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The morning news. [volume] (Savannah, Ga.) 1887-1900, November 29, 1888, Image 2

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MICROBES ON THE MARCH
A FEW STILL, LEFT jiT JACKSON
VILLE AND GAINESVILLE,
Three New Cases at the Former Place
and Four at the Latter—Mellonville
and Enterprise Both Report Clean
Dockets- All Hands Longing for the
Refugees.
Jacksonville, Fla,, Nov. 28.—Presi
dent Mitchell’s official bulletin for the
twenty-four hours ending at 6 o’clock
to-night is as follows:
New cases 3
Deaths 0
Total number of cases to date 4,W0
Total number of deaths to date 4*B
To-day’s new white patients are:
Adam LeGrek.
H. A. Rudolph.
Henry Rudolph.
No negroes were taken sick to-day.
WANT TO LET THE REFUGEES IN.
The Evening Metropolis to-day inter
viewed merchants and prominent men to
get an expression of their opinion regard
ing the recent action of the board of healtli
preventing refugees from returning until
after fumigation. A large majority are in
favor of giving parties who wish to come
admission. There is considerable feeling
against the board on account of the recent
ukase.
Mose Bayley, the negro who recently
killed Jim Smith at Pepper island, was
committed yesterday for trial oil a charge
of willful murder.
Phebe Titus, Annie Cummings, Henry
Gibson, George Hunter, Henry Richard
son. Sarah Burbridge and Sarali Pierce are
still prostrated with yellow fever, and are
attended by Dr. Dames, The two first
named are white women.
THANKSGIVING SERVICES.
A union Thanksgiving service will be
held at toe Newnttu Street Presbyterian
Church to-morrow. Rev. XV. A. McLean
will assist the pastor, Rev. IV. H. Dodge.
The steamship Ozama is expected to-day.
The refugees at Atlanta are demanding
admission.
The steamer Fred Deßary arrived from
Charleston to-day, and will take the upper
St. John’s riva( freight for points beyond
Astor and Sanford, and South Florida
freights in general.
There is serious talk of an indignation
meeting to condemn the action of the board
of health in keeping refugees out until after
fumigation.
Bartolo Thebaut who has had a desperate
encounter with the “prevailing” for the
past few weeks, is able to sit up in his room
to-day.
MALE OF TICKETS.
The Savannah, Florida and Western
Railway company will resume the sale of
tickets from Jacksonville to all points, sub
ject to quarantine regulations on Dec. 1.
D. W. Giliislie is raising funds in DeLand
for a colored college in Jacksonville.
W. W. Farmer, who was down with the
fever at Hart’s road last week, is conva
lescent.
Saunders, late an attache of the medical
bureau, is out on bail.
The steamship Delaware sailed to-day for
New York.
A Mrs. Taylor of No. 135 West Adams
street dropped dead in her yard this after
noon.
Not one case of fever has originated in
Pablo.
Gen. Spinner, ex-Secretary of the United
States treasury, who has been suffering
from a severe cold, has entirely recovered.
FATE OF THE CONDUCTORS.
Four street car conductors yielded up
their lives to the plague. Nearly every
Conductor was sick, some being very sick.
Miss Ella Bartholf, daughter of Capt. J.
F. Bartholf, was married last Thursday to
Frank Dale of Jacksonville.
The relief committee will take into con
sideration Friday the advisability of closing
the commissary Saturday afternoon.
The Misses Hardee were at Baldwin last
night awaiting a chance to get into town,
but were finally sent back to Madison.
Charley Watson, purser of the steamer
Rockledge, on the Indian river, will give
up his position shortly and return to this
city.
A. IV. Lawless and I. W. Winburg of
New Berlin have returned home from an ex
tended trip through the north and west.
HAZEN ARRESTED.
“Billy” Hazen came up on the steamer
Georgia to-day fram Burnside Beach, and
■was promptly arrested by Policeman Peters
nd carried before Judge Lee and fined SIOO.
He was a refugee who broke through the
lines.
Mrs. E. A. Henderson, who formerly kept
a boarding-house at the corner of Monroe
and Pine streets, was arrested this morning
and taken to the police court for having
entered the city without a permit. She
gave SSOO bail.
AN ILL-FATED LOCALITY.
There was a strange fatality at the inter
section of Bay and Hogan streets during the
epidemic. Those who died in this particular
locality were: L. R. Tuttle, F. Zanders, J.
H. Grunthal, Antone Christopher, Cone
Williams, R. Mulroy, Edgar Davidson, E.
A. Wanklyn, Joe Helleu-Elliott and W. J.
Saunders.
The postal authorities here were notified
to-day that ail mail fumigation would cease
in Florida on Dec. 1, and also that to
morrow mail trains would again run
through to Jacksonville and Wilmington.
GREAT PRESSURE.
Great pressure is being brought to bear by
the refugees to tie allowed fo enter the city,
and some of the citizens here go so far as
to say that they will protect refugees from
arrest in case they come in on the trains.
Hazen refused to pay his fine and now lies
the city jail. On the other hand, one or
two refugees are known to have come in
on to-day’s northern train, and no notice of
the fact was taken by the police.
The Timea-Unton, in a long leader this
morning, condemned the action of the au
thorities aud advocated immediate permis
sion tor the entrance of refugees. Among
other things, it says:
/Irperience has demonstrated that there is
little if any danger of contracting yellow fever
after the fall of frost. This epidemic does not
differ, so far as we can see. from
past visitations of the disease in
other locaities. Frost has been heralded all
over the country as the open sesame which
would admit refugees again within the gates of
their own city. If the authorities here have not
aided in this wide promulgation, t hey have, at
least, never spoken a word which would lead
refugees to think differently. Now, if we are to
be guided by the dominant Idea of yester
day’s tripartite conference, frost lias
nothing to do with removing or lessening the
danger of taking the disease. This can be re
moved only by disinfection, and whoever heard
of wholesale disinfection before,'or whoever
heard of shutting people out of a city while it
is in progress - VVha l a metamorphosis! We
have already had two frosts one light, the
other moderately heavy Now, wh.-it valid
reason can he given for refusing
refugee* an entrance here- Two thirds
or three-fourths of them would come to houses
that have not been infected *-v<-n if we admit
this to be a factor of danger after the fall ol
frost We shall he playing the refugees false If
we shut them ant eny l inger. They have been
told that frost would re ■ iw, nil danger and
now suddenly to take all this hack and compel
them to wait for nearly four week* while disin
fection is in progress would lie unwarranted,
swprecudented. uujust. aud eren tyrannical.
BURGEON PORTER'H DISPATCH.
Washington, Nov. 28. Surge m I 'or tor,
at Jacksonville, Fla., to-day telegraphed to
Burgeon General Hamilton that ns two
frost* have occurred, and the fever is prin
cipally confined to Houth Jacksonville,
across the river, to recommend* that ttor*
etriction* as to railroads Ist released so far
a* to permit people to leave the city, but
that unaci limaicd persons Ire not allowed
to return till after disinfection.
No New Cases at Enterprise
Sanford, Fla., Nov. 28.*—The only re-
E obtainable here relative to the fever at
irprlse, is no now cases, no deaths, and
>nly .wo under treatment are conva
lescing rapidly.
BLACK VOMIT IN GOTHAM.
A Nurse from Jacksonville Taken Sick
on His Arrival.
New York, Nov. 28.—Another case of
yellow fever was reported by Dr. George
C. Wilson to-night in the person of Rafael
Delano, of No. 7o Mulberry street. Delano
arrived here from Jacksonville with his
wife and two children to-day, and was
taken sick soon after his arrival. Shortly
after noon black vomit began and Dr.
Wilson notified the police and board of
health, which at once had him removed to
the reception ho'-pital. Delano told the
doctor that he had been in Jacksonville
during the epidemic and had nursed several
patients, but had never caught the fever
himsolf. As the man aud his family at
once went to a densely populated Italian
quarter, fears are entertained that the
germs may have spread. Dr. Edson, of tee
health board, said he had not learned of the
case until 11 o’clock to-night, and that ho
had not yet made an investigation.
Dr. Edson examined the mail late this
evening and prououneed It a genuine case
of yellow fever.
CHAI. LkoT-.ls “s O ' ANTINE OFF.
All Florida Hae teen Barred Out for
the Past Three Months,
Charleston, S. C., Nov. 28. —Tbo board
of health to-night raised the quarantine
blockade against Florida. The city has
Leon closed against the entire state forjthree
months. Ti e blockade was complete by sea
and land. The city kept a force of detect
ives on all the trains entering the city fr m
north, south and west, and these al
lowed neither passengers nor freight
to enter the city front any part
of Florida. During the hockade
about twenty persons manage 1 to elu.le the
detectives a:.d reach the city. In every
instance, however, they were arrested and
sent to the lazaretto, on an adj ining island,
where they were kept for fourteen day .
Asa result, there was not a single case of
malarial fever here during the entire season.
There was, then, ice here on Tuesday morn
ing-
Cold at Macclenny.
Macclenny, Fla., Nov. 28.—There has
not been any new cases of yellow fever in
this town since Nov. 19. There were
several cases three miles from here reported
on Nov. 21.
The weather has been cold here, the ther
mometer rangiug from 43 to 48’ for the
last week.
The business prospects are brightning.
Waycross Raises Its Quarantine.
Waycboss, Ha., Nov. 28.—At a meeting
of the city council here to-day the pro
priety of raising the quarantine against all
points was discussed, and believing all dan
ger to be over after the heavy frost and ice,
it was resolved that cn and after this date
all quarantine restrictions be removed from
all infected aud other points in Florida.
Mellonville’s Sick Convalescing.
Sanford, Fla. , Nov. 28. —There are no
new developments at Mellonville to-day
except that those who are sick and confined
in the old hotel building were at breakfast
this morning and are convalescing. There
are no other cases at Mellonville. Sanford
is perfectly healthy, as there is not a case
of sickness in the city.
Four New Cases at Gainesville.
Gainesville, Fla., Nov. 28.— Surgeon
Martin reports four new cases of yellow
fever to-dav—one white and three colored.
Refugees continue to return.
AMONG THE ATHENIANS.
Druggists Assign Free Exercises of
the Senior Class.
Athens, Ga., Nov. 28. —The drug firm of
G. W. Rush & Cos., of this city, made an as
signment to-day for the benefit of their
creditors. E. R. Brumby of this city has
been appointed assignee.
ihe senior class-tree exercises of the Uni
versity of Georgia were held this afternoon
at 4 o’clock on ti,e campus. A large crowd
was in attendance. A fine class poem was
delivered by T. Reem Crawford of Lincoln
ton, after which the class song was sung
with banjo, flute and guitar accompani
ments. The tree was plumed with great
ceremony and placed among similar historic
shrubberies of the college campus.
The Presbyterian synod of Georgia
opened here to-night with a sermon by Rev.
Dr. Strickler of Atlanta, the moderator.
The church was crowded with members of
the congregation and delegates.
Thanksgiving day will be generally ob
served here to-mc rrow by the merchants,
colleges, factories, etc.
MACON MENTION.
Ex-Treasurer Adams Indicted by the
Grand Jury.
Macon, Ga., Nov. 28.— The grand jury
found a true bill to-day against O. K.
Adama, the defaulting city treasurer. No
arrest was made to-uight, but it is under
stood that a bond for $5,000, the amount
fixed by the court, will be given to-morrow.
Capt. Adams to-day resigned the supreme
treasurship of the Knights of the Golden
Rule, and J. B. Lvnn of Terre Haute, lud.,
was appointed as his successor.
Hon. W. A. Felton, the new solicitor
general, was married to-day to Mary Ellen
Johnston, daughter of the late William B.
Johnstou. They left for a bridal trip
north.
John H. Inman and party will arrive here
to-morrow morning on their way to Colum
bus, and will be given an hour’s rule over
the city.
SLAIN IN SELF-DEFENSE.
Brogdon’a Version of the Killing of
His Friend Marshall.
Albany, Ga., Nov. 28. —John Marshall
and John Brogdon, employes of Broe-don
& Walker of Alapalia, left Albany yester
day morning on horseback. They had been
drinking freely. After riding twelve miles
they bad an altercation. Marshall ad
vanced upon Brogdon with an open knife,
whereupon the latter drew his pistol, shoot
ing Marshall directly in the forehead, and
killing him instantly. They had been boson
friends. Brogdon took his dead companion
to the nearest ,>■> t ■ ■ where lie re
mained w ith the body all night. This morn
ing the body was carried to Aeree, two
miles away, and shipped to Alapalia.
Brogdon has been tried, ami fully ac
quitted.
Shot Near Lake Woir.
Lake Weir, Fla., Nov. 28. — Monday
morning, about 9 o’clock, B. F. Rice and J.
H. Roach wore at Ocklawaba station. Rice
left some thirty minutes before Roach, and
waited on the road for him. When he
came Rice shot him with a pistol, the ball
striking just above the right hip ami pass
ing through, making an exit on the left of
the spine. The wound is dangerous, but not
necessarily fatal.
Bullete in a aan lord Dive.
Sanford, Fla., Nov. 28.— At a negro
dive kept by Tim Wilson, in Tucker’s row,
in this city, a shooting affair occurred this
noon, m which Mat V\ aters shot a id mor
tallv w ounded Washington Smith. Both are
colored. Smith before he foil also shot
Waters in the thigh.
Moonshine Bpolls at Auction.
Atlanta, (la., Nov. 28. — About fifty
gallons of moonshine whiskey, ami a dozen
or more old copper stills were sold at gov
ernment sale to-day, in front of tbo United
States building. The whiskey brought $1
per gallon, and the copper junk 7 -,. A cents
|m)|- pound.
Fire at Calhoun.
Calhoun, Ga., Nov. 28.— About fl o'clock
Monday night a tenement house in the
southern portion of town belonging to Col.
E. J. Kikes, and occupied by a negro woman,
was burned. The loss is $250 or S3OO, with
uo insurance.
TTIE MORNING NEWS: THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1888.
COVINGTON'S BLOOD CURDLE3.
Cohen’s M?ntal Improvement Less
Rapid than His Physical.
Covington, Ga., Nov. 28. —There is no
now development in regard to the recent
tragedy. The physicians attending Mr.
Cohen say that he is still improving and
gaining strength, though his mind does not
seem to keep pace with his physical im
provement. The attending physicians
now refuse to allow him to be
interrogated as to who struck him, saying
that what he (Cohen) might say in his pres
ent frame of mind could not bo accepted as
testimony either for or against any person.
Solicitor Wormick says he will not proceed
with the committing trial until Cohen dies
or it is decided that he will not be competent
to testify in the case. Echols is still guarded
at the F’lowers house by the sheriff.
The coroner’s jury brought in the follow
ing verdict:
We the jury empaneled ami sworn by the
c -iroaer of Newton county to inquire into the
cause of the death of T. if. Tnomax of Haines
ville. Ga.. whose body is now lying dead before
us, after a careful investigation, timl that be
came to his death by two blows on the head,
one being across the bridge of the nose and
both eyes, and the other on the left of
the forehead all ,ve the left eye, the blows
being indie ed by a heavy stick, known os a
wagon standard, wielded by the hand of some
person known to us, while deceased was
lying iu bed in room No. 0 of the l’itts hotel, in
Covington, (la., at an early hour na Wednesday
morning, Nov. 21, 1888, and that the killing was
murder. We tied, however, that circumstances
point t > Charles H. Echols as the person who
inflicted the fatal blows. \Y S. Osborne, coro
ner: O. H. Sucker, foremau: 8. W. Hawkins, A.
.1. Kan-ill. and. W. Anderson, .1. J. Corley, it. H.
Hicks, and 5| Hearing. K. I’. Carr. W. Scott,
Edward Head, S. .J. Kelley. T. I), (iwinn.
A NEW PHAS - IN THE STRIKE.
The Three Brotherhoods Request Arbi
tration of the Trouble.
Indianapolis, Nov. 28. —The switch
men's strike has assumed anew and threat
enirg phase. Traffic in the yards on the
Belt road moved along with regularity’ to
day. The officials assert that new men arc
applying constantly. The situation with
the strikers had grown desperate; they mus:
do something. Consequently they called
a secret conference last night with the en
gineers and firemen at which a very strong
sediment favorable to the switchrne 1 w.is
manifested. After prolonged discussion, a
decision was reached, which the striking
men hailed with pleasure. In accordance
with the action of the meeting, a committee
composed of representatives of the three
brotherhood, was appointed to call upon
the officers of the various roads to-day and
request them to submit the matter at issue
between them and the switchmen to arbi
tration.
THE CALL.
This forenoon the commit ee called on sev
eral superinte .dents aud followed its in
structions. No tbr a* accompanied the re
quest, ad the officials were left to judge
for them-elves whether the refusal to heed
it will lead to greater complica
tions. That they regarded this
phase of the trouble as much more
serious than mere surface appearances
indicates is evident from the haste with
which they gathered into secret conference
at the union station. The result of this
conference of t.iio superintendents has as
yet taken no definite form, either for arbi
tration or concession. The brakemen have
been outspoken in their sympathy for the
switchmen ever since the strike began. On
several occasions early in the trouble they
refused to fill places vacated by strikers, and
were discharged. This action they took
simply as individuals, but it is now under
stood that their brotherhood has passed on
the question and officially instructed its
members to fill no places which the switch
men have abandoned.
TALENTED LEGS.
Herty Leads, with Moore Three
Miles Behind.
New York, Nov. 29, 12:15 a. m.—The
midnight score at the walking match is:
Herty 327
Littlewood 320
Haworth 2’9
Golden 296
Hart 286
Conner 279
Vint 262
Tavlor 248
C. Smith .. 107
Moore 824
Cartwright..... 815
Day 199
Mason ‘294
Noremac 288
Campana 268
Elson 254
W. Smith 207
Peach 161
At the end of the 72 hours Herty was 25
miles and ti laps behind the world’s record.
Smylie has dropped out of the race.
COTTON IN CHINA.
Manufacturing the Staple—The Effort
to Introduce Machinery.
From the Boston Journal of Commerce.
Cotton manufacturing by power is find
ing an existence in the empire of China.
Mention has been made in these columns of
an effort in this direction at Shanghai. The
beginning of the enterprise was the intro
duction of a number of Japanese cotton
gins so arranged as to be run by belt power
from a steam engine. At our solicitation a
correspondent as that place secured for
us a plan of the plant which we
may at some time illustrate should the
subject become of sufficient interest.
Recent advices from Shanghai in
form us that the Chinese cotton merchants
of the place iiave petitioned the au
thorities adversely to the further prosceu
tion of the cotton spinning coni paily’s ope
rations, which are now confined to cleans
ing the raw material and placing it upon
the market. The object of the company is
to snin and weave the cotton which it gins,
but which lyxs not yet been attained beyond
the preliminary steps. The objection enter
tained by the petitioners toward Hie com
pany is because of the latter’s practice bf put
ting its ginned cotton upon the market in
competition and to the prejudice of the
business of the cotton merchants. The
authorities are evidently not iu sympathy
with the purposes of the petitioners, for
in their reply they express no apprehension
of tiie injury described and feared, a; the
amount of cotton annually cleansed by
the oompany with its machinery is only a
very small portion of the cotton marketed
in Bhungbni. Besides, the "superiority of
machinery over hand work, which it illus
trates. cannot but tend to the advantage of
commerce.’’ The authorities are not slow
in condemning the petitio i as exhibiting a
disposition to obtain an improper monopoly
and undue control of the cotton busiuess.
The company, at present, is simply utiliz
ing its ginning machinery till its plant is
completed for spinning and weaving.
When these plans are consummated protests
will more likely emanate from the manu
facturing population t han from ttie mercan
tile class. _ __ _
Partin* the Hair.
From the San Francisco Call.
“On the right, if you please," said a
representative of the Call last evening to a
tonsorial artist, who, brush and comb in
hand, w as about to part his hair on the left
side of the head.
“All right, sir,” remarked the knight of
tho brush aud comb; "was going to part it
on the other side from force of habit.
“How mauy people part the hair on the
right side!”
“Bhould say less than one in twenty.”
“And why do so mauy men part it on the
left side?”
"Because,” replied the artist, brushing
back a stray lock, “they've tieen brought
up to it from infancy. A mother facing
her boy always holds the comb in her right
hand, and it being easii>st to comb the hair
from left to right, she parts it on the left.
The boy wben he grows up and is able to
comb liie own hair, finds the part on that
side, and follows the line marked out by bis
mother. That’s why the majority of men
part on the left.”
THE WAYTHE GANG WAS CAUGHT.
A Piece of Speedy Detective Worli by
the Secret Service.
From the A'ew York Star.
Boston, Nov. 26. —Perhaps the quickest
work in the record of crime hunters was
that of the secret service officers during the
past week in capturing the gang of counter
feiters convicted last week in Auburn, N.
Y., who have for some time teen operating
in the northwestern part of Pennsylvania
and the southern tier counties of New
York. In the week’s good work Special
Agent Patrick Lyons of this city has
play cd a prominent and very creditable
part.
The story of the capture has been told
heretofore in a fragmentary manner, but
the first accurate siatement of the facts
was given to a reporter Hy United States
District Attorney Hoyt last night.
On the day after election Special Agent
Lyons was informed that a prominent
member of the gang of counterfeiters who
bad been circulating bogus silver coin could
be caught by following a certain course of
procedure. He at once put himself in com
munication with Chief Bellof Washington,
informing him of the information he had
received, and placed him-elf under
that officer’s instructions. Mr. Lyons
soon learned that H. B. Mellin,
who lived near Warren, Pa., was an
extensive dealer in the counterfeit money.
Large amounts of the coin h ive been cir
culated in that section, and so perfect was
the imitation and to ruch an extent had it
been circulated that the people in that
vicinity were very suspicious and took
every precaution to guard against receiving
it. Having this information. Agent Lyons
arranged with a man in Warren named
Edward Bennett to buy some of the money
of Mellin, and instructed him to mark it
for identification. One week ago last
Friday night Bennett went out to
the town where Mellin lived and
obtained the coin. He returned to
a hotel and went to a room for the
purpose of marking the coin. Here a most
singular accident occurred. Bennett went
into his room and left the door open.
Every one in tiiat vicinity was of course
suspicious of bright coin, or any mail in
whose possession it was found, aud so, when
a boarder chanced to pass by Bennett’s
open door and saw him handling and mark
ing bright silver coin his suspicions were
aroused. The boarder “gave the alarm”
and Bennett’s every movement was watched.
On the next evening he was to go to James
town to meet Agent Lyons. But being sus
pected as a counterfeiter, the constable
was at the depot ready to arrest him when
he started. Mr. Bennett submitted to the
arrest iu silence. It was indeed a trying
plight. He could not reveal his real pos.-
tion in the matter, for in that case tho
whole plan of capture would be thwarted.
However, he telegraphed to Agent Lyons
that he had been arrested and was in jail at
Warren. On Monday Lyons and Agent
Baggs of Utica came on, and after sufficient
explanation to the United States commis
sioner at Warren, Bennett was discharged,
and they were then ready to go on with
the work.
Agents Lyons and Baggs with Mr.
Bmi lett then started in search of Mellin.
He lived near a small town some dist ince
out of Warren, and left for that place by
t ain. The three men were sitting uear
each other in the car, talking in an uncon
cerned way just as the train pulled out of
North Warren. At that station several
passengers got on aud among them a large
swarthy looking man whom Bennett at once
discovered to bo Mellin. He at once turned
his face from him and whispered t > Agent
Lyons: "There’s yur man!” Mellin either
saw the movement or for some reason
became suspicious, and going to the
door jumped from the train and Agent
Lyons after him. As soon as Mellin could
recover his feet he started on the run,
emptying his pockets of all his loose “silver”
by casting it to the four winds, with very
little regard for either tbo wind or the “sil
ver.” Agent Lyons gave chase and soon
overhauled him. Mellin is a powerful man,
little less than a desperado, and as soon as
he saw that escape was impossible, turned
and showed fight. Lyons was too quick for
him, however, and ho gave Mellin a blow
in tho neck that laid him at full length on
his back.
“Put up your hands!” demanded Officer
Lyons as soou as Mellin regained his feet,
and by this times Officer Baggs having
come up, Mellin was taken back t> the
station and searched. On hii person six
teen spurious dollars that be had not got rid
of were found, and in his valise was a kit
of burglar’s tools, together with a dark
lantern, a revolver, skeleton keys, and
other implements of the trade. Mellin was
then lodged in jail at that place. Seeing
that there was no chance of getting out of
the box, Mellin was induced to give in
formation that led to the completion of tho
work.
He said that he hRd obtained liis money
of “Squire” Richardson of L'assa lags, who
bad supplied the whole country round about
with the extra “silver.” After some time
he was induced to write a letter of intro
duction to Richardson stating that the
bearer, Mr. Bennett, was a perfectly safe
man, and that be (Bennett) wished to buy
some st ck. The letters also stated that he
(Mellin) had known the b-aror for some
time, and could guarantee him to be a per
fect ly safe man.
Equipped with the letter ot introduction,
the three "queer hunters” again set out for
Cassadaga. and arrived there Monday even
ing. Officer Lyons busied himself in pro
curing an order for arrost, while Bennett
went with his letter to make tho acquaint
ance of the “ Squire.” He was warmly re
ceived by Richardson, who informed him
thai he was very sorry, but that ho could
not accommodate him with any money’, for
he was just out. More than this tho
“Squire” said that ho had been informed
that government officers were on the
alert, and it was advisable to carry on thoir
Lu-dness with the utmost caution. How
ever, be promised to send the money as soon
as possible, and then the two men sat ami
chatted away the evening, the “squire"
waiting for Bennett to go, and Bennett
waiting for Lyons to come. Later in tbo
evening Officer Lyons came in aud Richard
son was placed under arrest and brought to
Buffalo. The promises were searched and
many counterfeiting implements found.
SCIENTIFIC WATCH STEALING.
A Professional Pickpocket Tells How
He Goes About It.
from the London Standard.
A prison official relates tbe following
story: “When speaking one day to a con
vict, a professional pickpocket, to whom l
whs givjpg a word or two of friendly coun
sel, 1 asked him w hy he could not turn over
anew leaf and become an honest man. ‘I
could not. sir,’ he replied, ‘1 must pick
pockets. I would tako your watch to-mor
row if I met you in the Strand; not,’ ho
addl'd, ‘but what I'd give it back to you, for
you’ve been very kind to mo. Wculd you
like to know how to prevent your watch
being stolen f he continued; ’just let me
have it for a minute.’ Curious to learn a
useful hint, l was about to draw ms watch
troin my pocket, when I found that it was
already in this expert’s hand, without my
experiencing the slightest touch. He then
explained to me that the most approved
method of detaching a watch from its
owner was to hold the ring to which the
chain was attached flrmly between the
linger and thumb, and then, with a sharp
twist, snap the stool pivot connecting watch
and ring, leaving the watch free iu tue
thief's hand and the ring on the chain. ‘A
dead loss to us,’ he added, with cool effront
ery, ‘of (1 shillings.’ He then showed me
that if the ring and watch were connected
by a swivel joint, the difficulty of watch
stealing would be increased so much as to
make it scarcely worth the risk.”
Chicanery at Work.
Interested und unscrupulous dealers, ac
tuated by cupidity, occasionally represent
other dentifrice* as equal or akin to SOZO
DONT. Reject these substitutes always,
and insist upon having that genuine repro
ducer of dental beauty for your money; for
it alone is money’s worth.
"M. QUAD'S" EFFECTIVE KICK.
He Vleits Niagara Falla and Tries to
Reform the Hackmen.
From the Detroit Free Press.
I was down near the low er railroad bridge
at Niagara Falls, having a couple of boys
with me, when a hackman drove up and
offered to take us down and show us the
whirlpool, a mile below, and return to the
bridge for 50 cents each. When the offer
was declined he said he would take the three
of us for sl, and we got into his carriage.
He drove down to the Whirlpool house, and
as wo got out I noticed a sign reading:
“Fifty cents to go down to the whirlpool.”
“You agreed to bring us down and show
us the whirlpool,” I said to the hackman.
“Well, its down those stairs.”
“But I don’t propose to pay 50 cents to go
down there.”
“Then you won’t see it.”
“And your won’t get your dollar’ - ’
“W on’t I? Come, I am ready to take
you hack.”
“But we are not ready to go. You lied
to us, and I refuse to pay you a cent,”
“You either pay or I’ll make jelly of
you.”
“Come and try it,”
He did not accept the invitation, but
drove off up town, and a stranger said to
me:
“He has gone for a crowd, and you will
be luckv to get off alive. It’s a shame
faced swindle, of course, and here are a
dozen of us who have been played the same
way, but what can we do about it?”
“You can kick against the gang.”
“Yes, but we’d get the worst of it. They
are a bad lot. You'd better send the fellow
his money.”
“I’ll be hanged if I do.”
As we started up the river on foot a dozen
men followed to see the fun. When w r e
reached the end of the street car track a
mob of fourteen hacktnen received us. The
one who had lied to us demanded his dollar.
I refused to pay it. He called to his mob to
come on, and 1 hacked up to the building,
leveled the revolver at the crowd and
waited. They didn’t come on worth a cent.
They didn’t care for dollars just then. One
by one they slunk away, while I took the
car back to the Falls. The leader tried to
get me arrested for carrying a deadly
weapon, but no ono would issue a warrant.
One justice told him in my hearing:
“Every man coming to visit the falls
ought to come with two revolvers, and the
oftener he fires into your crowd the better
it will be for the honest people here. I wish
more kickers would come here. ”
When you feel depressed, don’t dose
yourself with mean bitters. Hodges’ Sar
saparilla renovates and invigorates the sys
tem, and cures all diseases arising from an
impure state of the blood. $1 per bottle, six
bottles for $5. Rangum Root Med. Cos.,
Nashville, Tenn. Sold by Lippman Bros.,
wholesale agents.
SHOES.
CAUTION!
Beware of fraud, as my name and the price
are stamped on the bottom of all my advertised
Shoes before leaving the factory, which protect
the wearers against high prices and inferior
goods. If a dealer offers W. L*. DOUGLAS
Shoes at a reduced price, or says he has them
without my name and price stamped on the
bottom, put him down as a fraud.
W.L. DOUGLAS
$3 SHOE GENTLEMEN.
The only calf $3 SEAMLESS Shoe smooth
inside. NO TACKS or WAX THREAD to
hurt the feet, easy as hand-sewed and WILL
NOT RIP.
W. L. DOUGLAS $4 SHOE, the original
and only hand sewed welt $4 shoe. ICquals cus
tom made shoes costing from st> to $'J.
W. L. DOUGLAS $3 50 POLICE SHOE.
Railroad Men and Letter Carriers all wear them.
Smooth inside as a Hand-Sewed Shoe. No Tacks
or Wax Thread to hurt the feet.
W. L. DOUGLAS $250 SHOE is unex
celled for heavy wear. Best Calf Shoe for the
price.
W. L. DOUGLAS $2 25 WORKING
MAN’S SHOE is the best in the world for
rough wear: one pair ought to mramanayear.
W.L DOUGI-As $2 BHOE FOR BOYS
is the best School Shoe in the world.
W. L. DOUGLAS $1 75 YOUTH’S
School Shoe gives the small Boys a chance to
wear the beet sho *s in the world.
All made in Congress, Button and Lace. If
not sold by your dealer, write.
W. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton, Mass.
FOR SALE BY
BYCK BROS.,
17 WHITAKER STREET.
KAINIT.
Inli-liflj Kail
If you wish to pay high
prices forever for Kainit, then
buy from the “Sole Agents of
the Great Kainit Trust,” but
if you want to beat this mo
nopoly, then buy from us.
We are ‘‘lndependent Deal
ers,” and propose to remain
so.
BALDWIN FERTILIZER CO.,
SAVANNAH. GA.
ORANGES.
FLORIDA ORANGES.
I am now receiving large consign
ments daily direct from the groves.
For sale very low.
A. H. CHAMPION.
CONTRACTORS
MARTIN COOLEY,
Contractor and Builder.
SAVANNAH. GA.
IYKOPOSALS promptly inbuiltfor Srw.ru,
Paving, Grading, Fridge Building, Wharf
Building, File Driving, etc., etc.
/ CENTS A WEEK pays for the
• W i —v DAILY MORNING NEWS, delir
p lered EARLY EVERY MORNING
■■■ ' S a, any part of the city.
MEETINGS.
FIRST DISTRICT POLITICAL CLUB.
A meeting of the Club will be held at Turner
Hall NOV. 29th, 1883, at 8 o’clock p. m. All
members are requested to be in attendance, as
business of importance will be transacted.
JAMES CORISH, Secretary.
NOTICE TO ROAD COMMISSIONERS.
The annual meeting of the Board of Road
Commissioners of Chatham county will be held
at the Court House on SATURDAY, Dec. Ist.,
at 10 o'clock a. m. R. COAKLEY. Secretary.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
Advertisements inserted under "Special
Fotices” will be charged $1 00 a Square each
insertion.
HO 1 FOR THUNDERBOLT!
COAST LINE RAILROAD.
CATHEDRAL CEMETERY, BO .V A VENTURE
AND THUNDERBOLT.
Schedule for This Day (Thanksgiving).
Steam Cars—Leave Savannah 8 a. m., 0:35 a.
m., 10:35 a. m., 11:45 a. m., 2 p. m., 4 p. in., 4 p.
m., 5 p. m. t 6p. m.. 6:50 p. m. Leave Bona
venture 7:80 a. ra., 0:05 a. in., 10:05 u. m.. 11:05
a. ra.. 12:40 p. m., 2:1(1 p. m., 3:30p.m., 4:30 p.
m., 5:30 p. m.. 6:30 p. m. Leave Thunderbolt
7:10 a. m., 9 a. m., 10 a. m., 11 a. m., 12:35 p. m ,
2:35 p. m., 3:25 p. m., 4:25 p. in., 5:35 p. m., 6:25
p. m. Round trip to Bonaveuture 29c.: round
trip to Thunderbolt 25c.; round trip to Cathe
dral Cemetery 10c. Take Broughton street cars
25 minutes before departure of suburban trains.
R. E. COBH, Superintendent.
IDLE OF HOPE AND MONTGOMERY.
The WEDNESDAY and SATURDAY SCHED
ULE will be observed TO-DAY (Thursday)
29th, on the outside line.
JAMES H. JOHNSTON. President.
TURKEYS ! TURKEYS !! TURKEYS! !!
VENISON: VENISON!! VENISON!”
AT JOYCE S! AT JOYCE’S” AT JOYCE'S”!
Abercorn and Liberty.
TELEPHONE 1 o*7 .
NOTICE.
Office Ocean Steamship Company, I
Savannah, Nov. 28th, ISBB. f
The regular schedule of the ships’ sailings
having been disarranged by the recent severe
gales, there will be no sailing from Savannah
for New York on FRIDAY', Nov. 30th and SUN
DAY, Dec. 2d. The first sailing hence for New
York will be the City of Augusta on TUESDAY ,
Dec. 4th. 6:30 p. m.'
C. G. ANDERSON, Agent.
NOTICE TO SHIPPERS.
Quarantine restrictions against Florida hav
ing been abolished, our boats will resume their
trips to Fernandina (connecting with all points
in Florida), commencing with Steamer “DAVID
CLARK,” leaving Savannah FRIDAY", Nov. 30,
at 5 p. m, C. WILLIAMS, Agent,
NOTICE.
Board of Sanitary Commissioners, i
Savannah, Ga., Nov. 27, 1888. (
YVhereas. This boaid has official information
of heavy frosts generally, extending to and in
eluding the several points in Florida which have
been infected with yellow fever; therefore be it
Resolved. That all quarantine restrictions
heretofore adopted by this board be and they
are hereby removed.
It is so ordered. JOHN SCIIYVARZ,
—‘ — Mayor pro tem.
j seal L Attest:
I l F rank E. Rebarer.
—r-~ Clerk of Council.
NOTICE.
Savannah, Florida and Western R'y Cos., /
Office of Savannah Freight Aoent, -
Savannah, Ga., Nov. 2S, 1888. I
On THURSDAY, Nov. 29, the warehouses of
this Railway Company in Savannah will be
closed against the reception and delivery of
freights. Perishable freights will be delivered
up to 9 a. m. W. 8. KING,
Savannah Freight Agent.
MISS OLI.I K THOMPSON
Will open her Academy for Dancing st Armory
Hall on TUESDAY AFTERNOON Dec. 4, for
Masters and misses at 3 o'clock. Instruction
days TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS, SATUR
DAY'S. Terms reasonable. For particulars
apply at 209 New Houston street or at hall.
TO SHIPPERS OF ORANGES FROM
FLORIDA.
Savannah, Florida and Western Ry. i
Freight Department, v
Savannah, Nov. 27, 1888.)
Beginning with this- date this Company will
inaugurate the quickest Freight Schedule to the
West and Northwest via Albany and Mont-
f ornery, for the movement of Oranges from
lorida that lias ever been offered shippers.
The time is as follows.
From Jacksonville to Chicago 75 hours.
From Callahan to Chicago 73 hours.
From Gainesville to Chicago 77 hours.
This schedule is in operation six days in the
week. WM. F. HARDEE, Gen. Freight Agt.
C. D. OWENS. Traffic Manager.
FRESH KILLED TURKEYS.
CHOICE TURKEYS, FRESH KILLED,
-AT-
PUTZELS.
1,000 TI'HKEVS
TO ARRIVE FOR THANKSGIVING. SEND
IN YOUR ORDERS.
L. PUTZEI..
HITLER K INLAND TO LET.
On Moderate Trrins for Three or Fle Year*.
This well-known and valuable plantation, situ
ated on the Altamaha river, opposite Darion,
consisting of 1,000 acres of prime rice land under
bank, two large barns witb threshing mill and
two comfortable dwelling bouses in good order.
Apply for terms, etc., to
CHARLES S. WYLLY, Estj.,
Darien. Oa.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
On and after DECEMBER Ist I shall discon
tinue keeping open all night. Store will be
open from 8 a. m to 10:.'i0 p. m.
WILLIAM F. HENDV, Druggist,
Cor, West Broad and Bryan Streets.
PAINT*, OIL*, V AKNISHEei.
Brushes, and a full line of Painters’ Material,
such as leads, Colors, fitalns. Dryers, and
Whiting, Paris White, Princess Metallic, and
all sizes of Glaas on hand and cut to order.
Call and get my prices and oblige,
Yours respectfully,
EDWARD J, KIEFFER.
TEN ACRES ENOUGH.
For Truck Farm or Hairy.
1 havp for rent about ten acres of ground,
suitable for Truck or Dairy. Accessible from
both the Belt Line and West Broad cars.
C. H. DORSETT.
RENTING OF STALL*.
Citv or Savannah, I
Orrira City Makshal, Nov. 14th, 1888. f
The Stalls in the City Market Building will he
rented on WEDNESDAY, December sth, 1888.
between the hours of 9 a. m and Ha. m. Par
ties desiring to retain their Stalls will please be
on hand prepared to pay between the above
named hours. ROBERT J. WaDE,
City Marshal.
NOTICE.
City Marshal s Orric*, I
Savannah. Oa., Oct. 11. msß. |
for Privy Vault cleaning have
Fj been placed In my hands by the C’ity Treas
urer All persons in arrears will pleaae call at
my office and settle without delay.
ROBT. J. WADEA
City Marshal.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
FOR ORDINARY:
To mg Friends and Fellow Citizen's of c\ at
ham County:
I respectfully announce myself as a candidate
for re-election to the office of ORDINARY of
Chatham County at the election to be held ~
the 2nd day of JANUARY next, and kindiy
solicit your votes And influence.
HAMPTON L. FERRILI.
DON’T BE DECEIVED.
Ask for ULMER’S LIVER CORRECTOR *
safe and reliable medicine, and take no other
I have introduced Dr. B. F. ULMER’S LIVER
CORRECTOR in my practice, and find that ,r
gives general satisfaction. The best evidence
of the estimation in which it is held is the fa t
that persons trying it once invariably return
for another bottle, recommending it at th
same time to their friends.
G. A. PENNY, M. D., Cedar Key, Fla.
I have found ULMER’S LIVER CORRECTOR
to act like a charm in torpid liver, etc.
D. O. Cj. HEERY, M. D., Atlanta, Ga
FOR ORDINARY.
I respectfully announce to my friends and tha
voters of Chatham county that I will be a can
didate for ORDINARY at the election to be held
on JANUARY 2d, and will be grateful for your
votes and support. P. J O’CONNOR.
WEDDINGS.
Wedding invitations and cards printed or en.
graved at the shortest notice and in the latest
styles. We carry an extensive and well selected
stock of fine papers, envelopes and cards es
pecially for such orders. Samples sent on ap.
plication. Morning News Printing House
Savannah, Ga.
AMUSEMENTS.
FAMILY BASKET EXCIRSIOS
ON
Thanksgiving Day!
AT
TYBEE ISLAND!
Trotting Races!
Running Races!
Turkey Shooting!
Bicycle Race!
Oyster Roast!
SCHEDULE— Standard Time—Two (2) trains,
leaving depot at 10 a. m. and 2:30 p. si
Fifty cents (50c ) round trip.
Don’t stay in town, but go to Tybee and en
joy the holiday. All amusements can be wit
nessed from Lewis Pavilion.
CHAS. F. GRAHAM.
BILL NYE, JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY
and H. a EDWARDS
—AT THE—
MASONIC HALL.
Thursday Evening, Nov. 29th,
AT 8 O’CLOCK.
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE
Young Men s Christian Association.
Ticket* for sale at Ludden <i Bates S. M. H
and Y. M. C. A. Rooms. Prices: -Reserved Seam
SI; General Admission, 75c.; Children, 50c.
Augusta National
EXPOSITION,
AUGUSTA, - GA.
THE LARGEST AND MOST EXTENSIVE EX
POSITION EVER HELD IN THE SOUTH.
RAILROAD RATES 1 CENT A MILE.
Opens Nov. 8, Closes Dec. 16,
IMIE Products of the South shown to th
World. largest Building in the South
Nine hundred and sixty feet long:, 200.010 squar
feet Best aocommodat ions for exhibitors an l
visitors. Regulation mile track, finest in th*
South. Three acres covered by machinery in
motion. Greatest attractions ever seen in the
South. Exhibits from all pans of the World.
$70,000 IN PRIZES AND PREMIUMB,
SIO,OOO TO RACE PURSES.
|l,0O) IN POULTRY AND PET STOCK'
Women’s Work and Works of Art admitted
free, and in charge of Woman s Exchaage.
Grand Military Parade.
SHAM BATTLE AND ENCAMPMENT COM
MENCING Nov. 12.
Military parade on Nov. 12, headed by tb*
Gallant Hampton. Reviewed by the Hiiwic
Gordon.
Sham Battle and encampment in Comman 1
of GEN. M. A. STOVALL.
Cappa s Seventh Regiment Rand of New York
in attendance.
SEED OATS.
Georgia Rust Proof Oats,
TEXAS RUST PROOF OATB,
KANSAS RUST PROOF OATS
KEYSTONE MIXED FEED.
OCR OWN MIXED FEED FOR COW\
COTTON SEED MEAL.
Corn, Oats, Hay, Etc.
T. J. DAVIS & CO.,
17a Bav Street. _
FERTILIZERS.
JOHN L HAMMOND. JOSEPH HULL
HAMMOND. HULL * CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
FERTILIZERS,
DEALERS IN
FERTILIZER MATERIAL,
AND
SOLE AGENTS FOR TBE SALE OF KAINIT
(German Potash Salt)
AT AND PROM THE POLLOWINO PORTS
SAVANNAH, GA., PORT ROYAL S. C-.
BRUNSWICK, GA.. JACKSONVILLE. FU ”
PENSACOLA, FLA.. MOBILE. ALA
118 BAY ST., SAVANNAH, GA

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