber Co. He is also one of the hustlers
who believes in boosting Ottumwa. F.
L. Canfleld is one of the representative
merchants of South Ottumwa. Every
one sooth of the river knows F. L.
Canfleld
and his career in the grocery
business demonstrates his capability
to make a safe and conservative trus
tee.
Taylor Well Equipped.
What can be said of the trustees can
he said with equal force of the candi
date f3r clerk of the township, James
C. Taylor. Mr. Taylor is well known
about Ottjimra and is well equipped to
handle duties of the position to
~~,.y
PRICK 50c and Sl.OO
if"
.* -.f
November 6th, 1910.
(Copyright, 1910, by Rev. T, S. Lin
scott, D. D.)
The Last Supper. Matt, xxvi: 17-30.
Golden Text—This is ray body which
is given for you, this do in remem
brance of me. Luke 22:19.
Verse 17—What, was the feast of
the passover, and wlfat did it corny
memorate?
What purpose does the feast of the
passover serve as evidence of Blblo
history?
What is the practical benefit of an-,
niversaries, religious, national and
personal
Verse 18—Has Jems the right to^
day, as in that day. to invite himself
and friends to any man's house 7
Why
Was Jesus' "time," for his crucifix
ion, a necessary or a contingent event,
i. e., was the event fixed by God or
would he have preferred that the Jews
had accepted, and not rejected Jesus?
Verse 19—What are the advantages
of making proper preparation, in ad
vance, for religious services, that is
of the heart and mind, as well as for
the place and the services themselves?
Verse 20—Which time is preferable
for the most solemn and impressive
service, the morning or the "even,
stud wily
Would it tend to spirituality, and
cultivate a spirit of love and unjty, if
the children of God were to sit down
and eat together, at their experience,
or prayer meetings? CP?'9 Pu«'t,on
must be answered in writing by mem
bers of the club.)
Verse 21—Did Jesus know that Jua-
which the electors of the townShip will
elect him November 8.
A Capable Man.
There is no more capable man for
the.post of assessor in the* township
than J. P. Knox. This candidate has
been a resident of the county for the
past forty years and is familiar with
things about this vicinity during his
life here. His candidacy for the post
of assessor will afford the voters of the
township an opportunity to select a
man from the ranks of agriculture, that
is fully capable of handling the posi
tion. Vote for J. F. Knox. 3,. 7-
ELDON.
I
Gov. Carroll spent an hour in Eldon
while enroute to Centerville Saturday,
No. 1 beine late. He met many of his
old acquaintances who pledged their
support.
Thursday Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Frank
lin returned from an extended visit of.
one year in Colorado Springs, Colo,
and Los Angeles six months.
Mrs. Kate Whistler arrived from her
home in Kansas* City Friday night
with her son Harvey, who has been ill.
They stopped with her mother Mrs.
Samuel Crow.
Leon Hinckley of Cleveland, Ohio,
arrived Friday night to visit his
mother and sister Mrs. Henry Ritz on
Walnut and Seventh street.
Rev, D. D. Proper of the Baptist
church, superintendent of missions,
who lives in Omaha, Nebr., was an
over night visitor Saturday and Sun
day. Mr. Proper was one of the 19th
Iowa Infantry and his comrades at
Eldon welcome him every time he is
here.
•.&?.&<
man who
__ __ *f'i ogMk
CRAMBLIT
"Characteristic
OFTEN
MAKES
S A-.
QUICK NEED
DR. KING'S
NEWS DISCOVERY
FOR
COUGHS^AND COLDS
WHOOPING COUCH
AND ALL TROUBLES OF
THRO
All AND LUNGS
... PROMPT USE WILL OFTEN PREVENT
PNEUMONIA AND CONSUMPTION
ff SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY
F. B. CLARK, Druggist.
Some Suggestive Questions on the
Sunday School Lesson For Nov. 6
FOP THE INTERNATIONAL NEWSPAFER BIBLE STUDY CLUB.|||
[Copyright. 1910, by Rev. T. S. Linscott: D. D.]
Virile, aggressive Young Men are the critical Judges of what
style really is—they wish to dress well—they desire Individ
uality and character In their clothes the commonpl
of-date makes no appeal to them, that's why our Suits
coats are their invariable choice. ii
"The Good
.'- .£,18"
We have a new and up to date line that will appeal to th«
A^y~T:X
.. v-tl-r.v:: "v
si FOR
THE CURE
THAT'S SURE
as was going to betray him from pass-^g
ing events, or supernaturally? Give
your reasons. ..
If human actions are contingent,
and not ^necessary, how can G^c'
know in advance what they are gointf
to be?
Verses 24-25—Could Judas have r'..1
frained from 'betrayiny Jesus, ami
have been loyal to him, had he choseft
to do so? Give four reasons.
Verses 26-28—Did Jesus' blessing of
the bread and the wine change its nn
ture, and if not, what cffect ail
have?
What was the precise thought Je
sus meant to convey by the wordw,.
"this is my body," and this is ny
blood?" ,£
What reasons are there to.believe
that Jesus meant this 5Jic.rament. of
the Lord's supper, to be kej^t up per-
.W':
::&-
r..fw.
Verses 22-23—Were.. the loyal dis»
ciples actually in doubt, as to whether
they were going to betray Jesur, iinu, 2
whether or not, what was their staler
of mind?
v|
1
Are there some sets 'which 'we m."»
be absolutely sure we v.*ill never- eom-,
mit, or should we always stand ..
doubt of ourselves? Give youv re-t7
sons.
What blessed purposes ar& SenvecT
by keeping up the Lord's, supper? re
verses 29-30—Will there be eating
and drinking in heaven and, whether. S&s-,
or not, what did Jesus mean by these
Lesson for Sunday, Nov. 13th»- lflOc
World's Temperance Sunday. Matt.
xxiv: 32-51. Y,
Ivfsi
•PS'
I**
il
YCiothe'S Store'
MARTIN'S
The Green Front
gr-Wv'." -.v
214 East
Miss Esther West of Des Moines is
visiting her friends In Eldon, having
been at one time a resident of this city.
Joe Denning has returned to Eldon
for a short time.
Italians Headed for Iowa.
Des Moines, Nov. 1—Secretary Sum
ber of the state board of health has
received word that twenty-three
Italian immigrants have landed in New
York from Naples and
S-.i
are.
Asiastic cholera. JVg
headed .for
Iowa. They will arrive at Des Moines,
Centerville, Cleveland and Sioux City
In a few dayB. Secretary Sumner
directs local hoards of health to ex
amine them to see
hftV*
4
4
or out-

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