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Shoshone journal. [volume] (Shoshone, Idaho) 1884-1931, January 03, 1919, Image 4

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THE SHOSHONE JOURNAL;
Published Kvery Friday at Shoshone, Idaho by,
EDWARD T. BARBER
Editor sod Propres <w
$2.00 Per Year, in Advance;
Subtcnplion Rale:
■ red at tile Fostotfice At Shwhots*, Idaho, fur trana
lugh the mails as second-class mai! matter
Ki
mission thr
MEMBER EASTERN I DAHO PRESS CLUB.
• WHERE ARE WE ATT'
oullonul
Kr«ut political purl
rament
he liuii two
th«r of the two

«
ownership in
• rfiilrs 1 .1 Wnnhlng on
o 1-nnw precis, ly
In at hut
men tamed
g<
Its pill' to
V ha» been a
rnni.-nt own
Yet it la « fad that th
strong trend toward* g»
. mhlp isjltcioa in
of late.
Wr do not amuo
► • , ! wo srr going to he i
th.. people wtll want to know before
they gr much further.
Tire political «Ituallon remind» u* of
"We don't Know
the popular rR#1lrn*
where we're join* but we
are on our
;

I
9ULDOZINQ THE PEACE
CONFERENCE
Kvery orfrantfcAtUm bavin* govern- ,
nu *ilal reform* o4 nay kind in sendln* ;
drlAf \U*a to I'r»nw to alt In conven- j
In the vicinity of the Pence
Anarchists .md I. W. W •
nd Hin
con -
ttons
Th
ft rence.
Hoci.'iUsU snd Ilolslwiviki
t-Viner* and the loud m.uthcl
..Sol ni lsrrprr»rntatIv«-s of orgnnfxed
nil preparing to build«*« the
.■»»OCCHHlon»
If et
Uilwr are
Pence
mco Into
( 'on fe
and chi
djuts l«irt*mUo*
«n demuiKlod that th*y !>«• til
■d on

th« Peace
lowed d.-tegul.'* to sit at
•eivable that »
>h a
Id he allow«-.!
table. It- ts l'<<
petto« table
: ny delegutt
. rs>llt«l •>>
in(«rested,
bor" delegnte
would he unfair to
Thl* war has been f.mgtit t
b-glslatlon and class
admit that sort of delegates
Id I»« to d«atroy
H the i*eofde.
t lMM •
except tbono dtrwcUy ac
11 led nation»
culled * !»a
w<
nome of the
To udnilt a *<
or a "Hin Kein" dalegutë
II other ch»
» or
»octet y
Ha
dent roy
rule and to
to the con
the fr
MtlOA WOl
itts of victory for
HEARST 8HOULO BE
EXPATRIATED.
Krem lime to Um« dull ig thi
and often thr pant few months, during
senate investigation, tt tuts
a i»j>»* )»!*»!> that William Han
mo close se thehead
war,
la»« »
th»- <
«ho«
flolph lirtft/nl W I
I'ropngitn.lu
< Inman
th».
the Gniled Htatrn. thill whether or
not t»« rooelvcd money from them, hi»
Ith them, a id many
o*
.1)
sympathies were
, t Ma *tur writers were well rewarded
for th»« despicable part they played
though each was careful to tell lhe
rte Inviwtlgatlng ooounltt«-«. so well
r night «-U «*• hy Chief Jllelashi of the
Bureau of Investigation, that their em
ployer. Hearst, did not know lhat they
»er«' I «eng paid hy German agents
Kuril in the game, a Ui'*» rt'«llte.
cile
g*»le named Archibald, who posed as s
» .ir oorrt-apondent during the Japu nese
and
« of his part In the
*• n
smoked out.
Russian war. wt
folio» leg the eX|M
German prv»|«agunda, oneafter another
of those who have disgraced their pro
fcoajon.rrum Brisbane down have two-a
put In thetr proper light by the oeimto
Investigating the naLon-il
mi and German propaganda.
onimlttee
t.,«-i buati
und th« »
tht* country hy the Huns
And through It
t campaign cari ls l on In
f
trull
»II the »H
ll» arst U plaint»' dim
It cannot l«e proven,
thnk that H»s»rst
itenuiitu
hut tt I
did lot
Mr
8 !
»umilhly
tmurd
to
d out if be
of 'hr motley
«Hy r«i
ficflk
4*1* |M
lvi? hi* oi*
f' 1
g If th.* other.
Id foil««»» the 1
«• of
did not art 1
would be ar
states ii
N eva»!* b«a«i and
it
tht
inton w
Mwhlbtt the
* I
llearst paper wthin its hiiundetie*.
He ha* persistently played the tier
ih« h,«gi-umg. J.'.d
gum« fr
nor»»« have «ought to excuse hi
1
ee 111" gti-unds of his h »• ■ I for 1
• »Ml, they have mn<ir •> ve« y pool ;.**!•,
and he stands revealed n his true
ught .unworthy the respect of un»
veer lean.
'-!
Mupposr he was not In love with
There are phwty of (a-opU-1
Jl tor United Htates nvl ebH-wrhctel
Who are not. but it did not deter them
from being on the side of right «hi«
K oust to nu»ke a decision
that oonitectlon. tt is to the tasting
«hams pf the Irish people at hoinn
*!m-J
And Id
able
•ntry's annnlea. and his
«Osntrymen ithould make him a msn
WShoet s country. ---Goodwin's W
font 1er« than
4M( wer OM«t of the ti[M who shourd
hose gone to the front from Ireland
wear ta the arm!
Hut thin is dire»-ur. (
eat. In a position to have been »
irwit power for good to the honor of
ns country and himself, chose t
With his
battling the Hun
rhi*
mn

kly
c'ömiWö Week at the baugm
The coming week at the Haugh wilt
h* filled with Its usual Hal of high ela
product Iona
SLiturdey —Kng of IHumonds
Monday—Dougl«» r'a'rb«nk* in' llound
in Moro»—«
;
I
,
I
j
»
j
Tuesday "itaod. t'p"
Wsdasoday -George Heb, n in
of the Mtroag Heart"
Tburwdny—Malected Pieturw
•N-idny—Klat»> Ferguson In
ger Mark"
rf»H HAIJC
Rectric wesher
Jules
rh* r%i
A good
inquire st th
bund
Jour*
aTUcCESBFUL ENTERTAINMENT
The dance tt the K P. hell new
roars eve was targe!)' attend»^ nml was
one of the moat enjoyable social
bald In Sbosl»o-ie this winter
KUWXgemcu! of the hail hare been sol-|
letted to repeat the »lance and they j
haie fixed the dit.!« of Jan 1T th f..r |
j«n«/th»r one m*t like the k.*t ,«n.
«venta
Th«
THE PEOPLE PAY.
nie bull btsomne*
till'/,,
The
Mon tun a
fun.iwIII bo nnuble t
claim* for'* Insurance by funne
year. leaving 400,000 Insumqe« unpaid
It ooMvctrd 4Oemt* nn acre premium
last year» and 60 cents thjs year, but
> there I« no reserve fund for comingm
: t ic* due to pant low rates.
j I lie a.m.i thing happened in 'hr grout
j Halifax disaster a year ago the state
necldeat .'fluid run short nearly a mil
lion
meet
or
this
It*» the an me old ntory of politic il
nmnnffmMMit cuttlnff rat?» below pri
vat« hunlwf»« for political effect und
the public only learns by experience.
When thr crash comes somebody
In fhlscAse Its the fnuner. In
pays
th- lit , r « x .it i! was »he laborer.
In the public ownership failure It's the
general iMxpuyer who ha» to dijf to
make up deficit* for 11 low priced rtr
ftimished for the benefit of some
P" r
vice
one besides hmiM'lf.
schi tncs all noun * fine on pa
whnn the in*«i»oti*rH are out for
7 nc
\otr* hut tl>(. people pay.
The vote luting plan of the N'on
n Lei.y«»e whereby the state
luit
would own prl-lelpal lines of jndustry
U l,o ope.-aic.l at cost for tlio fiuvr»,
»••units fin • und would work fine unt
the day cutne to pay the hills und then
tile people would pay and Mr. Townley
and his shudows would he gone.
Otto Kuhn states some pluln truths
when ho says:
"Next to beutln* (tie Hun. nothing
I in more Important than to Iwitt thoM
I who would Hiniiggle un - Amer 'can or
j nntl-American material*« l ilo tho mag~
n If) cunt and time tented «truc tu re
which lx America.
''Nothin* Im more vital to the future
of our country than to mulnium invio
late the tried and tented principles up
on which our inntltutlonn are bnned.
"The menace of hurcnucrutlHin and
neml-noclallstlc paterriallnm with th«*lr
InnldloiiM effect upon the very flbei and
marrow of the race confront« us now
(ïoodwln'g
I »et the people think
Weekly.
THE PLAIN TRUTH

*
nd It Is none too rally for bnslnr
j men to take their stand against their
perpetuation In time of peace
"Paternalism and liberty cannot ex
ist side bv f ide.
"Shall I he reconstruction period be
under the auspices of feml-soclulixtlc
and bureaucratic paternalism, or shall
we preserve, for meeting the big task
wlch confronts the wotld, the safe and
tested Instrument of individual effort
and enterprise? On the an*wer de
pend* hugely whether the victory will
he genuinely fruitful for the happi
' ness and well-being of the world, or
! whether the course will fond through
| turmoil and dlsulluslonment to ulll
re-action.
| matt
THE FLEET AT HOME.
I
Our Nua' 5 t* homo again.
Thebig war
nehored lu home waters after
hips ,
havln( . „
ompIMhed «
« of the most
uf recorded history In
,, I he surrender of the
fleet without firing a pun Is the I
possible
wonderfnl feat«
inaval warfare.
t
•mai
hiebest
tribut« to the allied
an adminnion
t Ik* y *had no - ii inc<
f th« kind of
the last man
nn
ft
►f the
I««.
(tarivmn* >thnt
*M>»nd the (
huma
r
I
I
Titian In not
twin gw ho fight t.
nre willing ti
It Is tx u
take a "last chance"
»I trait of Germn i char
yen will find it true of Indlvtd
I Tin- hull«
sm
uni German»
veil
s collectively,
■aid is always u ty
tl Cl
rant when holding the powers and a
ng.|crav«*n yeHow dog when the power Is in
|other hand*.
I
Thut the O Tintin navy surrendered
without firing a gun is the German I
I de* of calling ''kuinerade" when theodds
j «re against him.
j
A PLEASANT DINNER PARTY
Mr. and Mrs. W.
W. (»win on New
Years K» « entertain»*! the Ktookgrow
ers empfcyers In « most pleasant and
approoriate manner at n To'clock din
ner. The color scheme was In r«*d white
and blue There were 1» places at t\
tabb*. sixteen of which were occupied
by the present employees of the Stock
growers xml the three vacant places
were reserved for the three boys i nthe
j army. They are John Elliot. Clinton
{Ihnney and Karl Sw
I were
Their chairs
di:«i»»d wnh American flags and
i n picture of each
P
boy placed In his
It is needless to say that all
enjoyed the uctmsion to their
chair
prfw>n t
ful***t capacity.
i'
A RUNAWAY HAY TEAM
u four
horse Irani belong! i* IP Leatc.' Cannon
uf ihr North aide became trighed at
something while their wagon was be
ing unloaded into
and ran away
to a ».-»fan with a trailer . Th.- front
wagon »9» unloaded and Mr. Cannon
jws* at work on the trail wagon when
the team started to run The tram
beaded e »st but on batng frightened
j'hey turned «round and run west Mr.
Cnnnon enrht the front ten by the bits
«•■» II turned .»round but was unable to
»■«•W the,,, rte» run toward, thr J„„r
nj offl,, nd «reined Inclined to come
'»»Me I'-H rhasH their course tust as
ith., rear*li»*l the front step, swerve,!
to the left ,nd lammed thr front wag
• !/»rf* f f,. r ti ^ «.h«* J -nt
the team < n-ugh that Mr Cannon se*
>f them again A nay
ml on« wngen scrap !
I) of thi damages j
;
I»»at Wedueoday
afternoon
car on Hall Htreet
The team was httohwt
WI».
coott cM
.
MR. STOCKMAN
I have
lOOO Tons of Hay
FOR SALE
Call - JOHN S. HARTSHORN
Phone 30
Jerome, Idaho.
Vtyi- -
S
.*1
I
•i
iijiiiiij;
PI
if k.
/A
fl «. J
7
f
I
V
lÂÂ*?
(J
?™pjj
P V?
U 9
I
i
Evening Cheer
i ight
llieie
» Perfection Oil Heater
nrp evenings—enjoy its
cheery, smokeless, odorless glow.
Start it again in the
needed. It quickly
drives out chill. Perfection Oil
Heaters are easy to fill, light and
clean —they run full blast 8 hours
on one gallon of GiSnoco Safety Oil.
.1,
morning —
carry it fjpqj room to room a.
Sold by following dealers:
w.
L. WALKER, Agent, SHOSHONE
TI IE CONTINENTAL OIL COMPANY
(A Colorado Corporation)
PERFECTION
OIL HEATERS A
Look for th*
Mo*
GEMS FROM THE STARS AND
STRIPES.
Private Loyd Luzuder, of the lnfantry
has given to the world some verses
that will travel far and Inst long;
War.
Ho illd not cure if he never returned.
Hack to the world that he knew,
He left it, a youth with a shriveled
soul.
And his heart —It was not true.
Hut there on Flanders' blood red fields,
Where men are broken or made,
He fought the buttles of flesh and soul
While he had rod blood to wade.
Me swallowed the acid tnstç of fear
Thut rankled up In his throat;
And fought the one great fight of man.
And closed with God, the moat.
Yes.
the
»•ross ed
moat and won Ills
fight,
\ n ,| went through the purging fire—
l\ n( j n man like the pure white lilies
afloat.
Sprang from out of the mire.
He dl»l not know and could not see,
Hut war has opened his eyes
It showed him the road to heaven or
hell.
Ami
a men dies.
Yes how hi dies and how he lives.
And should fight the buttles of peace.
So. now. It matters If he never returns
When this wild turmoil shall cease.
1 singing for home and the comforts of
life Is humorously expressed In this
fragment of unoinyous verse:
WATER.
Just gobs and gobs in a tub
That stnams like geysers in action.
And towels .yes. Turkish to rub
My crusted frame to a pinkness.
And Ivory that's practically pure-
And 1 fall to hunting the cooties
And pray for my dream to endure.
ALBERT WILLIAMS DEAD.
Mrs. J. B. Bossier Is in receipt of the
news that her brother Albert Williams
ill«*! at Bakersfield . Calif. Dec. IS. Mr.
William« died of pheumonia following
a can« of flu. He had on many occa
sions nur». «I patients having all differ
ent form* of »'ontagious diseases but
had never before taken any of them.
At one time Mr Williams llv«*! near
Shoshone and his death will be mourned
[here by u larg«' circle of old time friends
SEWING RESUMED.
_.. . .. .
, which ,
' h ' n " U , on i,n <U ' <K,Uat *
l'^ t0rV ' ® u * »'<* «'**•
™ ' f 11 """I"
f '''"T?* f°' k P * r,V
"?* io,nUy responsible for the growth
uf th, ' t%,rror,Mt moveroojit in America.
Th, ' Socal1 "' ,w, ,y whtl h
«go nilmitt»*! thut It wjis pn>-Ger
)lm n und. whosebn«ine*t men left It
is now showing its true cokus. Amer
'»« *» confront«) hy a new war prob
Inn: the Imsuc can no iotig.'i- be Ignored
South Hon.l Tribune.
The It«-«! Cross rooms will he opened
for work prit Tuesday afternoon. Jun.
T. at two o'clock. Every one who can
rew Is urgis] to come. The (.'limiter ht»«
u heavy assignment, and the work has
he»-n greatly retard»-d m account of
the prevailing epidemic,
please come.
Rverylwty
j
I
I
PLAYING WITH FIRE
JOKESMITH
George Creel, chalrrlan of the
committee on public Information thanks
the publishers of the United States for
their adherance to selfjmposed rules of
censorship. This is refreshing from a
Journalist who has never learned that
the first principle of newspapering is
thls:not what to print, but what not to
print.
Mr.
have been to
Creel's chief accomplishments
field censorship over a
fraternity that has forgotten more a
bout patrotic self-suppresson than he
ever knew, and to give official approval
to news and photographs so apparently
faked that no accredited newspaper
correspondent could have been deceived
into sponsorng them.
Well, good-by George,
yerselfj_Chicago Tribune.
Take keer o'
HENRY WATTERSON GAGS
That the Itepublilans, in the face of
the president's appeal for a majority
In congress were able to accomplish
what they did at the elections shows
the eternal fealty of millions of Amerl
cans to the party name that is rem
Inscent of Lincoln and Grant and Me
Kinley . The strength of the popular
belief in Its economic policies is also
manifest, as the voters of America are
much interested in the type of busi
ness legislation that will follow the
Those who have several times
war.
In the past pronounced elegies upon
the Hepubltcan party must now realize
that it is returning to its old vigor und
strength and that the year 1920 will
probably witness such a presidential
struggle as the nation has not seen
lieforo.— laxiisvllle Courier-Journal.
DO YOU LIKE THE EXPERIMENT?
it is the time Tom .Dick, and Harry
^
The socialist tells us property is theft
und big business is a crime but ah the
big criminals had to be drafted to ne.p
save the war situation.
It is true there have been a few Jolts
in the program as when pink whiskered
Senator Jim Ham Lewis was left at
home by the old fashioned people of
Illlnoia.
We have had a taste of government
mann gement of railroads where cost
of all kinds of service have doubled and
deficits for operations are increasing.
Compare government telephone man
agenn-nt li> nny community with pri
vate management and. beyond Inborn
American courtesy, what has remain»«d?
Hut the courtesy that has been drilled
Into the telephone service under years
of efficient management is vanishing
under paternalism.
The time has come to sit dewn on the
.»r : Mary Klten Jane were usking them
*elves, shall we capitulate to theaocial
istlc germ of government ownership?
I

I
:
usurpations of collectivism und return
to the good old fundaments In of Jeffer
son.
The saying that the people are gov.
erned the best when they are governed j
the least still has elements of truth.
j
Th.
HIGH GRADE 8EED WHEAT
Th«- Farm Bureau is making up t»
order for a cor loud of the best Dick
low sect wheat to he obtain«!
wheat will cost 35.09 per hundred. On
tls order the farmers around Jenuu
hu, r already engaged forty nine trou
san»t pounds. Six men t-i this part of
Hie county have already bought their
seed supply of this same lot.
DOING GOOD WORK
p to the first of the month the Lin
n county I fay Grower»' Association
I has handled 35 car« of hay for Its
I members at a grain of from 32 to 32.50
per Ion over the local price being offer
ed. In addition to these 35 cars there
has
the County Agent 26 cars of hay.
,,l
■dfo beer
moM through the office of
HIS SWELLS) HEAD REDUCED
Why Recruit ai Camp Upton No Long
er Brags of His Prowess With
the "Padded Mitts."
A certain hus *y. row-boned recruit
from an interior town reached Camp
Upton recently and brought forth two
set« of boxing gloves. He confided it?
his comrades thut he was a mighty line
boxer, and "hack home" he had thrash
ed everybody who had tried conclus
ions with him. This declaration nat
urally was an invitation, and all
promptly professed to know nothing of
the manly art and asked If he would
give them a little Instruction.
Flattered, the youth stated his will
ingness to oblige, and the following
day was set for the leason. The pupils
promptly hunted up Benny Leonard,
the lightweight champion, who was
and is the boxing Instructor at Upton,
and
arranged to meet the re
cruit. The latter was informed that
he was to give the first lesson to *
very "fresh" youngster, and he agreed
to put the unknown In his place. When
Leonard was brought before him he
wanted to back out, stating that he
couldn't think of boxing with a man
so much smaller than himself.
Leonard, however, insisted that the
lesson go on, and each put on his
gloves. During the "lesson" Benny
never struck a blow, but contented
himself wllhflfelnting, ducking, dodging
and blocking until the volunteer teach
er was so exhausted with his own ef
forts that he could scarcely stand. He
stopped finally, congratulated the
champion on liis showing, said that he
did very well "for an amateur," and
then made his way to the barracks to
bed. When, later, he was Informed of
the identity of his antagonist, he said
several things more or less complimen
tary to those who hud put up the Job
oh him ami sent the gloves to his
home.—Leslie's Weekly.
CITY NO LONGER PEST HOLE
British Authorities Have Worked
Wonders in Cleaning Up Ancient
Capital of the Caliphs.
Paved streets, electric street lights,
municipal sprinkling carts, a modern
fire department—these are all in old
Bagdad now, says Cleveland Plain
dealer. Or, rather, they are in new
Bagdad, for the slumberous city on the
Tigris has assumed a new aspect since
the British drove out the Turks six
teen months ago.
Nothing now remains of the filth and
squalor of the Turkish regime. The
place Is still oriental, but the oriental
atmosphere Is less odoriferous. Dead
ents are not left to decompose In the
middle of narrow streets. Great Brit
nln has a wonderful way of leaving
orientalism unspoiled while making
it reasonably clean. The British sol
dier cannot abide filth. His sanitary
squads penetrate the remotest mews
and the most deeply hidden cesspools,
and the mews and the cesspools cease
to offend. The natives soon discover
that cleanliness Is not a horror.
lie has fallen Into the ways of his
Turkish masters. Bagdad Is as Inter
The Arab Is not naturally vile, but
estlng as ever, and ever so much safer.
After the war many British tourists
will visit the nnclent Ahbaslde capital,
the mighty caliphs,
will note with interest the British
benefits bestowed on the city that Wil
helm und Gott once picked as the far
goulpost of Mitteleuropa.
Fix the Furnace Now.
The prudent man will have his fur
nace put In thorough order at the pres
ent time. Letting It go till fall would
be rash at a time when labor is so
scarce as now and when there are sure
to be so many other people anxious to
have their furnaces put in order,
There was considerable complaint last
winter of the quality of some of the
coal, which was explained by the sto
, rl** received from the mining regions
of fhp work!n|r OTer of h a{ , he
.... »... ,
P' f hea, " , ' **"« of wh,ch represented
th ® «ecunimation of many years. This
winter the coal may contain fewer
Impurities, but necessity for getting
the greatest possible return in service
for every pound burned will be obvl
ous j„ v | aw 0 f {foe mi« that consumers
are allowed to purchase only a per
centage of the total amount they used
for heating their houses a year ago.
A furnace that Is out of order will
waste a great deal of coaL No one
can afford to have that aort of thing
going on at the present time.
Prop*r Breathing Help to Swimmer«.
Anyone'» hotly will float when the
lungs nre filled with sir, hot as a hu
roan brxly Is n trille heavier than sa
ter It will sink utile** bnov»»d up by
air In the lunga.
y< Dan Beard In
Boys* Life. Consequently If you learn
to breathe so that you Mow out your
hraalh In time to Intake a new breath
before you sink. It Is evident that you
will not sink at all. When breathing
while swimming do not take to«i many
breaths, but let your mouth serve as
the intake. It can do It quicker than
your nos»« because your mouth Is blg
«cr than your nostrils or nose holes.
Now if any of you tenderfeet drown
this sens«in it will he your own fault, i
Brealhe right and you will float.
CHAPLAINS TELL OF FRONT
Moral and Religious Situation There
Declared to Be Excellent, and
Will Stay That Way.
Chaplain» Francis B. Doherty and
Lyman' Hollins have just returned
from France on a military mission to
I he United States.
Chaplain Doherty is attached to gen
eral headquarters in France, being as
sociated with Bishop Charles II. Brent
j and Chaplain Paul Dwight Moody (son
i of the well-known evangelist of that
name) In the general headquarters
chaplains' office* Tiie function of this
office is, declares the religious public
ity committee, the direction and dis
tribution of chaplains' activities in
France to the end of the attainment of
the best and special interests of all
concerned, under General Pershing.
This work carries with it considerable
travel and gives an intimate knowledge
of the situation from a religious and
moral point of view.
From this broad knowledge Chap
lain Doherty says : "Everywhere we
find the same situation, here the same
story ; the condition and the spirit of
the men are excellent." When leaving
France on his present mission the
chaplain asked General Pershing:
"May we not tell our people in Amer
ica that the moral and religions situa
tion here is eminently high and very
satisfactory?" The reply was: "Tes,
and you may say furthermore, that it
is going to be kept up to that."
Chaplains Doherty and Hollins spoke
enthusiastically of the altogether ad
mirable spirit of fraternity existing
between those who are ministering to
our soldiers. The Catholic chaplains,
they say, are not merely looking to
the good of the Catholic hoys nor the
Protestant to that of the Protestant
boys ; each is working for the best In
terest of every man.
TURNING PESTS INTO PROFITS
United States Department of Agricul
ture Has Plans for Dealing With
the Rabbit Problem.
Fully 200,000,000 wild rabbits a«
killed In the United States every year
according to estimates made by th-»
biological survey of the United States
deportment- of agriculture. Many of
them are jack rabbits, the majority of
which have not been utilized in the
past.
consumed« they would represent be
tween 200,000 and 300,000 tons of val
uable food; and if proper
were taken to insure the collection of
If all the rabbits killed
we- ■
ruwisiirpn
skins, these alone would have a value
of $20,000,000. The biological survey
lias frequently been called upon to help
western farmers in coping with the
rabbit pest. In view of the probable
economic value of rabbit meat and fur
In the coming few years, the energies
or the farmers and ranchmen will be
directed to the conservation of this Im
portant resource,
of establishments for collecting, dress
ing, canning, and shipping rabbit meat
are in operation in western centers. As
In Australia the transition of the wild
rabbit in this country from its status
as a pest to source of profit is assured.
It Is believed.
Already a number

"Cellulon," New Wood Pulp Fiber.
There has. says tiie Board of Trade
Journal, been much discussion in the
German press during recent weeks con
cerning a wood pulp fiber named "Cel
lulon," for which large claims are
made ns an efficient substitute for jute,
cotton and other filters. It appears te
lle certain that the fiber Is not made
hy spinning long strips of paper run
off reels through water in the manner
which German paper textile substi
tutes have made familiar. The
ac
counts agree in describing the proc
ess, or processes, as a direct manu
facture from wood pulp. The con
sul general at Zurich, who has pre
sented a report to the foreign office,
states that the method employed op
erates on the same general lines a« i
that used for artificial silk manufac- i
that Is, by squeezing pulp un
der high pressure through small hole*
In plates.—Engineer.
tun
:
Wooden Shoes Classy.
If it were not for the pioneers hu
manity would be helpless. The wif*»
of Lieut. A. J. Huntington of the On*
Hundred Sixty-Second infantry, real
dent in Portland, Ore., has long bee*
of the opinion that shoes are too high
In price, and, having the courage of
her convictions and possessing also A
desire to save leather for the army, ehe
occasionally wears a pair of ne*t '
wooden low shoes. These are painted '
black, with a patent leather effect,
and are really very convenient and
classy In still life, though the rigidity
of the sole is some backset. The Heu- I
tenant sent the shoes from France,
where that style of shoes is much In
nse. With rnbber tires to dispense
with the staccato rattle on cement *
walks, mother and the girts might
save pin money and get along, and
with a few old pairs around the house
would never he out cf kindling wood.
i
I
Wheat Products Exporta.
Sir William Goode of the British
food ministry, says that from July
HUT, to April. 1918, the United Stataa
exported to the allies 80.000,000 bnsh
e!s of wheat products. Of this it l*
asserted that SO,000,000 bushels
resented voluntary sacrifices hy th*
American people in their consumption
of wheat.
re;
Real Vacati on.
"You say you an* on a vacation?*'
'Tea»" replied (ho philosophical
"For the next few weeks I
per
son.
going to quit riding on the
talking about the weather«"
ant
cars or
i

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