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The morning news. [volume] (Savannah, Ga.) 1887-1900, June 14, 1887, Image 2

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NINA VAN ZANDT DYING.
TEE PROXY BRIDE OF AUGUST
SPIES IN ILL HEALTH.
She Has Cut Loose From Her Family
and Is Having a Hard Time A Belief
That She Will Not Live to Hear the
Final Decision on the Anarchist’s
Appeal.
A Chicago letter to the New York Star
ays: August Spies’proxy maiden wife, Nina
Van Zandt, is failing rapidly in health,and it
in not likely that she will live even to learn the
decision of the Supreme Court with refer
ence to her loved one’s fate.
A few weeks ago, as I was riding out in a
Milwaukee avenue street ear, I noticed a
lady deeply veiled sat opposite me. There
was a wan look and an expression of inex
pressible sadness about the face that touched
me, and I became more and more convinced
that I had somewhere known her. The deep
veiling, however, prevented immediate rec
ognition, and I rode several blocks
before I summoned oourage to speak.
Crossing to the other side of the car,
as a burly fellow went out, leaving vacant
the seat beside her, I sat down by her side.
She started at the first word of 'recognition
from me, and said: “You must be mistaken,
sir. Ido not think we ever met before.”
and then raising her veil, she added: “Oh,
it is you, is it? I thought it was someone
who "knew me from that,” and she pointed
to a large placard picture of herself, swing
ing in the centre of the car, advising all to
go at once to “Blank's Dime Museum; wax
figure of Nina Van Zandt on exhibition for
a limited time only."
“Never mind,” I replied, “no one would
recognize you now from that picture.”
“Isn’t it an outrage," she said after a mo
ment’s pause, “to have one’s name and por
trait thus blazoned upon every thorough
fare. and a wax figure caricature in a mu
seum ! And yet the court has decided that
neither mv name nor my picture is a part
of me, and anybody can take them up and
use them. 1 thought surely that the
court would sustain the injunction against
the wax figure. No wonder that large
classes of men are losing respect for law. I
believe the laws, however, are good enough
—some of them—if the Judges were as good
or as just as the laws. Have you any good
news for me?” she added. “You were at
Ottawa when the case was argued before
the Supreme Court? Did the Judges look
like they were favorable to our side? I wish
I could have seen them. If I could only
have watched their expression as Mr. Swett
and Cant. Black were plead mg, I could have
divined the outcome. Don't you know any
thing good to tell me about it?”
I have known Miss Van Zandt for some
time, long before she made the foolish mis
take of marrying by proxy a man whose
liberty had been curtailed by legal proce
dure. I had known her when her cheeks
were full and rosy red, when her eyes
sparkled with the fund of mirth, wit, in
telligence, energy and will of the brain be
hind them. I liial khown her when she was
at least, one-third heavier than now. I had
known her when there was no sadness in the
expression of a face as beautiful, as intelli
gent, as sweet as one would wish to look
upon. We had been friends, are friends,
both before and since her sad infatuation
and sadder mistake. I looked upon the
beautiful face of my friend, made even more
beautiful by its sadness, until I could not
bear to look longer. No, I had no good
news to tell her, unless it might bo good to
tell her that she was dying.
“I know nothing more than you have
read in the papers,” I replied. “Oh!” she
said, “I never real the papers. lyhy, ——,
yon know I would be a maniac in a month
if I rend the awful things they say atout
me. Did the attorneys make good argu
ments at Ottawa ?”
“Yes,” I replied. “They did.” Both sides
made excellent speeches. But you have
never seen the supreme judges upon the
bench or you would not expect me to de
scribe any changes of countenance. Their
countenances never change. They sit there
like seven solemn owls, except that, an owl
sometimes winks or rolls its eyes. The ideai
judge is as motionless as the exhumed mum
mies of Ramses II or Sethi I.”
“Where are you going out this way?” I
asked.
“I am going to call on Mr. Spies’ sister;
she lives on the avenue, and I come out hore
every day or two for someone to talk to. I
get afraid of myself when alone.”
“You are looking much thinner (and I
had almost, said older) than you did a few
weeks ago.”
“Oh, this worry is killing me. Not only
the anxiety about the outcome of Iho case,
but the intolerable throngs of callers, cu
rious only to see me. and the army of beg
gai-s who have read that I was rich: and
then the letters, bushels of them, from every
conceivable sort of people, some of them
threatening my life, and some asking for
money; many abusing me, and no end to
the marriage proposals from unknown vaga
bonds who sav they art* much better than
auy Anarchist; that Mr. Spies will lie
hanged anyhow, and I had better conclude
to accept their offer. A great manv include
photos, so that I can see how good-looking
they are. Oh. 1 did not know the world
was so full of silly fools as it seems to be.
“I am nervous, sleepless and nearly wor
ried to death. The injunction suit cost me
a great, deal of money, and my income has
been shut off on every hand. I have nothing
now but the income on my book on the life
of Mr. Spies, and the attacks of the press
nave made its sales very slow. I have not
spoken to mother or father for montlis.
Then came that cruel edict from the jailer
that I should not be allowed to set* Mr. Spies
sven through iron bars.”
Here she broke down and tears were visi
ble in her eyes as we came to the street
where Miss Spies lived. I got off the car
and walked with Miss Van Zandt to the gate
of her friend’s house, where we parted, with
a promise that I would call at tier office at
an early date.
Meantime 1 made an afternoon rail upon
her mother, Mrs, Van Zandt. I wus ushered
into a parlor furnished with all that wealth
und taste could afford. Mrs. Van Zandt
tame in weeping. “I was trying to forget,”
she said, “when the servant brought your
card; and. while 1 wanted ever so much to
lee you, your name brought bnek all the
past to me. O, Mr. , our home is ruined!
*ts light is gone. My only child—my
daughter—my Nina!”
I said: “I thought you and Mr. Van
Zandt had consented to the marriage. I
was not aware of any discoid between Nina
and yourself.”
“\Ve did consent to the marriage at first:
then the Sheri if prohibited it, and Nina
agreed with us to let the matter drop until
the final result should be known. The secret
proxy inarmum was without our knowledge
or consent. ISma has not treated us right.
And oh, these horrid |Mq>ers. To be dragged
before the public, lied about, abused, sneered
at for things that wo have had no hand
in. and matters which are not of public con
cern, even If true; they have made my life
tin bearable.’"
Mrs. Van Zaildt nmdo a full statement of
the difficulty between herself and Nina,
most of which it is none of the public's hesi
n<s to know. Far better hail it been for
Nina had she kept tier mother as counselor
and guide. Nina has not stayed at home
since the proxy marriage, and has hurdly
spoken toner mother.
“Do you know,” said Mrs. Van Zandt, “I
believe that some of the uttornoys in that
case persuade l, induced and coaxed Nina
Into taking that step, thinking the effect
m>on public sentiment and the Supremo
Court would be good. Understand me, Ido
not s.iy that Nina ills* not love Mr. Hides’
she worships him. We all admire him very'
muon, and 1 do not wonder at iny daughters
love for him. Hut neither lie nor she had
auv idea of marriage until the entire diffi
culty was settled. If he was released they
were v, be married at once. I Mime this
ridiculous proxy buelnew was arranged bv
And It has Gad its
■S 1 .. Mv home and hnppim are ruined'
h !*> of mind is gone; the transac-
tion reacted against Mr, Spit's, and did his
cast- more harm than good.”
Miss Nina Van Zandt's office is at No. 102
Washington street, where she attends to fill
ing orders for her books. She looks fully
20 years older than before her acquaintance
witli Spies. Soon she will not care for the
opinions of this world. Ixmg tofore the
Supremo Court will have announced its de
cision unless it should be given at the June
term, Nina Van Zandt will not be among
those anxious to hear the verdict. She will
be where affairs of this earth will trouble
her no more.
THE PARIS THEATRE HORROR.
A Glance at the Victims of the Opera
Oomique Holocaust.
I'arm Letter to London Truth.
All along the Boulevards, from the Made
leine to the Chateau d’Eau, there is a block
of earriagos, private and hired. One stream
of wheeled vehicles goes from the wast to the
purlieus of the Opora Comique, and the other
from the east. The Princess Hohenlohe,
who has n passion for strong drama, whether
it is to be found in the Assize Courts, the
streets, or at the tlieutres, lias hurried here
from Alsace to be in the swim of tout le
monde. and to enjoy a good, rousing sensa
tion. The finest folks, no less than the com
monest wretches, have been in the queues
before the improvised mortuaries, which are
nothing less than chambers of horror —so
horrible that Grevin’s most gruesome wax
works nmy hide their diminished heads.
Ever since Wednesday night streams of
people —some of whom are habitual idlers,
but most of whom have forsaken work to
satisfy curiosity—have ilowed sluggishly
and steadily along the different streets that
debouch on the Opera Comique; but none
of them could get so far as that, hill's of
policemen huvmg barred the way against
all who hail not passes from the Prefecture.
Being on good terms with the Prefect, I
was able to run this police blockade and to
get a Colonel of the Fire Brigade to take me
over the ruins. There was in them a silent
eloquence that was nothing less than appal
ing. Every sense, save the auditive one,was
startled beyond endurance. You felt as if
in a steam bath. Though
fourteen engines had been at
work for several days, the fire was not
quite out, and you might have roasted eggs
in the black rubbish, it was so hot. The
pungent odor of charcoal took away one’s
breath, and made one feel dizzy and as if
lead and not brains were in one’s skull.
Elsewhere—-pardon my realism—there was
a strong and, under the circumstances, a
sickening smell of roasted meat when I was
on the theatre of the great lire of Wednes
day night. It was sui generis. I suppose a
cannibal would have been delighted. “There
must,” said the Colonel, “boa deep strata of
victims here, t his gridiron scent is so strong.
But we pa lit, to in any haste to dig them
out; the building is too shaky to meddle
witli the fallen rafters here unless in the
most cautious way.” One did not much
discern charnel-house smells. This is be
cause of the mass of charcoal in which the
unfortunates who met a fiery death were
imbedded.
It was only when one got near one of the
few boxes which remained that the nostrils
were dreadfully offended. “Look up there,”
said the Colonel. I did as he told me, and
beheld in a box that held on, as if by a mira
cle, to the wall, three Indies with blackened
visages. Ono was in black velvet. An
other had a jet cuirass. The third was in
pink and white, and had flowers in a mass
of frizzed fair hair. Her mouth was opened,
as if gasping for breath; the lips were
greatly curled back; and two rows of white,
even teeth were laid bare. The others leant
back in their clmirs quite quietly, and one of
them held a fan on the ledge of the box.
They formed the most awful sight I think I
ever gazed upon. The probability is that,
despairing of <-scaping in the fearful torrent
of human beings which tore in the dark
along corridors and stairs, they returned to
their seats and quietly waited to be burned
or suffocated. Death came upon them in
the form of suffocation. It was impossible,
up to the time I saw them, to get near them,
anil so they remained in their conspicuous
position for several days. Who these ladies
are nobody has an idea.
The freaks of the fire at the Opera Comique
were very odd. Thus press doors were
burned away in the wardrobe room, and the
costumes hanging in the racks wore in many
instances hardly injured. Black must be
greatly the fashion, although there is no
court anywhere in mourning. All the seven
ladies who were found in a cluster were in
arrangements of the color dear to Whistler.
I cannot think in virtue of what law they
got together, for they were clearly not re
lated, and the dressmakers’ stamps on the
inner belts of their corsages were in no two
cases the same.
An English artist whom I took to the
mortuary was struck with the elegance of
the gloves, the boots and shoes, and the
stockings. Wliat struck me was the horri
ble mockery of fashion expressed in the
condition of the fashionably-attired bodies.
The quantity of jewels found was prodi
gious.
DESERTED ALMOST AT THE ALTAR.
A Society Sensation in the Quiet Town
of Asheville.
Raleigh, N. C., Juue 10. —An unequaled
sensation of its kind agitates the people of
that well-known summer resort, the moun
tain town of Asheville, this .State. Tuesday
pajiers there announced that on Wednesday,
at Trinity Episcopal church, Rev. Percy R.
Eubuhks', of the Episcopal parishes of "Lex
ington and Concord, would marry Miss
Netty Henry, daughter of the late Judge J.
L. Henry, of Asheville. All the parties
were well-known and Akcioty was interested
The groom, a very stylish young clergy
man of fine family, left for Asheville Tues
day night. U)x>n his arrival there,
early Wednesday morning, he begun to
prepare for the marriage. As he was at
tiring himself his liest man came in witli the
appalling announcement that there was no
bride. The preacher was literally struck nil
of a heap at this news. It was hut too true.
The expected bride had, without ceremony,
and heavily veiled, taken the train out of
Asheville the previous evening and had
gone East, actually passing Preacher
Eubanks at the town of Marion, a meeting
point of trains, but there was no meeting.
Society is literally on its beam ends.
Preacher Eubanks has left the city, sadder
und wiser. No one knows whither the in
tended bride has gone, and no one can give
a reason for her action.
FINE RACES YESTERDAY.
Procrastination Wins First Race at. St
Louis and Miss Ford the Seotjtid
Bt. Louis, June 13.—The following were
the events to day:
Finsv Hack -One and a quarter miles. Pro
crastination won. with Mahoney second uud Pete
Willis third. Time 2:11.
Second Rack One and one-eightli miles. Hiss
Ford won, with Carey second and Rosalind
third. Time 1:57.
Third Rack One and one-eiglith miles. Hem
pi tie won, with Rebel Scout second and Alamo
third. Time 1:57%,.
For lira Rack— St. Louis sweepstakes for two
year-olds owned in St. Louis; five furlongs.
Itttcelund won, with Van behind second and
Rita R. third. Time 1 :0A4
Fifth Rack Purse for two-year-olds and up
wards; three-quarter mile; seventeen starters.
Cora L. won, with Howard (Iruy second and
Dudley Oaks third. Time 1:10.
LYNCH LAW.
A Murderer Arrested at Shelby Depot
and Strung Up.
Memphis, June 13.—Dago Joe, the'half
breed who shot anil killed \Valter Haynes at
Shelby Depot, Miss., on May 18, was taken
yefterilay afternoon from the officers by a
crowd of fifty men and hanged to a tree.
He laid been arrested at Texarkana and
brought hack on a requisition.
An Exquisite Perfume
Cling* to the skin of those who use Colgate’s
unsurpassed Toilet Soaps. Cashmere Bou
quet most popular.
TIIE MORNING NEWS: TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 1887.
WASHINGTON'S HOME.
MOUNT VERNON UNDER THE CON
TROL OF THE LADY REGENTS.
The Mansion and Its Furnishings Kept
as Near as Possible as It Was When
Washington Occupied It -Interesting
Relics of the First President—A Model
Farm.
From the Sew York Sun.
Washington, June 11.—Mount Vernon is
at all times more or less visited by strangers,
but at this season the tomb of Washington
is the Mecca for crowds of pilgrims. The
home of Washington was never more beau -
tiful or better eared for than at this time.
A great deal has been said alxiut turning
tlie house into a museum, but there is hardly
an article in it that did not belong to or was
not associated with Washington and the
Washington family. All the rooms are now
furnished and named for States. The largest
room, usually called the banquet hall or
state dining room, is now known as the New
York Room. It is in this room where the
Regent, Mrs. Lily Macallister Laughton, of
Pennsylvania, and the Vice Regents from
otiier States hold the annual council. They
sit around the handsome mahogany table
purchased from funds realized by Mrs. John
Sherwood’s readings, given especially for
the purpose. The table is an extension, and
when a dozen or fifteen women are around
it in council, Washington’s banquet hall
presents a business-like appearance.
Mrs. Townsend, Vice Regent for New
York, last year had the walls of this
room restored to their original color, also
the ceiling, ports of which had fallen.
Rembrandt Peale’s “Washington Before
Yorktown ’ hangs on the west side of the
r< Kim. It was given by the artist’s heirs to
the Mount Vernon Association fourteen years
ago. Washington is on horseback, and
with him are Lafayette, Hamilton. King,
Lincoln and Rochambeau. The picture is
framed in the wood of a tree that grew on
the farm of Robert Morris. The military
equipments used by Washington in the Brad
dock campaign are shown in a glass case.
The pretty story is told of the banquet
hall that Lafayette helped to put the first
paper on the walls on his third visit to this
country in 17K4. The paper was brought
over from England, and the room was to to
made ready for a ball given in honor of
Lafayette. But the paper-hanger, or “up
holsterer,” as he was then called, disap
pointed Mrs. Washington, and when the
gallant Marquis understood the situation he
at once offered his services. He, with other
guests, and Gen. Washington went to work
and papeied the room. Of course the ball
took place, and was, no doubt, more festive
than if given under more formal auspices.
The only interesting thing in the New York
room, not a Washington relic, is an old
British flag that belonged to Gen. Grant. It
is red silk, and so very old that it is quite in
tatters, and to preserve it the regents have
had it mounted on plush and framed.
The Washington family dining room is
now the South Carolina room. The side
board in this room is a veritable relic, used
by Washington and his wife at Mount Ver
non. It was presented by the wife of Gen.
Robert E. Lee, who wished it to go back in
its original place. Mrs. Lee gave the side
board for Mount Vernon to the wife of the
late Surgeon General Bjirnes, who is the
Vice Regant for the District of Columbia.
Among the whole number of Vice Re
f ents two only are unmarried women- —Miss
/ongfellow, daughter of the poet, who, of
course, represents Massachusetts, and Miss
Emily Harper, Vice Regent of Maryland.
Miss Longfellow is a tali, slender woman,
with fine, expressive eyes, and hair once
(lark, but prematurely gray. She chose
Washington’s library for tne Massachusetts
Room, and has furnished it with interesting
things, though there are none of the revolu
tionary relics kept in this room by Wash
ington now to be seen. Boston bought
many of the books and pamphlets for her
Athenaum nearly forty years ago. The
room itself is curious in the many panels or
closets in the walls.
Miss Harper has furnished for Maryland
Eleanor Custis’ bedroom. Mrs. Laughton,
for Pennsylvania, lias furnished what was
once known as the “River Room.” Only
part of the furniture is original. It is
claimed for the bedstead that Washington
used it in his march to Valley Forge. New
Jersey has the “Lafayette Room,” the
chamber occupied by the distinguished
Frenchman when a guest at Mount Vernon.
The bureau is the same used by Lafayette,
and an engraving of his portrait by Ary
Scheffer hangs on the wall, the original
portrait being in the House of Representa
tives. •
Only one room in the mansion is fitted up
throughout with real Washington furniture,
and this is the bedroom where he died. Vir
ginia, under her Vice-Regent, Mrs. Emma
Read Ball, whose husband is a grandson of
Washington’s niece, Frances Washington
8011, has charge of this room. Mrs. Ball
declares that everything in this chamber
was used by Washington at Mount Vernon.
The room just, over this one, and where
Mrs. Washington died a year and a half
later, has but one piece of the original fur
niture, a snuill mahogany corner-stand. The
wife of the late Alexander Mitchell, and
Vice-Regent for Wisconsin, has reproduced
the original furniture in mahogany. The
bed hangings and chairs, originally of bright
print, are copied in woollen cretonne. Tho
pillow-cases have reproduced tho embroid
ered crest and initials “M. W.”
The main hull is taken by Alnliamn,
through the Vice Regent, Mrs. Herbert;
Ohio has the east parlor, and Illinois the
west parlor;Georgia has Mrs, Washington’s
sitting rooom: Delaware has one of the bed
rooms; West Virginia the green room, and
four bedrooms are furnished by Connecti
cut. Maine, North Carolina and the District
of Columbia, through their Vice Regents.
Mount Vernon has various sources of rev
enue. One of the most satisfactory to the
Regents and to visit us is the sale of (lowers.
Tim tea rose. Mary Washington, is the popu
lar rose, and is sold more than any other to
strangers, who would not find tho same ro.se
l>y any other name as sweet as the name of
Washington's mother. Ten of tho two hun
dred acres forming the Mount Vernon es
tate are in the beautiful lawn about the
mansion. There are fifty acres of wood
land, and the rest are in pasturage, grain,
orchards und kitchen gardens. The Regents
design to make it, as far as possible, a model
farm, and a great deal of attention is given
to fine stock. The old lunch room lias been
banished, and one finds now in tho “family
kitchen” only sweet milk, to be bought by
the glass or quart , and at a moderate price.
The milk is, next to the roses, one of the
chief sources of revenue. The orchards are
young trees, but very soon the yield of fruit
must be considerable, and, of course, will bo
an additional income.
It is interesting to know that. Washing
ton’s farm, once given over to slave lalior,
is now wholly managed by women, who not
onlv arc ambitious to make it a model farm
and profitable, but are lx mud by certain
conditions to keep the place, as far as possi
ble, in its original Washingtonian fashion.
The mansion must be kept in repair, but it
must not lie changed. In the flower garden,
for example, the box plant is preserved in
the exact design of the hedges plan toil by
Washington. The four big sweet shrub
trees given to him bv Jefferson still flourish
in the same spot. The liest guide liook, in
fact tile only on, to Mount Vernon for a
dozen years past is tho work of a woman,
Elizabeth Bryant Johnston.
If tho Regents were men there would be a
vast ileal less sentiment about Washington’s
home and burial place, though it might
“tiay” bet ter in the farming sense. It was
Miss Pamelia Cunningham, of Georgia, who
organized the Ladies' Mount Vernon Asso
ciation and became the first Regent. She
believed the women of this country should
have the care of Mount Vernon. Tho
Regents wisely cherish every senti
ment, and t lie smallest, association with
Washington’s life, death, mid memiJfy.
For this reason, if no other, Mount
Vernon is Incoming every year
more attractive and interesting to
all classes of Americans, and to the most
distinguished strangers from every part of
the world. Two hundred thousand dollars
was the sum paid for Mount Vernon's two
hundred acres. Miss Cunningham appealed
to American women for money, and Edward
Everett gave nearly $70,000 from the pro
ceeds of his famous lecture on the “Life and
Character of Washington.”
ASTRONOMERS BY THE EARS.
Prof. Klein Responds to Prof. Proctor
Anent the Star of Bethlehem.
From the St. Louis Globe-Democrat.
Hartford. Kv., June 0. — I am greatly
surprised to read Prof. Richard A. Proctor’s
criticism of my discovery of the “Star of
Bethiehcm,” Judging from the tone of his
letter, I am inclined to believe that he be
longs to the old-fogy school of astronomers,
who still clmg to old exploded theories in
the face of all modern research. Now, in
the face of his criticism, I again announce
to the scientific world that I have discovered
the “Star of Bethlehem.” And the “Star
of Bethlehem” it is.
Prof. Proctor says: “Any one who can
see Cassiopeia at night in the middle of May
toward the zenith deserves most assuredly
the attention of the world.” Now, I did not
claim to see Cassiopeia at night at all. I
saw it in the afternoon liefore sundown, and
closely skirting the horizon, and not in the
zenith.
I belong to the modern school of astrono
mers, and have discovered that by the use
of a smoked glass and mirror attachment to
my telescope I can detect heavenly bodies,
even in close proximity to the sun, in broad
daylight. Any schoolboy or any person
who has gazed uixm an eclipse of the sun
through a smoked glass can readily under
stand the principles involved fumy new
method. It is not necessary for me to wait
until the shades of night appear in order to
detect a heavenly body, which by that time
would to below the horizon, and conse
quently invisible from our latitude.
If Prof. Proctor will take the trouble to
provide himself with modern astronomical
instruments—with a smoked glass and a
mirror—and endow his old fogy mind with
a few modern and progressive astronomical
ideas, and will take a peep heavenward
about 4 o’clock any afternoon this time of
year, he will find the constellation of Cas
siopeia in the position I have described it,
and in the midst of that rich old constella
tion he will see the Star of Bethlehem blaz
ing forth with lustre most intense.
Ridicule it and the Christian religion and
the New Testament-inspired account of this
wonderful star as he may, it still remains
intact, “the Star of Bethlehem,” just as the
Christian religion, which has been assailed
by Bob Ingersoll and other infidels, is still
with us and still guides countless multitudes
on the path that leads to the pearly gates of
the New Jerusalem.
God’s ways are past finding out, oven to
the wisest astononier and scientist; and when
Prof. Proctor says that it was impossible for
the great creator of the universe to cause the
sun to stand still, or for the Star of Bethle
hem to guide the wise men of the East to the
manger in which the infant Savior lay, he
is treading on dangerous ground, for God,
the great Creator of the univei-se, could cer
tainly frame laws for the movements of his
heavenly bodies to suit just such important
events, whether Prof. Proctor or any other
scientists of this day can understand how it
was done or not. 1 )oes Prof. Proctor un
derstand how God hung the earth upon
nothing, or why he created Jupiter, Saturn.
Mars, or the constellation of Cassiojjeia, or
ri thousand other or why he
created Prof. Proctor to take issue with him
and with the New Testament and with
“The Kentucky Professor” who dared to
announce his discovery to the world even in
the face of the vials of wrath hurled at his
head by the great, the noted and the tal
ented, but In this instance the greatly mis
taken, English astronomer?
I do not claim my recent discovery as
being the Tycho Brahe star, which appeared
in the years of 945 and 1264 in a traet in the
heavens between Cassiopeia and Cepheus.
I simply claim it is the original Star of Beth
lehem, and I defy Prof. Proctor or any
other astronomer to prove that it is not.
John M. Klein,
Of Hartford Observatory.
Gipsy Humor.
From Blackwood.
The Tziganes are rarely wanting in a cer
tain humor and power of repartee, which
often disarms the anger they have justly
provoked. A gipsy lieing in prison for hav
ing sworn falsely, was visited by the priest,
who tried to convince him of the sinfulness
of his conduct in swearing to what he had
not seen.
“You are loading a heavy sin on your
soul,” said the priest.
“Have I got a soul?” asked the Tzigane,
innocently.
“Of course you have a soul; every man
has one.”
“Can your reverence swear that I have
got a soul?”
“To be sure T can.”
“Yet your reverence cannot see my soul;
so why should it be wrong to swear to what
1 have not seen ?”
In a travelling menagerie, the keeper,
showing off his animals to a large assembled
audience, pointed to the cage where a furi
ous lion was pawing the ground, and pom
pously announced tlmt he was ready to give
a thousand florins to whoever would enter
that cage.
“I will,” said a starved looking Gipsy,
stepping forward.
“You will?” said tho keeper, looking con
temptuously at the small, puny figure.
“Very well, please yourself and walk in,”
and he made a feint of opening the door.
“Step in. Why are you not coming?”
“Certainly.” said the Gipsy. “I have no
sort of objection to earning a thousand
florins so easily; and I only wait till you re
move that, very unpleasant-looking animal,
which occupies the cage at present. ''
Of course the laugh was turned against
the showman, who in his proposition had
only spoken of the cage, without mentioning
the lion.
A starving and shivering gipsy once
craving hospitality, was asked to choose
what lie preferred, food or warmth. Would
he have something to eat, or would he rather
warm himself at the hearth?
“If you please,” he answered, “I would
like best to toast myself a piece of bacon at
the fire.”
A man abusing a gipsy who had stolen
his horse, declared thut he could produce
half a dozen witnesses to attest the fact.
“What are half a dozen witnesses?” said the
Tzigane; “I can produce a whole dozen who
have not seen it!”
Some gipsy proverbs are as follows;
.“Aiter misfortune comes fortune.”
“Better a donkey which lets you ride,
than n fine horse which throws you off.”
“Those are the fatten fishee which fall
back from the line in the water.”
"It is not good to choose women or cloth
by candle-light.”
“What is the use of a kiss, unless there be
two to divide it?”
“Who has got luck need only sit at home
with his mouth open.”
“Who wants to steal potatoes must not
forget the sack.” 1
“Two liuitl stones do not grind small.” m
“l’nlite words cost little and do much.” w
“Who flutters you has either cheated you
or wants to cheat.”
“\\ lio waits till another calls him to sup
per, often remains hungry.”
“If you have lost your horse, then vou
can throw away saddle and bridle os well.”
“Said Aaron to Mane*,
I-rfJt'ii cut off our nones/*
Aaron must have been a sufferer from ca
tarrh. The desperation which catarrh pro
duces is often sufficient to make people say
and do many rash things, and many con
finin' suffering just as if no such cur- mi Dr.
Mage’* Catarrh Remedy existed. It cures
every case from the simplest to the most
complicated, and nil the consequence* of
catarrh. A |>erson cnee cured by Dr. Sago’s
Catarrh Remedy will not be apt to take
i-old again, as It leaven the mucous mem
brane healthy and stony. By druggist*.
MARRIAGES. _
GIGNILLIAT-HEYWARdT Married, on the
evening of .lune 9th, 1887, nt the resident* of
Mr. T. Savage Heyward, the bride's brother.
Mb. William Gigsilliat to Miss MaryCaro
lisk Heyward, or Savannah, Ga., youngest
daughter of the late George C. Heyward, of
South Carolina.
MKKTIM.'.
ANCIENT LANDMARK LODGE AO. 231,
F. A. M.
The regular monthly meeting of thin A
Lodge will lie held at Masonic Temple W
THIS (Tuesday) EVENING at 8 o’clock.
Members of sister Lodges and visiting ~
brethren arc united to attend.
XV. S. ROCKWELL, W. M.
John S. Haines. Secretary.
CHIPPEWA THIBE NO. 1, I. O. OF R. M.
A regular meeting of this Tribe will be buhl
THIS EVENING at 8 o'clock (and hereafter),
corner Bull and Bay streets.
Visiting and transient brethren fraternally in
vited. S. A. BORDERS. Sachem.
C. F. M. Bernhardt. Chief of Records, j
SAVANNAH CADETS.
HEADQUARTERS SAVANNAH CADETS. )
Savannah, Ga., June 13,1887. (
You are hereby ordered to attend a regu- ?
lar meeting of the corps to lie held Sj
at the Armory on TUESDAY EVENING,mj
14th inst., at 8 o'clock. By order of Wf
H. M. BRANCH, IL*
Captain Commanding. sMs
R. P. Lovell, First Sergeant.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
NOTICE.
Office of Commissioners )
AND EX-OFFICIO JUDGES, CHATHAM Cos., Ga.. -
Savannah, Ga., June 14, 1887. )
Notice is hereby given that on and after
WEDNESDAY, 15th inst., and until further
notice, the causeway connecting Isle of Hope
with the mainland will be closed to travel daily
from 10 o’clock a. m. to 4 o'clock p. m.. for the
purpose of cutting a waterway and bjiilding a
bridge thereon. By order of Commissioners
Chatham County. JOHN R. DILLON.
Clerk C. C. C.
TO THE BONDHOLDERS OF THE SAVAN
NAH SCHI ETZEN GESELLSCHAFT.
You are hereby notified to present your re
ceipts for bonds at the law office of Lester <t
Ravenel and receive your pro rata share of the
fund in court from sale of Sehuetzen Park.
SIMON GUCKENHEIMER,
JACOB PAULSEN,
June 13th, 1887. Trustees and Receivers.
NOTICE.
Neither the Captain nor Consignee of the Ger
man bark “Meteor,” A. Voss, Master, will be re
sponsible for any debts contracted by the crew.
S. FAT3IAN, Consignee.
June 13th, 1887,
NOTICE TO CONSIGNEES.
Schooner “Charmer," from New York, is now
discharging cargo at Ducuworth’s Wharf. All
goods left on dock after 6 o’clock p. m. at
owner’s risk McDONOUGII & CO.,
Agents.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
All persons are hereby cautioned against har
boring or trusting any of the crew- of the Nor
wegian Bark “Nornta,” as no debt of their con
tracting will be paid by Master or
A. R. SALAS & CO., Consignees.
lO DOZEN
White and Brown Helmet Hats, 8 dozen Cloth
Hats, 6 dozen Soft Felt Hats, for sale low by
JAUDON, 150 St. Julian street.
NOTICE TO RAILROAD CONTRACTORS.
We, the undersigned, have contracted for
building the Savannah, Dublin and Western
Railroad. All who wish to make contracts for
grading, trestliug or furnishing ties, will apply
to
CARPENTER, GRANT, MUNDAY & CO.,
Pulaski House, Savannah, Ga.
Good prices paid for same.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
The Savannah Fire anil Marine Insurance
Company.
A call is hereby made upon stockholders, in
accordance with the charter, for an installment
of TWENTY-FIVE (25) DOLLARS per share of
the capital stock of this Company, being the
balance due on said stock, payable at the office
of the Company, No. 93 Bay street, .Savannah,
Georgia, to the Secretary, on or before the 15th
JUNE. 1887.
By direction of the Board of Directors.
W. H. DANIEL, Secretary.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
From this date and until further notice the
STEAMER KATIE will be withdrawn from the
Savannah river, for the purpose of general over
hauling- I>ue notice will be given of the re
sumption of her route.
JOHN LAWTON,
Manager.
REMOVAL.
DR. E. S. PURSE
lias removed his office and residence to 340
Liberty, between Whitaker an 1 Bull streets.
DR. HEARV s COLD]AG,
DENTIST,
Office corner Jones and Drayton streets.
ELMER’S LIVER CORRECTOR.
This vegetable preparation is invaluable for
the restoration of tone and strength to the sys
tem. For Dyspepsia, Constipation and other
ills, caused by a disordered liver, it cannot be
excelled. Highest prizes awarded, and in
dorsed by eminent medical men. Ask for Ul
mer's Liver Corrector and take no other. SIOO
a bottle. Freight paid to any address.
E. F. ULMER, M. D.,
Pharmacist, Savannah. Cla.
iit\
Goods
By Steamer Chattahoochee.
m LAWNS, NEW ORGANDIES, NEW
r CRINKLE SEERSUCKERS,
* COMPLETE LINE of Udine' Children’s
it and Lents Summer I ndrrsbirta
A full assortment of Empire State Shirts,
size from 18 to \7%. Boys' Shirts, from 12 to IHU,.
Ladies' and Children’s Lisle Thread Hose, In
black and colored.
(tents’ Lisle thread and Balbriggan Half Hose
in plain and fancy colors.
Gents’ Collars and Cuffs, with a complete line
of Black and Second Mourning floods, compris
ing everything new and desirable.
GERMAINE’S,
Next Furbor'is.
AMUSEMENTS.
SAVANNAH THEATRE.
Thtirsdav and Friday, -Fine 16 and 17.
The Fords.
Their opening a grand success. The Press
and Public unanimous in their praise.
Their efforts appreciated.
On above dates we have the honor to present
to our many friends T. 4V. Robertson’s charm
ing Comedy
HOME,
as presented at Wallack’s Theatre, New York,
preceded by the
Famous Q,uai*rel Scene
From Julius Caesar, by special request.
BRUTUS Mr. Thomas F. McCabe.
CASSIUS Mr. Lawrence Hanley.
Sale of Reserved Seats commences TUESDAY,
DAVIS BROS.' without extra charge. Prices
75c., 50c. and 25c
BArSE_ BA.XUL.
AMATEURS VS. WARRENS.
r pHE first of a series of five games, for the
I Amateur Championship of Savannah, will
be played at Base Ball Park TUESDAY, JUNE
14th. Admission 25 cents, with privilege of
Grand Stand. Ladies cordially invited, free.
FRUIT AM) GROCERIES.
I WILL SELL
The following articles cheaper
than can be bought elsewhere:
Raisins, Starch,
Nuts, Soap,
Figs, Clothes Pins,
• Dates, Clothes Lines,
Dried Apples, Soda,
Dried Peaches, Olive Oil,
Tea, Toilet Soap,
Extracts, Pickles.
LEMONS BY THE BOX.
LEMONS BY THE HUNDRED.
LEMONS BY THE DOZEN.
Call and get prices before buying elsewhere.
K. POWER,
Corner Congress. Bui! and St. Julian.
I I AY.
CHOICE EASTERN HAY.
FANCY WESTERN HAY.
Cow Peas.
SPECKLED, BLACK EYE, CLAY and MIXED.
LEMONS.
FRESH STOCK MESSINA LEMONS.
CORN, OATS, BRAN, CORN EYES.
PEANUTS, ONIONS, ETC.
Close Prices on Car Lots of Hay and Grain.
169 BAY.
W.D. SIMKINS & CO.
INSURANCE.
The Savannah Fire k Marine Ins. Cos.
CAPITAL $200,000.
OFFICE 93 BAY STREET.
WM. GARRARD, LEWIS KAYTON,
President. Vice President.
W. H. PANIEL, Secretary.
DIRECTORS.
JNO. L. HAMMOND, IIERJIAN MYERS.
GEORGE J. BALDWIN, SAMUEL MEINHARD,
J. H. ESTILL, L. KAYTON,
WM. GARRARD, I. G. HAAS,
W H. DANIEL, ANDREW HANLEY,
J. B. DUCKWORTH, DAVID WELLS,
C. R. WOODS.
Note.—On July Ist the office of the company
will be at 97 Itav street, the building now occu
pied as the Cotton Exchange,
MOLASSES.
molasses:
500 BARRELS MOLASSES
FOR BALE BY
C. M. GILBERT & CO
HOTELS.
WASHINGTON HOTEL
7th and Chestnut Streets,
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
JOHN TRACY, PROPRIETOR.
RATES, 50 PKR DAY.
Centrally located, only a short walk from
Penn'n and Reading Depots. New Passenger
Elevator, Electric Bells, New Dining Room and
all modern improvements. Polite attendance
and unsiiri>assed table.
KITSELL’S PRIVATE HOTEL
91 FIFTH AVENUE, NEAR 17 m STREET,
NEW YORK.
V MERIC AN and European plans. Location
most central. Rooms en suite or singly.
First-class board and accommodations. Prices
reasonable as a boarding house.
JAMES KITSELL,
Proprietor.
NEW HOTEL TOGNI,
(Formerly St. Mark’s.)
Newnan Street, near Bay, Jacksonville, Fla.
'T'IIE MOST central House in thecitv. Near
1 Post Office, Street Cars and all Ferries.
Nev, and Elegant Furniture. Electric Bells.
Baths, Etc. $2 50 to $3 per day.
JOHN Is. TOGNI, Proprietor.
S. A. UPSON, Manager.
DUB’S SCREVEN HOUSE.
'TMIIS POPULAR Hotel Is now provided with
1 a Passenger Elevator itho only one in the
city) and has been remodeled and newly fur
nished, The proprietor, who by recent purchase
is also the owner of the establishment, spares
neither pains nor expense in the entertainment
oi his guests. The imtronage of Florida visit
nrs is earnestly invited. The table of the
Screven House Is supplied with every luxury
that the markets at home or abroad can afford.
THE MOEKISON HOUSE.
One of tho Ijargcct Bnardinjj Hounes in tho
South.
\FKORDS phvisnnt South rooms, pood board
with pure Art i•! an Water, at pricn to suit
tho ;r wishing tablu. regular or transient accom
modations. Northeast comer Brought on and
Drnyton streets, opposite Marshall House.
SI M M VAX HI ISO IMS.
ARDEN PARK HOTEL AND COTTAGES
ARDEN, IV. C.
r PKNTH successful season. Now Often Send
I for descriptive circular. E. H. KEMBLE A
CO., Proprietors.
r p!D>l SAND ISLANDS —Westminster Hotel,
1 Westminster Park, Alexandria Bay, N. Y
"Unquestionably the finest location In the
Thousand Islands. Harper Magazine, .Sent,
>2*l • for descriptive pamphlet. H. F.
IaGLEHAIIT, Proprietor,
SUMMER RESORTS.
WAR! SPRINGS,
Meriwether County, Ga.
W ILL BK OPEN JUNE Ist., with first clast
' * accommodations at reasonable rates
Warm Springs are on the north side of Pina
Mountains, 1,500 feet above sea level and sur
rounded by beautiful and romantic seenery
The climate is delightfully cool and dry ’ No
mosquitoes, dust or mud
The Spring one ft Nature’s wonders, flora
1.100 gallons of water (90 degrees temperature?
per minute, affording the '
FINEST BATHING
in America. The baths are six large pools tea
feet square, two to five deep path CLEAR
FRESH, WARM WATER unlimited.
This water is a sure cure for Dyspepsia and
most cases of Rheumatism, Skin and Kidney
Diseases. There is also here a fine Chalybeate
Spriug.
Amusements of all kinds provided Good
Livery Stable, Bar and Billiard Saloon, Fiiia
Band of Music for Ball room and Lawn
The Georgia Midland and Gulf Railroad now
niunmg two daily trains from Columbus to
Warm Springs, will, on the 15th of June h
completed to Griffin, connecting there with 'the
Central Railroad for all points North and Fast
Two daily mails and Telegraph. For furthei
information address
CHARLES L. DAVIS, Proprietor
MONTVALE SPRINGS,
Blount County, - Tennessee,
r UHIS Health Resort will be open May Ist, 1887
X The most celebrated Dvspeptic Water
known. Elegant Hotel and Grounds. Excellent
Table. Telephone connection with Knoxville
Rates: $1 per day; §25 per month for May ao i <
June: Per day, $lO and §l2 per week, $35 and
S4O per month for July and August. Half rates
for children. J. q ENGEL, Prop
NEW HOLLAND SPRK
Gainesville, Hall County, Ga.
The Queen- City of the Mountains.
This celebrated and ever-popular watering
Place will be open for the reception of guest?
from
JUNE Ist to OCTOBER Ist.
The entire establishment has been entirely
refitted throughout, and the service and cuisine
will be unsurpassed.
Rates according to length of stay and location
m rooms.
Send for circulars giving full particulars
BARNES, EVANS & CO. AND CAMP BROS.,
Lessees and Proprietors.
F. J. WHITEHEAD, Manager.
The Niagara of the South.
TALLULAH, FALLS, GA„
ON the Piedmont Air Line, in the Blue Ride*
Mountains, 3,000 feet above sea level.
CLIFF HOUSE
AND COTTAGES,
Open from June to November. For full pap
tieulars address
F. H. & F. B. SCOFIELD, Proprietors.
Late of Hotel Kaatuskill, Catskill Mountains
N. Y., and Leland Hotel, Chicago.
CPHE ARLINGTON.—Open the year round.
1 This popular hotel, having a commandina
and central location, is a brick structure, in
modern style of hotel architecture and in com
pleteness of appointment is second to no hotel
in North Georgia. The commodious office, with
an open arcade, dining-room on first floor, and
large, airy rooms are newly and handsomely
furnished and fitted with all modern convey
ienees throughout. In the hotel is located the
post office, barber shop and a first-class billiard
!>arlor. The cuisine Is unequaled, and the ser.
vice in every respect is in keeping with that of
the best and home like hotels of the larger cities
Under a most liberal management every effort
will be made to provide for the comfort aud
enjoyment of its guests; with this in view.
Wunn’s Celebrated Orchestra, of Atlanta, has
been engaged to furoish music during tbs
months of July and August. The grand open
ing will be given Thursday evening. July 7th
1887. Any information regarding climate, watei
and the advantages of our "Queen City" as a
summer homo will he cheerfully given on ap
plication. Address WINK TAYL< >R, Proprietor,
Gainesville, Ga.
Montgomery White Sulphur Springs,
VIIfGI N I A .
—SEASON 1887.
OPEN JUNE Ist. First class in all its equip
ments. Terms reasonable. Special rate!
for families and large parties.
For particulars ad 11 red's
GEORGE W. FAGG & CO.,
Montgomery Springs P. 0.,
Montgomery county. Va.
LONG - BRANCH, N. J.
United States Hotel,
A Select Family and Transient Hotel.
OPENS JUNE 25, 1887.
LAI RD -Sc VAN CLEAF.
McABOY HOUSE, LYNN, N. L
IATELY remodeled and refurnished. Baft
J rooms ami modern sanitary arrangement;.
Terms $25 per month.
For further information address
L. S. BELL
(Carriages meet each train.)
POPULAR PRICES
Congress Ha 11.
SARATOGA SPRINGS,
Accommodates 1,000 persons. Rates, $3 per day
for rooms, except t hose on parlor ana first floor*
Open trom Juue 18 to Oct, 1.
CLEMENT & COX, Proprietors.
H. S. CLEM ENT, Manager. m
THE KENSINGTON.
Union Avenue, opposite Congress Springs Park
Saratoga Springs, N. Y.
OPENS SATURDAY, JUNE 18th.
For particulars address 229 Broadway. Rpoir
18, N. V., or 420 Oates Avenue, Brooklyn. N. \
PAUL C. < i RENI N<L^Proprietor,
lIIE WHITE SI LITIIH SPBLNIiS,
GREENBRIER COUNTY, W VA.
The most celebrated of all the Mountain
Resorts, and one of the oldest and most ttopulai
of American Watering places, will open for tkf
season June 1 Elevation above tide-water,
2,000 feet; surrounding mountains, 3,600 fo**>
Send for pamphlet describing hygienic advan
tages H F. EAKLE, Sup’t.
CLARENDON HOTEL,
Saratoga Springs, N. Y.
OPENS JUNE 25th.
Popular rates $3 00 per day
I. STEIN FELD,
Proprietor.^
f ’AIMS' SPRINGS and BATHS, AlkaliM
V 1 Llthia ami Superior Iron Waters, Hump
shire county. W. Va. ’nils celebrated mountain
rcMirt for health and pleasure; Baths of any
temperature; a summer climate unsurpassed;
charming summer home with its many improve
ments. accommodating 800 guests, opens June
Ist. Send for circular and rate sheet ifor medi
cal tin,l other testimony). WM. H. SALE, Pro
prietor.
npHE WATAUGA HOTEL, Blowing Rock, X.
I C. In the mountains f North Carolina.
4,000 feet above the sea. Easily accessible. Meat
cal graduate on the premises. Terms the lat
est in North Carolina. Oitened June Ist for “>■
season. For information address WAT Abu*
H< '1 EL CO., Blowing Rock, N. C.
DITCHER HOI HE.
PAWLING, N. Y., on the Harlem railroad; a
large brick structure, first class in every
particular. Now open. Tenon reasonable. ben
for circulars. WM. H BURROUGHS.
Proprietor.

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