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The morning news. [volume] (Savannah, Ga.) 1887-1900, March 13, 1889, Image 3

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RUSSIA’S SIBERIAN ROAD j
yONSY SHE 18 RAISING TO BEGIN
IH3 GREAT PROJECT.
gow the Line Would Probably Run-
Vast Grain Fields of the Future-En
gineering Difficulties.
From the New York Times.
St. Petersburg, Feb. 6.—Everybody
has beard, of course, about the enormous
]oa n negotiated by the Russian government
jn ‘ prance and covered by subscriptions in
that country four times over. That was
done at the opening of the present winter;
but do Americans even |jow realize ho w
that successful financial transaction of Rus
sia may react on American interests—on
the American grain market? Do they know
that a good part of the new loin is to be
applied forthwith to the construction of a
Kussian Pacific railroad which is to connect
London with Shanghai, making it possible
to leave the former and to reach the latter
within twenty-one or at most twenty-two
days?
Such is the fact. The question as to the
building of the road has already been settled
in the affirmative by the council of state,
presided over by the Grand Duke Michel,
uncle to the czar. The idea is an okl one;
a Siberian Pacific road is a vital necessity
for the empire of the czars, and as such
bas been talked of more or les3 for the last
fifteen t cars or so. Russian engineers
ha-. e been busy during all that time making
investigations of the technical difficulties
nresented by the most divergent localities
through which the proposed road is to pass.
It is the government that builds and con
trols railroads in Russia. It cannot be
gainsaid that as the system works there
are good points to be noted in it. But, be
ing first of all a military country, Rus.ia
has railroads built on a different plan from
that adopted in America. It is military
exigencies that have the utmost weight in
the selection of the direction to be given to
anew road. The shortest cut is generally
considered the best, since the shortest rail
road affords the speediest means for the
mobilization of troops.
When asked which direction would be
sanctioned for the first Russian railroad
that had to be built from St. Petersburg
to Moscow in 1855, matter-of-fact Emperor
Nicholas took a ruler, and drawing a strait
line from the new Russian capital to the an
cient one, simply said: "Thus must the
road go,” and so it went, notwitlistahding
the enormous difficulties presented by the
marshes on the direct line, and, when fin
ished. the road failed to connect the most
important commercial points of the locality
though they are often only a few miles dis
tant from the railroad track. Of course,
the recently completed Trans Caucasian
railroad, though strictly a military line,
could not be built on the same principle,
running, as it does, through shifting sands
and desert, the question being, not how to
make the line direct, but whether there
was a possibility of building any railroad
at all.
In the construction of the Paaific railroad
—started by no means for military purposes
—other things have to be taken into consid
eration besides the question of speed. The
line will chiefly serve for the transporta
tion of convicts to Siberia as well as of
merchandise, and then for the transporta
tion of Siberian produce into Russia and
further on. Now, in such a sparsely-popu
lated country as Siberia—o. 4 man to the
square verst, a verst being 0.663 of a mile —
it would be quite a consideration to carry
convicts so as to reach all the prisons along
the way, and such are of course situated in
the largest cities of Siberia, which in their
turn are the points to which all the natural
products are shipped by producers.
Ihe line most in favor among those in
consideration at the present time would, if
constructed, run thus: Beginning at St.
Petersburg it would go via Moscow, Nijny
Novgorod, Kazan, Perm, Ekato: inburg,
Tiumen, Tomsk, Krasnoyarsk, Irkutsk, Bo
jarskoye, Verkhneudinsk, Tchita, Ner
chinsk, Streteusk, Shilkovo, Blagovest
cheusk, Khabarovka, Kamen-Ribolov to
Vladivostok, the Russian military and
naval station on the Pacific ocean. This
enormous road will cover a distance of 10,-
000 versts, of which 1,700 versts are built
already, comprising the railroad from
Moscow to Nijny Novgorod and another
from Perm to Tiumen.
It is imp >ssible at a cursory glance to es
timate the enormous outlay of money nec
essary for such au undertaking; even now
the official estimates put it at 500,000,000
rubies, but prominent engineers say that
this figure will be doubled before the enor
mous technical difficulties presented by the
road are fully conquered.
The chief difficulty will lie—as far as can
be seen now—in the construction of bridges
oyer the large and swift-running Siberian
rivers. Then the line from Tiumen to
Tomsk will have to goby way of the Bara
bin Steppe, covered by innumerable little
lakes. In the rainy season that steppe is
converted into an impassable marsh; there
are no woods in the locality except a little
birchwood that the inhabitants use for the
construction of their huts. It will be a hard
task to construct a railroad in those marshes
where sand and stone sink to a depth of ful
ly 29 feet. There, also, it will be necessary
to build bridges over the Tobol, the Ishim,
the Irtish, and the Ob, all of wnich have to
be protected by dams. Still more difficult
will be the building of the bridge over the
leuisei, which is a very swift-flowing and
deep river; over the River Selenga, the
chilka, and the Amoor, as well as over eight
of its tributaries near Vladivostok. All the
material for those works have to bo
brought over by water-ways. There would
be much difficulty, also in feeding the work
men.
Apart from the importance of the Rus
nan Pacific road, In a military way—the
facilities it will afford in massing Russian
troops in the far ea-t of Asia —it is hardly
possible to overestimate itsimmense bearing
on the commerce of Russia and that of the
test of the world. Americans must not
forget that Siberia is by no means the arc
tic wilderness it is often depicted. Asa
tram producing country fully two-thirds of
itsimmense area of 3,917,287 square versts
comes up to t e standard of the great
American northwest. As yet the labor is
jacking there, the entire population of
Liberia numbering only 4,313,689 people,
>ut there is a steady outflow of peasants
jrom Great Russia into the wheat-growing
region of Siberia. All that this iminigra-
L 10 1) ‘et ds in order to be successful and
tughly productive is some enlightened as
“Stance from the government.
A 8 13 now, however, the chief products
, s *beria are going to be gold, silver, and
nrs; then there will be a large transit of
ea over the I’acific railroad; the Hiberian
v' I,nent 11 Tobolsk, Tomsk, Irkutsk,
(id \ oniseisk will supply enormous qusm-
Ues iif wheat, rye, and barley. Beside*
iis, 1 nmsk. in connection with the prov
. u,s ”‘ Akmolinskand Henupalatinsk, will
h.Viir 1 .l?' Ke herds of cattle, sheep, and
'If 6 *- , r he Hifierian rivers, so rich in fish,
to vi* v nut * ar K e quantities of frozen fish
J, , '' M,, rn Euroiie— European Russia being
sum,!,,,d at borne.
, m Pacific line will be supplemented by
,1 '*'!*' w bich is to connect the regions of
hand Yenisei rivers; work is already
null °P *"h a t canal, and, when completed,
i , , j h“ the chief means of transit for
'*stuffs raised in the above-mentioned
--imenu as well as in tho Zabaikal
tu t ‘i Sß Russian Pacific railroad takes
'cated direction, passenger trains
to run on It at a speed of
tr „; 111 ’'files in 2-1 hours, wills the freight
rnimi W 0 L 1< aveage 320 miles in the same
ri,4, \-V^ J llour,; thus a passenger may
sfti.i- 1 lar h vo *tok on tho sixteenth day
im ii '" U . 71,1 F Ht . Petersburg, and freight
L,ns? twentieth day. i’assengors from
r-n, i, ui Vla , * ie Eu-sian Pacific road would
and t hanghal on the twenty-second dav,
"biiefft’ft 1 ,°u a the twenty-sixth day,
five ''“k ß * them now thirty and tbtrty
hy ~.(£ y8 ’ rß pectively, to reach (Shanghai
Another project, which is proposed by
Gen. Protzenko, would have the Pacific
ro&d start at the town of Zlatoust on the
Ural, and thence go to Vladivostok by way
of Kurgan, Omsk, Tomsk, Krasnojorsk, the
northern shore of the Baikal sea, and
Khabarovka.
The Russian government seems to take
such intense interest in the development of
ways of communication for Siberia that it
is now even seriously considered to connect
ttie mouto of the Ob with the sea of Kars
by means of a railroad 375 miles long in
such a way that the sta voyage in those
parts would be curtailed by fully 1,077 miles
and such inconveuience set aside, siuce those
parts of the Arctic ocean are scarcely ever
fre? from floating icebergs. This last rail
road, however, wifi have only freight trains
running on it, and those only 180 days of
the year. When in running order, however,
that railroad could be running 13 trains
daily, the trains to be composed of twenty
five cars each.
A great future seems to be dawning on
Siberia, and the day is not far distant when
that immense northern grapery, in full
working order, may come out in threatening
competition with the productions of the
great American northwest.
EDISON’S WORKS IN PARIS.
Extensive Preparations For the Dis
play of Electrical Inventions.
From the New York Tribune.
For several days Thomas A. Edison has
been busily engaged in sending off articles
for h;s exhibit at the Paris exposition.
Nearly one-third of the entire floor space
allowed to the United States has been given
to him, and his preparations are on an ex
tensive scale. The exhibit of phonographs
will includes large number of instruments,
each of the latest type, with Mr. Edison’s
latest improved automatic tension regula
tor. A corps of assistants will bo in attend
ance, speaking nearly all the languages of
the civilized World. AU the various kinds of
instruments will be shown, from the origi
nal phonograph now in the South Kensing
ton Museum, London, down to the very lat
est improved type.
The telegraph department will contain
models of all the machines and patents
that Mr. Edison has worked out and all the
improvements he has effected. In the tele
phone division there will be a chronological
arrangement of all the devices from the
original Edison instrument popularly known
as the “Blake transmitter,” down to his lat
est improved tnotorgrapb, or loud-speaking
telephone. There will oe a comolete work
ing system set up showing the Edison car
bon telephones and the motorgraphs work
ing in juxtaposition. In electric lighting
there will be a complete three-wire munici
pal system extending over all the exhibit,
complete with motor, dynamos, central
station, and indicating and regulating ap
paratus, as perfect as if for a large city.
The principal feature of the whole exhibit,
however, will be an enormous model of an
incandescent lamp 40 feet high, the globe
being composed of no less than 30,000 in
candescent lamp bulbs, and the luminous
filament within being indicated by a loop of
red colored incandescent lamps. The effect
when the light is flashed into these thous
ands of bulbs will be wonderfully brilliant,
and it will illuminate the entire main
building.
Around the base of this novel lamp will
be a series of panels illustrative of the va
rious stages of the manufacture of incan
descent lamps, and on either side will be the
French and American flags worked out in
colored incandescent globes. One will be
inscribed “Paris,” and the other “Edison.”
Among other novelties will be a huge
dynamo capable of running 2,000 lamps,
much the largest dynamo that has ever been
constructed. An interesting feature will
be a series of charts, 100 in number, show
ing the growth and development of all Mr.
Edison’s inventions, from the first crude
idea, through all the successive stages, to the
complete and perfected instrument. There
will be a number of frames showing the
filaments in their natural condition, aud
after being carbonized, with samples, ar
ranged in chronological order, of all the
substances that have been experimented
with in this direction.
An interesting map of the first electric
central station and district in this
city will also be exhibited, with a
tabular statement showing the
growth of the busine-s from a net loss of
14,457 in 1883 to a net profit of $116,235 in
1888, aud this despite the reduction of gas
to $1 25 per 1,000 feet, while the equivalent
cost of electric light is $3 25.
A novel effect will be produced by a large
allegorical picture now being painted in the
laboratory, entitled “Menlo park, the birth
place of the incandescent lamp.” It will
show the original workshops and labora
tory of the wizard at Menlo park in the
gray twilight of a wintry day, with a flood
of radiance streaming from the windows.
In the foreground and running around to
the right is shown the original first electric
railroad ever built. Rising out of the cen
tral building is a vast ghostly incandescent
bulb whose radiating beams illuminate a
series of bordering designs snowing the
principal buildings of the world now lighted
by the Edison system, among them the
palace of the Mikado of Japan, the houses
of parliament, both in London and in Cape
Town, South Africa, and the palace of the
Emperor of Siam.
Three large shipments.of several hun
dred cases have already been made and the
remainder will be pjeked and shipped with
in a week or two. The exposition will open
on May 4, when Mr. Edison expects to have
the entire exhibit in working order.
A CONNECTICUT ROMANCE.
A Reporter Wins a Bride by Searching
for and Finding Her Mother.
From the New York Sun.
New Haven, March s.—There was a
quiet wedding in the little village of Terry
ville, Litchfield county, this afternoon, that
ends a pleasing love story and begins a
new chapter in the romantic life of a Con
necticut girl. Miss Jennie Hart, the adopted
daughter of a wealthy manufacturer of
Kensington, was the brids, and the man she
married is Thomas E. Nunenan, a reporter
for the New Haven Morning News. Nune
nan did not get his wife until lie tiad put in
some good work in the detective line in
search of the young lady’s parents. She re
fused to marry him until she knew the his
tory of her early life.
The only clew with which the ardent lover
began the search was the knowledge that
the girl had been adopted from some Bos
ton orphan asylum, and she had beard that
her real name was Hayden. Nunetian
hunted for a long time among the records
of ttie many institutions in Boston without
any success. Finally, at the Little Wand
erers’ Home, on Baldwin place, tile re
porter learned that the girl whose history
ho was in search of had been taken in when
6 voars old at the request of her grand
parents. Her father had died within a
few years after she was born, and the
widow was supported by the town The
mother of the child would be only 38 years
ol 1 if she were alive, but the superintend
ent reasoned that she must have been ill
then, as the town of Mouth Coventry, Conn.,
was obliged to Rupport her, and as they had
novor hoard from her, not oven a letter of
inquiry having been received, she was un
doubtedly dead. Mr. Hart, had takon the
girl immediately after she was received
from South Coventry, in 1876.
For woeks the young man hunted for
some trace of bis sweetheart’s mother, but
the fates seemed to be against him. He re
turned to his work at the office of the News,
and after a while he again started out. This
time he was sue essful. He found the
mother living in Rockville. Sho has mai*
rieil a socond timo, and had several cnil
dren by her second husband. The sequel
was as mteroiting as tho original search.
The little girl had been torn from her
mother fourteen years ago by a grandfather,
who, in order to bo relieved of the expense
of caring for the little one gave her to fcne
Little Wanderers’ Homo. He re
fused to tek the mother where her
child was, and died without revealing
the Soon after that she mar
ried ft Mr. Eidridge. Borne time ago she
THE MORNING NEWS: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1589.
saw a young lady in Putnam who resem
bled the lost one, and end avorid to find
some trace of her daughter tiiere. She had
a little photograph of the girl, taken a short
time before sue went away, >u. in teirs,
she showed it to Nunenau. Ha had a mtcr
piitograph in his pocket, with the exact
features of the smaller one, but he kept it
there. The time for disclosure had not
come. He suggested that, twelves years
having passed, it would be impossible to
recognize the littld girl in the person of the
young lady, and, besides, another name had
in all probability, been given her. But the
mother believed that she would know her
at sight, and gave proof that she could
identify her.
Nunenati’s next interview was in exec
utive -essioa, and the public .were not ad
mitted. Two days later Miss Hart and her
guardian, Mr. Woodruff, went to Rockville.
Mrs. Eidridge was busy sewing in the mill
where she was employed, when her atten
tion was attracted to a young lady who was
being shown about the room.
“I wonder who that young beauty is?”
Mrs. Eidridge said to a companion.
The young lady passed tbrougu with the
attendant, and was at the timo forgotten.
A few minutes later Mrs. Eidridge was
called to the office and greeted with the
affectionate name of "mother.” Soon the
Eidridge children were caressed by the
sister whom they knew but had never seen,
and the sister found relatives of whose ex
istence she had i ewiy learned.
To-day Miss Hart or Hayden rewarded
the tireless wooer at toe altar.
Weather Indications.
I l Special indications for Georgia:
I FAIR Fair weather, continued high tem-
L_Jperature, variable winds.
Comparison of mean temperature at Savan
nah. March '2, 1889, and the mean of same day
for fifteen years.
Departure i Total
Mean Temperature from the Departure
Mean { Since
for 15 years| Mch. 13,'89. -{-or — Jan. 1,1889.
69 | 50 -12 i- 252
Comparative rainfall statement:
| Departure Total
Mean Daily j Amount from the Departure
Amount for for Mean Since
10 years. Mch. 12, "89. j -|- or Jan. 1,1889.
13 1 .00 j .13 -|- 3.82
~Maximum temperature, 67.9; minimum tem
perature, 40 8.
The hight of the river at Augusta at 7:33
o’clock a. m. yesterday (Augusta time) was
11.0 feet, a fall of 0.1 feet during the pqpt
twentyfour hours.
Observations takon at the same moment of
time at all stations.
Savannah. March 12. 7:?6 p. m.. City time.
I
j Temperature, j
i ] !
Direction. Z?
j z
| Velocity. ?
| Rainfall.
NAME
or
STATIONS.
Portland 38 W 6;... Clear.
Boston 42 W 10 .... clear.
Block Island 38 W 20 j Clear.
New York city 4M8W121 Clear.
Philadelphia 48 SW 0— Clear.
Washington City. 60S E . .... Clear.
Norfolk 40 S Ej 6{— iClear.
Charlotte 621 S L Clear.
Hatteras . | 44 S E .. .... [Clear.
Detroit 40; E | ti| [Clear.
Fort Buford 22 N 18:.... Cloudy.
St. Vincent 10 NW:26 .... Clear.
Wilmington 50 S El C'ear.
Charleston 62 E {lO —{Cloudy.
Augusta 60j Ei Cloudy.
Savannah. 52 N E{ 6 {Cloudy.
Jacksonville 52 N Ei.. *T {Cloudy.
Cedar Keys 52 N E 8 .06 Raining.
Kev West 64,8 E{l2 74iRaining.
Atlanta 66 E(6 iEair.
Pensacola 59 N E 6 Cloudy.
Mobile 68 S 1 Cloudy.
Montgomery 58 N E 18 Cloudy.
Vicksburg . 58 E Cloudy.
New Orleans 58 N Cloudy.
Shreveport 58 E Clear.
Fort Smith 56NE Cloudy.
Galveston 54 E 6 Cloudy.
Palestine 58 E Fair.
Brownesville 56| W 8 Cloudy.
RioGrande 52 N E 6 Cloudy.
Knoxville 64 SW Clear.
Memphis 56 S E Clear.
Nashville. 56; E Clear.
Point Jupiter, Fla. 62 NW 6 ICloudy.
Titusville 58 N .. .24 Cloudy.
Cincinnati 52, SW Clear.
Pittsburg 50 SW 8 Clear.
Buffalo 34 SW Clear.
Cleveland. 42 E Clear.
Marquette 31 NW 16 Cloudy.
Chicago 38 SE Clear
Duluth 36 SW 8.... Cloudy.
St. Paul 381 W Cloudy.
Carlo 58ISW Cloudy.
St. Louis no; W 8 Cloudy.
Kansas City ni SW 6 .... Cloudy.
Omaha 48 N Cloudy.
Yankton 44 8 E Fair.
Bismarck 36 NW 12 ... Cloudy.
Cheyenn 50 NW{l2 Fair.
*T denotes trace of rainfall.
M. J. Wrioht, Jr.. Observer Signal Corps.
Aa Welcome aa are the Blowera of
Spring.
Equally are the returns of the 225th
Grand Monthly distribution of the Louisi
ana State Lottery, which took place on
Tuesday, (always Tuesday) Feb. 12, under
the sole supervision of Gens. Q. T. Beaure
gard of Louisiana, and Jubal A. Early of
Virginia. No. 25,215 drew the first capital
prize of #BOO,OOO. It was sold in fractional
twentieths at $1 each sent to M. A. Dauphin,
New Orleans, Li. Three to London, Paris
and American Bank, (Limited). San Fran
cisco, Cal.; one to C. V. Terrell, Decatur,
Tox.; one to E. C. Bartholemew, Titusville,
Pa.; one to George E. Bartlett, Boston,
Mass.; one to A. E. Peirce, Boston, Mass.;
one to Citizens’ National Bank of Kansas
City, Mo.; one to Union National Bank of
Kansas City, Mo.; one to a depositor Canal
Bank, New Orleans, La.; one to W illiam
Babson care of Pressous Express, Boston,
Mass.; one to a deposimr Wells. Fargo &
Co.’s Bank, San Francisco, Cal.; one to
Anglo Californian Bank, San Fran isco,
etc.,etc. No. 64,109 drew the second capital
prize of $100,000; it was also sold in frac
tional twentieths at $1 each; one to Chris
topher Rourk 603 I street, northwest,
Washington. D. C.; one to Wells, Fargo &
Co.’s Bank, San Francisco; one to Frank J.
Kuecht, Kankakee, 111.; one to H. D.
Mueller. Jr., care American Express Com
pany, Quincy, 111.; one to Johnson &
Walker, Marlin, Tex.; one to Charles W.
Webster, Hardy, Neb.; one to Robert
Schumann, 1448 Ling street, Philadelphia,
I’a.; one to E. T. Robberson, Spring
field, Mo.; etc., etc. No. 17,165
drew the third capital nrizo of $59,-
009, also sold in twentieth parts; one to
Shaw & Horst, Navasota, Tex.; one to K.
L. Malone, Griffin, Ga.; one paid to Bank
of C mimeroe, Memphis, Tenn.; one to a
depositor New Orleans National Bank, New
Orleans, La.; ono to National Savings Bank
of Washington, D. C.; etc., etc. The 227th
grand drawing will take plans on Tuesday,
April 16, 1889, full information of which
can lie had on application to M. A. Dauphin,
New Orleans, l.a.
WHOLESALE GROCERS.
henry Solomon &■ Sod,
Wholesale Grocers
AND ,
LIQUOR DEALERS,
173, *75, 182, 184 BAY STREET.
Jobbers of FLOURS, TOBACCOS and CIGARS.
Sole Agents for AMERICAN MACHINE
COMPANY'S PERFEtm -N SCALES.
_*ar-Ordera by MallßoUdtted.
Or DAVIS & SON,
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
PROVISION. HAY, GRAIN AND FLOUR,
and commission merghants,
196 and 198 Bay Street, - Savannah, Ga.
MEDICAL.
How’s
Your Liver?
Is the Oriental salutation,
knowing that good health,
cannot exist without a
healthy Liver. When the
Liver is torpid the Bow
els are sluggish and con
stipated, the food lies
in the stomach undi
gested, poisoning tho
blood; frequent headache
ensues; a feeling of lassi
tude, despondency and
nervousness indicato how
the whole system is de
ranged. Simmons Liver
Regulator has been the
means of restoring more
people to health and
happiness by giving them
a healthy Liver than any
agency known on earth.
It acts with extraor
dinary power and efficacy.
NEVER BEEN DISAPPOINTED
Asa general family remedy for Dyspepsia,
Torpid Liver, Constipation, etc.. I hardly
over use anything else, and have never
been disappointed In the effect produced;
it seems to be almost a perfect cure for all
diseases of the Stomach and Bowels.
W. J. McKlroy, Macon, Ot
According to a para
graph in the American Culti
vator of Boston, Consumption is
gradually decreasing in New
England. This is a gratifying fact,
and much of the credit of this
condition of things is due to the
extrhordinary popularity in the
past 50 years in New England of
Schenck’s Pulmonic Syrup.
To this wonderful remedy more
than all others combined is due
the credit of decreasing the ravages
of Consumption.
JULIUS BOYDEN,
No. 574 N. Main St. Providence, R. I.
Was a Soldier, and was discharged from the
U. S. Army as an incurable Consumptive,
His discharge reads “Advanced stage of Con
sumption of the Lungs.” He writes:
“In September I went to see Dr. Schenck,
and soon after began to use his Medicines.
In the following April I was entirely Welland
went to work. From that time to this I have
not spent one dollar for doctors or medicine.”
DR. SCHENCK’S Rook on Consumption,
Liver Complaint and Dyspepsia, sent Free.
DB. J. H. SCHENCK A SON, Philadelphia, !'.
DU OR OS
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Agents, N. Y. SOLD BY ALL DIiUtiOISTS.^
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woc 1/ rent. Scientific.Powerful,Durable,Con
fortablc and Effective. Avoid frauds.
Over 9.000 cured. Rend etaiopfor pamphlet.
ALSO ELECTRIC BELTS FOR HIHEAHEPL
Dr. HORNE, Inventor, 191 Wabash Ave. Chicaco.
CURE BtDEAF
r \ Jka 1 Peck’s Patent Improved Cu*h.
-A toned Ear Drum. PERFECTLY
Restore the liraring, whether Leaf
nrn is riuatd by colda, f>- *’*r or Injurle* to
”/ the natural drum. Invisible, comfortable.
i alway* in {position. M usic, rosrersatloa, ana
Lill XI whUperabeard distinctly. S ircmsful whers
all other remedle* fail. Sold only by P.
IIISCOX, 853 Broadway, corner of 14th st., N . If. City.
Write fer illuatrated book of "provfa Free. Meutloa paper
PARKER’S
feJIHAIR BALSAM
Jdjf’leatiaeiß and t**autifle* tho hair.
pPwKy* d# MB Promote* a luxuriant growth.
Never Fails to Restore Gray
Hair to its Youthful Color.
Dandruff A hair fulling
SA 60c. and SI.OO at Druggists.
FURNISHING GOODS.
Hen’s FBiistiiif
WE BEG' TO CALL THE ATTENTION OF
GOOD DRESSERS TO OUR
LINES OF
Welch, Margcta & Co.’s
Collars,
Cuffs,
Mwear anfl
Haiteliiefs,
IMPORTED BY US DIRECT, INSURING TO
OUR CUSTOMERS THE LATEST SHAPES
AND DESIGNS IN THESE ESSENTIAL FEA
TURES OF A GENTLEMAN'S TOILET.
RESPF.CTFULLt, •
1 ME k SONS.
• V < ) NTS \ WEEK ,ay for th „
•W [ DAILY MORNING NEWS. (IcUt-
V, m leiad EARLY EVERY MORNING
eaai 'S ut any part lUo uU>
STATE
or
WEATHER.
EVERYBODY IS INVITED
TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR
ONE CENT A WORD COLUMN,
For 15 cents you can have “your say" in the
Morning Nxws, provided you say It in 15 words,
ami pay 1 cent for each added word. The
CHEAP COLUMN embraces advertisements of
all kinds, vis.: FOR HALE, REAL ESTATE,
TO LEASE, SALE HOUSES, HORSES AND
CARRIAGES. SALE MISCELLANEOUS, BUSI
NESS OPPORTUNITIES, PERSONAL, BOARD
ING, W ANTED HELP, WANTED SITUA
TIONS, WANTED ROOMS, WANTED BOARD,
FOR RENT ROOMS, WANTED AGENTS.
WANTED HOUSES, WANTED MISCELLANE
OUS, LOST AND FOUND, TO LOAN, RE
MOVALS, AUCTIONS, EDUCATIONAL, PRO
FESSIONAL, MUSICAL, ATTORNEYS, Etc.
OUT OF TOWN ADVERTISERS
will have their orders promptly attended to and
will receive copies of the paper with the adver
tisement marked for inspection. Count the
number of words in your "ad" and remit
accordingly. Please remember that no adver
tisement is inserted for less than 15 cents.
LETTER BOXES
in the Mok.nxnq News are furnished without
cost for the reoeipt of answers to advertisers,
and all communications are strictly confi
dential.
Persons having advertising aocounts with
the Mohnixo News can send advertisements
BY TELEPHONE when it is nt convenient to
write anil forward them to the office.
Telephone of Business Office is No. 361.
Calls answered until lO p. m.
PERSONAL.
rTMIE price of one dozen line Cabinet Photo
-1 graphs and one extra, the proper size for an
Bxlo frame, is two dollars and fifty cents;frames
to fit the game very cheap. J. N. WILSON.
DR. J. D. LANIER has removed to the north
west corner of Bull and Liberty streets,
and will resume practice THIS MORNING.
IT'RANK The leg of Mutton and the fresh
Meats you got from T. W. FLEMING ore
the best 1 have ever seen. Don't fail to go there
all the time for our meats. POLLY.
N O DOUBT about it, the finest Chocolates
on the market are HEIDT’S, or they could
not be so popular.
MRS. A. RICHARDSON, experienced Mid
wife, lias removed to 124 West Broad street,
one door from Gaston.
HELP WANTED.
"\\rANTED, a middle-aged woman without
if encumbrances as cook and general help;
must come recommended. Apply northwest
corner Gwinnett and Price streets.
A \T ANTED, a first class male cook for a hotel
v V out of the city. Apply, at onoe, STRAUSS
BROS.. (irocers, Barnard street.
TAT ANTED, a middle-aged colored nurse, to
t t have night care for infant; references re
quired. Apply at half-past three p. m. at 65
Abercorn street.
A\ ’ ANTED, a girl to do housework and assist
M with children; w illing to go North in sum
mer. Apply 111 Perry street.
WANTED AGENTS-To sell the “King of
'' Glory,” the most charming Life of Christ
ever written. One agent has sold In les# than
four months 3,104 copies. One agent sold In
Savannah, Ga.. in 23 days, 578 copies. Only 90
cents for full outfit, including a copy of the
book in best binding. Address at once, SOUTH
WESTERN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 153 and 155
North Spruce street, Nashville, Tenn,
TAT ANTED, agents for the sale of lubricating
vV and burning oils on commission; liberal
inducements to tho right men. TRENTON
ROCK RESIGNING CO., 15 State street. New
York city.
EMPLOY MENT WANTED.
TATANTED.—A young foreigner, about 17
\ I years of age, of good and sober habits,
mastering the Italian language and rapidly
picking up the English, desires to learn any
good trade or business either in or out of the
city; he is perfectly willing to work bard and
make himself useful in all ways; salary no
object: can give good references. Address at
once A. N. 1.. P. O. Box 177, Savannah, da.
VATANTEP, by a single gentleman, a private
TT family in the country, a position as
teacher; satisfaction guaranteed. Address W.
G. 8., care News office. *
1 EMPLOYMENT WANTED, filer and ham
j merer, or sawyer for circular or baud;
Sood reference. Address N. C., care Morning
ews.
A YOUNG MAN wishes a position as clerk in
a retail or wholesale house, or as assistant
bookkeeper or collector. Address 8., this office.
A WHITE WOMAN wishes a situation as
chambermaid and seamstress, or house
maid. Address C. R . Morning News office.
STENOGRAPHER. A first class stenographer
and A1 type writer desires engageuient.
BTENO. Morning News office.
TAT ANTED.—A young man well acquainted
T V with the newspaper business desires to se
cure a position on some good paper, daily pre
ferred; a regular news hustler: best references.
Address C. G. MORRIS, care Daily Sun, Oriflßn,
Ga,
MISCELLANEOUS WANTS.
TAT ANTED, about April 10th, house of six or
VV seven rooms, with bath, between Gordon,
Bolton, Drayton and Price streets. Address,
vrfl h terms, 8., News office.
AA T ANTED, a drug store doing a good retail
VV business in the city of Savannah. Ad
dress. stating particulars, 8. G. W., car# News.
TATANTED, immediately, small room by single
VV man; In answering give price same. Ad
dress N. C.. Morning News.
TIT ANTED TO RENT, an office on West Broad
VV street, near Broughton. Address B. C.
HODGES, Harnett House.
ROOMS TO RENT.
TAOR RENT, single furnished room, with or
I without board; also, basement room suita
ble for doctor's office. 79 Broughton street.
HOUSES AND STORES FOB BENT.
IT'OR KENT, three story brick house, No. 65
1 .Jefferson, corner of Perry; newly painted
and re] mi re i; contains nine rooms on basement
and two-story outbuilding. Apply to J. W.
McALPIN, Executor.
FOB HALE.
TATE will have an auction sale of lot of scrub
VV Texas Mares and Hors -a They will be
sold cheap, and no guarantee Riven. They won't
cost much, so keep your small change. Date of
sale will be given later. J. K.GUII.MARTIN *
CO.
( 'HEAP, one nice Poplar Chamber Bet, one
Gold and Red Plush Louiige. three Re
frigerators, at CALLAHAN 8, 2144 Barnard
street. ‘
J7OB SALS, cheap, Ndi Duck Xgg* for
* hatching. P. 6 Broughton street.
IUKTURES, Crockery anil Furniture, less than
auction prices, at ( ALLAH AN'S, 3*JJ4 Bar
nard street.
•SAG. Hair, Tooth, Nall, Bhoe and Whisk
H F Brushes. Chamois and Sponges. At
HEIDT'B PHARMACY. _
I >aksKNGF.K locomotive with two logging
I trucks attached, for sale cheap or for rent.
Address W W. PA< E, Albany, Ga. ,
O "l C. —The sjteoial price to induce everybody
to try HEIDT'B Assorted JxtraChoco
lalcs hair pound handsome package.
IT'OR SALK, 180 bales good Country Hay, in
1 lota to suits purchas re, at COWAN'S
WAREHOUSE, foot of Montgomery street,
T LOW PRICES, fresh and reliable Beed
from Peter Henderson, Butst and other
growers ________
A RARE BARGAlN.—Beautiful residence in
Palatka, Fla.; larße 214 Story bouse, with
L, ten rooms; fine location; flues and closets In
all rooms: at a bargain It sold soon. 8. A.
ADAMS, Jacksonville, Fla., or E a FIELD,
I'aiatAa, Fla.
LOST.
IOBT. a Bunch of Keys, with ring and tag
j with owner’s name on. Return to CON
NELL’S TENCENT STORE, 154 Bryan street,
and lie rewarded.
IOST, Tuesday, on Whitaker street ear, or
J on Congress street, a Pink Enamel Brooch.
Reward if returned to 36 Abercorn street.
IOST, small Gold Watch Chain; gold fish
J ou end. Return to No. 49 York street and
get reward.
MISCELLANEOUS.
ev rC.. to-day only, for a dozen of HEIDT’S
I/ well known Wash Cloth Soap.
•J “C. POUND Pure Sugar Candy, Chocolate
J 1) Cream Drops. Why pay fancy prices
when finest Candies are sold low at HEIDT'BI
nil) YOU BEE those fine Uutterrup*. Crystal
lized Fruits, Ginger, Marshmallows?
HEIDT’S Fine Confections in handsome pack
ages.
1 POPULAR because of tho superiority of
HEIDT'B Fine Confections; beautifully put
11]' at C.'.c , loe. and 63c.
I AC. CAKE HEIDT'B SHAVING SOAP, With
1* J Mug, to introduce It. Remember each
day's inducements.
tC. OIL PASTE BLACKING; oils the shoe and
) preserves the teat her
IT'OR reliable Drugs, fresh Seeds ami fine Con-
I factious, at low prices, go to HEIDT'B.
•-( '. UNBREAKABLE COMBS. HEIDT'B
for all reliable Toilet Articles at reason
able prices.
1 AC. HEIDT'B Celebrated Cough Drops; 260.
1" ‘ Balsam, Wild Cherry, Honey and Tar
(10URT HOUSE NOTICE.—If you want your
J building put up so that it will fall down in
two years time, and have to be repaired every
three months afterward, give it out by contract
and let jaukiogs do tho work lty so doing you
can gel a paiier ending insiffad, VTf oak put up,
then if it falls down it will not hurt anyone.
Carpenter work done to order. Superintending
a specialty. Address A. J. SNEDEKER.
'l'ilK SINGER SEWING MACHINE stUl draws
I large crowds of ladies, who recelvo free
chances on tho elegant Slumber Roll and a
Smith Egge Buttonhole Attachment. Draw
ing to take place Saturday.
?’l' W. FLEMING, corner Whitaker and
X Liberty streets, lias at all times the very
l>est grades of all kinds of fresh meats. Give
him a call.
I UST RECEIVED, a beautiful line of Monde
fl auil Linen Lap Dusters dud Horse Sheets
cheap. NKIPUNGKR & RABUN.
rp<> whom it may concern: T W. FLEMING,
I corner Whitaker and Liberty streets, has
the freshest meats of the finest quality to be
found in the city.
Divorces- a. GOODRICH, attorney at law,
124 Dearborn street. Chicago; advice free;
21 years experience; business quietly and legally
transacted.
BEFORE you buy or sell property consult
ItOBT. 11. TATEM, Heal Estate Dealer
and Auctioneer.
PETITIONS FOB INCORPORATION.
PETITION FOR INCORPORATION.'"
CTATE OF GEORGIA, Chatham County. -
)’ To the Honorable the Superior Court of said
oounty:
Thepetition of FRANKLIN JONES. JOHN
Mclntosh, James allen williams,
JAMES ROSS. JOHN C. SIMMONS, CHARLES
It PRICE, THOMAS E. FERREBEK, and BEN
JAMIN CASHIN, all of said couuty and state,
respectfully sbeweth: That they have associated
themselves together for the purpose of forming
a c rporatiou to be composed or your said peti
tioner and such other persons as they may
associate with them, and desire to be incor
porated by the corporate name of the "CO
OPERATIVE MERCHANDISING ASSOCIA
TION," under suctf constitution and by-laws as
may be adopted by them for their government.
That the object of the said association is to
keep and operate a store or stores In the city of
Savannah, oounty and state aforesaid, and to
buy, sell and carry on trade In groceries, pro
visions, dry goods, clothing, boots, shoes, bats,
caps, wines, liquors, cigars, tobacco, and in all
the goods, wares and merchandises, usually kept
and sold in grocery, dry goods, clothing and
furnishing stores; or in any or either or all of
the articles aforesaid. That the capital they
propose to employ at present is the sum of two
thousand ($3,000) dollars, ail of which amount
has been actually jiald in: but said association
desires to have the power to increase Its capital
stock, from time to time, to a sum not exceed
ing five thousand ($5,000) dollars. That the place
of business of said association will be in the
city of Savannah, county and state aforesaid.
And that your petitioners desire to tie incor
porated. as aforesaid, for the period of twenty
years, with the privilege of renewal at the ex
piration of that time. And that they desire to
bo invested with all the powers, rights and
privileges usually conferred upon corporations
of similar character, as may he necessary for
the purposes hereinbefore sot forth ami con
sistent with the laws of Georgia. Wherefore,
y-our pet [tinners pray that they and their asso
elates and successors may be incorporated for
the term of twenty years, with the privilege of
renewal at the expiration of that period, under
the name and style of the "CO-OPERATIVE
MERCHANDISING ASSOCIATION," and that
the said association may ba empowered to In
crease its capital stock from time to time, as it
may see fit,, to an amount not exceeding five
thousand ($6,000). And that said association
may be empowered to purchase and hold prop
erty, real and personal, to contract and he con
tracted with, to sue and be sued in its corporate
capacity, to have a corporate seal, and to do
anil perform all such acts ns may lie necessary
to or may facilitate the attainment of the ob
jects and purposes of said association as here
inbefore set forth. And may be invested with
and exercise and enjoy all the rights, power*
and privileges incident and belonging to cor
porations under the laws of the btAih of Geor
gla.
And your petitioners will ever pray. etc.
WM. W. OSBORNE,
Petitioners' Attorney.
Petition filed In office and recorded this stb
March, 1889. JAMES K. P. CARR.
Clerk S. 0. O. C , Ga.
STOVES.
THE PATENT
WIRE GAUZE OVEN DOOF
•a the Latest Improvement onth
[t produce* Practical Remit* in Baking aa
Roasting never before attained in any
Cooking Apparatus, and will
M&tio&izt the Present Methods of Cooltiq
ITS THEOHT
to, that, all Food Bak*d or Koastad, nhouM ha <W>k*
u frh air frealy ad mitt ml loth* oven. ThUiado*
>7 and incarding tba clo** OTn door heretofore ua*d,an
tihutitutinir for it a door containing a alioel of Win
ilaiiea near]y hr large us the door itM'lf,
Through this Gauze Door the air freel:
circulates* facilitating the procaa* of cooking, an
•roduring food that is unequalled in flavor ami m
rition.and actually cook'd with lean cnuaumptiOA 0
uel than in an orea with a cloaed door.
It mak*a nn enormous Haring in tho weight of meal
It also produces larger Loaves of Bread
wquiree leu* attention from the cook, and promote
he health of the family by tho IGI'IUOB qUALIT
JT 'XUS FOOD COOKED IW IT.
OPINION OF AnIeXPERT,
Mm. Mart B. Welch, Teacher Doraeetic Kconomj
owa Htate ITnWeraity. aaya: “My deliberate judgmeo
• that the oven of the Karifrn, as coin pared with other*
• not only more equally heated in every part- front a
►ell an rear— but as a reault of it a auverlor ▼•ntiUtioi
he food placed therein is better cooked, while retaia
ng a aweeter flavor, and a larger proportion of Itabes
lice*. I find.aUo, that thecotiMurontlon of fuel inthi
Uuige ia much leas than any other for same work."
SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED"ICIRCULARS AND PRICE LIST
•XCELSIOR MANF’C CO., ST.LOUIS
Sail kv OLAIt t DANIELS. Btvuzsh. Os.
_ 1 111 J.l
LIGHTNING HODS.
THE JTNA LIHUIxMNG ROD ft.
No. 44 Barnard St, Smooth, Gt,
f 8 prepared to give estimates nn tha redding
1 of dwellings and public buildings with ths
best aoppar rods. Work guaraatoed and refer*
shoos given. Orders promptly attended to from
Georgia, Florida an* South Carotins.
Yak bkbsouox ahajuajua
AUCTION SALES TO-DAY.
A-tTCTIONT SALE.
I.D- Laßoche & Son, Auctioneers.
THIS DAY, in front of our store, 168 Bay street
at 11 o'clock, we will sell:
1 Piano, 1 very fine Bu :gy. l Cook Stove and
Utensils, and Bureau. Bedstead, Carpets, lot
Tinware and Pans, Rilliard Table, Baby Car
riage. Silver-plated Ware, Tables, Chairs, Bug
gies, W gens, etc., etc.
AUCTION SALES_ FUTURE DAYS.
Underwriter’s Sale at Auction.
Dried Phosphate Rock and Am
moniated Fertilizers.
By J. McLaughlin & Son,
On THURSDAY, 14th March, 1889, at Kelly’s
wharf, foot of Bull street, city of Savannah,
at 12 o'clock;
400 LONG tons dried phosphate
ROCK. 50 SHORT TONS AM MONIATED FER
TILIZERS of Hammond, Hull & Co.’* high
grade Vegetahl ■ Fertilizer, damagod on board
the barge Florida, on her voyage trom Battery
Creek, South Carolina, to Savannah.
Sold for account Underwriters and aU con
cerned. Terms cash.
CLOTHING.
’"Toth"""
IN ORDER TO REDUCE OUR
WINTER STOCK
AND MAKE ROOM FOR
Spring Goods
WE PRESENT TO EVERY
2011 PIIRCHISER
Bis Plifa ta.
Come and Try Your Luck,
You May be the Lucky One.
You run no risk at any rate,
aa you will find our various
Departments complete with
all the latest Novelties, with
prices lower than the lowest
APPEL I IE
One Price Clothiers,
Hatters and Gents Furnishers.
163 Congress Street,
(OPP. THE MARKET.)
—2OTH.
TABLE DELICACIES.
jellies andPreseras
Mince Meat,
DY THE FOUND OR BUCKET.
Finest Brands of Flour.
Best Grades of Bitter.
STRAUSS BROS.,
22 and 22 1-2 Barnard Street.
■■■■ 1 .
SPORTING GOODS.
A CHEAP LOT
—OB'
Hawks Ons
FOR SALE.
Fire Arms, Ammunition,
Fishing Tackle, and all kinds
of Sporting Goods.
—AT—
6. S. McAlpin,
31 WHITAKER STREET.
IV&pacuU AUaatina givan to loading shall*,
3

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