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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, November 22, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1910-11-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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'Si
iy CITIZENS
jfc^wjISPS*:
LARGE MEETING YESTERDAY AT
OPERA HOUSE AFFORDS EN-
LIGHTMENT TO VOTERS^ON
GREAT PUBLIC QUESTION.
.. ••«•.••,...• "A ,i #ijj&
SPEAKERS VIEW PLAN
FROM VARYING ANGLES
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P/r
A large number of Ottumwans de
sirous of learning something about the
most talked of question in Ottumwa
at present, gathered at the Grand
opera, house yesterday afternoon and
for1 three hours heard the waterworks
proposition discussed from' various
angles. The meeting was presided
over by D. F. Moi*ey, who allotted about
twenty-five minutes to each speaker.
RGV,
Father James Foley was called
upon to open the meeting with prayer,
after which the speakers in turn were
introduced. The program proper con
sisted of six speakers—three on each
side of the question. Afterwards a
number of others were called upon and
made remarks of varying'length. Ques
tions were a
sited freely and the gen
eral trend of the men present seemed
».-M be the quest cfr information,
Mayor Opens' Oratory.
Mayor S. P. Hartman was the first
3peaker of the meeting and led out
with a refutation of the^ charge of
secrecy in,the dealings of thecouneil
with the waterworks question. He
ptaied that snqh was not the purpo^m
«f the aldertnanic body and that
'secrecy obtained only where the deal
ings made public would Jeopardize xhe
city's interests in the negotiations
with the water company. He reviewed
his service in the council and of the
continual fight for settlement of the
water question and mehtioned the reso
lutions and orders by the council try
ing to compel the water company to
render better service. He told of
meeting with Mr. Slingluff of the
water company whom he stated told
him that the company could not nor
would not make the improvements de
sired.'The offers of $235,000 and of
$260,000 were reviewed and their re
fusal mentioned arid upon the advice
of Capt. W. H.'C. Jaques, "then solici
tor, the hydrant rentals were withheld.
Orders Investigation.
He then, stated that Engineer J. T.
Brady was ordered to make an investi
gation of the physicial value of the
plant to determine upon a price to
offer the company for its plant and
this resulted in the $280,000 price
being fixed: by the city. The advice of
local bankers, said the,speaker, Was
sought and made use of in the matter
of bonds and the work of other cities
which had similar dealings to pais
through, were compared.. All of the
properties of the plant that were pos
sible to se«, were gone over and in
ventoried, leaving only the pipe in the
ground unseen. The condition of
these was based largely on the
Mather plumbing firm, a letter from
which was read by the mayor. Letters
were also read from Sioux City, Water
loo and Cedar Rapids where the cities
own the waterworks and these letters
told of the success these cities have
had from tb^ir plants. He said that
on-investigation made in conferring
with engineers and others Interested
in water concerns, he learned that
pipes in the ground eighteen to twenty
five years were better than new pipes.
-Questions the Wisdom.
"If cleanliness is next to godliness
as we are told it is, it seems to me
that the discussion of the water ques
tion on this Sunday afternoonn is
quite appropriate," sair Merrill C.
Gilmore in his remarks which were
second on the program yesterday
afternoon. "If eloquence and perse
verance were sufficient to buy the
waterworks, then .the efforts already
put forth by its supporters should
have already built one. Mr. Gilmoro
then spoke on the matter of the re
port of the citizens' committee which
favored the purchase of the plant and
said that if the law meant that only
a few leading citizens were sufficient
to pass upon the wisdom of the coun
cil's action in this matter, it were un
necessary to hold an election Tuesday
to ratify the action of the aldermen.
"But," said he, "the law does not
mean anything of the kind."
g® MRS. GILL!LAND DEAD.
igMiiiiii,
Mother of Senator From Mills County
Passe* Away at Advanced
Age.
Council Bluffs, Nov. 21.— Frances
Gilliland, aged 93, one of the pio
neer women of Iowa, died here Satur
day 'at the home of her daughter, Mrs.
C. H. Lucas. Mrs. Gilliland lived in
Mills county. Iowa from 1852 until a
few weeks ago. Senator Shirley Gilli
land of Glenw^od is her sots.
tmtmm :W«!5
-mi
THREE MEII PRE8ENT EACH SIDE
AND GENERAL DISCISSION FOL
BY PERSONS IN THE
^AUDIENCE—MANY INTERESTED.
S
Of Kansas EditSP
St. Paul, Minn., Nov*. 21.—
F. D. Warren of Glrard, Kan
sas, editor af- the "Appeal to
Reason" must serve six months
in the federal prison at
Leavenworth, Kansas, and pay
a fine of $1,000 imposed by a 4
jury in the United States court
in Kansas. The sentence of
that codrt was affirmed by the
circuit court of. appeals today.
Warren was accused of sending
through the mails envelopes on
the outside of which a reward
was printed of $1,000 for kid
naping ex-Gov. Taylor and re-.
turning him to Kentucky.
DEATH SUMMONS
AID JO KNOX
'MiJi
HENRY M. HOYT, COUNSELOR FOR
STATE DEPT., SUCCUMBS IN
^WASHINGTON, D. C.
Washington, D. C., Nov. 21.—Henry
Martin Hoyt, counselor for the depart
ment of state, died at his home Sun
day morning of peritonitis. The body
will be taken to Mr. Hoytt's home city
of Wilkesbarr'e, Pa., for interment.
Knox's Right Hand Man.
Mr. Hoyt was the right hand man
of Philander C. Knox when the latter
was attorney general. He made him
self so indispensable that when Mr.
Knox became secretary of state he lost
no time in obtaining the transfer of
Hoyt from the department of justice
to his own field of action. Mr. Hoyt
was assigned on Aug. 21, 1909, to a
new office, that of counselor of the de
partment.
•He was appointed assistant attorney
general in 1897 by President McKinley
and served in that position until
March 31, 1903, -when he was appoint
ed solicitor general by President.
1
FRIENDS BOOM SENATOR CARTER
Deefat for Re-election Said to Have
?-w
Been Followed by Offer of
'-is
01TUT4WA. WAPELTjO
i-.i'S' •fV
HQOS-
evejt
*v? iftnref *v
Mr.-'Hoyt* waa born in Wilkesbarre,
Pa., on Dec. 2, 1"866, being the son of
Gen. H. M. Hoyt, once governor of
the commonowealth. He was graduat
ed from Tale in 1878. In 1883 he mar
ried a daughter of Col. Morton Mc
Michael of Philadelphia.
He moved that year to New York
to become assistant cashier of the
United States National bank, but
after three years there he returned to
Philadelphia to become treasurer and
afterward president of the Investment
Company of Philadelphia'. In 1894 he
resumed the practice of law in Phila
delphia.
yv
M'M higher Office#
Helena, Mont., Nov. 21.—Friends of
United States, Senator Thomas H. Car
ter, standpatter, who was defeated for
re-electi&n at the recent election say
that the senator has been offered an
appointment as a member of tbe su
preme court to fill tlte vacancy caused
by the retirement of Associate Justice
Moody. Senator Carter left hurriedly
for Washington yesterday.
DES MOINES MAN
BORNEO TO DEATH
HENRY RORABAUGH, STREETCAR
CONDUCTOR, KILLED IN OIL
EXPLOSION.
'l--*
Des Moines, Nov. 21.—Harry Rora
baugh, 32 years old, a conductor in
the employ of the Des Moines City
Railway company, was burned to death
in his home at 2058 Bast :d ave
nue aboiit 6 o'clock last evening when
a crude oil heater which he was re
pairing, exploded and covered his en
tire body with the blazing oil. Rora
baugh was burned to a crisp almost
instantly and when neighbors rushed
to the scene and pulled the form from
the wreckage it was burned beyond
recognition.
Crude Oil Explodes!"
There were no witnesses to the acci
dent and the police were unable to se
cure its exact cause. Mrs. Rorabaugh
stated to Coroner Newlen, however,
that her husband had been fixing a
pipe which led from a tank in a shed
at the rear of the house to the stove
in the residence. Suddenly there was
a terrific explosion and the building
was in flames. Grasping her child, she
ran from the house ahead of the pursu
ing flames.'
J. M. Jamieson, a neighbor, residing
at 2006 East Grand avenue, ran from
his home to the burning house, and
Oscar Lewis, a motorman, residing atj
2205 Lyon street, arrived shortly aft
erward. The two men, after a hurried.
search, found a portion of Rorabaugh's
body protruding from under the wreck
age of the shed kitchen and dragged it
OUt.
GASOLINE LIGHTING PLANT IN
ARMORY EXPLODES DURING
8UNDAY EVENINCL SERVICES
8UNDAY THERE TO 1^1,04J.
______
Evangelist Sunday will speak in the
auditorium tonight and tbe city au
thorities have forbidden the use of the
gasoline lighting plant, sa:
dangerous.
will reach nearly $30,000. The
buildings were fully covered by in
surance, but the beef was only par
tially covered,
TWO GAMES PLAYED^
Postofflce and Iron Works Basketball
i'! Five Lose to Their
Opponents.
In the first league games of the sea
son Saturday night in the Y. M. C.
flepos
ji'p- is
Fort Dodge, Nov. 21.-H Special.)
During a mass meeting which was be
ing held in the auditorium of the ar
mory here last night, a leakage in the
gasoline lighting plant resulted in a
blaze which soon cut off escape by the
main entrance—the side doors were
all locked. Women began screaming
and faintjng and it was thought that
a serious accident would happen
amonog the 500 people. Evangelist Em
mons, with the assistance of the choir,
succeeded after some time in restoring
order until /the doors could be opened,
and all were soon able to pass out of
the building. The fire was soon ex
tinguished when the crowd had left
the building.
it is
Day for
8und*y-
lV ?«,.£
Waiterloo, Nov. 21.—(Special.)—
Evangelist Sunday addressed 7,500
men in the large tabernacle here yes
terday afternoon on the subject
"Chickens Come Home to Roost." It
was the largest mass meeting ever
held in this city. The tabernacle was
packed from the choir loft to the front
door. Yesterday's collection was $5,000,
enough to pay all the bills. There will
be no more collections now, except
on Sundays. The total collection has
reached $7,0,00. The total attendance
has been 139,300. Yesterday's total
attendance was 32,000, the copversiona
having reached 622.
H| BA6 FIRE. AT PES MOipK8^«
Slaughter'
$30,000 Lois Due to Boy's
\Fi
Oarelecsness.
Des Moines, Nov. '21.—A fire was
c..used by a small boy throwing a
cigarette into a pile of hay at the
Longman & Baird slaughter house on
Southeast Eleventh street yesterday
afternoon at 4:30. Two hundred, and
fifty carcasses of dressed beeves were
consumed in the blaze which entirely
destroyed the plant. Aboujt $700 worth
of hides were also lest. The total
IOSJ
A.
the Business college and John Mor
rell & Co., basketball fives were vic
torious. The postofflce players were
defeated by the collegians by the
score of 17 to 11. The iron works men
were snowed under by the packers by
the score of 33 to 8.
POLLS HPEN AT 7
O'CLOCK TUESDAY
3.*? V-&
I"
CITIZENS WIL LVOTE ON QUES
TION OF BUYING WATER-^
WORKS TOMORROW.
w-: fc.'
The people of Ottumwa will tomor
row decide' the much mooted water
worKB question. Women twenty-one
years of age and over will be priv
ileged to vote as well as men who
have reached their majority. Women
are not required register. The
polls- will open at 7 o'clock in tne
morning and»close at the same hour
in the evening. It is expected' that
the results of the election will be
known by 10 o'clock at night. The
polling places are as follows: First
ward at ward house second ward at
404 East Main street third ward at
court house fourth ward at 637 We3t
Second street fifth ward at 801
Church street sixth ward at ward
house seventh wf»rd at I. O. O. F.
hall
The ballot which will be used is al
most as large as the one' used at the
general election. It contains the con
tract entered into by the city council
and the Public Water Co. Voters are
required to mark the ballot in two
places. The first is at the top, asking
whether the contract entered into by
the council and water company be
adopted. At the bottom the voters are
asked to vote "yes" or "no" for the
issuance of bonds in the sum .of $275,
000 for buying the waterworks.
"1S18
WAR DEPARTMENT INSTRUCTS
GENERAL^ HOYT OF TEXAS to
BE AT GOVERNOR'8 CALL SUN-
WERE PREVENTED.
Washington, D. C., Nov. 21—
Brig. General Hoyt, commander
of the department of Texas, has
been Instructed by the war depart,
ment t$ hold troops ready to meet
any call made by the governor of
Texas to preserva neutrality on
the part of the United States in
connection with the revolt, hn
Mexico.
Mexico 6ity, Nov. 21.—The insurrec
tion against the Diaz government,
which was scheduled to open Sunday,
failed to materialize, according to re
ports from the various cities and
provinces. There were only two or
three disturbances in widely sep
arated districts during the last twenty
four hours, and all of them were put
down by. government troops without
serious difficulty.
One of the skirmishes was at Guer
rero, in the state of Coahuila. There
was a threatening outbreak there dur
ing the day, but the federal troops
are in control and the village is under
martial law. This Is the district in
which the estate^ of Francisco Modero,
alleged revolutionary leader, are lo
cated, and it is thought he may have
entered that place following his dis
appearance from San Antonio, Texas.
Sant- Cruz, located between the
capital and Puebla, was the scene 6f
another small outbreak. A party of
revolutionists, few in number, were
driven to the mountains by the rurales.
An attempt also was made to burn a
briuge on the Mexican railway near
Santa Cruz, but It was prevented by
the soldiers. .'
Close Guard In Capital.
Despite the.Jyjt there was no
ia^g^yerj^'' ]precauti^^^^^^®a^
trouble Even In Mexico City sol
diers and police patrolled the streets
all day, but net an act occurred, so far
as can be learned, that required their
services. An an extra peace move no
bull fights were allowed to take place,
and large gatherings of any kind in
any section of the capital were for
bidden. (M
Pittched Battle Not Confirmed.'
San Antonio^ Texas., Nov. 21.—Late
advices from Eagle Pass today fa^l to
confirm the report that 400 persons
were killed in a pitched battle at Zaca
tecas, Mexico, Saturday night.
Reports from Mexico City state that
no word of any disorder at Zacatecas
has reached there.
Outbreak at Harmanz.
Eagle Pass, Tex^aa, Nov. 21.—Ad
vices received today state that an out
break took place
ftt
aws 'UBS DAY, NOVEMBER 23. 1910.
fb®
W
1
5
Harmanz last
nights Four citizens' and two policemen
were injured in dispersing the crowd.
FIGHT SALOON PfcTITIONS
Des Moines Unionists Serve Notice
../That Union Cigars Only Must
Be Sold.
Des Moines, Nov. 21.—(Special.)-—
The union cigar men of this city today
served notice upon the saloon men,
who have commenced work to secure
a new petition of consent under
which they can continue to run theli1
saloons, that unless they sign an iron
clad agreement to sell only union made
cigars all union men of the city will
not only refuse to sign the petition of
consent but will work against the
saloonlsts.
.•
A TRIANGULAR DEBATE.
Ottumwa High Schoolers are Negotiat
ing for a Unique Battle of^'
Words.
The debators of the Ottumwa high
school are considering the matter of
meeting the students of the Des
Moines high school and the Iowa City
high school in a triangular debate. The
local students are to meet a Des
Moines team here' and at the same
time send another team to Des Moines
to battle with the students there.
Iowa City and Des Moines will debate
at tho same time, and Ottumwa and
Iowa City will also hook up in a battle
of words. The local students have not
yet decided to enter Into the debate, al
though they are considering the mat
ter.
TALK8 TO MINISTERS
Fred S. Goodjnan Tdlls of Pastor's Re
latione to Men at Y. M. C. A.
w,
-y j- Today.
"The Pastor's Relation to Men," was
the topic of a talk by Fred S. Goodman
this morning at the meeting of the
Minister's association in the Y. M. C.
A. The topic was thoroughly gone
into and a discussion followed in which
many of the ministers present took
part. The occasion was made a
pleasant one as well as profitable one.
This was the chief feature of the
minister's meeting and the impres
sion made by Mr. Goodman was pleas
ing. Mr. Goodman is a Sunday school
worker from New York. •.
iSf
SECOND DI8TRKVT CONGRESSMAN
BOOSTING M'CLAIN FOR COM
MERCE COURT,
4
Famous Russian Novelist Whose
Last Days Were Marked by Tragedy
$
Count Leo Tolstoi
THE TOLSTOI HOMfe..
Tf-1-
Alj .WASHINGTON
IN
ft:
cjJL
%4
Washington, D. C., Nov. 21.—(Spe
cial Correspondence)—Representative
Dawson is the first of the Iowa delega
tion to arrive in Washington and he
has at once set to work to make an
early round of the departments to get
into touch with affairs which may in
terest his constituency and the 'state
generally. This morning Mr. Dawson
called on the attorney general to urge
the appointment of Emlin McClain at
present a member of the supreme
court of Iowa, to a place on the com
merce court. Judge McClain has ex
ceptionally strong endorsements from
the entire circuit and Dawson, after
an interview with the attorney gen
eral, expressed himself as hopeful
that McClain may land the plum.
F. J. Sheridan of the third Iowa district
for many years a special agent of the
bureau of commerce and labor, and an
expert on the cost of commodities,
etc., has been promoted and trans
ferred to the tariff board.
MENMTHGUNS
HEftVILY FINED
JOE CONSELLO AND A. L. DARNER
PARRYING HUGE REVOLVERS,
MADE BAD THREATS.
••••& MAUt
n-'"
Police Judge Mcrrissey's desk at the
police station this mofnlns reaeml'Vl
a small arsenal. Two revolvers «f
thirty-two calibre taken from Joe Con
sello, an Italian from Hiteman and A.
L. Darrer were us^u as evidence
against the two men who were charged
with carrying concealed weapons. Dar
ner waa out searching for a colored
man who was employed as porter in
a local saloon, whom he alleged in
sulted him. When arrested by Chief
Gallagher, Darner declared' that If he
saw the h0gro he would shoot him. Up
was Intoxicated and when arrtgned Ip
court thi^f mornlnpr on the charge ana
that of carrying concealed weapons
pleaded guilty and was fined $15. lie
went to Jail for Ave days.
Conselto became angry over a trivial
matter in a saloon on East Main street
and made a srun play when Officer
.Black ws called and arrested him. He
had to overpower the man before he
I secured the weapon. Consello pjeadetl
(guilty to the charge this morning and
paid a fine of $15.
Kansas Shows Growth.,'
Washington, D. C., Nov. 21.—The
population of the state of Kansas is
1,690,949, on increase of 220,454.
1,690,949, an increase of 220,45'
....
OV. S, -.- -:y-. ':/i "i'V
th -mippi
ODA HUBBELL OF BARI^Rl^HTs
WIFE, AND TWO CHILDREN
Vi
8LAIN HOME BURNED.
4 -^4
•ft
"WarysvifleV^io., Novl 2i.—(Oda ilub
bell, a farmer, near Barnard, Mo., his
wife and two children, were shot an^
killed at their home last night by an
unknown person who fired the house
to conceal his crime.
Shots were heard at the Hubbell
home'last night, but no neighbors went
there until the house was seen burn
ing, when they made an effort to ex
tinguish the fire. Afterwards the
charred bodies of the children were
found in a bed, that of the mother in
her bed and Hubbell's on the floor in
another room. It was evident he
struggled with the murderer and was
killdd in the yard and dragged back
into the house, which was then fired.
Hezekiah Roscoe, of Barnard, was
arrested in connection with the crime.
It is said Hubbell had won a large
amount of money from him in a card
game.|i
AOTO SPEEDER
FORFEITS MONEY
i.yj.
m-
w- •Ti
MARSHALL OF OLLIE AR
RESTED WHILE SPEEDING
i'}.
O ACROSS BRIDGE
5
Speeding across the Market street
bridge Saturday afternoon at the rate
of, thirty miles an hour dodging street
cars and vehicles, R. E. Marshall of
Ollie found himself "pinched" when
Patrolman Gerschen Llewellyn, erst
while speed cop, stepped over the rail
ing and placed him under arrest. Mar
shall left $10 for his appearance In
court this morning but failed to show
up and the city treasury was enriched
by ten slmolcons.
Charles W.illan and B. F. McClus
key, charged with disturbing the peace
pleaded guilty and went to jail for
three days each.
Elmer Stern and George Rodgers for
intoxication, were given their liberty.
HILL MAKES GOOD SCORE,
South Ottismwa Bowler
223 1-3 in Six Gama|^pj
Averages
f. fowling.
Wnat is considered an exceptionally
good score was made this morning in
six games played on the Mission alleys
by Art HiH. the South Ottumwa
bowler. Hill averaged 2231-3 In the
six games. His scores for each were
223, 276, 191, 199, 246 antf 205,
v.:' .-'v.-
811S1S
SPECIAL ^TRAIN BEARING RE
MAINS LEAVES A8TAPOVA
WHERE NOVELI8X DIED IN. A
RUDE HUT.
uv
Attapova, Nov. 21*—A apaetal
train, which will taka the bMiy of
County Leo Tolstoi to Yaanaya
Pol In la, laft hara this afternoon.
Count Tolstoi will be qui«tlyr
burled on tha hill at hie old homa
in Yaanaya Poilana. By tiie wlah
th«r» will be nalther ceremany. nor
flowers and the burial will be ate
tremaly aimple.
Astapova, Russia, Nor. 21.— Count
Leo Tolstoi died peacefully Sunday
morning. Dr. Makovetsky and the oth^
er attending physicians, and Countesa
Tolstoi were at his side when the end
caihe.
Countess Tolstoi was admitted to tlie
sick room for the first time Saturday
night, but her husband failed to 'rec
ognize her. She had hastened to' him
when she learned several days ago
that his illness was serious and the
physicians had deemed it advisable
that ahe be kept away from the count
fearing that her presence might cauao
,$ie pafilenti^imotlnB^fv
Life of Count Tolstoi.
Couat LyofI
His "War and Peace," a tale of in
vasion of Russia by Napoleon in 1812
and regarded in Russia as being his
ma|terpiece, though his "Anna
Karenina," whldh appeared in 187ft and
"The Cossacks" found", greater favor
abroad, which with his ICraataev
Sonota, translated in 1890 also created
wide attention.
Tolstoi wrote much on education
and reminiscences of childhood and
youth, but of recent years he had de«
voted himself to religious
He made "return not evil," tha key*
stone of the Christian faith and ln«
sisted that the literal interpretation of
the sermon on the Mount was tlie oafcf
rule of the Christian life. The religious
views of Tolstoi were set forth In bin
"Christ's Christianity" and "My Re*
ligion."
In 1898 he .wrote "The Kingdom
•v^m
a
., 3
v)&
l| 'i
$
few.
8
NUMBER 45
fV
WIFE AT DEATH BED,
BUT NOT RECOGNIZED
W.l
•t':
LA8T HOURS W&RK CLOUDED BY
UNC0N8CI0U8NE88 WHICH PRB«
VENTED PLANS FOR MAKINQ
PEACE WITH CHURCH.
U1
Nlcholavltch, usually
called Count Leo Tolstoi, novelist and
social reformer, was born August 28,
1828, at Yasnaya,' Poliana^ln the prov
ce of Tula, Russia. When 28 years
he entered the army- and served in
Caucasus and in the defense of
Sebastopol against the British and
French allied forces.
He first made a reputation in litera«
ture by a vivid sketch written on Se
bastopol and when he left the army
soon after the Crimean war h* devoted
himself to literature.
ot
God Within Us" and an Important
work on the social question., In 1885 ha
wrote "The Four Gospels .Harmonised
and Translated." His other works in
cluded "My Confession," "Criticisms of
Dogmatical Christianity," "What Be
lieve What Is to Be Done.*
"What is Art/' "The Christian
Teaching, "The Resurrection," "The
Slavery of the Times," "What Is Re
ligion" and many others on the moat
varied subjects were Tolstofs.
Tolstoi was excommunicated by
the Holy Synod and in October, 1908,
he deposited his memoirs and diaries
with the curator of the Rumyansoff'
museum on the condition that they
should not be published until ten
years after _hIs death and In November
of the sanrre year he legally made over
his whole fortune, including his real
and personal estate, to his wife and
children. In 1896 Tolstoi wrote a pow
erful vindication of the Dukllober sect,
which In that year had suffered great
persecution for Its religious profes
sions. On the Russians censor refus
ing to permit its publication Tolstoi
applied to the London Times, which
prints^ the lengthy article in full.
He continued from that time on to ad
dress his literary efforts to the British
press. On March 17, 1896, the London
Dally Chronicle published along letter
from Tolstoi to a correspondent in
England on the Vene&vjslan dispute
which had recently arisen between the
United States and Grsat Britain. It
was a strong indictment of war.
Tolstoi was several times threatened
with expulsion from Russia and was
several,, times, according to reports,
upon the point of beinsr executed, but
he seemed on the .whole to have been
treated with unusual leniency In view
of hl» pronounced views, especially as
set forth In a manifesto entitled "The
People's Rights." His criticisms of im
perial acts and his open letter to the
emperor.
He v.f»s. however, expelled from
Moscow In July 1901. and had since re
sided at Yasnaya Pollna.
Not to Be Buried by Church. 'C Jf
St. Petersburg, Nov. 21.—The duma
adjourned today's session out of re
spect for Count Tolstoi, who died at
Astapova yesterday. In proposing ad
journment the president eulogized Tol-
I a. (Coptined on pege 8)
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