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Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, July 30, 1912, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1912-07-30/ed-1/seq-4/

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AUGUST 14 THE DATE FOR BIQ
PICNIC—ENTERTAINMENT "A
STUNT" FROM EACH PUPIL.
Albia, July 29.—The Sunday schools
of Albia whl unite In a big picnic at
the city park Thursday afternoon, Au
gust 8. About 4 o'clock a big paTade
will start and everybody will have an
opportunity to judge of the strength
and quality of the Sunday school move
ment in Albia. The line of march will
include the public square and some
portion of both Washington and Ben
ton avenues east. After reaching the
city park, there will be games and
ahtletic sports of all descriptions. Sup
per will be served at 6 p. TO., each
school forming a company. At 7:30
a short program will be given In the
Auditorium, a "stunt" from each school
will feature the program. Floats, au
tomobiles, hayracks, banners, Hags,
etc., are being prepared for the great
feature of the day, the parade.
SAY POWESHIEK CO.
CROPS THE FINEST
Albia, July 29.—Ralph Taylor and
party returned from Lansing, Mich.,
Saturday morning with three new au
tomobiles. The first twenty miles of
the homeward journey was made In
the mud. Of all fine crops they saw
they report as finest those seen
around Grlnnell in Poweshiek county,
Iowa.
LAND INCREASES
$6 IN SIX MONTHS
Mapleton, July 29.—As an Indication
of the upward tendency of land prices
In that vicinity, the sale of the old
"sheep ranch" five miles east of Maple
ton, which has just changed hands for
the third time within the past five
months. On March 15, last, this tract
of 320 acres was sold at public auction,
and was purchased by Peter Lamp of
Mapleton, who bid it at $115 per acre.
Mr. Lamp was in possession of the
farm only a few days when he sold it
to A. Christiansen of Battle Oreek,
at an advance of $6 per acre. A few
days ago the place was disposed of to
Hans Pacheldrof of Crawford county,
who thought it a good investment at
$138 per acre.
Found Watch Lost for Fifteen Years.
Dow City, July 29.—Fifteen years
ago, Frank Thompson bought a sliver
watch for which paid $25. He had
only carried It a short time, however,
until he lost it in a pasture, where he
lived near Dunlap. Last Friday as
Fred Randall, who was walking across
the same pasture, found the watch
laying face upward, and strange to
say, the moisture had not penetrated
to the works, and all that was needed
was to wind the watch and start it
going. It is apparently in good run
ning order after laying 15 years ex
posed to the weather. Mr. Thompson
Is delighted to recover his treasure.
Fired Fatal Shot Before Mirror.
Ft. Madison, July 29.— Standing
before a mirror Albert Powers, a for
mer resident of this city, shot and
killed himself at his home in Argen
tine, Kas., recently. Domestic trou
bles coupled with the excessive heat
are given ae the reasons of the Bulclde.
ft hi"
Going toTakeaTrip
Let us pay part of your fare. We'll do
this if you buy your suit of us.
Buy a $25.00 Suit for jt 10 nn
Buy a $22.50 Suit for 1 7 *n
Buy a $20.00 Suit for .. ^$14.75
Buy an $18.00 Suit for 1 ^*fl
Buy a $15.00 Suit for ...... $ 9.95
Big reductions on everything.
Buy now. You'll save money.
PEACH&CRESWELL CLO. CO.
Chas. Cresswell. Harry A Trost
jjlowa State News|
SUNOAY SCHOOL
PARADE IN ALBIA MOST ADVERTISE
You Can Do No Better Than to Ad
vertise Your WANTS in theCourier
Want Columns. Half Cent a Word.
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AGRICULTURISTS
AMES ADDS COURSE TO DEPART­
MENT OF JOURNALISM—VALUE
OF HOME PUBLICITY.
Ames, Jqly 29.—Some knowledge of
advertising live stock and other farm
products is to be added to the equip
ment of the up-to-date agriculturists
who graduate from Iowa state college
in the future. A course in agricul
tural advertising has just been added
to the instruction given in the depart
ment of agricultural journalism. It
will be conducted by F. W. Beckman,
head of the department and it will
combine a study of the fundamental
principles of advertising with practice
in writing agricultural advertising
copy. Consideration, will be given
to advertising in the home weekly for
farm advertising.
"This course Is added in response
to a demand for it from our students,"
said Dean Chas. F. Curtiss. "The mod
ern farmer is using more and more ad
vertising space. The live stock breed
ers of Iowa are today investing some
hundreds of thousands of dollars a
year in advertising his products. This
expenditure is going to increase and
the coming agriculturist ought to know
something about advertising so he may
spend his hundreds of thousands to the
best advantage."
OTTUMWANSAT
JONES FUNERAL
Eddyville, July 29.—Lloyd, the 17
year-old son of Mr. and Mlrs. Hugh
Jones, died at his home in White City
Friday evening at 7:30 o'clock after
an illness of typhoid fever. Mr. Jones
is a nephew of Mrs. Chas. Tennant of
Eddyville. Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Ten
nant, Mrs. William Lewis and Mr. and
Mrs. J. Nevin of Ottumwa went to
White City Sunday to attend the fun
eral.
POLICE ARREST
100 IN 24 HOURS
Des Moines, July 29.—In the 24
hours beginning Saturday evening, the
police of this city arrested almost 100
persons. This Is an average of about
one to each thousand Inhabitants. A
peculiar fact concerning the arreBts Is
the small number of men arrested for
intoxication, there being twelve taken
for this offense.
Will Not Build a New Hotel.
Keokuk, July 29.—"The only thing I
have to say is that our plan to build
a hotel here has been dropped for the
present," said George Christian, of the
Christian & Hedrlck firm of hotel pro
prietors, when called upon by a re
porter at the Keokuk hotel Saturday.
Mr. Christian would not go into de
tail to explain the sudden abandon
ment of the hotel project. The firm
still owns the site at Fourth and Blon
deau streets, and according to friends
of the Des Moines men they have no
intention of selling it just now.
It's a Burning Shame
not to have Bucklen's Arnica Salve to
cure burns, eczema, boils, sores, piles,
cuts, bruises, wounds and ulcers. 25c.
—Frank B. Clark.
Ifff^
I0WAN ALMOST
INSTANTLY KILLED
CHAUNCEY MYERS VICTIM OF EX.
PLOSION AT SIGOURNEY PEA
NUT ROASTER BLEW UP.
Sigourney, July 29.—Chauncey
Myers of Washington, Iowa, was al
most Instantly killed here yesterday
afternoon when the boilers of a peanut
roaster exploded, the fragments strik
ing him in the back. The explosion
occurred just as he was stepping In to
an autotmoblle to leave for home.
Myers wag a candidate for tl)jB state
legislature on the republican ticket.
COMMISSION OF
INDUSTRY PROPOSED
(Continued From Page 1.)
for courts when combinations are ad
judged illegal.
"Recommendation to the United
States Steel corporation—That In the
blast furnaces and rolling mills three?
shifts of men, working eight hours
each, ought to take the place of two
shifts of men working twelve hours
each."
The republicans take up the ma
jority report and criticise it in detail.
In disputing the findings of fact the
minority report says:
"By singling out unusual incidents
and unusual evidence, selecting un
usual years, unusual prices, and un
usual practices as a standard of com
parison, the majority has created an
overdrawn picture portraying diaboli
cal Ingenuity and sinister malevolence
as the characteristics of the United
States Steel corporation oifficials."
The report of Herbert Knox Smith,
commissioner of corporations, is in
dorsed by the minority for the most
part. They agree with him that of the
$1,400,000,000 of capital of the st6el
corporation in April, 1901, $600,000,
000 or $700,000,000 was water. They
also agree that for the decade from
1901 to 1910 the trust earnings aver
aged from 11 to 12 per cent. The
minority further finds that the steel
corporation has generally fixed prices
and independents have "followed."
The Gary dinners are said to be "the
gastronomic shadow of the price un
derstandings rather than their sub
stance."
"The system of interlocking direct
orates has insidious disadvantages
which no man can guage," says the•
report. "We doubt the wisdom of their
absolute prohibition, unless regulation
shall fail to abate their evil."
The report devotes the following
paragraph to the labor situation in
steel trust plants:
"The labor situation in certain
manufacturing departments of the
steel industry has always been bad,
and today is bad. As a rule, in the
plants of the corporation conditions
are better than in the plants of the
Independents. In the rolling mills and
blast furnaces men often have been
required to work, or at all events re
main on more or less exacting duty,
for twelve hours a day for seven days
a week. Incredible as it may seem, the
fact is indisputable. It is true that a
blast furnace must be kept going night
and day. If it is extinguished it is
ruined. We believe that the corpora
tion Is substantially improving this
situation, but we can not forbear
from uttering the. suggestion that
three shifts of eight hours each ought
to take the place of two shifts of
twelve hours each."
CONCERT TUESDAY
Fifty-fourth Regiment Band Will Give
Program Tomorrow Night
In City Park.
Owing to the Chautauqua Thursday
night, the Fifty-fourth regiment band
will give its concert this week on
Tuesday evening. Director B. O. Wor
rell has prepared the following pro
gram to be played in City Park to
horrow evening, July 30:
March—"Path of Honor" Jewell
Selection—"The Chocolate Sol
dier" Strauss
Caprice—"Restless Rube" Clarke
Selection—"Tannhauser" .... Wagner
March—"Dixie Belle" Heber
Medley—"Harris Hits" Clarke
March—"The Viking" King
Waltzes—"Desdemona" ......Bradford
Medley—"Southern Songs" .Conterno
HITEMAN DEFEATED
CENTERVILLE MEN
Hiteman, July 29.—Hiteman defeat
ed Centerville here Saturday in a
hard fought 13-lnnlng game by a score
of 3 to 2. Both pitchers pitched ex
cellent ball throughout the entire
game.
Batteries—Hiteman, Fitzpatrick and
Bagnall Centerville, Hendee and Ma
son.
MORRELL BRANCH MAN
DIES IN OMAHA
Michael McCormick, a well known
resident of Omaha, died yesterday fol
lowing 'an operation for Intestinal
trouble. He rallied from the effects of
the operation but infection set in.
V,
OTTUMWA COURIER. TUESDAY, JULY 30.1912.
Mr.
McCormick, at the time of his death
and for the past twelve years, was the
Omaha and Council Bluffs representa
tive of John Morrell & Co. He was a
member of several well known Cath
olic societies and is survived by a
widow and five children.
MAKE TRIP SUNDAY.
Claude Chidester and Don Schamp
Make Overland Trip By Motor
cycle Yesterday.
Claude Chidester and Don Schamp,
two local motorcycle enthusiasts,
made an overland trip yesterday to
Burlington on their machines. The
boys left Ottumwa about 8 o'clock,
arriving In the water city about 11:30,
making the trip in about three hours,
but on the return they made the
distance in thirty minutes less time.
The boys report the roads to be in
fine condition. The stopped at Fair
field and Mount Pleasant for short
visit®.
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Now Comes the Greatest Opportunities
of our Remarkable July Clearance Sale.
Everything of a Summer Nature Must
GO and GO Quickly. Investigate!
Tomowow and Wednesday are the last two
days of our Great July Clearance Sale. Prices
on all Summer Merchandise have been greatly
reduced to effect a quick disposal Come early
tomorrow and share in the substantial savings.
Clean Up Rack of Dresses
New Bargains
—Save Money and secure summer comfort with
one of these smart, dainty dresses which will be
found on the famous clean-up racks tomorrow and
Wednesday.
$3.95 Street Dresses $1.50
-^-Pretty Gingham, Percale
and La^wn street dresses in a
good range of wanted sifces,
regular prices were from
$2.95 to $3.95, tomorrow and
Wednesday
only
I.dU
(Second Floor.)
Up to $10.00 Dresses, $2.95
—Dainty Madras, Gingham,
tissue and voile dresses in
the season's latest styles
values up to $10 ,on
clean-up racks for
(Second Floor.)
Summer Hats take new prices
Lot No 1.
Lot No. 2
Lot No. 3
Values up
to $2.50 at
Up to $12.50 Dresses, $3.89
—Handsome white voile, all
over embroidery and net
dresses in a wealth of charm
ing styles, sold at $7.50, $10
and $12.50, your
or 2 a
Values up to
$1.50 at only
Values up to
$2.00 at only
Values up to
$2.50 at only
Trimmed Hats at HALF
—A quick outgoing of a big group of
stunning summer hats, trimmed models,
all at ... Half Price
(Millinery Salon—Second floor.,)
Soecial Sale of Linen Wash Dresses
$1.25
—The strong arm of cash buying brings these new linene
Wash Dresses to you for half their regular prices. Ev
eryone is new and fresh, just unpacked this morning,
embroidery collar and cults, neatly trimmed with buttons
—fifty women may have these 1
$2.50 Dresses for only
(Second Floor.)
Out-clearing Sale of Lace Curtains
—All odd pairs and lots reduced in the final days of
our clearing sale.
—Heavy and substantial are the notable qualities
in every curtain.
—$1.25 Point Net Curtains 98c
—$1.75 Point Net Curtails $1.29
—$2.50 heavy Nottingham Curtains $1.89
—$3.00 heavy Nottingham Curtains $1.98
—$3.50 Novelty Braid Curtains $2.45
—$5.50 'irish Point and Cluny Curtains $3.98
(Third Floor.)
Tuesday and Wednesday
OTTUMWA IOWA
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
o.ifo
(Second Floor.)
75c Children's Dresses 39c
—Fabric range includes
Lawns, Madras, Ginghams
and Percales in braid and
self trimmed models—sizes
from 2 to 10 yrs,
75c dresses 3^6
(Second Floor.)
—All remaining summer
hats are grouped into three
lots for quick disposal
Ratines, Piques, White
Duck and Bedford Cord
Lots are as follows:
50c
95c
1.25
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—Chic styles in lingerie, tailored and pure
linen waists, lace and ernbroidery trimmed—
high or low neck, some slightly soiled from
display, 98c
values for only ..
,29c
$1.69 Norfolk Waists at $1
—Summer models in dainty Norfolk Waists,
ladies' and misses' sizes—white and colors
trimmed with patent leather belt,
$1.69 Waists
*00
^'"it
$1 Princess Slips at 69c
—Neat Princess Slips and Two Piece Combi
nation Suits in Linen ,lace and em
broidery trimmed, all sizes, tomorrow.. »o9C
(Second Floor.)
Showerproof Foulard, taffeta and
messaline silks, in all shades and colors,
regular 95c
quality for
4 7€
35c Tussah Silks, the yard, only 17c $
12]/£c Batiste and Lawn, yard 6j4c
(First Floor.)
Interesting Bargains
in
Pumps and
Oxfords
—Ladies' pumps and oxfords in white canvas,
suede, nubuck, velvet, patent or dull
leather, $3 and $4 values at *95
—Patent and dull leather pumps and oxfords
in ladies' and misses' sizes, short vamp and
high arch, a very popular style, 2.00
pumps and oxfords for only
1.45
—Ladies' and Misses' high shoes in button
or lace effect—new fall styles, $2.50
shoes for Tuesday and Wednesday .,. .1 .r
The beat time /or
shopping
Price Sale Wash Goods
—Pretty Tissues, organdies, dimities,
and voiles, soft and sheer fabrics, regu
lar 25c quality, to
morrow and Wednesday ....
.*
—Flaxon, voiles, organdies and dimities
in a large rangs of pretty patterns,* 2Qc
grade, clearing sale •^•4
.price, yd ......... w.............
-^Foulards, batiste and French Lawns,
in neat designs and patterns, some 40
inches wide, 18c
value, the yard
.9C
i'i
(First Floor.) ...
Other Important Out-clear
ings of Summer Merchaneise
8i/2c Amoskeag staple Ginghams 7c
35c full bleached Sheeting at 25c
36 inch Cambric Percales, 15c quality .... 9c
I2V2C bleached Huck Towels, only 9c
7!/2C unbleached brown linen crash .... 4%c
—Pure Irish Linen, silver bleached, floral and
striped patterns,
65c value .....*
Wonderhose, guaranteed hosiery, 4 pairs
in a box, regular
$1 value for W
—Boys' Knickerbocker Pants, with belt
straps and Wc tch pocket, serges, gray ,tan,
browns and novelty colors, full peg
top style, $1.50 grade 5f3C
Flrst
very
eoon after 8 a,m.
—The building is
thoroughly reno
vated over night
and will be found
cool and pleasant
In the mornings.
in
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