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Shoshone journal. [volume] (Shoshone, Idaho) 1884-1931, December 06, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063039/1918-12-06/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE BOIL OF HONOR'
m
9
X
APP, CHARLES W.
Jj£ ANDERSON, CLARENCE M.
ATKINSON, r. M.
|f BANNER, GEORGE H.
® BALLINGER, MERRILL
K BATE, JOHN W.
BATE, OLLIE M.
jÿ BEACH, LEO
9- BELTON, GUV C.
BENNER, FRED C.
gt BERGMAN, H. W.
BOCK, ARTHUR
M BONO, STEPHEN •
gl BORDEN, ROSS P.
BURNS, ELBERT J.
BURRELL, ORMANO
BUSHNELL, OO'JOLAS
3 »
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CANNON, ALLEN W.
Af CANZLER, ALVE
CARNEGIE, VSRN A.
. CARTER. CHARLES
X CABEY, DWIGHT
(■[ CASEY, CARL
E CLEMENTS. FERDINAND
K CASEY, THOMAS
|g CHENEY, FRANK B.
jg CHRISTOFFERSON,
*• CLOSE. GEOROE H.
COOK. MONT. E.
fg CRANDALL, BUO W.
jfif dale, chas k
E DALLIMORE. DR. F. C.
jit DAMON, HARRY
vn# DAVIES, JOHN E,
W- DEXTER, CLARENCE
'M DRUMMOND, DONALD F.
um EDDIE, LESLIE
m- ELLIOTT, JOHN
g l ELLIOTT, CLARENCE B.
Pi ELROD, JESSE E.
|[ ERICKSON. JOHN T.
ft FIELDS, ARTHUR
FIELDS, EBLEY
K FIREBAUOH, JOHN P.
FRANTZ, JAMBS F.
PA FULLER, AMOS Q.
|p FULLER, RUSSELL
GAGE, HARRY B.
GEORGE, JIM
ft OROOMAN, OSCAR W.
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GROSSE, EDWIN
GREENE, EARL
GWIN, ERNEST E.
HANSEN, CHARLE8 J.
HANSON, ERNEST ALLEN
|p HATCH, D. P
g INCAS. JOSEPH
JEWETT, CLAUDE
JOHNSON. CHESTER
ft JOHNSON. ROBY
^ JORGENSEN, KAR
KEPFORO, ALVA 0.
|P KLIBVER, CORNELIUS
Ig LACY, ERICK E
■" LEITHEISER, FRED
ff L INHA RES, JOSEPH
im* LOFTON, PERRY P.
* MtGRAW. E. F.
McIntyre, paul
M cMAHON. JOHN TRUMAN
McQuillan, jos. alvin
I X MABBUTT, FRED
gt MABBUTT, CHARLES
■a MAKKER, ARLOW
ft MATHIB, FRANK J.
may, MeCOY
g MASON. PET CR
jm » MEYER. LAWRENCE B.
■A MEYERS. WALTER
ft MILLER. JACOB
* MILLS. CHAUNCEY C.
X NELSON, DAVID E.
OSBORN. BERT W.
0 OSBORN, CLARENCE W.
~g PARKER. CLAUDE R.
PA PEAKE. FRED
PERSONIUS, H. C.
PEAKE, JUDGE F.
0 PINNEY. H C.
POMJOLA, Ml ILO
Mû PORTER, J. W.
POWERS, DAN.
PROPST. EVERETT O.
Si RADER, CHAS. R.
gt RCAIft. HENRY
tt RECHEL. ZENO C.
ft RICKEY, LEROY
ROBINETTE, CLARENCE L.
SAT OR Y, B. H.
fg SCHEU, JACOB
SCOTT, JAMES a
K SHEEHAN. JOHN
SHELLMAN. LYLE
SINCLAIR. C W
ft SLIGCR. FLOYO X
SLUDER, CLARENCE
g SPRENGER. JOSEPH
SPROUL, WM. J.
SPURCK. LESLIE 8.
STONER, MARRY L.
SWOPE. EARL
Ml TERHONE, H ARTHUR
Ä THEVENIN, FRED
THOMPSON. MILTON C.
0 TRUMAN. REX.
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Kg VA8CONSELLS. FRANK
VAUGHN. MAYO HARRY
St VAUGHN, L. F.
VIEREA. MORRIS
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— WALKER. FRED
W688. OTIS H.
WEEKS.' WESLEY H.
WEEKS, B E
ÿS WE! SB, PAUL W
**• WHEELER, RAYMOND
ftö WHITE, WM. H.
*7 WILSON. CHARLES
j m WILLIAMS. E. 8
« WILLIAMSON. ASHER
WINDLE, FAY
gf WiRTZHERGER. HER.
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0 YAOEN, DAVID
0 ZIMMERMAN, GARRET B,
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9
SARAH PUROUM,
SB. Red Cio«a Nurse
X
<3 It is perfectly
safe to buy your
Christmas gifts by
mail—from
BOYD PARK
MAKFJ15 Of JEWELRY
txu lAjtfc cm
■to vor, nuir
BARGAINS IN USED CARS
k t
uu <x*. oi lma ns. N,
CV*fBR(C«4 iftil < tSB*
rtt-t.aU ♦ * to M 4 *
»•nr.» 1/ wmi+4 kf
f'jftéino* #***
»»*<'«*• W flit
Hu, PimI C|| dmt*
>EEdtlleP w Ié A a to Co., tali Uk* CUr
Mh ■#«*! <*4 lim «»d 4 mcfIr
EXPERT KODAK Finishing
Hmvt our prolr **kni*l ph-tof r»pb*m do your
JF|£M SHIPLERS
144 Mouth Main
Nall Laka Ctty
SapyllM
(.MMrM
HELP WAÊÏFÈ Hr-nwstUhHrytsifFslfi.ro
if unit® barber irpd« Many cm ail
to-wut m-E-d «jariH*r», fornl oiipfirtunUiMi
Mir» QVff draft ft#*« Haritp/B in army ham
fiai prapared
I
r SL-*
urticFri eatABUatk«
•rk*. <'all nr writs
f «II•««, 4» H Want T«mpk- Ht Halt Lake Oity
Molrr Barber
MADE TIME OF GAT REUNION
-
Basting ths Bounds," In Virginia, at
Least, Draw Together Neigh
bore From Far and Near.
"Renting the bounds" was a spe
ctslljr Important duty In the colonie»,
where land surveys were Imperfect,
land smut» Irregular, anti the bound
or lee of each man's farm or pluutu
tlon at firm very uncertain. In Vlr
ginln this heating the bounds
called
was
Landmarks
processioning."
were renewed that were becoming ob
quld he
• they wero
deeply recul; piles of great stones
containing a certain number for dee
the o
stored.
Itternted; Mazes
somewhat grown
on a tree
over
on war« sometimes scattered—
rtglnnl number would be ra
sped»! treea would ba found
fallen or cut down; new marking
tree» would Ma planted, usually penr
tree*. »» they lived. Pla
! puled iHiundarlas were decided upon
j and announced to all Ihe persons pres
ant some of whom st tha next "pro
cc««toning" would sven he ab!« to
teallfy as to the correct line. This
processioning took plure between
Easier and Whitsuntide, that lovely
' »eaaon of the year to Virginia; and
must have proved a pleasant reunion
: of neighbors, a May-party. In New
j England this
was failed "poramMu
j litiing the bound«," and the surveyors
who took charge were called "pertim
bnlfitorfi"
"t>ound*go**r». M -*-Allc«
Morn«* Karle In Child Life In Colonial
! Thtva.
in
The Ancient Quipu.
The quipu reached Its most elaborate
i form turning the I'eruvlun», from whose
j language the term "quipu.* meaning
' Is borrowed. It couslsts of a
"knot,'
I mul» cord, to which aro fastened st
I given distance« thinner cords of dlf
I forent colors, euch cord being knotted
In divers way« for spool id purposes,
i and each color having Its own slgnltl
1 eance. Red strands stood for soldiers,
i yellow fur gold, white for silver, green
! for corn, und so forth, while n single
; knot uieaut ten. two knots meant twen
I tv. double knots two hundred. Such
simple device* served manifold pnr
; pose*. Reside« their convenience iu
' reckoning, they were used for keeping
: the annals
! for transmitting orders to
provinces; for registering details of
th* iiriBy.
t the empire of the Incan;
outlying
Soma Tablea Priceless.
There 1.« u treioeiidous demand today
fur old mahogany or oak tables. Ü
there are any hlatorle axsoclutlonk at
tached to the«« tablea they bring fahil
lull* price». There are plenty of t»
tde» In the country itoK«c*»lng reul his
toric ltil»re«t. but none of them I» In
the least likely nt the moment to come
on the open market. The table on
which Napoleon signed hla abdication
may b*
ild to he pried ess. In Eng
land there Is a luntwacany tattle which
tnolltloM suy«
an the
as washed up
■ n!*I of Clare after the wreck of tho
hpunLsh unn «» la.
Biblical Thrift.
The Scripture» give us many lesson*
In thrift. Ezekiel warned the children
»f Israel that during the siege of Jeru
«u!em they would hav* to be thrifty.
II ,, ^ .V . ..
He «»id: Take thwu also unto thee
. . , , . ,
■ , , î y% , ».T*' Ul 1
lent»«, and millet, and Btchv«. and
put them in one roaxel and make the*
bre*d thereof. —Ezekiel Iv: 9. Th«
Bible shows thnt Ezekiel ordered the
children of Israel to eat their meat
by weight, and even thus only "from
time to time."—Thrift Magazine.
Sable Phitoeopber.
D« hymn tells you 'bout bein' "tn
heaven a thousand years." but Jar'«
*or»e folks what couldn't stand sich
long-time prosperity.—Atlanta Consti
tution.
Japanese Conjugal Etiquette.
When America» people judge the de- f
gree of affection between a Japanese i
husband and wife by their eoudnet to i
each other they make a great mistake, i
It would be as bad form for a man to |
express approval of his wife or chll- j
dren as It would be for him to praise I
any other part of himself, and every |
wife tMkes a pride in conducting her
self according to the rigid rules of
etiquette, which recognise dignity and
humility as the virtues that reflect ;
greatest glory on the home of which ,
•h« is mistress.
i
PRESIDENT BEGINS
JOURNEY TO FRANCE
EXPECTS TO BE ABROAD NOT
I MORE THAN SIX WEEKS,
ACCORDING TO PLANS.

Party Sailed From New York on Tues
day and Expect« to Reach
Brett In About Seven
Dayt.
Washington. President Wilson on
Tuesday, D<-reuiMor 3, begun tils trip
' to Eurup« io attend the pouce confer
ence.
The president left Washington on a
•peciul train for .New York, where he
und his party boarded the transport
George Washington, on which the voy
age ueross the Atlnutir is helug made.
About seven days will he required
for the trip and the ship will dock at
u French port, presumably llrest.
The president does not expect to be
abroad for more thun six weeks, which
would give him Just a month, on
European soit, llefore the peace con
ference meets lie will confer with Bra
inier» Lloyd George of Great Britain,
(Tuiueuceuu of France and Orlando of
Italy, uud probably with king Albert
of llelgltim, as to the salient points of
the peace treaty.
While in Europe, Mr. Wilson plans
to visit England and Italy as well as
France, and he may go to Brussels. He
ulao Is understood to intend to tuuke u
pilgrimage lo some of the battlefields
in Franc*.
Joseph P. JTtimulty, the president's
secretary, accompanied Mr. Wilson to
iNew York, but did not go aboard. He
lias returned to Washington lo conduct
the business of the White House and
will bo the eyes and ears of the presi
dent in tills country. Mr. Tumulty will
lit- In frequent communication with the
president by cable and will keep him
fully advised of events at home.
(Inly three of the live American rep
resentatives to the pence conference
us announced at the White House will
cross with the presldenL They are the
president himself, Secretary of State
Hubert Lansing und .Henry White, for
mer itmhussiidor to France und Italy,
Colonel K. M. House and General Tus
ker II. Bliss, the other two members,
are In France und will Join the presi
dent there.
EXPERT ADVICE AT CONFERENCE
Evidence of Preparedneea of American
Government to Enter Negotiations.
New York. Striking evidence of the
preparedness of the American govern
ment to enter Into peace negotiations
was given in
twenty-three members of an advisory
commission of experts who have made
a year's study of political and economic
conditions In Kurope and Asia sailed
with President Wilson and his fellow
delegates on the George Washington.
With them go several tons of docu
ments und maps, which, together with
other records of their Investigations
already In Paris or on their way, com
prise it collection of International dutu
said to he without parallel In history.
announcement time
an
Freight*' Goea Down In Lake.
N. Y.—Eleven men,
Wuterpiws.
comprising the crew of the bow sec
tion
liaved t
Mint section of the boat went down Iu
Lake Ontario, near Duck Island, Tues
day night In a terrific gale and bliz
zard.
if the freighter Mlneola, are be
have been drowned when
j
;
Prohibits Antagonistic Flags.
A hill prohibiting the
display of flags or emblems of orgiui
rhlcli espouse principle« of
Washington
I nations
nvormm'iit nutiiK<mistlc t'> tliu count!*
United States, was In
tut ton of the
traduced by Representative Osborne of
California.
Fooh Sends Ultimatum.
Marshal Fooh has sent a
London.
new ultimatum to the German anuls
that Ger
tlee delegates demuudlng
many give tip the rest of the loeomo
igreed to, according to an Ex
tive
(»hniu:** 'IVU-gruph clls|mtob from Cop*
eubsgvn.
.
j H>r "' ""
Mad loanist 5i..l83,(K*t to
. , .. .
trie« since Its organisation, and «Ug
*«*** «hange- in the existing hrv to
nmttan ,. -jauidons use of
J* r ,during the period
- 7 . ,
'' r * 1111 1
Loan to War Industries.
Washington The war tttmnee cor
d to congress that It
ar Indus
Says Huns Treat Americans Well.
Washington.
■lean pris
itt. Germany,
lizisl. well elotto«! and morale e\
it" in n cablegram to the A uteri
Twenty three hundred
oers of war at Camp
cere reported "well I
Am<
i;
I
:
;
i
oetii
can Rail Cross from l.em (5. Levy o(
•rs' relief si«'tlon. who has
the prise
Ju«t visited Rastatt.
File Holdings List in Enemy Lands, j
Washington.— All Americans owning '
proper!v in enemv countries have been ■
a.sketl by the state department to file i
with 'he department a complete list of
information Is!
bp una jq e to hand over all the 5000 .
locomotives stipula teil In the armistice j
agreement hy December 17. according J
to tl)e Malin, and it Is possible that the
a uj es will grant them more time.
The
such hob tings,
needixi in settlement of war claims.
Germany Short on Locomotive».
Parts.—It appears the Germans wtR
00 WITH PRESIDENT
Wilson Names Delegates to Rep
resent the United States
at Paris.
GEN. BUSS ONE OF THEM
Dirtinguished Soldier Chosen at Mill*
tary Expert—Former Ambassador
White It Republican Member of
the American Commission.
Washington.—President Wilson an
nounced Friday night the names of
the delegates he has appointed to rejs
resent Ihe United Stilles at the peace
conference. They are:
WOODROW WILSON, president of
the United States.
ROBERT LANSING, secretary of
state.
EDWARD M. HOUSE, the presi
dent's chief confidant, now represent
ing him at Versailles.
HENRY WHITE, formerly ambas
sador to Italy and to France.
GEN. TASKER H. BLISS. American
military adviser of the supreme war
council.
White House Statement.
The names were dlselosed In the fol
lowing announcement from the White
I louse :
"It win* announced at the executive
olllce that ihe representatives of the
United States at the (lenee conference
would he the president himself, the sec
retary of state, Henry White, recently
ambassador to France;
House and Gen. Tasker H. miss.
"It was explained that It had not
been possible to announce these ap
pointments before because the number
of representatives each of the chief
belligerents was to send had. until ft
day or two ago, been, under discus
sion."
Edward SI.
Bliss' Name a Surprise.
The only surprise in the announce
ment was Ihe selection of Gen. Tasker
H. Bliss, former chief of staff of the
army and now Ihe representative of
Ihe American war department In the
supreme war council of the allies.
For several days It had been gen
erally understood that the Republican
member of the delegation would he
Mr. White. That Secretary Lansing
and Colonel House would be the other
unofficially ad
members had been
mltted.
White Long in Service.
Henry White, long In diplomatic
service, was the American ambassador
to France during President Roosevelt's
administration. Ills diplomatic service
began in 1883, when he served for two
ns secretary to the American
He was trans
yeura
legation nt Vienna,
for red to London In 1^*84 as second sec
rotary of the American legation and In
18.8(1 he was made secretary to the lega
tion there, being recalled by President
Cleveland In 181)3. He returned to Lon
don as secretary to the embassy In
1.807 and remained until l!)0f>.
During his career he ulso served the
government In special diplomatic cn
pncttles, representing the United States
nt the International conference In I.oti
lon, 1887-88, for the abolition of sugar
bounties.
He was a delegate from the United
States to the International conference
on agriculture at Rome in 1005, and
also was t/.e American delegate to the
International conference on Moroccan
affairs at Algeclrns. From March. 1905,
to March, 1007, Mr. White was the
American ambassador to Italy, leaving
that Important post to become the am
bassador to France, where he remained
until December, 1909.
V/ill Parley in Berlin.
London.—Representatives of Great
Britain, France and the United States
will arrive In Berlin shortly to d^mss
the armistice, the Berlin correspond
ent of the Cologne-Gazette says he un
JorstmnK
A meeting of the allied lenders in
London will he a preliminary to the
peace conference, the Daily Express
«ays. Colonel House and Premier Or
lando of Italy will be here with the
British and French statesmen.
Paris.—A group of members of the
chamber of deputies representing agrl
eulturnl Interests have sent o teller to
Premier Clemenceau expressing objec
glvlug special representation to
ihe socialists at the (teure conference.
If that should he agreed to, however
the deputies urge that the farming und
peasant classes also be represented,
since they had shed blood more freely
that» any other Class.
don P
ith the government nt Berlin,
1
Bavaria for Separate Peace.
London.— Bavaria probably will ask 1
have separate plenipotentiaries at
•Ill claim ;
to
the peace negotiations und
eondltlons of n separate peaee, says j
ihe Purls Matin In commenting on the
action of Bavaria In breaking off re
luttons
Th*
•lallst council of Munich hits
lelographeil to the executive commit
ui« of the Berlin Socialist council de- |
mantling the dismissal of Dr. W. S.
.Suif, foreign minister; Philipp Schelde
mann. minister of colonies, and Mathi
as Erzberge r. who. it has been an
P , .
nonncetl. will conduct negotiations pre
tlm!n * r ï *° ' 5< R ni, " ! n treaf y of
ctl t0 °vertl»mw a government which
continues such persons in Important
The telegram Invites the Berlin coun
posts.
Viscount Khto Jap Envoy.
Washington.—Viscount Knto. for
mer minister of foreign affairs, will
head the Japanese delegation to the
peace conference according to unoffi
clal advices re° , *'ting Washington
from Japan.
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Back Feel Achy After Grip?
C OLDS and influenza leave thousands with weak kidneys
and aching backs. The kidneys have to do most of the
work of fightingoff a cold or a contagious disease. They
weaken—slow up. Then you feel dull and draggy, irritable
or nervous, and have headaches, dizzy spells, lame back,
backache, sore joints and irregular kidney action. Give the
kidneys quick help and avoid serious kidney troubles. Doan s
lways in unusual demand after gnp epidemics
as so many people have learned their reliability. Doans are
used the world over. They are recommended by your own
friends and neighbors.
Kidney Pills
are a
Personal Reports of Real Cases
A UTAH CASE.
W. W. Robinson, First East,
nr. First North Sts., American
Fork, Utah, says: "I know Doan's
Kidney Pills to be just what is
claimed for them. For months last
winter I was suffering with a
steady ache and pains across my
kidneys. The slightest move
which caused any strain on my
hack sent those pains through it.
A druggist recommended Doan's
Kidney Pills, so I tried them.
Doan's completely cured me of the
attack."
AN IDAHO CASE.
Mrs. J. A. Butcher, 841 E. Ninth
Ave., Pocatello, Idaho, says:
had suffered with kidney com
plaint more or less from the time
I was a child and several times
the attacks were very severe, es
pecially when I over worked or
caught cold. Last spring when I
had one of those attacks, Doan'a
Kidney Pills were recommended.
I started using Doan's and they
were juft what I needed. After
finishing the second box I was en
tirely free from the backache and
felt better in every way."
"1
DOAN'S
KIDNEY
PILLS
60c a Box at All Stores. Foster-Milbum Co., Buffalo, N.Y. Mfg. Chem.
On the Stand.
"You sny you stood up?"
"I Ray stood, your honor. If n man
stands he naturally stands up. You
can't stand any other way."
"Is thnsso? Ten dollars for con
tempt. Stnnd down."—Kansas City
Journal.
STOMACH UPSET?
PAPE'S DIAPEPSIN AT ONCE ENDS
DYSPEPSIA, ACIDITY, GAS,
INDIGESTION.
Your meals hit back! Your stomach
Is sour, acid, gassy and you feel blof-.t
ed after eating or you have heavy
lumps of Indigestion pain or headache,
but never mind. Here Is Instant relief.
0
• 0
Don't stay «upset ! Eat a tablet of
Pape's Diapepsin and immediately the
Indigestion, gases, acidity and all stom
ach distress ends.
Pape's Diapepsin tablets are the sur
est, quickest stomach relievers in the
world. They cost very little at drug
stores. Adv.
Awful Language.
•"This Eengleesh language I cannot
liners tali'," wailed the poor French
soldier to his English friend. "Now,
zo* 'ere ; 1 look in nty leetle book an'
eet zny that eef I go queek 1 go fast,
eof I am tied up I r.m fast, eef I spend
zee money too much I am fust.
j
I
The kaiser cannot exclaim with the
famous trench king: "All Is lost hut j
honor?"
"Au* zen I find zls in zee Eengleesh
newspaper: 'Zee first one won one one
Oui, zee Eengleesh Ian- |
Eet ees awful !"
Peuml prize!
SBinge!
i
Impossible.
j
j
never had any J
I
—- I
A patent covers a combined pick j
and shovel, so mounted that the same
;
I
A Chicago servant girl recently stay- !
honor to lose."
"Why not?"
"Beeat'se his Huns
handle serves for both.
ed nt one place s)x months. Then she
was discharged—from the hospltnl.
A Wh*tCMM. Qernslaf, I
Refreshing Mil Healing
Your
Eyes
Ltllt* — Murine for Red
ness, Soreness, Granula
tion. I tching and Burning
Tyvs or Eyelids;
T Drop«" After the Movie« Motoring or Gotf
trill win your confidence. Ask Yoar Druggist
for Marine when your Eyes Need Care. M-IS
Mario« Eye R«m «d y Co.. Chicago
of the E
It Didn't Work.
The miscreant stood before the
judge, charged with cruelty to hl»
wife. On the hope of obtaining clem
ency he thought he would pay his wife
a cheap compliment.
"Tell you right now, judge. They
got me wrong on this cruelty stuff.
I've got some woman. She sure I»
hard to beat."
"Well, you seem to have overcome
all obstacles, from her appearance,"
remarked his honor. And he handet
him the limit.
Just as Mother Thinks.
Son (reading the paper)—There's no
use talking, dad. Absolute unity of
command Is 'ssentlal to victory.
Dad—That's what you mother
thinks.—Life.
Should Turn Over a New Leaf.
"This book will do
Scout—
Give me two."—Boys' Life.
Storekeeper
half of your work for you."
"Fine !
RECEIVING WAR CROSS
The patriotio
spirit and devotion
with which Ameri
can women have
so far performed
war-service work
and made sacrifices
has never been
equalled in the
history of any
country. Mothers,
wives and sisters
support this burden
with strength and
fortitude. But
those w ho are al
ready miserable
from the com
plainte and weak
nesses which are so common to «Runen,
should take the right tonic for the womanly
system.
m
.
f
—'
Riyfjtü I<
y
-
I
If a woman is borne down by pain
and sufferings at regular or irregular
intervals, by nervousness or dizzy^ spells,
by headache or backache, "Favorite
Prescription'' should be taken. If _her
existence is made gloomy by the chronic
weaknesses, delicate derangements, and
painful disorders that afflict her sex, she
will find relief and emancipation from her
troubles in Dr. Pierce'9 Favorite Prescrip
It she's overworked, nervous, or
" run-down,'' she finds new life and
strength. It's a powerful, invigorating
herbal tonic and nervine which was dis
turn.
covered and used by an eminent physician
for many years, in costs of "female com
plaints" and weaknesses. "Favorite Pre
scription" can now oe had in tablet
form U3 well as liquid at most drug
"' or<a - Send to Doctor Pierce's Invalids'
^P ,e l> Buffalo, N. Y n for a ten-ccnt
trial package of tablets.
For fifty years Dr. Pierce's Pleasant
Beliefs have been most satisfactory in
liver and bowel troubles.
Bronchial Troubles
Keothe the Irritation and yott relieve th*
distress. Do both quicLly and effectively
by using promptly a dependable remedy-r-*
PISO'S
W. N. U., Salt Lak* City, No- 49-1914

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