OCR Interpretation


Ottumwa tri-weekly courier. [volume] (Ottumwa, Iowa) 1903-1916, July 06, 1915, Image 7

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86061215/1915-07-06/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

'Of
8
*sp$r*T,Yip* :p
MANAGER OF SMELTING AND RE
FINING COMPANY AT KEOKUK
IS BUSY.
Keokuk, July 3.—R. G. Hall, general
manager of the River Smelting & Re
fining Co., which will locate its plant
in Keokuk, who arrived here, announc
ed that the Stone & Webster engineer
ing corporation of Boston will con
struct the plant, which will be 400 feet
square and will be built of concrete*
brick and steel. It is expected to have
the plant in operation within the next
four months. It will handle ore for
the smelting of zinc.
Work will be started next week
when the Burlington engineers will
commence the installation of a switch
track from the Mount Pleasant branch
of the road.
A temporary office and engineer's
headquarters will be built. There
will also be constructed a storage
house 1,000 feet long. The Stone
ft Webster Co., will send its foremen
here and local labor will be secured
in the construction work.
It is expected that employment will
be given to some 200 men on this fac
tory construction. Skilled labor will
be secured for the operation of the
smelter.
DECIDES CITY MAY
ISStTE WATER BONDS
Des Moines, July 3.—The city's
right to issue bonds for the purchase
of the waterworks was established to
day when Judge Utterback of the dis
trict court handed down a decision de
claring valid the bond election of No
vember 3, 1914.
The decision was given In the
friendly Injunction proceedings
brought by Bion S. Hutchins to settle
all legal question. The petition asked
to restrain the city from proceeding
further with the move to issue bonds
on the ground that the election was
Illegal. Judge Utterback denied the
injunction and held the election legal.
Both sides will join In an appeal to
the supreme court.
Across Iowa in 1849
Forty-niner Tells of Experience* on Long Trip.
George J. Kellogg, who made the journey across the plains from Illi
nois to California during the gold rush In 1849, gives the following account
of his experiences In Iowa in a pamphlet that has recently come Into tne
possession of the State Historical society of Iowa:
"April 5, twenty-one miles to Fulton, where we crossed the Mississippi.
Sixty-two California wagons had crossed ahead of us roads bad, sandy,
rocky, or mud to the hub. One hundred and twenty-one miles to Iowa City,
then the state capital. April 18 shot a wild turkey and a deer In Iowa coun
ty got stuck In a slough with almost an empty wagon took eleven yoke
cattle to pull us out. Lay by in Iowa and turned out our cattle into an un
husked cornfield, at 15 cents per head a day, for three dayB. In Polk coun
ty saw a buffalo and an elk. Passed through Des Moines, May 7 poo
ferry swam our cattle and oame near losing two yoke in a tree top wait
ed for new ferryboat and the crowd crossed till midnight. May 10, no wood,
But up an ox yoke that night a big storm our cattle left
covered them next day rain, hail and wind.
Wanted
GOOD VEAL. AND BUTCHER STOCK
also hides and chickens wanted.
Bought at highest prices. Boston
Market, 123 East Second. Both
phones, 60. Oeorge Schulta. We will
call for them.
WANTED—YOUR OLD CARPETS TO
make Into rugs, beautiful and durabU
rugs from old carpet at reasonable
prices. Write tor descriptive catalog.
Bloomfleld Rug Works, Bloomfleld.
iowa
For Sale
FOR SALE—1914 6 PASS. FORD
•hock absorber, Prefrtolite, Stewart
Warner horn, robe rail, Kingston
vibrator, extra radium rod, anti-rat
tler, cut out, good tires. Price $325.
Address J-l-B care Courier.
TOR SALE CHEAP—IRON FENCE
braces and cultivators. IS. Sigtsl.
NEW FACTORY TO
BE BOUT AT ONCE
Bringing Up Father.
ArZAW.
WELL. AT LAST
TOO JOINED
THl* 4REAT
SECRET ORDE1*
W
May 23, crossed
EVERYBODY READS THE WANT ADS WHAT HAVE YOU TO SELL?
.01
ufl
®nc*
y,^®|
the Missouri.
Miscellaneous
WANTED—YOU TO KNOW THAT
the celebrated Shetland stallion
Comet "C" will be found at Geo. R.
Glltner & Sons for service, 4 miles
east of Ottumwa.
Ml GIRL HEARS
SIOUX CITYAN GETS TOUCHING
LITTLE NOTE FROM WAR
SUFFERER.
Sioux City, July 3.—Marietta Hos*
trop, daughter of a Cedar Falls bank
er, has received a touching letter from
France written by the mother of a
3-year-old girl who received a doll in
a consignment of gifts sent from the
congregation of the Danish Bethle
hem church of that city. The letter
follows.
"St. Sauveur le VIcomte, Ruendos
Paves de l'Abboujes, Pres de Cher
bourg, Manche.—Dear Miss Hostrop:
I thank you for the nice gift you made
me, for it is I who have your beauti
ful doll. How much I have already
amused myself with It, for we are so
unhappy since this terrible war has
come to afflict our beautiful country.
My papa left ten months ago up to
this time we have never had news
from him, and I dare not think I am
an orphan so young.
"I am only 3'/2. years old too young
to have already known so much mis
fortune. My heart breaks in telling
you these words. Mamma weeps all
the time. When will this misery end?
It is now ten months since we left our
native land, driven out by the army.
Our homfe- is burned. Mamma says
we have no more linen, scarcely any
thing to warm ourselves.
"Good-bye, dear Miss Hostrop. I
close by sending you my warmest
kisses. Excuse my poor writing I
am so small that mamma has to guide
my hand. I thank you once more for
your beautiful little gift. I expect a
reply from you. I shall be so happy.
Your kind letter will make me forget
all my troubles. A little girl who
loves you.
"Marcelle Jeudy."
THREE IN NARROW
ESCAPE FROM DEATH
Iowa City, July 3.—Three people nar
rowly escaped drowning, and one of
them, a baby of eight months, may yet
die of pneumonia. The Imperiled trio
included Rev. C. Allison of the West
Liberty Christian church and" his wife
and infant son, Paul. The little one
was submerged in the Iowa City park
lake, when a maid let go of the handle
of its carriage, and the buggy slid
down a long incline, and plunged into
the lake, at a point where the water
is about six feet deep. Discovering
the near tragedy, the father dived from
his boat, near by, and the mother also
plunged into the lake. The father
found the baby—still in its carriage—
but, as neither man nor woman could
swim, both were nearly drowned, when
a number of young men in the park
rescued the entire party. The baby
was unconscious and almost died be
fore resuscitation followed.
CVZAM!
I'VE
BEE.M A
VOOFNUFF
TY/O DATS
NOW!
WELL BROTHER
COULD XOO
LET ME H/KVE
FIVE
h/
^'.i».-.-.--7
Des Moines, July 3.—New laws, In
cluding those directed against the
liquor traffic, and the so-called "tip
ping" evil and those permitting cities
to adopt the city manager plan, and
absent voters to cast their ballots by
mail, will become effective In Iowa
at midnight tonight.
Other legislation of the recent thir
ty-sixth general assembly, which also
becomes operative, authorizes a new
scale of salaries for county sheriffs,
treasurers and auditors restricts the
sale of drugs to drug stores, thus pro
hibiting department or general stores
from handling them requires railroad
companies to pay their employes twice
a month, and permits chattel loan
companies to charge an interest rate
of 2 per cent a month on loans.
Tenant-liquor laws go Into effect In
anticipation of statutory prohibition
New York, July 3.—On the author
ity of Charles Becker's counsel, Mar
tin T. Manton, it was said today that
if Becker fails in his appeal to the
United States supreme court, he will,
before going to the electric chair for
the murder of Herman Rosenthal,
make a public disclosure of the names
of the men with whom he is alleged
to have divided $100,000 in graft mon
ey collected from gamblers and keep
ers of illegal resorts during bis
career as head of the famous police
strong arm squad. Six men, some of
them police department officials, are
understood to be Involved in the state
ment Becker has prepared while
awaUlng the outcome of appeals to
Govetaor Whitman and the United
States supreme court.
"Becker will make a clean breast
of the grafting," said Mr. Manton.
"He will issue a statement, not for
Washington, D. C., July 3.—Renewed
efforts to send supplies into Mexico
City and to establish communication,
not only by cable, but by wireless,
were the relief measures which the
United States today Bet in motion to
assist the thousands of foreigners cut
off from the outBlde world.
American Consul Silliman was in
structed to lnsiBt that General Car
rara permit diplomatic communica
tions to pass to and from Mexico City
over the portion of the cable controlled
by his forces.
The Zapata forces on the Mexico
City end are agreeable to it.
Red Cross authorities say they are
helpless to give assurances that the
food supplies will reach those for
SIGOURNEY SCHOOL
BOARD MEETS
Slgourney, July 3.~The annual meet
ing of the Sigourney school board was
held Thursday, July 1. The important
work before the board for this session
was the examination of the books of
the treasurer and secretary. "After
completing their work the board found
that the books of the two officers
agreed in all the funds and their re
ports "were approved.
The secretary's report showed there
are 790 people in the district of school
age, of whom there are 356 males and
434 females. The board levied $10,000
teachers' fund $6,500 contingent and
$2,000 bonding fund for the coming
year, and with the reelection of the
present secretary the board completed
their work.
I ALBIA.
Harry Cramer of Albia was in Char
iton last Tuesday on business.
Miss Merle Yates of Albia returned
home from her visit at CenterVille.
Mrs. Bert Allen and children of Albia
wont to O-tumwa to visit relatives and
friends a few weeks.
Becker to "Squeal" If He is
Unsuccessful in His Appeal
Trying to Help Mexicans
Miss Kate Weldman of Albia returnr
ft
ft
•WELL*
OF
COURSE!
:¥WI-:••
OTTUMWA COURIER, TUESDAY, JULY 6, 1915
Tipping" Prohibited Under
New Law Effective Tonight
on January 1, 1916. These are Intend
ed to prevent circumvention of pro
hibitory measures now in effect in the
"dry" parts of the state, and to effec
tively cope with the "bootleggers"
when the entire state swings into the
temperance column. After tonight,
those caught selling liquor in "dry"
territory second time will be liable
to imprisonment in the penitentiary
for one year, and to fines ranging up
to |1,000. Railroads are required to
keep a public record of all shipments
of liquor Into restricted territories.
The attorney general's office has
served notice that the antl-tipping law
must be observed to the letter In
Iowa. The resiwnslbllity for Its en
forcement has been placed upon coun
ty officials. A fine of $25 or thirty
days in Jail is the penalty for one who
gives or receives a tip of even as low
as a nickel.
pay, but to divide the guilt of graft.
He realizes his perilous position and
does not want to die, If die he must,
and leave a set of men to use others
as he has been used. He wishes to
have the truth off his mind as soon as
possible."
It was reported that Becker's state
ment would attempt to explain the
death of "Big Tim" Sullivan, who was
believed to" have been killed by a
New Haven railroad train.
Conflicting statements and denials
by some of the informers against
Becker and by others confused the
situation today. One clear point was
that the informers could not deny
their testimony against Becker with
out violating the contract under
which they were granted immunity by
the state's representatives. Under
this agreement they were to enjoy
immunity unless shown to be guilty
jot perjury.
whom they are intended, because of
Interrupted communications.
Mexico City now is absolutely cut
off from communication with the out
side world except by such couriers as
may safely pass through the Hues of
the two hostile armies facing each
other in the suburbs.
The Carranza agency announced re
ceipt of this telegram from General
Carranza at Vera, Crus:
"Deny report that General Gonzales
has been defeated near Mexico City
even though it may have been reported
by Consul Canada*- You can also deny
that General Obregon lost battle at
Lagos, as it was In this place he de
feated 3,000 Villa troops and Is on his
march toward Aguas Calientes."
ed the last of the week from a visit
with relatives in Nebraska.
J. H. Merrick returnod home from
Montana Friday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. George Tucker are the
parents of a son, born recently.
Mrs. Geo. Stone of Melrose spent
Tuesday in Albia.
Miss Helen oMore of Albia has re
turned from Oskaloosa.
Herbert Merrick of Albia came home
Friday from Iowa City to spend the
Fourth.
BLAKESBURG.
Frank Abegg of Alliance, Nebr., is
visiting his parents Mr. and Mrs. Wal
ter Abegg.
Miss Elizabeth- Robertson left Thurs
day for Hedrick where she will spend
a few weeks with her parents.
Mrs. Bertha Snow went to Fairfield
Friday where she will visit at the home
of her brother J. E. Cohagan and fam
ily.
Miss Winifred Webster of Des Moines
is visiting at the home of Lester Jay
and wife.
S. A. Cohagan and wife returend to
their home In Davenport Wednesday
after a week's visit with relatives here.
Miss Kendall accompanied by Mrs.
Laura Miller and daughter Mary went
to Falrfleld where they will spend a
few days with friends.
iiKu^.i* ^,1.%'ijfe ,, a..,^-i,^rw^^),iiMra
3
3
JW* vw •'Swrv-*
ft
ft
NOW
THAT xoo ARC OHC
OP 0^ TO
AftK. XOO TO
CONTftlfcUTe
TO OVA
fund:
I At
I Evening Story I
A WINNING PENALTY.
By Jean Grey.
(Copyright, 1916, by the McClure
Newspaper Syndicate).
"Be good, sweet maid, and let who
will be clever," Davis half chanted,
nodding significantly at Bllse.
She blushed faintly, frowned and
turned her back.
"It Is nice to be good—even for
revenue. Don't think I blame you,
dear girl—serious minded young men
with money in both pockets are not to
be despised."
"No! Rather light minded ones who
have nothing of any sort," Ells* flung
back with immense scorn.
Davis ohuckled. "I'm worth as much
as seven dollars, actual cash. Poten
tially—just wait till the royalties begin
rolling In."
"Why not say till the Greek calends
you generally do?" Bllse came
back at him, her voice choking. "I'm
not twitting you with poverty—don't
you dare say It. It's being poor with
malice aforethought that sets me wild.
That's your sort."
Will plaintiff state her case? De
fense reserved." Davis laughed, yet
not quite easily. He had sensed the
choking voice.
Blise turned upon him, her dropped
hands clenching hard. "If you starved
for an ideal, disdaining to work un
worthily, I could love you, starve with
you Joyously," she said, "but when you
let weak pride and pur* vanity stand
in the way—"
I don't understand," Davis Inter
rupted. now looking uncomfortable.
"You do understand," Blise retorted.
"You think It reason. Graham wanted
to rewrite an act. You put the play
in a drawer and have not looked at it
since. Because, forsooth, he's an ass
—off the stage. I know it—everybody
does. But he has the instinct that tells
him what will get over. You lack It.
Your way may be evef so much finer
tt
"Thanks for them kind words,"
Davis tried to say with merry scorn,
but hurt and angry in spite of himself.
Blsie went on pitilessly: "It was
so with your book—first half Is ador
able— fresh and witty and clean.
Everybody says so—but you will lug
In dirt all through the last half. Need
less dirt! Yes, you shall hear the
truth. If your soul wore a dirty gar
ment I could understand your sticking
by it. It doesn^. You are clean—
your unoleanness is just an affecta
tion—no matter how you prate about
strength—"
"This grows monotonous," Davis
broke In, "like the Mona Lisa smile.
I'd rather be sworn at than have you
so perfectly reasonable. Maybe I
ought to let Impatience do her perfect
work. Still it occurs to me you are
perhaps more acutely aware of my
shortcomings from viewing them
through the lens of another man's
perfections."
"Only partly right," Elsie answered.
"I've felt this coming all along—but
until you brought In Maginn I
wouldn't let myself say It—-even to my
self. I—"
"So I fetched a stick to break my
own head. Well, it shall be bless you,
my children!" Davis Interrupted sup
erbly. "Maginn, the little busy bee,
Improves the shining hour. Naturally
he hovers over all sweets—"
"Maginn has Just this to do with it,"
she cried, her nails dug into her palms.
"He's below you—worlds beneath you
—In every way except one—he does
what he can and does it with a sin
cerity of belief in himself th,at quite
redeems his conceit. If you tried only
half so hard—"
"You forget. I am not a banker's
son," Davis cried, now thoroughly
angry. "Don't waste more breath, my
dear. I understand. You are tired of
waiting, of hoping, of believing. Mag
inn, with his expectations, his sweetly
solemn mind, tempts you sadly. Take
him and welcome. I offer you my fell
citation and wish you a very good ev
ening."
"As you will, but take this," Blsie
answered, slipping off his ring, a mere
thread of gold with a winking fire opal
on top. Her hand trembled. Was it
for this she had but half an hour
earlier sent Maginn away with a "No"
so kind it was Irrevocable? She knew
It was wicked, but she had been kind
as a penance for hating poor Maginn
because of his humble perfections.
They were bearing him so much farth
er and higher than Lynn Davis' better
parts were ever likely to carry him.
Now, Lynn was jealous. She would
condone that In no man. She all but
flung the ring at him. He let it fall
BROTH SIR,
MOVT "bC LUXOU
LIFE
and roll on the floor. He made to
set his heel on it She snatched it
out of harm's way, her lips suddenly
tremulous, her fine eyes dim.
He watched her smiling bitterly.
'Finding is keeping," he said. "You
can't disclaim your treasure trove.
Anyway, the bauble is too cheap to be
worth returning."
Blise could not speak.
"Cheap like the giver," he went on
bitterly. "Yet I went without cigars
three months to buy it, more shame to
me. If I were like Maginn I could
have bought you a diamond with just a
few hours' work. Do you like baubles?
I never thought you really cared—"
"You know I—I—loved that ring—
better than—than—the finest, the cost
liest," Elsie burst out. "I would not
have had it different."
"Aren't you truly a sybarite in love
with luxury?" Davis asked, drawing a
pace nearer.
She shook her head, her breath com
ing quick. "I don't mind lacking
things—hardly a little bit," she said.
"The hard part is doing without be
cause you must. If I were only rich
enough I should let myself be really
dowdy now and then."
"Is that why you are suddenly so
severe with me?" Davis asked his eyes
beginning to twinkle. She flung up her
head, saying bravely with a crimson
flush, "No!"
"Then why, Maginn and his perfec
tions aside?" Davis demanded.
She turned on him, her eyes flash*
ing. "Let Maginn alone!" she said.
"Mention of him Is—insulting. My
concern Is—you. You only! Do you
think It does not hurt me to have you
slothful, Indifferent, to see men unfit
to black your boots going ahead of
you in the race of life? You are not
great, but I do believe you have In
you the makings of greatness. I
thought love and trust would help you
to show it. Now I see my mistake.
You say you love me?"
"It may be a delusion—but I love
to hug it," Davis answered.
"Then If you do—if you $are enough
to think of me as a wife, listen! Put
It to yourself thus: Here is a prize
worth winning. I'm going to win it,
though the job is a man's size. It
means hard work and putting dragons
to rout—dragons of shyness and con
celt—"
"Ah, me! How highly some people
esteem themselves!" Davis broke in.
'Say, guardian angel, what will hap
pen if I refuse?"
"Worse things—much worse," Blise
said promptly, coming very close and
looking up In his face. "For—I shall
marry you and make you work, wheth
er or no—"
"In that case," he cried, kissing her,
"I refuse absolutely!"
KEOKUK IS REQUIRED TO TAKE
8TEPS FOR MEETING CUR
RENT EXPEN8ES.
Keokuk, July 8.—Fifteen thousand
dollars in time warrants to provide
revenue with which to meet current
expenses will be floated by the city,
the council Friday having passed the
necessary resolution. It provides that
the warrants shall draw five per cent
interest, shall be sold at par and will
be payable October 1,1915. This sum
of $15,000 will be distributed as a
credit to the following funds in the
several amounts named:
General fund, $5,D00 grading fund,
$4,000 sewer fund, $2,000 park fund,
$2,000 fire funds, $2,000.
The three firemen to be released
from the service of the city on July
81, in order to reduce the expenses
of the department are Fred McQuade,
Nelson Burris and Francis Tigue. The
latter choose to retire from the depart
ment Friday rather than wait for the
time limitation. It was stated by the
commissioner of public safety that a
private effort was being made to se
cure positions for the three firemen
that are retired under the necessity
of retrenchment.
At a meeting of the civil service
board for the purpose of examining
applicants for positions as mlnutemen,
none appeared. Five mlnutemen at a
Balary of $12.50 per month each are
to be employed to take the place of
the three regular firemen that have
been ordered removed July 81.
ft
4AZ \M'
4AOAM
1 V/OOL.D
PK6 TO A*K
"W,
.". ••WV'T.'T
Professional Cards
OR. A. O. WILLIAMS
Burgeon C., R. I. St P. Ry. Co., C., B.
ft Q. Ry. Co., O. R., B. ft S. CO.
Residence, 21« North Jefferson street
Office, 120 Court street.
No. Going Southwest Depart
26A—Southwest Limited .. 1:46 a.m.
8A—Kansas City Local... 10: IB a. m.
3SB—Ottumwa to Seymour 4:80 p. m,
•SB—Local freight f:
Going East, via Cut-off.
98B—Local 7:48Sk m.
8A—Davenport, Chicago.. 6:17 p.m.
J6A—Leave Junction 12:19 a. m.
A stub train wll leave station
for Junction at 11:40 p. ra., re-r
turning arrive at Station
12: IB a. m.
Marion Line, Going North
4B—Ced. Rapids, Savanna,
Chicago 0:80 a.®.
108B—Cedar Rapids. Marlon 6:10 p. at
•8B—Local freight' 6:80a.m.
Marion Line, Coming South.
108B—Frolh Marlon 10:15 a. m.
21B—From Marlon 18:86 a.m.
97B—Local freight .. 4:00 p. m.
A—Dally.
B—Except Sunday.
Local freights depart from and term
inate Ottumwa Junction.
Locals 92-~ and 98-B run on
day, Wednesday and Friday.
T. H. Jaooba, Agent
BURLINGTON ROUTE C. B. A Q.
No. Going East Depart
12A—Chlc., Dubq., Quiney 1:00 a.m.
10A—Chicago Limited 7:18a.m.
22A—Ar. from Des Motnea 10:08p.m.
6A—Chicago Limited .... 1:88p.m.
212B—Ft. Mad., St. Louis 8:86 p. m,
4A—Chlc., St. Louis, Qcy. 7:15 p.m.
8A—Chic., Peoria, R'kfd. 11:11 p. m.
178B—Ottiunwa, Burlington 11:88 a.m.
18B—Otta to Burlington ,. 8:06 a.m.
Going West.
BA—Omaha and Nebr.,.. 1:18a.m.
8A—Omaha, Ore., Calif.. 7:87a.m.
28A—Des Moines local .... 8:06a.m.
213B—Ar. from Ft. Mad ... 11:80a.m.
178B—Peoria to Creston... 1:65 p. m.
1A—Chicago to Denver .18:87a. m,
11A—Ar. from Burlington.. 9:*V r. m.
tA—Chicago to Denver .. 4:68 p. m.'
A—Dally.
B—Except Sunday.
C., R. I. A P. RAILWAY.
No. Going North- Depart
471B—Des Moines, Omaha. 7:88 p. m.
478B—Des Moines, east and
west .. ..... 10:50a.m.
476A—Des Moines, east, west
and north 8:2?a.m.
Q^ing South.
470B—South and southwest 8:68 a. m.
47SB—Keokuk and south... 8:88p.m.
474A— ... .....10:01p.m.
Connects at Bldon eaqt
bound at 12:48 a. m. and *i
Kansas City and south*
wejst at 1:82 a. m.
A—Daily.
B—Except Sunday.'
St. Louis, July 8.—B. M. Maper ot
Keokuk, la., came to St. Louis Thurs
day to search for his brother, A. C.
Maper, 28 years old, and a friend, Max
Klndig, both of Keokuk. Maper told
the police both men had come to St.
Louis for a visit, and their families
had heard nothing lately of their
whereabouts.
WHITE TO FIGHT WELSH. *1
New York, July 8.—Charley White
of Chicago, and Freddie Welsh, wortd'i
lightweight champion, are matched to
fight a ten round bout here tonight,
Betting odds here today were 6 to I
on White to beat the Englishman.
Bv) George McManus
NEVEHs, MIND
ME
UUVT TtLt
me hov* to
*Etl3N
FKOW
TVil-% CLUli
f,T
••, a
Residence
tele­
phone HO office telephone, 90. Ottum
wa, Iowa.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
W. H. C. Jaques Jo R. Jaquei
JAQUES A JAQUES.
Attorneys at Law
107 North Court St. Both phones No.
SB.
W. D. Tlsdale Geo. F. HefndeJL.
TISDALE A HEINDKL J|
Attorneys at Law
Phoenix Trust Bldg., South Market*
St., Ottumwa, Iowa.
Railroad Time Tables^
C. M. A ST. P. TRAINS
e--
-H'
,7 -i
w*5
1
J. H. Rnulnson, Agent.
J. H. Robinson, Agent.
WABASH RAILWAY.
No. Going South Depart
2A—Moberly,
St.
SOB—Moberly
L., K. C... 7:50 a. m.
and east.... 8:00 p. m.
96A—Local freight 4:00 p.m.
Coming North.
BIB—Moberly local 11:50 a.m.
8A—From Kansas City.... 7:10 p.m.
96A—Local freight 1:00 p. m.
A—Dally. ,1
B—Except Sunday.
96A and 96A carry passengers Bun*
days.
T. H. Jaoobs, Agent.
KEOKUK MAN TRIES
TO LOCATE BROTHER
3

xml | txt