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The morning news. [volume] (Savannah, Ga.) 1887-1900, December 02, 1888, Image 7

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m . V COMMERCIAL.
market.
MM OfllCF, OF THE MORNING NEWS, i
sBB Savannah, Ga., Dec. 1, 4 p.m. f
market was very dull an i un
: T Jrnere was only a moderate inquiry,
fu M offering stock. The total sales for
iwere 1,198 bales. On 'Change at the
at Ida. m. the market was reported
AP ,j with sales of 155 bales At
call at 1 p. m, it. was dull, the sales
oil whales. At the third and last call at
it (’llosed dull and unchanged, with fur
■ sa >s <c>f 432 bales. The following are the
■ o „>s. ng spot quotations of the Cotton Lx
K
Ht-iltnfft Jir 10
Mend mill aunt?
Kyvi ordi nary 8
'<M
rn linnets- -The market was strong, but not
higher. There was a very active do
ind about TOO bags were sold ou the basis
cotton 13 ®lB
lin , ,n * ieorgias and Floridas IS ®l9
fine 23 ®—
ice 28V4^ —
Comparative Cotton Statement,
Receipts, Exports and Stock on Hand Dec. 1, 1688, and
for the Same Tin* Last Year.
j! 1888-83. j| 1887-88.
MS*. Wnd
Stock on hand Sept. 1 o<* 7,105 : 675 6,818'
Received to-day 1,343 4,242ij 1,202 3,051
Received previously 11,403 431,70911 10,677 686,302
Total 13,608 I'.-3,177' 15*. 151 M 5.831
Exported to-day 184 1,263 6,014!
Exported previously 7,052 377.596 6,922 467,883
Total 7.i;r. W-X* D.ftaj 473,037
B Rice The market continues dull and un-
Bhangol. The sales during the day were 65
Barrels. At the Board of Trade the market was
■■ported quiet and unchanged.
B Tbe receipts thus far this seaso of rough rice
Bare 367.343 bushels. The shipments of cloan
Bere 5.819 barrels, distributed as follows: To
Baltimore, 1*693 barrels; to Boston, 591 barrels;
BdNew York, Go 9 barrels; to Philadelphia, 1,30s
Barrels: to the interior, 1,688 barrels. The stock
Bn hand of rough is 215,814 bushels, and of clean
Bus barrels.
■ The following are the official closing spot
■notations. SnmH job lots are hold at
Higher:
■ Fair ~
I Good 4^i(9is
■ rrirne —• ••%•■••• *>9B®**4
B Fancy .......6 ®G^£
Bough—
B Country lots $ .5(21 90
B Tidewater 1 00®1 25
I Naval Stores—The market, for spirits turpen
Bine was Arm and advancing. The sales for the
■ay were 150 casks at 43H*c for regulars. At
■he Board of Trade on the opening call the
Biarket was reported firm at 48c for regulars,
■t the second call it closed firm at 43>*c for
Begulars. Rosin—The market was dull and un
changed. The sales for the dav were only
B£l barrels. At the Board of Trade on the first
Bali the market was reported quiet at the fol
■owing nuotations: A, B, C and D 85c, E 87Uc.
|F 90c, G 95c, H $1 06, I $1 15, K $1 25. M $1 65,
IN $2 10, window glass f2 70. water white $3 !0.
■At the dosing call it was unchanged.
- NAVAL STORKS STATEMENT.
Spirit*. Rosin.
Ftock on hand April 1 3.670 66,654
Received to-day 683 872
Received previously 136,468 356,977
Total ..140,821 423^503
Exported to-day 2,071 159
Exported previously 122,928 349,247
Total ... 124.994 349 .<1 f
S’ock on hand and on shipboard
today 15,627 74.087
Receipts same day last year 228 2,343
MARKETS BY TELEGRAPH.
• FINANCIAL.
New York, Dec 1, noon—Stocks active but
weak. Money easy at H®2 per cent. Ex
chance -long. $4 short, $4 B*Hi. Govern
ment bonds dull butt Um. State bonds dull but
steady.
Erie 2566 Richm'd AW. Pt.
Chicago & North. Terminal 243^
lake Shore I(X>\s Western Union... 83>t
Norf. & W. pref.. 4S
5 iH) p. m.—Exchange dull but steady. Money
easy at 4®2 per cent. Sub-Treasury balances
Gold, sls ,'► ■ ,000; currency, $1 £ ,000. Gov
ernment bonds dull hut steady; four percents
12 . four and a half per cent, coupons 108.
brate bonds uil but firm.
lac stock market was active, feverish, and
’ pak to-day throughout the entire session, an l
ttm result of the two hours business is to leave
the entire list materially lower than last even
i”/ The temper of the room was conserva
tively bearish, but London was doing nothing,
while commission people were not factors at
any time in the course of prices. Bears under
Such (ircnmsUncw became more aggressive as
tL- day wore along, and the market became
more active and the weakness more pronounced.
The pressure was specially severe against
Southwestern stocks, grangers, and a few
ethers, such as Louisville and Nashville and
<-oiton Oil, the latter being a marked feature
of the market Vanderbilts and Lake Shore in
particular were the strong features of the day,
although they were fractionally lower at the
close. Everything on the active list is lower,
and Manhattan and Atchison, Topeka and
Santa Fe lost 2 per cent, each, Northwestern
Omaha preferred and Missouri Pacific IV4
each, Louisville and Nashville and New England
Pleach, ( anada Southern and Richmond and
Mest Point preferred 1 each, and others frac
tion;:! amounts. Sales aggregated 155,000 shares.
The following were the closing quotations:
AiariassA, 2t05.104V4 clfle, first mort *9o^
Aia. class B, 6s 108 N. Y. Central 108
Georgia 7s. raort. 106 Norf. AW. pref. .48
K Carolina cons 65120V4 Nor. Pacific 214
N. Carolina cons 4s 91 “ pref... 584
Po. Caro. (Brown Pacific Mail. 374
conaols 105 U Reading 464
Tennessee set.3s 71U Richmond £ Ale 13
Virginia6r 48 Richm'd AW. Pt.
Va. 6s consoli'ted. 32 Terminal 24-"4
Northwestern. 1054 Rock Island 101
preferred 1384 St. Paul. . 624
bela. and Lack 1364 “ preferred.. 102
Erie 254 Texas Pacific 214
Last Tennessee 9 TennJ’oal<V Iron 344
, 1 • bore 1004 Union Pacific.. Im
I. ville&Nash 634 N.J.Central • 69
Memphis A Char.. 53 Missouri Pacific... 754
Mobile A 0hi0... 9 Western Union R 34
Nash. A Chatt’a 6j4 Cotton Oil certifl. 614
New Orleans Pa
" \nd interest.
Th weekly statement of the associated hanks
1 by the clearing house to-day, shows the
following changes:
Reserve in creased $2,235,325
Loans increased 590.200
SpeciM decreased 4.872.900
:! tenders increased 1,643,200
Deposits decreased . 3,977,600
Circulation decreased 6,700
banks now hold $9,906,150 in excess of the 25
Percent, rule.
COTTON.
. Liverpool, Dec. 1. noon.—Cotton quiet, with
limited inquiry; American middling 5 7-16d;
7,000 bales, of which 509 bales were for
speculation and export; receipts 11,000 bales--
American 7.400.
Futures American middling, low middling
clause, December delivery 5 24-64d: December
and January 5 22-64d; January and February
o 2.3-tVtd, also 6 22-64d; February and March
2.3'dd; March and April 5 23-64d; April and
May 6 2T-64d; Mav and June 5 27-64d; July and
August 5 39-6-ld, also 531 64d. Market steady at
the advance.
UCO p. m.—Bales of the day 5,900 bales of
American.
American middling 5 7 16d.
Futures- American middling, low middling
' ause,December delivery 5 24-9ld, sellers; De
cember and January 5 22>Md, buvers: January
Ap 1 February 5 2.-64d, buyers; February and
•'larchs :3-64d.sellers; March and April 6 26-<>4d.
April and May 5 25-64d, buyers; May
June 5 27-64d. value; June and July
29-64d. Fellers; July and August 5 30-64d, buy
Futures closed steady.
Nnw Your Dec. 1, noon.—Cotton steady;
1% bales; middling uplands 940; mid
rtling Orleans 10c.
Futures— Market opened steady and closed
•wady.with sales as follows: December delivery
°P® r f e d at 9 49c, c)j'd at 9 58c; January opened
J 64c, closed at 9 67c; February opened at
9 77c. closed at 9 Bt>c; March o|ened at 9 88c.
closed 9 9 c: April opened at 9 9f>c. closed at
10 01c; May opened at 10 06c, closed 10 10c.
5:00 p. m.— Cotton closed steady; middling
uplands 94c; middling Orleans 10c; sales to
day 122 bales, last evening 73; net receipts 790
bales, gross 1.101.
Futures—Market closed steadv. with sales of
42,000 bales, as follows: December delivery
9 53®9 7>4c, January 9 67®9 68c. February 9 80®
9 81c, March 9 91®9 92 \ April 10 01®10 02c,
May 10 10®10 11c, June 10 19®10 2- c. July 10 25
®lO 28c, August 10 3u®lo 31c; September 9 90®
Hubbard. Price A Co.'s cotton circular says:
‘Dispatches from New' Orleans indicated t bat
the receipts there wmuld probablv amount to
only 6,000 bales, as against 16,000 this day last
year. Upon this, considerably more firmness
was displayed, and an advance of from 4®6
points was established. The bears of the past
few days were not, however, conspicuous
buyers."
Galveston, Dec. I.—Cotton steady; middling
9 9-lCc; net receipts 3,680 bales, gross 3,680;
Bales 1,222 bales; stock 56,244 bales; exports,
to Great Britain 4,765 bales, to the continent
1,943.
Norfolk, Dec. I.—Cotton steady; middling
94c; net receipts 4.027 bales, gross 4,027; sales
1.501 bales; 5t0ck33,502 bales; exports, to Great
Britain 2,378 bales, coastwise 1,475.
Baltimore, Dec. 1.--Cotton nominal; mid
dllng 94®9%c; net receipts bales, gross
913; sales 5 0 bales, all spinners; stock 21,628
bales; exports, coastwise 100 bales.
Boston, Dec. I.—Cotton quiet: middling 10®
104 c; net receipts 34 bales, gross 2,936; sales
none; stock none; exports, to Great Britain 99
bales.
Wilmington, Dec. I.—Cotton firm; mid-
net receipts 1,183 bales, gross 1,183;
sales none; stock 25,179 iiales.
Philadelphia, Dec. I.—Cotton quiet; mid
dling 10 3-itk*: net receipts 128 bales, gross 606:
s toe it (actual) 13,1U0 bales; exports, to Great
Britain 1.053 bales, to the continent 1,619.
New Orleans, Dec. I.—Cotton steady; mid
dling 9 7-16 c; net receipts 6,031 bales, gross 6,488;
sales 4.250 bales; stock 232,399 bales; exports,
to Great Britain 3,571 bales, to France 9,535,
coastwise 2.657.
Mobile, Dec. I.—Cotton steady; middling
9 7-lCc; net receipts 2.130 bales, gross 2, 1 30; sales
1.000 bales; stock 25,407 bales; exports,coastwise
279 bai
Memphis, Dec. I.—Cotton quiet; middling
9 7-ltte; receipts 4,800 bales; shipments 6,700
bales; sales bales: stock 105,883 bales.
Augusta, Dec. I.—Cotton quiet but steady ;
mid Bing 94c; receipts 1,630 bales; shipments
1,417 bales; sales none; stock 2.',313 bales.
Charleston, Dec. I.—Cotton firm: holding
higher; middling V%c; net receipts 829 bales,
gross 329; sales 80-• bales; stock 65,615 bales;
exports, to the continent 4,(XX) hales.
Atlanta, Dec. I.—Cotton firm; middling
OWc: receipts, 653 bales.
New York, Dec. I.—Consolidated net re
ceipts for all cotton ports to-day 28,983 bales;
exports, to Great Britain 11,861 bales, to the
continent 7,562, to France 9,535; stock at all
American ports 764,969 bales.
The total visible supply of cotton for the
world is 2,294,751 bales, or which 2,039,751 hales
are American, against 2,832,458 and 2,376,258
bales, respectively, last year. Receipts at all
interior towns for the week 155,295 bales. Re
ceipts from plantations 282,750 bales. Crop in
sight 3,161,654 bales.
provisions, groceries, etc.
Literpool, Dec. 1, noon—Wheat quiet; de
mand poor; holders offer moderately. Corn firm;
demand good: new mixed western 4s B^d.
New York, Dec. 1, noon.—Flour slow but
s.eady. Wheat active and easy. Corn dull and
lower. Pork quiet; mess sls 50® 15 75. Lard
quiet but weak at $8 60. Freights steady.
5:00 p. m.—Flour. Southern steady and quiet.
Wheat dull and unsettled; No. 2 red $1 05V4®
1 in elevator; No. 2 red, December delivery
$1 03£r®1 05$r, closing at $1 054 '. January de
livery $1
(dosing at $1 12*4. Corn firm and ?4®lc higher;
No. 2, 474®479ic in elevator; options
higher atui firm; December delivery 47*£®48)4-,
closing at 4S}£c; January delivery
May delivery 47?£c. Oats 4®H , ‘ higtn-r; op
tions U®4c higher; January delivery 32 9-16®
closing at 3294 c; May delivery 354'c: No.
2 spot 31)4®3194c. Hops dull and easy; state
19®24c. Coffee —options closed steady and 30
®45 points above yesterday; December delivery
15 35®15 45c, January delivery 15 50®15 55c;
spot Rio higher, fair cargoes 17c. Sugar firm
and quiet; refined quiet out steady. Molasses
steady. Petroleum steady and quiet; crude, in
bblg, $6 55®7 15: refined, here, $7 20. Cotton
seed oil firm. Hi *es steady. Wool stronger;
domestic fleece 30®38c, pulled 20®39c, Texas
14®26c. Pork lower; m©6s sls 25®15 50. Beef
quiet. Beef hams 13c. Tierced beef dull: ci*y
extra India mess 18®22c. Cut meats weak:
pickled hams 10®104c, pickled shoulders 84c.
pickled bellies 84®84c. Middles quiet; short
clear SB. Lard dull; western steam $8 60; city
$7 90; refined $8 80 to the continent. Freights
steady.
Chicago, Dec. I.—Wheat ruled weak and
somewhat nervous. The (Opening was about the
same as yesterday's closing, but under fair
offerings during most of the session declined,
with some fluctuations. l%c. and closed about
ISRC low er than yesterday. Corn ruled steady
and quiet, closing 4c lower than on yesterday.
Oats wero easier and quiet. Pork was irregular
opened 6®7V£c higher, but declined 39®35c
anil closed tame. Lard was woak and unsettled,
closing 20®25c lower. Short ribs were irregu
lar. closing 15®20c lower.
Cash quotations were as follows: Flour
quiet and unchanged. Wheat No. 2 spring
$1
No. 1,35i4c. Mess pork at sl3 374®13 50.
per 100 lbs.. s*. Short rib sides, loose
$7 uo®< 10. Dry salted shoulders, boxed *7 12U,.
Short clear sides, boxed, $7 50®7 6?4. Whisky
at $1 20.
Leading futures ranged as follows:
Opening. Highest. Closing.
No. 2 Wheat—
Dec. delivery.... $ 1 044 $t 044 V 02tf
Jan. delivery..., 1 06 1 06 104
May delivery 1194 1 lljfi 1 094
Corn, No. 2
Dec. delivery... 35-4 354 35J4
Jan. delivery. .. 3544 354 25fa
May delivery .. 384 384 3^4
Oats, No. 2
Dec. delivery.... 264
Mav delivery. .. 304 304 304
Jan. delivery.. sl3 774 sl3 774 sl3 35
May delivery.... 14 124 24 124 13 80
Lard, Per 100 lbs—
Dec delivery. . $3 10 $8 124 $8 00
Jan. delivery ... 795 7 974
May delivery... . 8 074 810 7 874
Short Ribs, Per lOOlbs—
•Tan. delivery. .. $7 10 $7 10 $6 90
May delivery.... 7 274 7 274 710
Baltimore, Dec. I.—Flour quiet with a little
better undertone; Howard street and Western
superfine s3l>o®3 65; extra $3 75®4 65; family
$4 80®5 60; city mills. Rio brands, extra $5 75
®6 00. Wheat - Southern barely steady; Fultz
$1 07® 1 10; Longberry $1 09® 1 10; No 2South
ern $1 05; Western quiet; No. 2 red winter, on
spot and December delivery 994ft 1 99%c; Janu
ary delivery $1 02®1 024 c. New com—South
ern firm; wnite 45®52c; yellow 38®43c; Western
firm.
Cincinnati, Dec. 1— Flour in light demand.
Wheat dull; No. 2 red $1 04®1 05. Corn easier;
No. 2 mixed 44c. Oats steady; No. 2 mixed 29
®294c. Provisions Pork dull and nominal;
mess sl4 50. dull and lower at $3. Bulk
meats dull and unchanged; short ribs at $7 50.
llacon dull and unchanged: short clear $9 25.
Whiskv steadv at $1 14. Hogs lower: common
and light $4 60®5 25, packing and butchers $5 10
®5 30.
St. Louis, Dec. I.—Flour quiet and nominally
unchanged. Wheat lower; the market was
unsettled most of the session, first declining -V*
and 1 hen reading %c, but afterwards settled
down, as all tbe other markets were declining
and advices bearish, finally closiug 1c below'
yesterday; No. 2 red. cash $1 004. nominal: De
cember delivery $1 01®1 014. closing at $1 01
bid; May delivery $1 084®1 080*. closing $1 034
asked. Corn about steady: No. 2. cash 344 c;
December delivery 324®8*4c; May delivery
•2>4<\ closing 354 c bid. Oats quiet but firmer;
No 2 cash 25c, May delivery :k)o. Whisky steady
at $1 14. Provisions demoralized. Pork sl4 50.
lard nominally at $7 80®7 90 for prime steam.
Dry salt meats -boxed shoulders $6 75, longs
and ribs $7 25; short clear $7 50. Bacon boxed
shoulders $7 .374; longs and clear ribs $8 374 ;
short clears $* 624 Hams $lO 50®13 00.
Loitsvillk. Dec. l.—Grain closed unchanged:
Wheat—No. 2 red, $1 02. Corn—No. 2
mixed 444 c. Oats-No. 2 mixed, 274 c. Provis
ions unchanged. Bacon—clear ribs $8 75, clear
Hides $9 50(2,9 75. Bulk meats -clear sides $8 50.
bugar cured meats—Hams, sll 50® 12 50.
New Orleans. Dec. I.—Sugars strong and
higher; Louisiana o|M*n kettle, choice 5 116®
5Uc; centrifugal grades, plantation granulated
7c. choice white 6 7-16®64c, choice yellow clari
fied 64®6 3-16 c.
NAVAL STORES.
London, Dec. 1.-Turpentine 355.
Liverpool, Dec. L noon.—Spirits turpentine
355.
New Yore, Do.*. 1, noon -Spirits turpentine
dull at 4>4c. Rosin active at $1 0-’4®l 0 4.
5:00 p. in.—Rosin unchanged for common to
good strained. Turpentine quiet.
Charleston, Dec. I.—Turpentine at 4-4 41
Rosin unchanged.
Wilmington. N C . Dec. I.— Spirits turpentine
firm at 43c. Rosin steady; strained 80c, good
■trained H*Uc. Tar firm at, $1 50. Crude turpen
tine firm; Hard $1 35; yellow dip and virgin
$2 25.
PETROLEUM.
New York, D*r. I.—The petroleum market
opened firm at 864 c. Fluctuations after the
opening were very narrow, the extreme range
of prices being only The market closed
dull at 864 c.
RICE.
New Yore, Dec. 1.-Rioe firm and wanted;
domestic 4
SUIPPING IXTKLLIGEN’CE.
MINTATUR DAY.
Sun Rises 7:01
Sun Sets 4:59
High Water at Savannah 7:08 a m. 7:19 p m
Sun dat, Dec 2, 1883.
ARRIVED YESTERDAY.
Steamship City of Augusta. Catharine. New
York—C G Anderson.
Steamship Nedjed (Br), Pole, Liverpool, in
ballast—Richardson & Barnard.
Bark Victoria (Br'. Davis, Liverpool, with salt
to CM Gilbert A Cos; vessel to M S Cosulieh &.
Cos. (See local.)
Scbr Mary F Godfrey, Godfrey, Barren Island,
with guano toCRR; vessel to Jos A Roberts &
Cos. (See local.)
Steamer Ethel, Carroll, Cohen's Bluff and way
landings—W T Gibson. Manager.
ARRIVED UP FROM TYBEE YESTERDAY.
Steamship Dracona (Br). Tait, to load for
Barcelona—Richardson & Barnard.
Steamship Southwold (Br), Press, to load for
Reval—Richardson £ Barnard.
ARRIVED UP FROM QUARANTINE YESTER
DAY.
Steamship Gladiolus (Br), Wright, to load for
Antwerp—A Minis & Sons.
Steamship Napier (Br). Harvey, to load for
Genoa—M S Cosulieh & Cos.
CLEARED YESTERDAY.
Steamship Dessoug, Askins, Philadelphia—C
GAnderson.
Bark Mississippi (Nor), Jacobsen, Hull—A R
Salas &. Cos.
Bark Santa Anna et Maria (Ital), Farace,
Genoa- A R Salas A Cos.
Bark Soli deo Gloria (Ger>, Abendrotb, I/on
don American Trading Society.
Scbr Ida C Schoolcraft, Booye, Providence—
Jos A Roberts &. Cos.
Schr Roger Drury, Delay, New Haven—Stan
ley & Salas.
SAILED YESTERDAY.
Steamship Dessoug. Philadelphia.
Bark Devon (Br), .
Schr Roger Drury, New Haven.
MEMORANDA.
Buenos Ayres, Oct 31 Arrived, bark Axel
(Non, Nielsen, Brunswick.
Oct 30—Sailed, barks Alice, Swain. Monte
video; Chas Cox (Br), Neilson, Pensacola: Forza
(Alls), Percich, Brunswick; Gna(Kor), Andersen,
Pensacola: Harald(Sw). Johannsen, Brunswick:
Nimrod (Aus), Scopinich, Savannah; Sabino
(Nor), Borgensen, Pensacola; Nov 2, Akyab
(Ital), Schiaffino. do.
Dunnet Head, Nov 29—Passed, steamship
Robinia (Bn, Smith, Savannah for Reval.
Santos, Oct 24--Sailed, barks Angioliua (Ital),
Vassal*, Pensacola: Armenia (Ital), Fidele, do;
G M Sian wood, ('lark, Pernambuco; Nov 5,
Georg Suppicich (Ger), Doge, Brunswick; <th,
Tjomo (Nor), Terjeln, Tybee.
Blueflelds, Nov 19 In port , steamer Kong Alf
(Nor), Dahl, from Philadelphia, to load for
Savannah.
Bull River, S C, Nov 29—Arrived, steamer Blue
Jacket (Br), from St Andrews.
Sailed, bark Croydon (Br), Newport. E.
Charleston, Nov 29—Arrived, schr Harriet C
Kerlin, Marts, Savannah.
Sailed, schr Belle O'Neill, Femandina.
Georgetown. S C, Nov 29—Arrived, schr D W
McLean, McLean, New York.
Sailed. U S tug Easton. Wilmington; schr
Marion Hill, Armstrong, Demerara.
Newport News, Nov 29—Sailed, steamship
Inchrhona (Br), McDonald, Savannah for Liver
pool.
Port Royal, 8 C, Nov 29 Arrived, brig Marena,
Moore. New York.
Philadelphia, Nov 29—Cleared, schr A & E
Hooper, Willetts, Savannah.
Richmond. Va. Nov 28—Sailed, schr Prescott
Hazeltine, Lambert's Point, to load forCoosaw,
S C.
Fernandina. Dec I—Arrived, schrs Dora
Matthews, Brown, New York; Chas Morford,
Herbert, Havana.
Cleared, schr J B Atkinson, Donohoe, Balti
more.
New York, Dec I—Arrived, steamships Ger
manic and City of Berlin, Liverpool; State of
Nevada, Glasgow; Aller, Bremen.
SPOKEN.
Nov 21, lat 28 52, lon 74 36, bark Nadia (Nor),
from Pensacola for Ensenada.
MARITIME MISCELLANY.
New York, Nov 29—Steamer Alene (Br),
Seiders. at this port from Kingston, Ja. reports
tbe following: Nov 27, lat 33 45, lon 73 45, passed
a brigantine rigged steamer; had bowsprit and
cutwater, funnel and boats painted black, hull
black; apparently about 1.000 tons burden;
fires were apparently out and ]>ort anchor was
being used as a drag; could not make out her
name; she appeared to be very deep A short
distance away from her steamer Napier (Br),
from New York for Savannah, was hove to, evi
dently standing by the distressed steamer;
weather at the time clear but blowing a whole
gale from the SW. accompanied with a high
sea; 25th to 27th experienced a succession of
strong gales between SW and NW, with a high
sea; 25th, lat 27 32, lon 74 09. passed steamer
Stamford (Nor), from Blueflelds for New York.
Wilmington, N C, Nov 28—Steamer Parklands
(Br will be taken up on tbe marine railway at
Skinner’s shipyard to-day for repairs to nia
chinery. The new shaft to replace the broken
one has not arrived.
RECFJPTS.
Per Charleston and Savannah Railway, Dec 1
—32 bales cotton, 140 sashes (glazed), 2 tanks oil,
100 sacks rice. 1 bale hides. 4 cars wood, 32 pairs
wheels on axles. 00 sacks peanuts. 50 bxs candy,
2 cases candy. 33 pkgs tobacco, 15 crates sewing
machines, 25 iron bucklers and ptubs, 120 bdLs
wood work, 5 bdls plow irons.
Per Central Railroad, Dec 1—4.061 bales cot
ton. 68 bales yarn. 5 bales domestics. 110 kegs
powder, 25 bales hides, 4 rolls leather. 84 pkgs
paper, 20 pkgs tobacco, 86 pkgs fresh meat. 309
bbls rosin, 24,800 lbs bacon, 22 pkgs furniture, 21
bbls spirits turpentine, 140 tons pig iron, 9 half
bbls whisky, 6 bbls whisky. 110 half bbJs beer. 3
pkgs machinery, 50) bushels corn, 24 head
mules, 84 casks clay. 89 pkgs mdse. 40 pkgs bug
gios, etc, 4 cars cotton seed, 100 bbls cotton seed
oil, 7 cars stone, 100 boxes soap, 50 cases eggs,
300 bbls grits.
Per Savannah. Florida and Western Railway,
Dec 1—1,4.5 bales cotton. 613 bbls rosin. 44 4
bbls spirits turpentine, 8,520 boxes oranges, 47
boxes lemons, 12.465 lbs fresh beef, 1 coop
chickens. 28 pkgs hardware. 39 bales hides, 4
cases cigars. 1 bale wool, 44 bbl syrup. 100 cross
arms, 40 sacks rice. 151 pkgs furniture. 3 sacks
moss, 1 car shingles, 2 care coal, 1 car wood. 31
cart lumber. 8 care rails, 4 passenger coaches, 1
oil tank, 4 bbls bottles. I car cotton seed, 20 sks
coffee. 12 pkgs tobacco, 3 organs, 6 casks beer, 5
bbls whisky, 8 bdls paper. 2 cases preserves. 57
bbls crude turpentine, 864 kegs, 10 bbls meal. 6
carts. 41 tons pig iron. 300 bbls flour, 578 bushels
corn, 290 bbls grits, and mdse.
EXPORTS.
Per steamship Dessoug, for Philadelphia
-294 ba’es cotton, I<s bales yarn, 1474 bales straw,
43 bbls rice, 72 bbls rosin, 114,624 feet lumber,
126 bnls spirits turpentine. 81 casks clay. 52 bbls
ureters and terrapins, 450 empties. 12 obis r oil,
5 bbls oranges, 1.519 crates oranges, 421 tons pig
Iron, 143 pkgs mdse
Per bark Mississippi (Nor), for Hull—7so bbls
spirits turpentine, measuring gallons;
3,448 bbls rosin, weighing 1,621,240 pounds—S I*
Shot ter & Cos.
Per bark SantA Anna et Maria (Ital). for
Genoa—2.664 bbls rosin, weighing 1,264.315
pounds; 1,200 white oak staves—S I* Shot ter &
Cos.
I’er bark Soli deo Gloria (Gor), for T/ondon -
2,621 bbls spirits turpent me, measuring 132.895
gallons—Jas Farm Jr.
Per schr Roger Drury, for New Haven— 312,392
feet p p lumber—Stanley A Salas.
NEW TEMPLE TO BUDDHA.
Headquarters Established at Last by
the Tbeosophical Eoclety in New
York City.
New York, Dec. I.- From timo to time,
since the founders of tbo Tbeosophi
cal Society sailed to India to heathen
ize the natives there, news of
their doings have interested (more or le s)
the curious in such mattors, and has been
published widely in the newspapers of Eu
rope and America.
It is not so well known, however, that
there is an active band of their followers iri
New York, who continue to hold meetings
and issue different papers and tracts de
signed to convince tbo skeptical of the
great truths of theosophy. 1 hev are not
rich, and the notorious project of building
a Buddhist temple in the ciyr has never
gone further than to form a dream in the
minds of the promoters. They have, how
ever, obtained means enough to fit up a
place, which serves for a temple, and the
place, singularly enough, is in an office
building in one of the very busiest streets
in Now York. They have hired a ball for
their regular meetings, Mott Memorial hall,
it is, and there, on certain specified Tues
day nights, strange people, suen as wander
ing Hindoos, Oriontal Hebrews, and unre
constructed Greeks bold forth on tbe rnan
nerK and queer religions of their races and
birth places. They (tbe Tbeosophists of
Now York) also publish a monthly ’maga
zine called the Path. Nobody understands
THE MORNING NEWS: SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1888.
it excepting themselves, but enough of them
have subscribed, I am told, to pay the
printer, and tbe editors and contributors
work for the good of the cause.
The most remarkable development, how
ever, is unquestionably tbe little toy tem
ple at 117 Nassau street. Here, if the stor
ies of the initiates are to be believed, cer
tain marvels are to be witnessed. Unhap
pily for the interests of the newspaper
readers these marvels are not performed to
order, and I was unable to persuade the
mild-eyed heathen priest who was in
charge, to do any miracles for me, though
he was willing enough to let me inspect tho
place and its fittings.
It is a little room. Fortunately, tbe
Theosophists, like Mr. Dick, care nothing
for the swinging of cats, and are not ob
liged to rent superfluous space. You get
into the rooms by the prosaic means of
going up the slowest elevator in town, enter
ing a business office, r,nd getting permis
sior there (if you can), to go through a side
door into the sanctuary. It is tergiversa
tion. but it pays.
After opening the door, the priest pulls a
curtain aside, and if you look closely you
will find tho curtains is a Persian fabric of
great beauty. Being lifted, it discloses a
curious scene. Opposite tbo doorway sits
Buddna. The god is small, and as ugly as
conventionality demands, and he hits cross
legged in a little niche, pondering tbe inex
plicable secrets of nature, as imperturbably
as be would if stationed in a Mahatma’s
cave. In front of him a pot of incense is
kept continually burning, and the smoke
arises in wavy w reaths that load the air
with a stifling perfume. On tho floor in
front of tho image lies a Ceylonese grass
mat, brought to New York by William Q
J udge.
Buddha, although apparently the presid
ing deity of the place, does not seem to have
full sway, fer on the wall at one end of
tbe room, the blazing seal of the society oc
cupies the place of honor. Over it is pic
tured in illuminated letters, the motto: “No
religion higher than truth.” Around the
other walls are displayed some twenty-five
shields, one for each of tho branches >f the
society that have been established all over
the United States. “All over” is not quite ac
curate, but there are branchsocieties in New
York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, lowa, Missouri
aud California. These brauchos have each
a distinctive name borrowed from the eas
tern religions, among them, Ishwara, Ved
anta, Isis, Dharrua and Nirwana. This last
is located in Nebraska, and may be sup
posed by the irreverent, to stand for tfie
principal desire or longing of the citizens
of that state.
A heavy Turkish rug covers the flor.r,
and plain, ordinary, everyday furniture
store chairs and a table stand around for
furniture, but on the table well as on the
walls are various objects of interest.
Anioug them are representations of the
1 heosopluc&l convent ion in India, and of
the s ciety buildings in Bombay. Another
s ene is the picture of an Egyptian initia
tion painted in magic colors, the pigm-nts
for which wero dug by Mme. Blavatskv’s
fair fingers out of an ancient stone wall in
Teheran. Those who doubt this statement,
are at liberty to go to Teheran and see the
wall, which is still there. Mr. Judge has
carried this picture nearly all over the
world, and it is accordingly prized highly
by tbe faithful. Underneath the picture is
a bracket on wbich are certain occult
things whose use the priest would not ex
plain. They are a square and a pyramid of
crystal, and a sphere of polished steel. If
they aro of any service beyond being orna
mental, the initiates only are allowed to
know it.
Half a dozen emblems of religions other
than Buddhaismi are displayed on the walls.
Among them is a drawing, said to be a re
presentation of an ancient Indian statue
of a virgin and a child guarded by Celes
tial shadowy beings. Tne priest also des
cribed a bronze, which is shortly to be
added to the queer collection, and which
is a copy of an obelisk standing in the rock
cut cities of India, deserted some 3,000 or
4,000 y ears ago. This obelisk, he says, also
bears tbe sculptured images of a virgin and
child. How tbe virginal charac.er of the.-e
undoubtedlv ancient representations is es
tablished, I could not learn. The priest
said it would be necessary forme to study
many volumes of unimpeachable history
before being convinced.
011 the table lies a huge album contain
ing photographs of famous theosophists, and
some not famous, from all over the world.
It also contains a pictuie of some Ma
hatma, which (tho picture) is said to wink
its eyes at long intervals. It did not wink
while I was looking, but I saw tho picture.
Copies in English and .‘Sanscrit of the
Bhagavad-Gita lie also on tbe table; the
latter eight times as large as tho former, to
say nothing of its being really harder to
understand. There is, moreover, a visitors’
book, in which I found alleged names in
what is said to be Hebrew aud Sanscrit,
They wero certainly not written in Italian
script or Roman letters, but looked very
much like a lot of parentheses aud excla
mation (joints. Other names were J. Rals
ton Skinner, of Cincinnati, O.; Prof. Piazzi
Smytbe, ?>arah Fisher Ames, H. B. Foulke,
of Philadelphia, and many equally known
to fame.
The most remarkable thing in the room
is a huge misshapen mass of rock crystal,
with what looks like a largo natural fau<-et.
This side is blazingly brilliant, or was when
I saw it. It is said to vary in brilliancy at,
times, and to be a veritable magic crystal
in wbich the spiritual sighted can see vis
ions. mostly relating to theosophical mat
ters. Tho officers consult it at cer
tain times of the mouth to learn the
condition of the branches of the
society, and they claim that when
the members of the inner circle only are
present, queer sights are seen, and invisible
hells are heard to ring.
The rooms are open to visitors daily,
though the Hindoo priest is not alv ass
there. He was very reserved when I quei
tioned him about himself, though he was
willing enough to talk fluently about tbe
temple and the aims of the society. His ap
pearance was sufficiently striking to attract
attention even in this cosmopolitan city if
he had been met anywhere else except in
this toy temple. He was rather taller than
the average Hindoo, and immeasurably
more emaciated than anyother human
being outside of a dime museum has a right
to be. Ho had the strongly marked feat
ures and full black beard that belong by
rigut to the religious recluse of the eas ,
nnd was garbed in a compromise between
his native costume and the clothing best
adapted to tho American climate. Over
what looked like a ready made suit from a
Broadway clothier’s establishment he wore
a long blue coat of no particular pattern—
just a coat, nnd on his head was perched
one of those mnrvelous triumnhs of human
ingenuity known as a Poona turban. This
is alleged to be wonderfully twisted up out
thirty-four or thirty-five yards of Lowy
cotton cloth, and the most expert native*
are said to take two hours to do tho twist
ing. When it is done it is a wrapper for
the head that defie* boat and cold alike,
and looks as if it would keep off a stroke of
lightning.
His name, however, is more remarkable
than his turban, being no lees tha t Ba la
ma Naarayana Pelt. It is noticeable that
a strange odor, like, and very unlike san
dalwood. floats in the air around him. Ho
speaks English perfectly, and uses it skill
fully to conceal his thoughts. It is said by
some of the theosophists that he is here on
some mission from the Mahatmas, and will
disappear when that is accomplished.
Meantime ho is frequently at the temple,
and when there he assumes charge of things.
Tbe number of bona fide Buddhists in
tho United States who are interested in the
now movi ment is considerable, though so
far as known William Q. Judge, tho Presi
of the New York Theosophists, is the only
American who has been admitted to tbe
Buddhist church by tho Rt. Rev H. Bum- !
angala, the high cockoioruin who rules that
institution, and who dwells on Adams Peak,
in Ceylon. David A. Curtis.
The Georgia Southern and Florida rail
rood bonds, which are ♦ |>er cent, and have
forty years to run, are selling below par,
because it is anew road, not generally
known to investors. Macon, Augusta and
Savannah brokers have a to w Georgia
Southern and Florida bonds fer sale.
CLOTHING.
WANTED, 30,000 PEOPLE
To examine their superior line of novelties in Clothing,
Hats and Gents’ hnrnishings.
have had, for our line of business, we feel proud to state our
success so far this season, so to speak, has been phenomenal.
We have sold already more goods this season than we sold
the entire season last year,
many goods; notwithstanding our buyer was compelled to go
North to the markets a few days ago for the second time
this season to purchase more goods.
*^?h^piestiouTaturany ,, anse37 ,,^iar^3TSl e^a!son? , "uny
are we selling so many goods?
We
™"^[Mieve?Tuisrepresen?any^irticle^^^^ ,,
one thing and do another.
We run our own Tailoring Department to render any
alteration necessary, free of charge.
Those facts the public and our friends iu general are dally finding out, * hich solves the problem.
APPEL & SCHATJL,
One Price Clothiers. 163 Congress Street, Opposite the Market.
NO TIME TO WRITE
OUR AD
THIS WEEK.
1311 st Ii k tar Card in If,
lor tajins, test ted, We're lift.
DBYFUS BROS.,
181, 18h and 183 Congress Street, Corner Jefferson
MILLINJERY
The Great Sale
FINE MILLINERY
at
KrousM’s Hammotb Millinery Bouse
IS CONTINUED. AND HAS REACHED ITS HIGHEST SUCCESS, AND AT CERTAIN
HOURS DURING THE DAY THE CROWDS CAN HARDLY BE WAITED ON. AND ALL
TESTIFY TO THE EXCELLENCE AND EINE QUALITIES OF THE GOODS. AI.SO THAT
OUR PRICES ARE LOWER TH \N FOR THE SAME GRADE OF GOODS SOLD ANYWHERE
NORTH. OUR LARGE WHOLESALE TRADE ENABLES US TO IMPORT DIRECT FIM>
LONDON AND PARIS. AND OUR RETAILING ON FIRST FLOOR AT STRICTLY WHOLE
SALE PRICES PUTS FINK MILLINERY WITHIN REACH OF EVERYBODY. COMMO
GOODS, AS YOU SEE IN FLAKING ADVERTISEMENTS AS BARGAINS, WE AI.MOS |
GIVE THEM TO YOU. FOR INSTANCE: BLACK AND COLORED TIPS, WHICH Wt
HAVE BEEN AND ARE NOW SELLING AT 15 CENTS PER BUNCH, ARE ADVERTISED
BY OTHERS AT 19 Cl NTS WINGS, BY THE THOUSANDS, IN ALL COLORS. WE
SOLD THEM AT 5 CENTS, OTHERS THINK THEM BIG BARGAINS AT 8 < ENTS
SAME IN RIBBONS PLUSHES. ETC TO-DAY WE OPEN A LARGE INVOICE OF
KINK FRENCH FELT AND PLUSH HATS AT A GREAT BARGAIN, ALSO NOVELTIES,
BIRDS, DIRECT FROM EUROPE. WE KEEP UP THE GRADE OF OUR PLUSHES,
VELVETS. RIBBONS. ETC. ETC. WE WILL CONTINUE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
TO RETAIL ON FIRST FLOOR AT STRICTLY SAME PRICES. WE SELL TO MIL
LINERS AT WHOLESALE UPSTAIRS. WE WILL ALSO CONTINUE OUR GREAT
RIBBON SALE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE, AND HAVE MARKED OUR XXX BRAND,
ALL SILK RIBBON, PICOT EDGE, NO. 13, AT 12)4 CENTS.
MolTs famoiti Millinery Hoe.
BHOEB.
If You Want the Best Shoe Ever Sold in
Savannah for the Money, Buy
BUTLER k MORRISSETS
GENTS' $3 SHOES,
In all the Leading Styles.
This line of Gents’ Shoes are made expressly for us, and
every pair stamped with the firm’s name. As stylish as any
shoe made. Smooth in-soles, free from tacks and thread,
thereby insuring ease and comfort.
Take a look at our show window, and you will see the
handsomest line of Gents’ $3 Shoes ever seen in Savannah.
Our Boys’ Button Boots at $1 50 are at the top of the
heap.
BUTLER& MORRISSEY,
V2Q BROUGHTON STTfKF.T. \
INVIGORINE^
Dyspepsia. and all Languid or Debilitated Conditions ot the System ; Loss of Derrs Dower, from whatsrer cause, so usual wit
Lawyers. Preachers and Writers: and Feebleness from Old Age. In Stages of PubartT and Chang* of Lifa Inrigorins regie
lotos and gnats. PaiCli $1.06 tor Fall Pint Bottle. Sold by Druggists. B. M. WOOLUf A CO.. Manures. ATLADTA, I
umu Bins. W nnliwli KM, Imiatk, oa. __
Dr. Woolley's
rUKXITTTRK, CARPETS, MATTIWU, BTC.
Tie MM of ft Sli
SO ORIGINAL S0 COMPLETE.
SO NOVEL t SO CHEAP.
SO NEW. SO GAY.
OUR HOUDAYjJTOCK I
Be Sure and See It!
A Glimpse of Fairyland!
APPROPRIATE GIFTS
FOR ALL KINDS OF FOLKS,
LITTLE OR BIGr,
AT ALL KINDS OF PRICES,
GREAT OR SMALL.
WE ARE PLEASING- THEM ALL.
OUR VERY LARGE AND VARIED ASSORTMENT OF
Furniture of All Kinds, and Household Decorations,
Makes it an Easy Matter for Any On* in Search of a for Their Sister, Cousin, Aunt, or
Any One Else to Got Just, What They Want. Without, the Bother of looking; All Around,
Making Yourselves Tired, and not (lain Anything In the End.
TO SEE THEM IS TO BUY THEM.
Our Low Prices Make These Beautiful Goods All Bargains.
Come to Headquarters, Where Your Money Will Go the Furihest, and Where You Are Sure to
Find Just What You Want.
LINDSAY £ MORGAN,
CARPETS, I-ABIION MA I riMJ. DRT liINIIM, ETC.
EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS
IN BOYS’ CLOTHING FOR
THE COMING WEEK.
Our stock of clothing for boys is immense. We have style
after style of short pants’ suits for boys 4to 14 years, for
school wear, and will be sold at the following reduced
prices:
BOYS' SUITS that w.r* $?.
This week’f pric $1 50.
BOYS' SUITS that wer %\ 75.
This week's price $1 35.
BOYS’ SUITS that were $2 25,
This week’s price $1 75.
BOYS' SUITS that wen* f 2 W).
This week's price f I
CARPETS! CARPETS!
Not last year’s goods, not remnants. But first-class stock.
We will offer during the coming week:
35 pieces BODY BRUSSELS at $1 05; worth
$1 25 per yard.
50 pieces TAPESTRY BRUSSELS at Tie.
per yard.
50 plerea TAPESTRY BRUSSELS at 85c.
•er yard.
Canton Mattings!
100 pieces Canton Mattings at 20c., 25c. and 35c. per
yard.
Carpets and Matting will be made and laid at tho shortest
possible notice.
600 Smyrna Rugs ranging in price from 85c. each to S2O.
200 Crumb Cloths in the following sizes: 21x3, 3x3, 3xl,
3x41, prices from $4 to $lO.
COLORED SILK PLUSHES.
All new and desirable shades in the following widths, 16,
18 and 24 inches, at reduced prices.
COLORED DRESS GOODS!
24-Inch English OMbown at 10c. yard. Double Fold Caahmero at 12lfc. Norfolk Suiting** In stripe*
and checks, 35 inches wide, at 20c h yard. ( anhinere serges in all desirable shades, 35 inches wide
at 20c. a yard. Gray Costume Cloths, in 6trlpes and checks, 40 inches wide at 2k;. a vard. Hen
rietta Finish Cashmere, 38 inches, 36e. a yard 45-inch genuine Henrietta. 50c.; worth 75c. a yard.
M-inch Dress Flannel, all-wool, 50c. yard, 40 Inch all wool, Shorarh Cloth. 40r. a yard. 4JMnrh
Gray and Brown Tricot, 40c. a yard. worth 50c. 40-ioob extra quality Surah Serge, 50c.; worth 75c\
yarn. 3H-lnch Solid Color Tricots, all*wool, 45c. a yard. Extra quality Artnure Chocks and Stripes
<sc.; wortli $1 per yard 54 inch Tricots mixed and solid colors, uew shades, all-wool, 3 grades at
65c., 75c. and $1 per yard.
Imported novelties in Dress Patterns, 25 different styles,
from $6 to $lB a pattern.
TANARUS) . HOGAN .
C ORN ICb.
CHAB. A. COX,
45 BARNARD BT.. SAVANNAH, GA*
—HASUFAcTURsa or—
GALVANIZED IRON CORNICES
TIN ROOFING IN "ill ITS BRANCHES
Estimates for city or country work promptly
furnished
Agent for ths celebrated Swedish Metallic
Paint.
Agent for Walter's Patent Tin Shingles.
I ll n MOWING NEWS carrton react
I Mr P ar t of the city early Twenty
* II L five cents a week pays for the Daily.
BOYS’ SUITS that were $3.
This week's price $2 55.
BOYS’ SUITS that were $ i 75,
Thin week's price S3.
BOYS' SUITS that were $4 50 and $5.
This week's price $ i 75 and $4 25.
We have all the nobby Short Pants’ Suits for
dress wear at $5, SO, $7, $8 and s]o.
22 pieces 8 PLY INGRAIN at 90c. per yard.
35 pieces 3-PLY INGRAIN at 77c. per yard.
90 pieces ALL-WOOL EXTRA SUPERS at
75c. |r yard.
STEAM LAUNDRY.
NOW IS THE TIME
TO HAVE YOUR
BLANKETS, LACE CURTAINS
AND OTHER HOUSEHOLD LIKEN
DONE UP.
Shirts, Collars and Cuffs a Specialty.
Libera] Weekly And Monthly contracts made.
30 per cent, of wear and tear of clothes saved
by the usa of Soap made and used by tho
EMPIRE STEAM LAUNDRY.
108 Broughton Street, between Hull and Dray
ton Streets. Telephone No. 00.
MATHER Ac BATTEN. Proprietor..
LIGHTNING KOIIN.
tOSa ileum rod To.,
No. 44 Barnard St, Savannah, Ga.,
Is prepared to give estimates on the roddlur of
d'valUuK* and nubile bu rnings with the bast
oopper rods. Work truaranb-ed and reference*
given. Order* promptly attended to from
QtorglA, Florida and South Carolina.
van nwsUHOT a hai:nakd. Prop
7

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