OCR Interpretation


The morning news. [volume] (Savannah, Ga.) 1887-1900, November 23, 1887, Image 5

Image and text provided by Digital Library of Georgia, a project of GALILEO located at the University of Georgia Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063034/1887-11-23/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

THE SHADOW ON THEIR HEARTH.
gome Complications that Arose from
the Family’s Efforts to Dispel It.
From the Neu> York Suit.
Harrisburg, Pa., Nov. 10.—Prof. J. R.
Sherrard, Superintendent of the Lawrence
County Common Schools, lives in Shenango
township, that county, in a fine residence
surrounded by orchards and vineyards and
fertile fields. The professor’s wife and his
20-year-old son John share his pastoral re
treat. John has won local fame as a base
ball umpire. The family is happy , and but
one thing has ever crept in to disturb its
peace. That disturber hasu’t crept in ex
actly either. Sometimes it has come in
with a jump over a five-rail fence. Some
times it has unhooked the garden gate
with its horn and stalked in as unblush
ingly as the lightning-rod agent. If
the six-foot bars of the pasture lot have
bade it pause sometimes, it has paused only
long enough to butt down the bars aDd
come in with a crash. This shadow ou the
Sherrard hearth is cows. It seems as if
every cow in the township regarded itself
as a candidate at large for a place at Prof.
Sherrard’s orchard, garden, or front yard,
and loses no opportunity to prove its eligi
bility and make its election sure. This pre
dilection on the part of the township cow to
pass in and occupy the Sherrard premises,
besides being a lurking menace to domestic
tranquility, so to speak, was tough on the
hired man. He had to protest, at all hours,
with clubs and stones and an occasional
shotgun, against this predilection, and it dis
turbed his slumbers, and broke bis rest. So
he resigned a few days ago and left the
Sherrard family alone with its sorrow.
The night after the hired man left Prof.
Sherrard woke up and heard the tramp of
cows in his orchard. There being no hired
mail to show .the sweet-breathed kine the
quickest way off the grounds the professor
resolved to go out and eject them himself.
His wife was asleep, and for fear of waking
her he did not dress himself, merely draw
ing on his slippers.
“This night shirt’s enough to have on to
drive con’s out at midnight,” said he. “It
won’t take long, anyhow.”
Then the Professor tip-toed out of the
bouse and went into the orchard to evict
the cows. Shenango township cows are
like all other cows. They will open a gate
or break down a panel of fence to get into a
lot, but when you go to drive them out
they pretend they don’t know how in the
world to get out, although ten rods of
broken down fence may yawn for them
and open gates confront them at every turn.
So Prof. Sherrard was still engaged in the
inspiriting effort to surround and head off a
half dozen cows that persisted in taking as
many different directions in evading the
open panel of orchard fence when his wife
awoke and found him gone. She was startled
for a moment, but remembered the shadow
on their hearth. *
“Cows!” she cried, and sprang out of bed.
She went to the window and, looking out,
saw the awful sight of the Superintendent
of Common Schools of Lawrence county,
robed in his night shirt, chasing impudent
and obstinate cows around and around his
orchard, dodging like a spectre in and out
among the trees, but plunking stones at the
cattle with unmistakable corporeal vim.
“Oh, my!” said the wife, “I wonder if I
hadn’t better go help him shoo them out!”
Waiting only long enough to slip on her
shoes, she hurried out, and presently there
were two white-clad figures flitting about
in the orchard on the trails of headstrong
cows. The Professor’s wife had not been
long with him in the midnight roundup
when Mr. John Sherrard, the son, quit
sleeping. He rose up in bed. He listened.
“Cows!” said he.
John got up. He put on his trousers, his
hat, his coat, and his shoes.
“I’ll slip out quietly,” said he, “and throw
these cattle over the fence without waking
up the old folks.”
Ho went out of the front door. The com
bined efforts of the Professor and his wife,
it seemed, had convinced the cows that it
was the desire of the family that they should
5o away, and they were going away just as
ohn reached the yard. The cows were
passing along toward the gate. John drove
them all out, and then turned to re-enter
the house, when he saw two white figures
coming toward him along the orchard fence.
Now, there had been reports in that part of
the township that certain persons had, at
different times, seen a ghost stalking abroad
at midnight, or thereabout, now at one
place and then at another. John had heard
these reports, and when he saw the two
white figures moving in the orchard he was
startled. But he wasn’t scared. He had
umpired too many base ball games to be
scared by a little thing like ghosts.
“Hello!” said he to himself. “Here’s the
Shenango township spook! I wonder who's
the fraud he’s got along with him.”
Then John stooped down and picked up a
stone. He threw it in the direction of the
spectres. It whizzed past their heads, and
quick as a flash they turned and ran back a
few yards, and dodged down in a fence
corner.
“I’ll have s*cij fun with these ghosts,”
said John, a-A he began bombarding the
fence corner wUh stones. They rattled
about on the ground, and by and by one of
the ghosts shouted in a deep, masculine
voice:
“Hey there! Let up on this, or I’ll have
you arrested 1”
That struck John as being so funny that
he made up his mind to go back and wake
Ids father up, and tell him about it. He en
tered the professor’s room. The light was
burning and showed the empty bed. A
glimmer of something shot across John’s
mind.
“Roaring Jupiter!” he exclaimed, and
started tor the yard again. Before he got
out of the house the back door wus thrown
open, and two panting and flustered figures
in white, with mud on their clothes, came
hurriedly in. They looked at John, and
John looked at them. At last John said, in
mock surprise:
“What in the world’s the matter, and
where?”
“Cows!” exclaimed his mother, “and you
ought to be ashamed of yourself!”
“Cows!” exclaimed his father, “and you
pack yo’ rself back to bed, sir!”
Then they all went to bed, and the shadow
on the Sherrard hearth deepened.
WHY PEOPLE BECOME BALD.
An Interesting Address on the Loss of
Hair—The Remedy.
From the London Standard.
At the opening meeting of the Britsh
Tricboiogical Association, the inaugural ad
dress was delivered by Mr. C. H. Wheeler,
who saiu that it was the object of the British
Trichological Association to trace the loss
of hair to its true calses, to investigate the
secrets of nature, and learn the physiolog
ical actions of remedies that would benefit
and assist natnro to repair disordered func
tions. Out of 17,000 men upon the “Medi
cal Register” he believed that scarcely
twenty had made a special study of tbo
hair. Hair falling might be induced by one
cause only, or by several acting together or
in succession, as debilitating influences,
nerve troubles, excitement, care, worry,
blood diseases, hereditary predisposition,
occupation, climate, mecbancial obstruc
tion, mental emotion, bail ventilation, high
temperature, vegetoid plaints, and animal
parasites. The cause of baldness was not
m the hair shaft, but in the faulty function
of nutrition, and altbrough there were in
in this country some 50,1)00 so-called hair
dressers, their treatment had proved prac
tically impotent to prevent, arrest, or
modify the progress of baldness. The asso
ciation was endeavoring to establish a hos
pital for the treatment of hair diseases with
a staff of triehologists, and periodical lec
tures and demonstrations; and it behooved
them to Impress upon the nation tho advisa
bility of giving the association a charter,
and compelling every trichologist to pass an
examination before be:ng allowed to prac
tice. ....
The habit of keeping the hair dry and
free from some kind of grease to assist the
depressed rowel’s of the hair was to his mind
a source ot a great deal of boldness. Out
of 380 subjects between the ages of 25 and
50, who had passed under his observation. 02
were either bald or getting so, and the curi
ous fact was brought to light that 61 out of
the 92 were wines drinkers.
In 50 habitual spirit drinkers, men of
similar ages, he found 7 partly bald and 11
quite bald. Among total abstainers, on the
other hand, he found 9 partly bald and 7
totally bald out of 50. After obtaining
these statistics he took note of 50 “beer
drinkmg drunkards,” the investigation re
sulting in the discovery that 5 were parti
ally bald and 4 quite bald. It was only
fair, however, to add that the spirit
drinkers were well-to-do, while the beer
drinking drunkards belonged to the very
poorest class.
On another occasion he made notes of 140
bald persons of mixed classes and of vari
ous ages. This showed that 47 wore full
beards, 43 shaved nearly the whole face, 41
shaved only the chin, and 9 shaved onlv the
moustache, thus showing that the beard
had little to do with baldness as a cause.
In his owq experience since 1879, when this
matter began to especially engage attention,
ho was not able to demonstrate oonclusively
the transmission of any special fungus or
parasite from lower animals to man or
woman in this excessive hair falling or bald
ness.
He had never been in position to do this
experimentally, yet his conviction was that
the dog and the cat were often the cause of
some hair loss; and trichologists should study
and test the question when they had an op
portunity of witnessing the commencement
of extensive hair falling, when no other
cause could with a certainty be proved or
even assigned for it. It was becoming an
increased belief that dogs were subject to
somo unknown disease which caused bald
ness to human beings. Cases of this kind
had been brought within his view, and had
induced him to give a good deal of attention
to the subject.
In one instance, Mr. Wheeler said, a gen
leman, an artist, had a large black retriever
dog, whose coat had suddenly become gray,
in fact almost white, and it was being shed
in such large quantities that he could not be
had in the house without everything he
touched being covered with bail's. This
gentleman had a beautiful head of hair
when ho first spoke about the dog, but when
he came again the next year he was quite
bald. He also said the female servant that
attended the dog had lost nearly the whole
of her hair. •*
For himself he was convinced that the
continuous electric current was the most
active and efficient hair stimulant of the
day. It was a remedy of great therapeutic
value when used as an accessory to other
remedies.
A CENTENARIAN.
A Witness of the Reign of Terror in
France.
From the Pall Mall Gazette.
A Constantinople correspondent writes to
us as follows with reference to a remarkable
centenarian who had been a friend of
Robespierre: Constantinople lias just lost
its oldest inhabitant in the person of M.
Dimitrios Antippa, who died on the 10th
inst. at the extraordinary age of 115. He
really counted as a figure in history, though
few who knew him and respected him as a
modest yet influential merchant were aware
how eventful had been the early part of his
long life. He was born in 1772, at Cepba
lonia, his parents being engaged in com
merce at Constantinople. Here he remained
until he was 15, when, yielding to the per
suasions of the attache at the French Em
bassy, M. Chenier, brother of the famous
poet and a great friend of the family, An
tippa pere resolved to send his sou to Paris,
the centre of thought and learning, whore
he might complete his education in the best
way. The boy saw the French capital dur
ing its most awful revolutionary period. He
witnessed all the ghastly scenes of the
Reign of Terror. He knew Marat, Danton,
and Robespierre personally. Asa Greek he
could frequent both Girondist and Mon
tugnard society, and was intimate now with
Camille Desmoulins and Barnave, now with
Tallien and St. Just. In Mine. Tallien’s
salon he danced the Carmagnole and sang
“Ca ira.” He was a friend of
poor Andre Chenier, and saw
him die. He also was present
at the murder of Marie Antoinette on the
scaffold. In fact he witnessed the guillotine
destroy all its most famous victims.' When
the storm had passed, in the calm time
which succeeded it, young Antippa returned
to his parental home at Constantinople, and
started life as a merchant. From numerous
friends of note in Paris he had obtained
most flattering letters of recommendation,
and theso helped him at once to get complete
recognition in the French society of Con
stantinople, then far more powerful than it
is to-day. The Embassies, one and all, re
ceived him as a distinguished guest, and the
French Ambassador became his most inti
mate friend. At the French Embassy young
Antippa is said to have first introduced the
Carmagnole, which was danced in Pera
during the carnival of 1794-5.
In his habits M. Antippa was most retir
ing, even reserved and cold toward stran
ers. For eighty years he lived at his resid
ence at Tatavla, on the heights facing the
Turkish capital. It was within easy distance
of his office at Galata, to which he was wont
to ride daily, invariably attended by a ser
vant.
Pour Dollars a Month.
W. J. Holland in Pittsburg Dispatch.
The largest manufacturer of porcelain in
Kioto is Kinko-san, who employs over 303
workmen. These are not, however, con
gregated in one gre .t building or group of
buildings, but are scattered over a large
neighborhood in Awata. I was permitted
this afternoon to inspect the various pro
cesses in the manufacture of tho pore lain
under the guidance of the proprietor him
self. The bulk of the ware made is de
signed for exportation, and a great deal of
it goes to the United States and England.
Most of it is very pretty, and all of it is,
considering the amount of labor bestowed
upon it, remarkably cheap.
1 was at some pains to ascertain the prices
paid for labor tn the cloissoneand porcelain
factories. The work is done by the piece,
and a good turner in a pottery establishment
or enamelier receives from 50c. to 75c. per
diem. The beat painters earn from 75c. to
$1 50 per diem. The wages are graded
downward from these maximum figures lo
those paid boys and girls employes:! in tho
similar operations, who earn from 10c. to
15c. a day. As I have remarked in a
previous letter, when speaking of the wages
paid farm laborers in Japan, we of the
West, with our exaggerated’ideas of the
worth of labor and of the low purchasing
power of our corn, are apt to form false
estimates when contemplating the scale of
prices paid here. But the truth is that
Japanese tastes are simple and wants few
and while from 75c. to $1 per diem would be
accounted starvation wages In Ameroa, they
m reality represent a very just and liberal
compensation in Japan.
I cannot better illustrate what I mean
than by relating an incident which occurred
in Tokio the other day. A friend of miue
was met and accosted by a Swede, who in
sisted upon talking with him.
“What are you doing here?” said my
friend.
“I am working for a Japanese who is in
the iron business. ”
“What are you getting?”
"Four dollars a month.”
“Four dollars a month 1 Why, man, that
will not keep soul and laxly together.”
“Oh. yes, but it will. I have a good
boarding house, and get all the meat and
fish and bread I want and only pay $3 a
month.”
If Your Lungs are Destroyed
Do not expect that Dr. Pieroe's “Golden
Medical Discovery” will make new ones for
you. It can do much, but not impossibili
ties. If, however, you have not yet reached
the last stages of consumption, there is
hope for you. But do not delay, lest you
cross the fatal line where help is impossible.
The Discovery has arrested tho aggravating
cough of thousands of consumptives, cured
their night sweats and hectic fevers, and
reslvro J them to health ahd lumen iuu.
THE MORNING NEWS: WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1887.
DRY GOODS.
Priestley's Black Dress GooM
YI7E beg to announce that we have in stock 25 different 'tyles of the celebrated English maim
v V facuirer, PRIESTLEY. These goods are as well known among ladies as Coates' Spool Cot
ton and we therefore take pleasure in calling attention to them. They comprise in part of.
PRIESTLEY'S Silk Warp Henrietta Cloth at 75c., $1 and $1 25.
PRIESTLEY’S Ravenna Cloth, entirely new this season.
PRIESTLEY'S Drap de Alma, always desirable.
PRIESTLEY’S Melrose Cloth, a beautiful design.
PRIESTLEY’ S Panama Cloth: this is an exceedingly handsome clofX
PRIESTLEY'S Black India Cloth: everybody admires it.
PRIESTLEY'S Silk Warp Melrose Cloth.
PRIESTLEY’S Black Diagonal Cloth.
PRIESTLEY'S Black Hortense Cloth.
PRIESTLEY’S Satin Striped Cloth.
PRIESTLEY’S All Wool Nun's Veiling.
PRIESTLEY'S Silk Warp Nun's Veiling.
PRIESTLEY’S Cashmere de Inde; extraordinarily beautiful
We call attention to the fact that our prices are strictly the
lowest in the market, and invite ladies to examine these goods
and compare prices. There is nothing out this season in
FANCY DRESS GOODS
Which we have not in stock. We claim that onr Dress Goods stock is superior to anything yet
seen in this city, and we claim to be able to sell the best goods at mieh prices at which only medium
qualities can be purchased elsewhere. We know talk is cheap. We ask you to investigate. If we
ao not come up to promise we can't make you pure ase. Hence we cordially invite you to call
and satisfy yourself whether our promises are good or not. Wo have more to risk than you have
in making this announcement. Wo risk our reputation. You risk a little of your time.
Do You Think We Can Afford to Sham?
If we have convinced you of the above facts, we beg you to look through our Silk, Velvet and
Flush stocks.
OUR BLACK AND COLORED SILKS
Are unquestionably of the best wearing Silks in the market. We warrant every yard to give
satisfaction. We have them at all prices. We would kindly ask you to examine our $1 and Si U 5
Silks. We feel that we can justly brag of them. You need not buy any, but we would like you to
know what we have.
Our Silk Plushes and Silk Velvets
Are of every shade and hue in plain and fancy designs. We also desire you to see our Moire
Batins. They are very pretty and cheap.
Braided and Beaded Trimmings.
We have everything in that line to be found onjy in the most extensive trimming houses in
New York, and we also insist that our prices are much below the fancy prices you have to pay for
them elsewhere.
Onr English Walking Jackets, Dolmans, Wraps,
Tailor made, in Plush, Velvet, Silk, Cloth and Fancy Materials, is unsurpassed In style, general
make-up, assortment and prices. You cannot afford to purchase elsewhere. It is absolutely
necessary that you see our stock and judge for yourself before purchasing. Remember, we do
not ask you to take this all in good faith, but to investigate what we have said, as it is to your
benefit as well as ours.
DRUMMER’S SAMPLES.
We have purchased a large lot of Drummer's Samples at 50c. on the dollar, and offer them
correspondingly low. They comprise Hand-made Knitted T.ilxiggans, Infant's Saoques, Infant's
Caps, Silk and Worsted Stockings and Mitts. Also, a large line or Infant's and Children's Merino
Embroidered Sacques and Cloaks.
OUR BAZAR
Contains a most superb stock of all kinds of FANCY GOODS;
Plush and Leather Work Boxes,
Plush and Leather Manicure Cases.
Plush and Leather Shaving Cases.
Fans of the most elegant designs in Laee and Ostrich.
Feathers, Bisque and Bronze Figures, and thousands of other elegant articles
suitable for Wedding Presents, etc.
This Week We Offer in Our Bazar Two Articles at Special Sale.
mo dozen full regular SEAMLESS BALBRIGGAN LADIES’ HOSE at 10c. ( which cannot be
had elsewhere for less than 25c.
250 dozen 40-inch DAMASK TOWELS at 10c., worth 25c.
David W eisbein,
153 BROUGHTON STREET.
FURNITURE, CARPETS, MATTING, ETC
Scared to Death.
WAKE UP OLD MAN, GET
UP AND HUN!
Or you will be late to get the pick of those astonishing bargains in FURNITURE and
CARPETS, which LINDSAY & MORGAN are offering at Bankrupt Prices.
They are showing a most elaborate lino ot FANCY GOODS in their Furniture
Department, and have just received a large invoice of NEW RUGS in their Carpet
Department.
Don’t be late, but come at once and make your selection.
LINDSAY & MORGAN.
CARPETS!' CARPETS! CARPETS!
Now is the time for Bargains in Carpets.
A fine selection of Cotton Chains, Union’s Extra Supers,
All Wool, Two and Three-P!ys, Tapestries and Body Brus
sels just arrived. Our line of Furniture is complete in all
its departments. Just received, a carload of Cooking and
Heating Stoves. So call on us for Bargains. We don’t in
tend to be undersold, for cash or on easy terms.
TEEPLE & CO.
193 and 195 Broughton Street.
ARMSTRONG BRACE!
ELASTIC SUSPENDER WITHOUT RUBBER,
Combining Comfort and Durability.
NO RUBBER USED IN THESE COODB. NICKEL PLATED
BRASS SPRINGS FURNISH THE ELASTICITY.
Ask Your Dealer for Them,l
Sent by Mail, Post Paid, on leeeipt of price at the fol owmv List
A Quality, plain or fy. web, 501 > Quality, pl’n or fancy web 5125
xwv* 1 W U l .ASFtgiv B " 75 * " plain eilk web 1.60
'V ( /frL )/W \2\C “ “ “ lOOiF “ fancy “ 2,00
r W
LOTTERY.
——
t-.SL
LOUISIANA STATE LOTTERY COMPANY
Incorporated by the Leghslaturt) in lNCtf, for
Educatioual and Charitable purposes, and its
irauchise made a part of the piv.sont stale coi
btitution, in 1679, by an overwhelming poi id a*
vote.
Its llraml Single \ umberNDrawlnga taka
flare moiiUily, unl the i.rainl t^eini*Annual
IravviiitfH regularly exery i\ month*
aud iftecemben.
“HV do hereby certify that ire supervise, th a
arrangements for all the Monthly and Semi-
Annual Drawings of the. Louisiana State Lot
tery Company % and in person manage and con
trol the Jinlivings themselves, and that the same
are conducted with honesty, Jan ness, and in
good faith toward ail parties, and ire ant ho rue
the Company to use Has certificate, With fac
similes oj out' signature# aUac/icd. in its adver
tisements. *
Commissioners,
IT> the vnder*i(jned Rank* and Ranker* wfU
pay all Pnzes drawn in the Louisiana State bat
teries w'o’rh >y he presented at our counteri
J. H. OGLESBY, Pres, Louisiana Nat’l Bank
PIERRE LANAUX, Pres State Nat’l Bank
A. BALDWIN, Pres. New Orleans Nat’l Bank,
CARL KOHN, Pres. Union National Bank
GRAND SEMI-ANNUAL DRAWING
In the Academy of Music, New Orleans,
TUESDAY. December 13. 1887,
CAPITAL PRIZE, $300,000.
100,000 Tickets at Twenty Dollars
each. Halves $10; Quarters $5;
Tenths $2; Twentieth sl.
LIST W PRIZES.
1 PRIZE OK $300,000 is $ 800,000
1 PRIZE OF 100.000 is 100,000
1 PRIZE OK 50,000 is 50.000
1 PRIZE OK 26,000 Is 35,000
2 PRIZES OF 10,000 are 80,000
5 PRIZES OK 5,000 are 26,000
25 PRIZES OK 1.000 are 26,000
100 PRIZES OF 500 are 50,000
200 PRIZES OF 300 are 00,000
500 PRIZES OK 200 are 100,OIK)
APPROXIMATION PRIZES.
100 Prizes of SSOO approximating to
$300,000 l’ri/.e are ’ 50,000
100 Prizes of SBOO approximating to
SIOO,OOO Prize are 30,000
100 Prizes of S2OO approximating to
$50,000 Prize are 20,000
TERMINAL PRIZES.
1,000 Prizes of SIOO decided by. SBOO,OOO
Prize are 100,000
1,000 Prizes of sloodecided by. .SIOO,OOO
Prize are 100,000
3,130 Prizes amounting to $1,056,000
For Club Rates, or any further information
appiy to the undersigned. Your handwriting
must be distinct and Signature plain. More
rapid return mail delivery will tie assured by
your enclosing an Envelope bearing your full
address.
Send POSTAL VOTES, Express Money Or
ders or New York Exchange in ordinary letter.
Currency by Express (at nurexpen-ei addressed
to M. A. DAUPHIV,
New Orleans, La.
orM. A. DAUPHIN,
Washington, It. C.
Address Registered Letters w
NEW ORLEANS NATIONAL BANK,
Mew Orleans, La
DFMPMRFR That the presence of Gen
ii EL IVI L- ! VI DL_ I A era ; s Beauregard and
Early, who are in charge of the draw ings, is a
guarantee of absolute fairness and integrity,
that the chances are all equal, ami that no one
can possibly divine what number will draw a
Prize.
REMEMBER that the payment of all Prizes
is UTAH\YIKKI> HY FOUR NATIONAL
BANK* of New Orleans, and the Tickets are
signed by the ITesident of an Institution ivboso
chartered rights are recognized in the highest
Courts; therefore, lie ware ot any imitations or
anonymous schemes.
FRUIT AND GROCERIES.
NEW CURRANTS,
New Citron,
New Nuts.
Choice Mixed Pickles and
Chow Chow by the quart.
Hock Candy, Drip Syrup,
and a first-class stock of Staple
and Fancy Groceries, at
THE
MufoalCfi-Operativc Association,
BARNARD AND BROUGHTON ST. LANE.
(TBARRELS A PPLES.
On BARRELS EATING AND COOKING
L > PEARS, 50 Barrels HEBRON POTATOES.
25 Sack a RIO and JAVA COFFEE, LIQUORS
and WINES of all kinds, SUGAR, CANNED
MEATS, Choice FLOUR, CANNED GOODS,
NUTS and RAISINS, New TURKISH PRUNES,
New CITRON. BUTTER. CHEE-iB, LARD,
SUGARS, SOAP, STARCH, CRACKERS,
BROOMS, PAILS, CRANBERRIES, GRAPES,
etc. For sale at lowest prices.
A,*H, CHAMPION.
NEW RAISINS,
PATRAS CURRANTS IN BARRELS,
Vostizza Currants in Cases
CITRON IN 50-POUND TIN BOXES,
THK FINEST INPOBTED.
NEW NUT’S A. N D FIGS.
As Fruit Cake is better with some age, would
it not be well to buy the Fruit at once?.
ft. HI. & C. W. WEST.
DKY GOODS.
Mini! Aimouncemcut!
u
BEADED TRIMMINGS 1214 c yard up.
iiruided Seta and Panels to match $3 25
complete.
Beaded Seta, worth $2 75, for $1 75 each.
Dress Braids, fancy, 2-inch wide, 12Ljc. yard.
Hercules Braids, Black, Cream and Colured,
sc. up.
Black and Colored Silk Binding Braids 10c,
yard,
60 dozen School Handkerchiefs at \6V dozen.
Now line Silk liankerchiefs at 36c. to $2 50
ea- ii.
Wool Gloves, Ladies', Men’s and Children’s,2se.
each.
Stitched Back Kid Gloves TBo. to $1 25 pair.
Merino Undervests 25c. to $2 50 each.
Men’s Sanitary Underwear $4 50 suit.
Corsets, all grades, 35c. and up.
Dr. Warner’s Health and Nursing Corsets.
Dr. Warner's Hose Supporters, all sizes, best
made.
Ask for the “Ribbon Bow" and “Errainie”
Collars for ladies.
Full lines of Gents' Shirts, Collars, Cuffs and
Ties.
Try our 15c. Seamless Socks.
H. A. DUMAS,
Wo Xi (JUJU HTT-UiUL’K.
TOOTS AND SnOES.
SHOES FOR GENTLEMEN!
STYLISH SHOES for LADIES
Solid & Cheap Children’s SHOES.
A. S. COHEN,
1391 BROUGHTON STREET.
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, WAGONS, ETC.
% Carriage Spoke and the Wagon Wheels were Tired.”
THE REPOSITORY OF THE SOUTH.
Our stock is the largest and complement It was bought right, and will be sold at prices that will
meet and vanquish all competition.
BUGGIES, McCALL WAGONS, PHAETONS, PLANTATION
WAGONS, ROCKAWAYS, TURPENTINE WAGONS.
VFULL and complete line of HARNESS at bottom prices, and every article usually found in a
first class CARRIAGE, WAGON and BUGGY REPOSITORY. We handle the products of
the liest and leading makers, and our goods will always he found reliable and satisfactory.
It will lie money in your pocket to see our stock and get our prices before buying.
OFFICE: CORNER BAY AND MONTGOMERY STREETS.
SALOMON COHEN.
BLACKBERRY JUICE.
'sample bottles free
t||> MEL^Sf
IwoMEN'-CHaDREjI
X • iWINMOViTCJVS 01 1
HUNGARIAN - |
An Efficient Remedy lor
Diarrhcea. Cholera Morbus, Dysentery
And all Disorders of the Bowels. Imported by
Mihalovitch, Fletcher &.Co., Cincinnati,Ohio
—FOR SALE BV
A. EHRLICH & BRO., Sole Agents, Savannah,
Ga., and all wholesale and retail Druggists,
Liquor Dealers and Wine Merchants everywhere,
SAUCE. ~ ~~~
(Tffß WORCESTERSHIRE)^
Imparts the most delicious taste and test to
EXTRACT SOUPS,
of a LETTER from fl
a MEDICAL GEN- : f CJll A VIES,
TLEMAN at Mad- | i „
raa, to his brother j It *■
at WORCESTER, A IL . __ _ _
May, 1851. HOrACOLD
“Tell ESAU
LEA ft PERKINS’MEATS, 1
that their sauce Is lfT, ri JkS
highly enteemed in CAIMS*
India, and ia in my k.
opinion, tho znost lUft rERpM WEIjWH*
palatable, as well
ah the most whole- IMIUJIIT^
some sauco that ink. zAI _
inado.” Vz,- .
Signature Is on every bottle of the genuine.
JOHN DUNCAN'S-SONS, N.Y.,
AGENTS FOR THE UNITED STATES.
COTTON SEED WANTED.
IS CENTS
Per Bushel ($l2 per ton) paid for good
COHi SEED
Delivered In Carload Lots at
Southern Cotton Oil Cos. Mills
—AT—
SAVANNAH, GA.,
ATLANTA, GA.,
COLUMBUS, GA.
Price subject to change unless notified of ac
ceptance for certain quantity to be shipped by a
future date Address nearest mill as above.
CORSETS.
SOAP.
SOAPS! SOAPS!
OEAHB’, RIEGER’S, COLGATE’S, CLEAV
i ER’S, KECKKLAEK’B, BAYLEY’S, LU
BIN’S. PEMBUC’b MEDICATED just received at
BUTLER’S PHARMACY, i
WATCHES AND JEWELRY.
"the PLACE TO buy '
WEDDING PRESENTS
Such as DIAMONDS, FINE STERLING SIL
VERWARE, ELEGANT JEWELRY,
B’KENOH CLOCKS, etc., is to be found M
A. L. Desbouillons,
21 BULL STREET,
the *ole afirent for the celebrated ROCKFORD
RAILROAD WATCHES, and who al*o
makes a sj>oc*iaity of
18-Karat Wedding Rings
AND THE FINEST WATCHES.
I Anything you buy from him being warranted
as represented.
I Opera, Gxlitpsosl at Post.
HOTELS.
NEW HOTEL T OGN L
(Formerly St. Mark's.*
Newimn Street, near Bay. Jacksonville, Fla.
WINTER ANL SUMMER.
MOST central House in the city. Near
1 Rost Office, Street Cars and all Ferries.
New and Elegant Furniture. Electric Bella,
Baths, Etc. $2 50 to $ per day.
JOHN B. TOGNI, Rroprletor.
DUB’S SCREVEN HOUSE.
r I’ll IS I*OFIT,AH Hotel Is now provided with
1 a Passenger Elevator (tho only one In the
city) and has been remodeled and newly fur
nished. The proprietor, who by recent purchase
is also the owner of tho establishment, sparse
neither pains nor expense in the entertainment
of bis guests. The patronage of Florida visit
ors is earnestly invited. The table of the
Screven House is supplied with every luxury
that the markets at home or abroad can afford.
GROCEKIKsC ~
GEO. W. TIEDEMAnT~
-..WHOLESALE—
Grocer, Provision Dealer (Wn Merchant,
NO. 161 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA.
O. DAVIS. M. A. DAVIS.
O. DAVIS & SON",
(Successors to Graham a Hubbell)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Provisions, Grain arid Hay,
181 and 183 Bay St., cor. Jefferson,
SAVANNAH, GA.
Jas. E. Grady. Jno. C. DkLettiuc.
Jas. E. Grady, Jr.
GRADY, DeLETTRE & CO.,
Successors to Honcontßn, Grady & Cos.,
WHOLESALE GROCERS, and dealers in
PROVISIONS, CORN, HAY, FEED, Etc.
Old Stand, corner Bay and Abercorn streets,
SAVANNAH. GA.
FISH AMI OYSTERS."
" ESTABLISHED 1858. ~~
M. M. SULLIVAN,
Wholesale Fish and Oyster Dealer,
150 Bryan st. and 152 Bay lane. Savannah, Ga.
Kish orders for Cedar Keys received here have
prompt attention.
PLUMBER,
l. a. McCarthy.
Successor to Chas. E. Wakefield,
PLUMBER, G\S and STEAM FITTER,
48 Barnard street, SAVANNAH, GA
Telephone 373.
CONTRACTOR*.
p' j. fallonT~
BUILDER AND CONTRACTOR,
23 DRAYTON STREET, SAVANNAH.
I ESTIMATES promptly furnished for building
J of any class.
IKON PIPE.
RUSTLESS IRON PIPE;
EQUAL TO GALVANIZED PIPE, AT
MC( H LESS PRICE.
J. D. WEED & CO.
- 1 — a
PAINTS AND OILS.
JOHN G. BUTLER,
WHITE LEADS, COLORS. OILS, GLAS&
VARNISH, ETCg READY MIXES
PAINTS; RAILROAD, STEAMER AND MIQ
SUPPLIES, SASHES, DOORS, BUNDS AN!
BUILDERS’ HARDWARE. Sole Agent fog.
GEORGIA LIME, CALCINED PLASTER, CE
MENT, HAIR and LAND PLASTER
6 Whitaker Street, Savannah, Georgia.
POTATOES."
POTATOES.
500 BARRELS POT AT OEi
-FOR SALE BY—
, C. M. GILBERT & CCf
5

xml | txt