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The morning news. [volume] (Savannah, Ga.) 1887-1900, March 13, 1889, Image 2

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FLORIDA’S METROPOLIS.
THE PRIZES AT THE INTERSTATE
DRILL F.XED AT $3,000.
It Will Occur April lO and 11-Crack
Companies from Several States
Expected Wtlinski Will Have to
Undersro Further Amputation of His
Legs—Tourists Pouring in.
Jacksonville, Fla., March 12. —Tbe
interstate military drill is now fully settled.
H. 8.. Plant fare $350 and an' ther railroad
man gave SSOO this afternoon. April 10
and 11 have been lixed as the Jays, and all
the preparations are now going on on a
grand scale. Companies from the Caro
linas, Georgia, Alabama ard Tennes-ee will
participate. The first prize will be SI,OOO,
and the full li-t will amount to over $3,000.
An unfortunate Charleston drummer
named Abram Wilinski, ou Fob. 21, had
both legs cut off by a Florida Railway and
Navigation train. His physicians, to save
his life, afterward amputated both
limbs above the part where the wheels had
crushed them, and now comes information
that both legs will have to be cut off again.
If the poor fellow lives through nil this
butchery he will show remarkable vitality.
WAR ON THE DOGS.
The police force has begun war against
the canine creation and Uiirteen dogs bit
the dust this morning and nine yesterday.
“Dick 1 ' Oldham goes around and gathers
them up and carts them three miles from
the city. “Dick” says he wishes the city
had not declared war until the cemetery
as finished.
The trustees and stockholders of the
Farmer’s Alliance have been in session to
day at ii alliance exchange offi-e in tin's
city. All the business transit' ted was of a
private nature and of importance to the
order only.
TOURISTS ROLLING IN.
Jacksonville is fast filling up with tourists,
and the streets pre-ont. t etr old time tupe t
of business activity The hotels ar ■ filling
up'erv fast, and in the afternoon and
evening present a very animated appear
ance, with scores of touris s
sealed on the piazas enjoying the balmy' air
of Florida; in the evening the brilliantly
illuminated windows of the lijteis, the
handsome illumination of fat. James pa;k
by the electric light, and the delicious
strains of music from the Windsor, all con
spire to render this portion of the city a
most enjoyable resort.
THK SUB TROPICAL.
The Sub-Tropical is getting in its work
■well, and its special attractions of after
noon and evening concerts, Mrs. Abbott’s
wonderful and mysterious | owers as shown
in her tests on the stage, and the other
ettractii ns provided by the management,
render the exposition one of tbe pleasantest
places of resort in the city. The winter
visitors have found this out, and every after
noon scores of them visit the “Sub” to see
the exhibits made there of Florida’s indus
tries, and to note the many specimens of
rare, and to them, almost unknown, species
of plants and shrubs. Tbe tropical plants
that were set out a year and a half ago
within the exposition bu lding and in the
grounds, are now growing most luxuriantly,
and they present a wealth of information
and research that the tourists from the
north are not slow to avail theinsel \es of.
THE GEORGIA WONDER.
Mrs. Abbott, the “Georgia Womle ,” as
she is called, has attracted a great deal of
notice here. Opinions are varied concern
ing her powers. Many have denounced her
methods as tricky, and fay that there is
nothing in her so-called mamfes
tStinnf. Many who were skeptics
at fist, toon an early opportunity
to test for themselves her power, and at the
close of the experiments they all declared
that there was more in it than they thought.
She has been a drawing card at the exposi
tion, and Director General Webb and Secre
tary Adams have been con pliru. nted highly
on their foresight in securing her.
MR. PLANT’S PARTY.
H. B. Plant and party inspected the Sub-
Tropical this forenoon, and Air. Plant es
pecially was greatly pleased with the ap
pearance of the exposition grounds and the
display within the building. He said that
the citizens of Jacksonville, especially the
directors and others interested in the Sub-
Tropical, deserve great thanks foe their en
terpns i:i starting up ihe exposition under
the adverse circumstances this year, and he
predicts a brilliant and successful opening
for next year.
THE CITY’S SEWERS.
Many people are impatient!}' waiting for
the special report that is to be made on tne
city’s sewers by the Boston export, who
came here and made a thorough inspection
of 1 he present system.
From the time taken to present the re
port it is supposed that it will be most com
pi ete in every respect.
Hon. Thomas C. Platt and party of New
York were among tbe Sub-Tropicals visi
tors this forenoon. The well-known ex
senator inspected the exlii its very carefully
and seemed pleased with the display.
FLORIDA’S HEALTH BOARD.
Dr. Daniel Elected President—The
Health Officer.
Tallahassee, Fla., March 12.—The
members of the board of health met here
to-day and elected Dr. R. P. Daniel of Jack
sonville president of the board. Dr. J. Y.
Porter of Key West is the only man spoken
of for state health officer, but he is now on
the retired list of the United States army
and may be rejected under the Florida
laws. This point will be settled before an
appointment is mad *, as all want Dr. Porter
to he state health officer if possible.
Gov. Fleming and State Superintendent
of Schools Russell are now in DeFuniak at
tendingthe meeting of the teaches of the
state. They will return on Thursday.
BASE BALL AT JACKSONVILLE.
The Home Club Plays a Tie Game with
the Philapelphiaa.
Jacksonville, Fla., March 12.—The
Philadelphia and Jacksonville ball clubs
crossed bats to-dav and an interesting game
was the result, the score being 2to 2. The
visitors arrived this morning, and were
well tired out with their journey and were
hardly in condition to do go and work.
Harry Wright laughed this evening over
the result, but said that bis boys were m m
to tbe grounds, while the Jacksonville club
had practiced tor some time. The week will
be spent here, as tho players like the ac
commodate ns, ground, and Florida’s balmy
air. A feature of the game was the bat
tery work of both nines, Webrle pitching a
lightning curve. 'I he Bcore by innings and
a summary follows:
Jacksonville 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 o—9
Philadelphia 0 0 i o 0 0 0 1 o 9
batteries Jacksonville, Webrle and Stallings:
Philadelphia, < i|eaM>n and Rcliriver
Errors— Philadelphia 3, Jacksonville 2.
Hita—Philadelphia 0. Jacksonvill ■ o
Three-base hit Thompson of Philadelphia.
Ntahings did exceptionally fi ;e cate nng,
Gleason, while not so swift, was very eft. c -
ive. Schriver’s throwing to second caused
much applause, as did also Vandyke’s tine
catching at second in the Jackson v file team.
Among the Albanians. v
Albany, Ga., March 12.—Phylis Ca* - r, &
negro woman, was brought up from Sum
ner last night for surgical treatment,
having been accidentally shot.
Anthony McCarthy knock > t M >se Crum
ley In the head with au ax handle this
morning in Saudy Bottom. Both are
negroes.
Captain of the Dragoons.
Darien, Ga. , March 12. —Thomas S.
Wylly, Jr., was unanimously ulec.od captain
of the Mclntosh Li 'lit Drug sms t >-day by
tbe largest vote tver polled by the com
pany.
GEORGIA’S CAPITAL.
Hover Agrees to Leave Town—Ru
mors of a Possible Duel.
Atlanta, Ga., March 13. —Chief Con
nally issued an order to the police force
this morning to find H. Hover and exam
ine his personal effects. This was the re
sult of the report that in addition to mak
ing anarchist speeches he carries dyna
mic shells around with him. Hover
could not be found during the day
arid had vacated his room and carried
off his baggage. Late this evening he
visited the -tation to explain about the
dy amite. The mysterious shells, one of
which ' e exhibited, he said were merely a
paten! inhaler, and perfectly harmless. He
remarked that he was tired of Atlanta, had
been assaulted sev era] times and was ready
to leave. He was allowed to go.
The Louisuille party, headed by Mayor
Jacob-, is here to inspect the street paving
syste n and Belgian blocks, as Louisville is
going to make a change from cobble stone3.
The party was shown over the city to-day,
and visited the granite quarries at Slone
mountain and Lithonia. The gentlemen
went home to-night.
RUMORS OF A DUEL.
There are rumors of a possible duel be
tween L. DeGive, proprietor of the opera
house, and Frederick J. Cooke, manager of
tbe Atlanta branch of the American Press
Association. The parties have had a bitter
newspaper controversy, occasion-d by a
recent article of Mr. Cooke’s criticising the
opera house. Correspo donee is pending
between the gentlemen, but it has not yet
reached the fighting p >m .
Tbe governor to-day releived R. T. Dunn
of Brunswick from liability on the official
bond of Tax Receiver Goodbread of Glynn
couutv. The request for release was with
out reflection on Mr. Goodbread. and was
due to a certain business transaction of Mr.
Dunn which made it necessary, and which
Mr. Goodbread approved.
The superior court is engaged on the
$25,000 damage suit of IV. H. Dooly against
the Greorgia Pacific railroad for injuries
Do ly re eived iu an accident last year
while a conductor.
The capital furnishing commission had a
short session to-day looking after the details
of their w rk.
In the federal court to-day a large num
ber of revenue violators i lead guilty and
were given light sentences.
BAINBRIDGE BRIEFS.
A Woman so Badly Burned that Her
Life Is Despaired Of.
Bainbridge, Ga., March 12.—Mrs. Mar
tha Lambert, wife of Mathew Lambert,
was so seriously burned a few days ago
while helping her husband burn brush that
her life is despaired of.
A lively alarm of fire startled the people
ltpre early yesterday morning. The fire
was caused by sparks igniting dead leaves
on lop of (Juincy Peacock’s house. There
was no damage.
The body of Ella, daughter of Amos
Jackson, both of whom are supposed to
have been murdered by Alexander Hender
son, was found Friday forty-two miles
below the home of her father in Apalachi
cola river. The body was thrown into
Spring creek, that empties into the Flint,
and drifted into the former. The body of
Amos Jackson has not been found.
The magnates of the Savannah, Florida
and Western railway visited us several
days ago. The party consisted of H. B.
Plant, Judge Chisholm, H. S. Haines, R. G.
Fleming and others. They were highly
pleased with their visit.
President J. W. Woolfoik, president of
the Alabama Midland Railway < ’onstrnction
Company, has returned from New York,
SOLDIERS AT ST. SIMON’S.
The Drill Ground Selected and Work
to Begin at Once.
Brunswick, Ga,, March 12.—C01. IV. E.
Kay, J. H. King, Capt. Barnie Dart, Capt.
J. 8. Thomas and Edwin Brobston went to
St. Simon's island yesterday to locate the
ground for the military encampment. The
ground selected is a beautiful ten-acre lot,
about half in live oak woods and half in
Bermuda sod* situated w thin three min
utes’ waik from the pier. The competitive
drill ground i on the beacti. overlooked by
a high bluff, that is to be used for a grand
stand, with seats sloping toward the beach.
A large number of hands w ;!) tie set to work
at once, and, among other things, a large
dancing pavilion will be erected. The
Brunswick Company is making wonderful
improvements around the Beach hotel and
will spend several thousand dollars beau
tifying the grounds.
CLEVELAND COMING.
Private advices to-night from New York
state positively that ex-President and Mrs.
Cleveland, with ex-Secretary Bayard and
family, will'eave iu a few days for a trip
to Brunswick and Jekyl I-laiid.
FIRES AT HA. D cSVILLE.
Timely Discoveries m Each Case Pre
vent Serious Losses.
Hardeevilie, S. C., March 13. —Sunday
afternoon about 3:30 o’clock the railroad
and telegraph office at Hardeevilie came
near being destroyed by fire. A brace to a
telegraph p !e behind the office was dis
covered to be in a blaze just in time to pro
ve it ti e fire from communicating to the
building.
Monday morui'ig about 8 o’clock the resi
dence of \V. J. Evans was discoveied to be
on fire on thereof near the chimney, but by
the prompt response and timely action
of both white and colored, the fire was got
te under control after burning over a con
siderable place.
An hour after this fire a colored man’s
house was found on fire, but the flames
were put out with little damage.
Tins morning about -1 o’clock the resi
dence of John M. Richardson, at
Bluffton, 8. C., was found to be in a blaze,
and owing to the early hour very few per
sons were stirring. The house was burned
with nearly all its furniture. Very little
was saved by the family. Tne origin of the
fire is unknown.
TENNIS IN THE TROPICS.
The Favorites Win the Championship
at St. Augustine.
Jacksonville, Fla., March 12.—A St.
Augustine special to the Times-Union says:
“The tennis games for the tropical cham
pionship to-day were won by the Favor
ites. In the first round Campbell boa!
Lynch by default. Peac ck beat Dulles
15,0,0,1. Warden tent Tnimadgo bv de
fault. Thompson beat York 0,0, 6, 1. Beck
with lies' Hopkins 0,1, 0,3. Miller boat
Wort hi gt in 0. 2, ti, 3. II noli beat Ken
nedy 0,3, 0,3. Wright but Smith 0, 2,0, 2.
In the second round, Miller beat Beck
with 0,1, 10, 60. T'l ipson beat W orden
6,2, 0, 1. VV: ight and Beac'"h to p)av.
The tournament foe the championship
doubles wis played at 3 o’clock and proved
an exc ti ig game between Trevor and
Thompson against Dulles and Ken
nedy. The score was: 7,5, 0,
4, in favor of Trevor and Thompson,
it is said to have been the must i otly con
tested game of tenuis over played in
Ain vicu. 1 lie layers caug tt e ball at
almost impossible angles, returning the
same back n and forth without touching the
ground, eight times.
Woolfoik'a Trial.
Macon, Ga., Mar h 12.—This was the
second day of the Woolfoik trial. Six y
eight jurors were examined and only three
qualified. Two were rejected by the defense
and one by the s ate. The jury now con
sists of nine. An effort is being made to
secure the other throe. The stale lias five
c ore in and the defense two in re strikes.
Wollfolk created a disturbance in the jail
and again t the court house this afternoon
by obs.inately refusing to obey the sheriff’s
orders,
Adams is weaker, hut still alive.
THE MORNING NEWS: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13. 1889.
AN ILL-F ATED SPOT.
A German Killed A hile Walking Near
the Scene of the Mud Run Horror.
Macch Chunk, Pa., March 12.—Otto
man Schmidt of Wilkesbarre, while walk
ii gon the track this morning, was struck
and instantly killed at Mud Run station by
a Lehigh Valley passenger train bearing
the witnesses and several of the defendants
in the Mud Run disaster trials which are in
progress in this city. Schmidt’s t ody was
mangled almost beyond recognition. This
seemi to be a singularly fatal spot. In ad
dition to the terrible collision of October
last, when sixty persons were killed, there
has been a number of casts recently
I similar to that of Schmidt.
ENGINEER COOK’S TRIAL.
The second day of the trial of Eugineer
Cook, in connecs ion with th Mud Run disas
ter. opened with Bupt. Mitchell of the Lehigh
Valley Railroad Company in the witness
box. His testimony was especially damag
ing to Engineer Cook. The defense sought
t > nrove mat the head-light from the second
engine blinded Cook and prevented him
from seeing the red light, but was unable
to do so, and it then endeavored to
prove that some person or per
sons stood in front of the red lantern,
which was used as a signal. It was the
custom of the railroad employes to place a
lantern on the platform, ad the testimony
of the telegraph operators, as well as that
f four other witnessas. showed that the
lantern had been placed on the platform,
and that one of the engineers blew two
whistles, which meant that they understood
or saw the signal.
SPEED OF THE TRAIN.
All the expert testimony adduced proved
that the train was running at the rate of
twenty to twenty-five mile* an hour, and
that Engineer Cook could have stopped the
tr in in time to prevent a collision. Of
seven witnesses examined all seemed
to concur in the sbelief that
the accident could have been averted
by Conk ir Major, engineer of the second lo
comotive. Beveral witnesses who were in the
wrecked cars corroborated the testimony of
the railroad officials. All efforts of the
counsel for the defense to find a flaw in the
rule3 of the railroad company failed.
The commonwealth will probably close
its case to-morrow.
JOHN A CAMPBELL DEAD.
An Ex-Justice of the Supreme Court
and a Prominent Confederate.
Baltimore, March 12. —Hon. John A.
Campbell, ex-justice of the supreme court
of the United States and assistant confed
erate secretary of war, died at his home in
this city this afternoon, aged nearly 78.
His death was the end of a long illness re
sulting from old age. He was born nar
Washington, IVilkes county, Georgia,
and graduated from the university
of that state at the age of 15
years with first honors, and after
wards went to VVest Point. He was ad
mitted to the practice of law in Florida He
practiced law in Montgomery, Ala., aid
there married Miss Anne E. Gold til waits.
He went to Mobil *, Ala., where he litigated
and settled almost all the land titles which
were complicated at that time by reason of
obscurity of Spanish grants.
SENT TO THE LEGISLATURE.
In 1836 he was elected a member of the
state legislature. In 1853 lie was nominated
to fill the vacancy in the supreme court by
President Pierce and was unanimously con
firmed by the Senate. He entered upon his
duties at the age of 42. 11l the spring of
1861 he resigned his position ou the conrt,
went south and be.came assistant secretary
of war of the confederacy. He himself re
garded his success in the great “state”
case, as it is called—the states
of New York and New Hampshire vs.
Louisiana —as the triumph of his legal life,
as it established his view of the rights of
the states under the constitution. Recurring
to his argument in that state Chief Justice
Waite said; “That is the greatest legal
argument that I have ever hoard,” and
Ju tice Miller said, "I concur in that
opinion.” Historian Bancroft wrote that it
was a profound study of the constitution.
AN BXQDU3 OF NEGROES.
Southern Agents Baiting Them with
Visionary Yarns.
Raleigh, N. C., March 13. —Southern
agenti moving negro families to Arkansas
are quietly, bill successfully at work. Their
operations are confined thus far to a few
counties on the railroad lines near Golds
boro. The counties are systematically can
vassed. Several thousand persons have
already gone, and the indications point
to an extensive movement. Many
largo plantations are almost de
serted. Negro drummers are paid
$5 for each family secured. The entire ex
pen *e of transportation to Little Rock is
paid by the agents. The negroes say they
are promised forty acres of land, a brick
house, a cow, and $1 50 per day for labor,
and are told that corn sells for 19 cents a
barrel, and meat at cent a pound.
They know nothing of their destination.
The removal is by families. Thu planters
in the counties affected are greatly embar
rassed at the loss of farm hands at the be
ginning of the planting season.
FALL RIVER’S STRIKERS.
No Change in the Situation—A Maes
Meeting Held.
Fall River, Mass., March 12.—The
strike situation in this city is not greatly
changed, but appears to favor the weavers.
They are firm, and only 1,000 out of 4,000
looms are running. A mass meeting of
(5,000 striking weavers was held on South
park this morning, and th3 mo t notable
matters in the addresses were as follows: The
loom fixers in some mills are being dis
charged for declining to take the places of
the striking weavers. Advice was given to
boycott saloons, and offers of foot ball play
er-’ services have been made as a means of
raising money. The crowd, though large,
was remarkably orderly, and not a police
man was in signt. Tiie manufacturers show
no change of front.
MILWAUKEE’S MONGOLIANS.
The Accused Prisoners Held in De
fault of $6,000 Ball.
Milwaukee, Wis., March 13.—The ex
amination of Hah Ding and Sam Yin Jail,
the Chinamen accused of debauching little
girls in their laundrios, was concluded tins
morning, and the Mongolians were held in
b nds of $5,000 each to answer. The reeling
against the Chinese lauudrymen which last
night evinced itself in the mobbing qf laun
dries in various parts of the city, has not
yet entirely, subsided. T e evicted China
men ate huddled together iu a laundry on
the w it side, and are fearful that they will
suffer personal injury.
TO BE PAID $75,000. ,
A. F. Walker Accepts the Railway
Association's Chairmanship. (
CHICAGO, March 13.—Aldace F. Walker
lias finally accepted the chairmanship of
the Interstate Commerce Railway Associa
tion. The po-ition is guaranteed him for
three years at a salary of $25,000 per
annum. He expects to enter upon the dis
charge of Ids new duties iu about three
weeks, meanwhile closing up ins business
connection with the federal interstate com
mission. He will remove his family to Chi
cago and make this city his home for an
indefinite period.
Important to Florid i Tourists.
Health, luxury, home comforts, fine drives,
fishing, hunting, boating anil magnificent scen
ery and finest orange groves at the popular
Sanford House. Sanford, Fla,, under the liberal
management of Smith ,fc Rogers. Sanford
House wharf is the terminus of the elegant St.
John’s river steamer. Light railroads center at
tills point. Summer resort Prospect House,
Fentatoquit Hail and Cottages, Hay Shore,
Long Island. J
NEW HAMPSHIRE'S EJECTION.
The Prohibition Amendment Defeated
by a Decided Majority.
Boston, Mass., March 12.—Only partial
returns from the New Hamp-hire elections
are received, but there seems little doubt
that the constitutional prohibition amend
ment has bee i defeated by a decided ma
jority. Of the cities, Nashua appears to be
the only one voting in favor of the amend
ment, giving it 202 majority. Carroll and
Coos counties are the only ones
that show indications of having fa
vored the amendment, although Grafton
county may show a small majority, but not
the necessary two-thirds. Tnere is little
doubt of the adoption of all the other pro
posed amendments, excent one which pro
vides for striking from the bill of rights the
word “protestant,” thereby making the
constitution non-sectarian. The fate of
this amendment cannot yet be learned, as
the returns are very meager.
THE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE.
The prohibitory amendment was the
most important issue, and comparatively
little interest was manifested throughout
the state on the other amendments. In
Nashua and other cities vigorous efforts
were made by women, who stool all day
at the • polls soliciting votes and
aiding the temperance movement in
every possible way. Returns from
sixty cities and towns give a majority of
4,524. Tiie indications are now that the
prohibitory amendment will be defeated by
nearly 3,000 votes and ail the others
adopted. If the remaining towns cast the
relative vote in compari on with that
of last fall, as those already heard from, the
total vote in the state on the amendment
will be about 16,000.
COPPER’S COST.
New York Operators Shy Despite the
Improvement Abroad.
New York, March 12.—The news from
abroad in reference to the copper syndicate
was of a less excited nature this morning.
The action of prominent London bankers
yesterday in coining forward and assuming
control of the syndicate's affairs lias had a
re-assuring effect upon the foreign market
arid to-day Chili bars imnroye 1 ill on spot,
and £5 ou futures. Cables froth London
stated that the market was firm at the
advance. From Paris intelligence came
tha t Societe des Metaux shares were quoted
at 150 francs, and Rio Tint > at 243 francs.
HOLDING OFF AT NEW YORK.
Despite the improvement in the foreign
market, operators here were not inclined to
take hold of metal to-day. The Lake cop
per call passed without a bid being re
ceived, at;d offers for good merchantable
brands were purely nominal and no sales
res ilted. Bears on ’change shook their
heads ominously when the improved
foreign cables came in and argued t hat the
Mathesons action yesterday was prompted
with a view of affording a loop hole for the
Rothschilds to get out of the French cor
poration.
FURTHER IMPROVEMENT LOOKED* FOR.
Further improvement of £4 or £5, they
said, in London figures, would not be sur
prising. When tiie price had reached £6O
or thereabout- for spot Chili bars, the bears
further argued, the money men at the head
of the syndicate would quickly dispose of
their stock and leave the monopoly to its
ultimate fate. All the financial aid re
ceived by the syndicate of late is attributed
to this cause,
LONDON QUOTATIONS.
London. March 12. —Copper to-day
touched £SB, closing at £56.
A QUIETER FEELING.
Paris, March 12. —At the close of the
bourse to-day the feeling wis quieter. It
is reporte 1 that the R ithschild- and Bar
ings are arranging to take all the copper
mine stocks at £45 per ton.
A DOUBLE POLICE FORCE.
Indianapolis Saddled with an Expen
sive Luxury.
Indianapolis, March 12. —Indianapolis
now has a double force, two police head
quarters and nobody can tell how they will
secure their pay. The board organized
under a bill passed by the legislature, met
this morning and organized a police force.
This force was selected las night and in
cluded a number of the officer of the old
force. Part of tiie men reported, were
sworn in and assigned to duty. All the
men sworn in are democrats, the republi
cans of the old force declining to accept ap
pointments under the new board.
TO AVOID A CLASH.
The patr. linen of the ew board were in
structed to avoid a clash with the old force.
T ie new beard will file a comnla nt f r
possession before the judge and commis
sioners. The city will at once file an an
swer, alloging that the bill is uncon-titu
tional, because the legislature cannot fill
offices by appointment, and because the
bills have never be *n signed by tiie spea 1 er
of the House anti lieutenant governor after
their passage, as required by the constitu
tion.
WEST VIRGINIA’S GOVERNOR.
Wilaon to Hold the Office for the Pres
, ent at Least.
Charleston, W. Va., March 12.—The
supreme court this morning dec ded in the
Goff-Wilson gubernatorial mandamus case
that Gov. Wilson is entitled to holdover
until such time as the contest between
Fleming and Goff shall have been settled,
or, in other w-rds, Goff is not entitled to
the seat on the ground that the returns were
not declared by the legislature. The fight
will now be between Wilson and Carr on
quo warranto proceedings.
Changes at Niagara Falls.
From the Toronto Mail.
On Friday last a mass of rock fell from
the Hor eshoe falls, and twenty-four hours
later another mass was precipitated iuto
tiie abyss below, witlra noise so closely re
sembling that of an earthquake as to alarm
the residents of the neighborhood. The re
sult of the displacement is a change i t the
shape of the fall. Formerly tin Canadian
fall deserved t > be described as a horseshoe;
but the breakiug away of rocks in the
center some years ago made it V shaped.
Now that a further displacement has oc
curred, tiie fall has returned to its old con
dition. It is of course generally known
that the falls of Niagara are gradually
moving to tiie south. The de p cut through
the solid rock marks the course they have
taken iu their backward movement. It is
a wonderful excavation—a chasm dug out
by the sheer force of water. Not less ast n
ishing has been the removal of the debris.
Tiie rock has been thoroughly pulverized,
and has been swept- out of the river to bo
distributed in Lake Ontario.
Once it was thought that in the wearing
away process the falls would ultimately
reach Lake Erie, and there degeuera e into
a -cries of rapids. But tiie the irv lias hap
pily been set aside bv one which retains t >
us the cataract, though the s.iadow of its
nrosent sif and tunc t reduced in size. The
latest idea is that the falls will recede two
miles and then remain stationary, their
bight at that point being 80 feet instead of
1(54, as at present. The supposition is sup
ported by au argtiineiit which appears
reasonable. The present site is a limestone
formation, some 80 or 90 feet thick, with a
shaly foundation. As the shal > is washed
away the limestone breaks off and the falls
take a step backward. But tbe end of the
shaly deposit will bo reached two miles
from the present fElIs, and then tlu* rushing
water will have more than it can do to
wash away the s lid precipice over which
it will be projected. It would boa waste of
time to attempt to estimate the numlier of
centuries that will elapse before Niagara
falls have found their permanent site. The
jokes atiout cabmen and pro ably the
(Jiieen Victoria Jubilee Niagara Falls park
will be numbered with the antiquities long
before this.
MOKE PBECIOUS THAN GOLD.
Barest and Costliest of Gallium Metals
at $3,250 an Ounce.
From the St. Louis Globe-Democrat.
Fully ninety-nine persons in every hun
dred, if a s ked to name the most precious
metals, would mention gold at first, plati
num as second, and silver as third. If
asked to name others, a few might add
nickel, and a very few aluminum to the
list. Let us see how near to the truth they
would be. Gold is worth a out $340 per
pound troy; platinum $l3O, and silver
about sl2. Nickel would be quoted at
about 60 cents, and pure aluminum at $8 or
$0 to the troy pound.
We will now compare these prices wi‘h
those of the rarer and less well known of
the metals. To take them in alphabetical
order, barium sells for $975 a pound, when
it is sold at all, and calcium is worth SI,BOO
a pound. Cerium is a shade higher—its
cost is SIOO an ounce, or $1,930 a pound.
These begin to look lb;e fabulous price?,
but they do not reach the highest p unt;
chromium brings S3OO, cobalt falls t > about
half the price of silver, while didymium is
the same price as cerium, and erbium $lO
cheaper on the ounce than calcium, or just
$1,650 pier pound.
If the wealth of the Vanderbilts be not
overstated, it amounts to nearly $200,000,-
000.. With this sum they could purchase 312
tons of gold and have something leftover,
but they couldn't buv teutons of gallium,
that rare metal being worth $3,250 an
ounce. With this metal the highest price
is reached, and it may well be called the
rarest and most precious of metals.
Giucinum is worth s3soperounce;ialium,
$158; iridium, $658 a pound; lanthanium,
$175, aid lithium $169 per ounce. N obium
costs $l3B per ounce; osmium, palladium,
platinum, potassiu n and rhodium bring re
spectively $640, S4OO, $l3O, $33 and $513 per
pound. Strontium costs $l2B an ounce;
tantmm, $144; telurium, $9; thorium,
$372; vanadium. $330; vitrium, $144; and
zirconium $250 an ounce.
Thus we see that the commonly received
opinion as to what are the most precious
metals is quite erroneous. Barium is more
than four times as vaiuabl as gold, and gal
lium more than 162 times as costly, while
many of the metals are twice and thrice as
valuable. Aluminum, which now costs $8
or $9 a pound, will eventually be produced
as cheaply as steel. When this can be done
it will push the latter metal out of a great
many of its present uses, as it poss-s-es
great strength, toughness, and elasticity,
with extreme lightness of weight. Its
sources of supply are inexhaustible, and its
present high cost arises from the difficulty
of it? extraction in a metallic form. I ,aium
seems to be chief!/used for pointing gold
pens, and many of the metals mentioned
have but a limited sphere of usefulness.
BRICE’S EXPENSIVE CANE,
The Stick That President Cleveland
Gave Him on Election Day.
From the Washington Post.
It leaks out that during his recent visit to
Washington, when he and Mrs. Brice were
guests at the white house, the chairman of
the democratic national executive commit
tee was presented with a cane inscribed,
“From Grover Cleveland to Calvin S. Brice,
Washington, November 6, 1888.”
It is a malacca stick, handsomely mounted
in gold, and the date, it will be observed, is
that on which the last presidential election
was held. Mr. Brice prizes the gift ver v
highly, and has placed it in a glass case,in
his parlor, where it can be seen but not
handled by his friends. He is considerable
of a wag, and is merciless wheu any of his
chums get where he cau have a little sport
with them, so that they are glad of a chance
to tease him. The standing joke, therefore,
is to ask Brice what that cane cost him.
He smiles a Knowing sort of smile aud
answer’s:
“You needn’t worry about its cost, for it
is worth every cent I paid for it.”
Nobody knows just how much the late
campaign cost Mr. Brice, but it was some
thing over SIOO,OOO. His original contribu
tion to the democratic campaign fund was
$50,000, and he kept drawing checks when
ever the treasury got low as fast as Mr.
Cauda called for money. Then, when it
was all over, there were a lot of bills to be
settled, aud nobody else to pay them. Toe
committee of a defeated pan y always have
to buy a lot of dead horses when the election
is over.
Mr. B ice has recently confessed to his
friends'that it was Mrs. Cleveland who in
duced him to accept t o cnaii manship. He
did not wait, it, and his friends and business
associates all protested again C his taking
charge of the campaign. He cams to
Washington and talked the matter over
with the Pro-iden', who urged him to ac
eetp, but he declined to do so until Mrs.
Cleveland added her powers of persuasion.
MEDICAL.
*
Peculiar
Peculiar in combination, proportion, and
preparation of ingredients, Hood's Sarsapa.
rilla possesses the curative value of the best
known reme- ■■ dies of the
vegetable HQOG S kingdom.
Peculiar in its strength and economy, Hood’s
Sarsaparilla is the only medicine of which can
truly be said, “ One Hundred Doses One Dol
lar.” Peculiar in its medicinal merits, Hood's
Sarsaparilla accomplishes cures hitherto un
tonZ Sa rsa pa rs 11 a
the title of “The greatest blood purifier ever
discovered.” Peculiar in Us “good name
at home,” —there Is more of Hood’s Sarsa
parilla sold In Lowell than of all other
blood purifiers. Peculiar in its phenomenal
record of „ sales abroad
no other TANARUS" vCU liar preparation
ever atftuned so rapidly nor held so
steadfastly the confidence of all classes
of people. Peculiar in the brain-work which
It represents, Hood's Sarsaparilla com
bines all the knowledge which modern
research ■** _ Ia f in medical
science has I O lISUiT developed,
with many years practical experience in
preparing medicines. Be sure to get only
Hood’s Sarsaparilla
Sold by all druggists. £1; six for $5. Prepared only
by C. I. IIOOD & CO., Apothecaries, Lowell, Mass.
_J OO Doses One Dollar
AGRICULTUHAL IMPLEMENTS.
id mm.
Dow Law Cotton Planters.
Seed Drills for Beans and Peas.
Planet Junior Seed Drills.
Planet Junior Horse Hoes.
Planet Junior Cultivators.
Horse Hoes and Cultivators Combined.
Single and Double Wheel Hand Hoes.
Fire Fly Garden Wheel Hoes.
Genuine Avery's, Dixie and Boss Plows,
Georgia Stocks, Steel Sleeps and
Scooters, Bull Tongues, Shovels and Half
Shovels at WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
palmerTbos.,
SAVANNAH, GA.
MEETINGS.
GEORGIA CHAPTER AO.^TrTX~M?^
An extra convocation of this Chapter,-, •
will be held THIS (Wednesday; EVEN- fs. '
ING, March 13. at 8 o'clock. ■
Transient companions are cordially --32£_Aj
invited.
R. A. will be conferred. By order of
THOMAS BALLANTYNE, H. P.
P. H. Ward, Recorder.
MAGNOLIA ENCAMPMENT NO. 1, I. O
O. F.
Regular meeting jl
at Odd Fellows’ Tem
pie, THIS (Wednes
day) EVENING at §jr
58. W. I. O’BRIEN, C. P.
J. S. Tyson, Scribe.
GOLDEN Ht I.E LODGE NO. 12, I. O. O. F.
A regular meeting of this Lodge will be held
THIS EVENING at 8 o'clock.
A full attendance is earnestly reonested.
Members of other Ijodges anil visiting brothers
are invited to attend.
By order of THOMAS STOCKTON, N. G.
E. E. Cheatham, Secretary.
YOUNG MEN’S HEBREW ASSOCIATION.
Attend regular monthly meeting at Associa
tion Hall (Masonic Temple), 8 o'clock TO
NIGHT. As business of importance is to be
considered, full attendance desired. By order
PRESIDENT.
Max Robinson, Secretary.
PULASKI LOAN ASSOCIATION.
The regular monthly mee ing of Pulaski Loan
Association, being the ninety-first of Series 8.,
will be held THIS (Wednesday) EVENING at 8
o'clock, at the office of Garrard & Meldrim, 135
Bay street, R. D. WALKER, President.
William Garrard, Secretary.
THE MERCHANTS’ AND MECHANICS’
LOAN ASSOCIATION.
The eighty-second (82d) regular monthly meet
ing of this Association will be held at the office
of th > Secretary, 118 Bryan street, THIS
(Wednesday) EVENING, at 8 o’clock.
D. G. PURSE, President.
J. L. Whatley, Secretary.
THE JASPERVILLE LAND AND IM
' PROVE.MENT COMPANY.
The first (Ist) annual meeting of the stock
holders of this company will be held on
THIS (WEDNESDAY) EVENING,I3th inst..at 8
o’clock, a.t the office of the Secretary, 107 Bay
street. By order of M. A. COHEN, President*
S. L. Lazaron, Secretary.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
Advertisements inserted under “Special
Notices" vrill be charged $1 00 a Square each
insertion.
ATTENTION, GOOD LIVERS!
Will have to-day and the balance of the week,
on my stalls, per Boston and Baltimore steam
ers.
CHOICE BEEF, MUTTON AND VEAL,
PICKLED BEEF TONGUES AND TRIPE,
Creamery Butter, Choice Sausages, Fresh and
Salt Water Fish, Roe Shad, Poultry, Game and
Vegetables to order.
H. LOGAN, CITY MARKET.
Where you will get > our marketing fresh and
from first hands.
67 AND 6S CITY MARKET.
NOTICE.
Ocean Steamship Company of Savannah.
Shippers of FRESH VEGETABLES wishing
to procure the benefit of the SPECIAL CON
TRACT RATES will call at the office and sign
the contract.
C. G. ANDERSON, Agent.
Savannah, March 1, 1889.
DR. .1 D. LANIER
Has removed to northwest corner Bull and Lib
erty streets, and will resume practice this morn
ing.
March 4,1889,
FOR SALE.
TWENTY EXTRA FINE MULES, ml.
-Apply to-
JAMES E. MORAN,
98 Bay street, or at Stable, New street.
A NATIONAL BLESSING.
We have used DR. ULMER’S LIVER COR
RECTOR and take pleasure in stating that it
has answered finely for all the purposes for
which we have used it. It is pleasant to
and acts well as an aperient, etc.
HON. THOMAS P. SAFFOLD.
W. L. HIGH, Banker.
J. C. C. BLACKBURN, M. D.
Madison, Ga.
Prepared by B. F. ULMER, M. D„ Pharma
cist, Savannah, Ga. Price $1 per bottle.
If you cannot obtain the ‘ Corrector” from
your druggist, send your order- direct, and it
will be forwarded by express, freight paid.
GOR MQNEY-rVfUNDEO.
Soldljallßriifjists^fcE
NURSERY.
Free! Free! Free!
OUR NEW DESCRIPTIVE AND ILLUS
TRATED CATALOGUE OF
Bedding and Greenhouse Plants, Boses,
Evergreens, Hardy Shrubs, Palms, Etc.,
be mailed free to all applicants.
Having erected several new plant houses, and
added largely to our former extensive collec
tions, we are enabled to offer stock
than ever before. Address P. J. BERCKMANS,
Fruitland Nurseries, Augusta, (la.
CANNED Goods.
California Can Goods.
r PffE largest and tost selected stock of Can
1 Goods in tho city. A special run this week.
J. S. F. BARBOUR.
Corner New Houston and Barnard Streets.
TKItltA (OITA.
PERTH AMBOT TERRA COTTA (0.
Architectural Terra Cotta,
SPECIAL SIZES AND COLORS OF FRONT
BRICK.
18 Cortlandt, New York, N. Y.; Drexel Build
ing, Philadelphia, I’a.; hi South Clark street,
Chicago, ilk; Perth Amboy, N. J,
REWARD.
lie ward.
r pilE above reward will be paid for tho arrest
1 of the party or parties, with proof to convict,
who tore dowiapart of the fence around Base
Ball Park and damaged the grand stand build
ing. All parties hereafter trespassing on said
park will bo prosecuted.
J. H. KBTTLL
CARPETS, DRY GOODS, ETC
Dins
hJaj’s laps
SILKS
One lot Printed China Silk at 50c yard
One lot Printed China Silk at 65c
One lot Printed Ch ina Silk at ~9c yard '
One lot Printed China Silk at 90c ,*.?
One lot Colored Surah Silk at 50c yard '' ar *
n i a°t Colored Suiah Silk at 85c. van
One lot ladle I-rancaise, plain and checked
$1 10, worth $1 50, yard. ’ al
Dress Goods.
A comDlete assortment of Paris Dress W
tits, all new- styles.
Special attention is invited to a lot of FremA
('hey ots, ail wool,and fully 52incheswide whL.
has never been sold at retail less than Si i
W e will give our customers the benefit ~f o',
Mng Mo^
WASH FABRICS
and DOMESTICS
At the following prices for this week, and fm
spot cash only:
100 pieces Lon da e Cambric at 10c. per vard
100 pieces l.onsda e Sheeting atTMc perVar.l
100 pice s Fruit of the Loom at Bc. per Vard
100 pieces Domestic Sateens at 7c. per vard
100 pieces French-Finish Sateens at BUc
yard; worth )2>4c. " '
100 pieces Plaid and Striped Seersuckers al
654 c. per yard; worth ICc.
100 pieces Plaid and Striped Seersuckers at
BM(C. per yard; worth 1254 c.
100 pieces Standard Prints, fast colors at 5c
per yard; worth 85kc.
BOYS’ SUITS
and ODD PANTS.
150 pairs Boys’ Odd Pants at 25c. each un u
$1 50.
100 Boys’ Suits at $1 40; worth $2.
100 Boys’ Suits at $2 25; worth $2 75.
100 Boy's Suits at $2 7.5; worth $3 25.
150 pieces Fresh Canton Matting just re
ceived. Prices ranging from 20c. per yard t<
45c, per yard.
Daniel Hogan.
MACHINERY.
J. W. TYNAN
ENGINEER and MACHINIST,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.
Corner West Broad and Indian Streets.
ALL KINDS OF MACHINERY, BOILERS,
v-rr., made and repaired. STEAM PUMPS
GOVERNORS, INJECTORS AND STEAJ
WATER FITTINGS of all kind* for sale.
IRON YVORKs.
McDonough (S Baliaatyue,
IRON FOUNDERS,
Macliinisti, Boiler Makers and Blacksmiths
MANUFACTURERS OF
STATIONARY and PORTABLE ENGINES
VERTICAL and TOP RUNNING CORN
MILLS, SUGAR MILLS and PANS.
4 GENTS for Alert and Union Injectors. th<
1 v simplest and most affective on t:ie market
Gullett Light Draft Magnolia Cotton Gin, thi
best in the market.
All orders promptly attended to. Send f<*
Prir*f List.
~ DYES.
LADIES Pd™
3>o Your Own Dyeing, at Home# •
Th y will dye everything. They are sold every;
Where. Price lOc. a package. They have noequi
Jor Strength, Brightness, Amount in Package
or for F istnessof Color, or non-fading Qualities
They do not crock or For sale bf
B. F. Ulmer, M. f>.. Pharmacist, corner Brough
ton and Houston streets; P. B. Reid, Druggie
and Apothecary, corner Jones and Abercort
streets; Edward J. Kieffer, Druggist, cornel
West Broad and Stewart streets, anu L* u
Strong.
TRIN'hS
PRINTING, ETC.
SOUTHEUN
HEADQUARTERS FOR
ACCOUNT BOOKS,
PRINTING,
AND
LITHOGRAPHING.
Clank Books that Open Flat a Specialty.
FINE BINDING
in all Styles, for Public anil Privates Libraries
Turkey Morocco, Crushed Seal, or La
vunt, Kubia aiul other yualitiea
MUSIC andMAGAZINE3.
IN MAKULii. I’LAJN OK GILT EDGlis
Morning News Steam Printing House
Printing, Lithographing and Binding,
SAVANNAH, - - . ciA -
Curporations, < Jfficials, Merchants, and busi
ness men generally who require the very ni
quality of work ure invlteii to lavor us
their patronage. Our Account Books have oee
used by the leading houses in the South for in
paw twenty years, and have stood the test in
smCKOTH, DtTiiAjiiunr aku woasMASaHir. '
concerns can be fit ted out promptly, at
ulde prices,with whatever supplies .they require
In rur Hue. _ „„ —ttb
f JTALL OBDEHS KXJXUTES ON <K a
OWN PREMISm

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