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American Falls press. [volume] (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, October 25, 1918, Image 1

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American Falls Press
DAHO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2.'», 1918.
MM BER 9K.
AMERICAN FALLS, POWER COUNTY.
VOLUME XVIII.
UNCONDITIONAL SURRENDER
MEANING OF REPLY <
*
*
PRESIDENT SPEAKS PLAINLY TO *
GERMAN PEOPLE
If an Armistice Is Arranged Foeh *
Will Name the Terms—Will Not +
Trnst Military Rulers of Germany +
Who Hare Not Kept Faith in the +
PasL-.The Reply Leaves No Chancel*
for Argument.
+
*
I
The president says that significant |
and important as the constitutional
changes seem to be which are spoken
of by the German foreign secretary, it I
does not appear that the principle of
a government rsponsible to the Ger
man people has yet been fully or per
manently worked out. He reiterates
that the nations of the world do not
and cannot trust the word of those
who have hitherto been the masters.
of German policy, and gives warning |
that if the United States must deal t
with the military masters and the j
monarchal autocrats of Germany,
now or later, it must demand not
peace negotiations, but surrender. J
The statement follows: I
The secretary of state jnakes pub-1
lie the following: !
From the secretary of state to the j
charge des'affairies in charge of Ger-j
man interests in the United States:
Department of state. October 23,
1918:
+
+
President Wilson has informed the *
German government that he has trans +
mitted its correspondence to him seek- | -
ing an armistice and peace to the i *
allies with the suggestion that if *
those governments are disposed to ! +
effect peace upon theterms and
visers and the military advisers of |
the United States be asked to submit I
principles indicated their military ad - 1
the necessary terms of such an armi- j
stice as will fully protect the interests I
i
+
of the peoples involved.
He says that should such terms of j
armistice be suggested, acceptance by i
Germany will afford the best concrete |
evidence of her unequivocal accept- i
of the terms and principles of
ance
peace.
Means Surrender or Fight it Out
Sir:
T have the honor to acknowledge
of
T have the honor to acknowledge
the receipt of your note of the 22 nd
transmitting a communication under
date of the 20th from the German
government aad to advise you that
the president has instructed me to re_
ply thereto as follows:
Having received the solemn and ex
plicit assurance of the German gov
ernment that it unreservedly accepts!
the terms of peace laid down in his j
address to the congress of the United
States on the 8 th of January. 1918, |
the principles of settlement
subsequent ad -1
dresses, particularly the address of j
the 27th of September and that it de
sires to discuss the details of their j
application and that this wish and ,
KÄ dTcUrOerman e j f
policy and conducted the present war f
on Germany's behalf, hut from min- "■
isters who speak for the majority of I
the reichstag and for an overwhelm- ;
ing majority of the German peoples:
and having received also the explicit
promise of the present German gov-1 f
ernment that the humane rules of
civilized warfare will be observed,
both on land and sea by the German
armed forces, the president of , h e j
ä rsut. 1 äs Sissuri™«
ments with which the government ofl
<'-»«■ «w*
..
He deems it his duty to say again
however, that the only armistice he
would feel justified in submitting for
consideration would be one which
should leave the United States and
the powers associated with her in a
position to enforce any arrangements
that may be entered into and to make
s m
a renewal of hostilities on the part of
Germany impossible. The president
has. therefore, transmitted his eorre
S2 Ti th thf
which the government of the United
States is associated as a belligerent,
with the suggestion that, if those
governments are disposed to effect
peace upon the terms and principles
indicated, their military advisers and
the military advisers of the United
States be asked to submit to the gov
ernments associated against Germany
? the necessary terms of such an armi
stice as will fully protect the inter
ests of the people« involved and in
sure to the associated governments
the unrestricted power to safeguard
and enforce the details of -the peace
to which the German government has
agreed, provided they deem such an
armistice be suggested, their accept
ance by Germany will afford the best
concrete evidence of her unequivocal
acceptance of the terms and principles
of peace from wbich the whole action
proceeds.
and
enunciated in his
President is Frank.
The president would deem himself
lacking in candour did he not point
out in the frankest possible terms the
why extraordinary safeguards
Significant im
reason
must be demanded,
portant as the constitutional changes
seem to be which are spoken of by
the German foreign secretary' in his
note of the 20th of October, it does
not appear that the principles of a
government responsible to the Ger
people has yet been fully work
ed out or that any guarantees either
exist or are in contemplation that the
alterations of principle and of prac
tic» now partially agreed upon will be
Moreover, it does not ap- |
man
V
permanent.
++*+++**+++++******
+ +
<
*

+
CALL FOR AID FROM RED
(ROSS.
+
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+
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+

+
+
It is urgently requested by
the members of the Red Cross
that all persons who have hail
any experience in nursing, and
are willing to assist in taking
care of influenza cases send
in their names to Florence Bar
ber, Secretary of the Red Cross
telephone 76 or 115J. Please
report any cases of influenza
to Miss Barber so that nurses
or other necessary aid can be
promptly provided.
F
+
*
+
+
*
*
+
+
+
+
+
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th, king of Prussia to control the pel-I +
icy of the empire is unimpaired; that +
the determining initiative still re- *
mains with those who have hitherto j *
been the masters of Germany. Feel - 1 *
ing that the whole peace of thy world !*
depends now on plain speaking and:+
straightforward action, the president
deems it his duty to say, without any|
attempt to soften what may seem ha r d
words, that the nations of the world
do not and can not trust the word of
those who have hitherto been the
masters of German policy, and to i
point out once more that in conclud
mg peace and attempting to undo the
infinite injuries and injustices of this
war the government of the United ;
J States can not deal with any but verit
I able representatives of the German j
people who have been assured of a j as
! genuine constitutional standing as the
j real rulers of Germany. If it must ;
deal with the autocrats of Germany |j
now. or if it is likely to have to deal 1
with them later in regard to the Ger
man empire, it must demand, not
neace negotiations, but surrender. |
Nothing can be gained by leaving this ,,
essential thing unsaid.
Accept, sir. the renewed assurances
of my high consideration. |
r j
Mr. Frederick Oedei din.
Change d'affairs of Switzerland. ad j
>« - <~~.—*
big Him Defenses nil the Day to |
Ihe Holland Border. !
+
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+
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+ +
♦ +
+ +
+ +
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-
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the
pear that the heart of the present dif
Acuity has been reached. It may be
that future wars have been brought
under the control of the German p' o
pit but the present *ar has not be°n;
and it is with the present war that v e
It is evident that the
+
+
+
+
are dealing,
German people have no means of
commanding the acquiescence of the
military authorities of the empire in
the popular will; that the power of T
j the United States
|
j
j
,
j f The attack of the ^sh third^nd
f ''" r b armies on a d p f .
"■ \a'en s e nn- Dednesdav s of vital
I ■"««•tip importance. Tbe allrnd ^11
; ™ it i
an the " 8 's 'o Holland ami r it is
M*" it will have a tremendous ef -1
f ect also on the enem f. on
sn ™' ,, n ,
Masses of Bri'ish cannon moved no |
during the comparative lull of the
j fmv da^ ear!v\\ ednesdav loos
VL** ' r, " r '*"•*'""*
' ., . . . , „.. .
HSSÄ XS5.
r .. -°"
r "'™" defp " aps ' .
T,1P l,nner a K ^The'
neclal ' ! , ,a , a n
a r ,'Hary five was w*ner«ll>
" "''J ' 1 '' a,,ns had
a 0pn nifn t ° f s .. „ . ..
'' np a *J that the German
Pl acP - T is . . . . ,. h
rommnnd pvioentiv' nfn not nnve raitn
e X t.n„ 0 ted infamry would be
,
"™ p to h ? ,d f be positions stacked
Tbrtmvn o; Ä was taken
^ mües noriheart ;
IW551
-
, !
VI LIES STRIKE HARD
VT V VITAL LINE
Lnt-st Attack Creates Salient Menao
J
1
rrr*e<t jp a
!
st to the
n! Solesnps
North of Valenciennes tbe Germans j
are resisting the allied advance with
heavy long-range artillery fire all the
way to Tournai. North of Tournai
British patrols have crossed the
Scheldt at several places, especially
Pecq and Nivelles. Prisoners are
being taken all along the line.
The situation in Belgium is virtually ,
uncharged '"-i the pnemv resistance
tlierp has stiffened, the German ar
tillory and machine gunners being
most active.
most active.
!
JW5SV
VON DER LANCKEN WILL
DIRECT BELGIAN PROBE
Inquiry Into Allied Charge* Will lie
Under Control of Leader In the Mnr
The London Daily News says that
the commission of neutral residents
of Biussels which is to investigate
charges of unnecessary devastation
der of Miss Cavell.
and destruction during the German
retreat In Belgium will he under the
direction of Baron von der Lancken.
civjl governor of Brussels
"Tli selection of von der Lancken
the News. !
j s extraordinary." says
"when it is recalled that he played a I
leading role in the murder of Edith
Ca'ell. It was von der Lancken who]
i^r.ored the representations of the |
.American minister. Brand Whitlock..
and reflIRed to allo w Miss Uavell to,
| receive a visit from a Belgian lawyer.";
+ + + + + + + 4 + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ++
+
+ j
+
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+
THE SPIDER AND THE KEY

+
By Rev. S. R. Maxwell, Former Organizer. Field Manager and National
Lecturer of the Nonpartisan League.)
+

F
I have watched the spider build her web to catch the unsuspecting
+ fly, I have watched her fling out her cables of gossamer from her own
+ body. I have seen these cables glue themselves to the trees, I have ad
* mired the skill of the spider as with clawed feet she tested the cables to
* see if they held. I have seen her take up her station in the center and
+ then, round and round, I have watched her weave her web of death, and
then she hides herself at a point where she Is in sensitive touch with +
every part of the web to watch for the fly. As I watched I said: "Here +
is the scheming autocrat and here are his methods." ♦
Townley's machine is an expression of himself, and he hides behind +
dummies close to his web to cateh the unsuspecting fly. The facts +
+ prove this. He has refused to make the management of the League +
+ demoeratic, after a score of men who were loyal to the purpose of the
+ League and who had demonstrated their loyalty at the risk of having +
+ their own reputations tarnished forever, undertook to defend the +
League by apologizing for (he disloyalty of Towniey himself, asked +
respectfully that it be done. He has refused to listen to the demands +
+ of these splendid men. He has refused to explain why he abolished the +
+ department in the League w here the most of these men were employed. +
* He has refused*?«» publish to the world his connection with the absolute +
* control of the League Exchange, an affair that handles one and a half +
+ million of dollars in good paper. He has refused to show his connec
tion with the publication company. He has refused to show his eon
ncction with the United Stores Company, another concern of Dis that
+ W»««« •"»""« ** îî»h ^he'two mlH.ims" col'
+ llp «."f 1 1,1 « p ' ,rrp < t statement «! what he did with the two millions <ol
* leeted from the League mem * rs. these concerns
j * he alone carries the key to the tr i ,
1 * fact* carry their own an wir with t
!* x ^
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ,, ■ + + + ++ + + + + + + *♦ + ♦♦♦♦
---—
. . „n o • ** /^1
Davis Answers r ree Service Charges !
+
+
+
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+
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+
+
+
T
+
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He has refused to show whj he, and
These
*
* I
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i
D . w. Davis made the following
i statement in Boise Wednesday, touch-j
ing uporl the charges made against
him by E. A. Strong, editor of the
Power County News, and repeated by
; the state Secretary and the State
mana ger of the Nonpartisan league |
j witb great fl ar j n g of trumpets. It is
j as follows: . j
w :
; -just a wor d to the voters of Idaho. |
|j bave i ive d in Idaho for 12 years
1 an d bav e been in business all that
time j bave , in the community in i
which I reside, an honorable place
| If my life and business record can-|
,, ot sppak for me I doubt if my words j
can help . •
. _ .
| "But, to begin with 1 am not a
j grafter.
"I have paid all the bills for elec
j do^nol" ^rthe" Vower*^
"irsjsssffArs:!"'
rangements with the ' late Senator j
No bill has ever been present
i
I
"I did work for the state in the I
| Liberty Loan campaign and I did the !
! '
^
*
*
î + + + + * + + + + + + + + + + + +
is * + + + + v ** + + + * * + * * + *
-1
n ,
|
h
be
- Brady.
, ! cd to me for this service, and I owe I
none.
4I****************!
+
4 ,
4
I am very anxious to get the Press,
J bu* have neglected to keep you in
1 formed of my change in address.
LETTERS FROM POWER
COUNTY SOLDIERS.
In France, Sept. 13. 1918.
Dear Mr. Barber:
van called from Cassia county
but had made my home in Power
county for several months prior to
the time of being called and I'll take
(his opportunity to send a few linos
a
for publication in your paper.
I didn't have the pleasue of staying
! very long in the camps near home or
in the U. S. either, but I have liked.
the army life from the start. I sail
ed for France August 13th from a
Canadian port and after a very good
trip over smooth water, without inci
dent, landed at an English port on
August 31st. There might have been
submarines watching for us but we
never got to see one anywhere. A
; '
!
j
The following interesting story is from the pen of Rev. S. R. Maxwell, who j
j started with the Nonpartisan league as an organizer, was advanced to field j
manager and later to one of the national speakers. He left the organization,
he says, beeause what he saw from the inside would not permit him to longer
remain with the organization. He is now fighting Townleyism as hard and |
pri bahly more efficiently than any other writer, because the first-hand in
foil ation he gained has given him an appreciation of conditions th:r 1 ut- ,
siders car not have.
Talking to Arthur Williams, who stands high in Townlev's favor, about the ;
, Consumers' Store Company, he gave me the following outline of the plan:
The Consumers' Store Company, according to Williams, is incorporated, and
abou; $i.ouo,000 has been collected from the farmers to finance it. The stock
and con t ro | an( j management of the company is not in the bands of the farm
SOME INTERESTING INSIDE INFORMATION.
ers, who simply receive, in exchange for their *100 subscription, so-called
! "Buyers' Certificates."
"Who owns the stores company?" I asked him. "Do the certificate holders
!
,, ,
''Certainly not," he replied. "A bunch of rubes would wreck it in a
He added that the million dollar corporation was controlled by the directors.
control it?"
and. in response to a question as to who elected the directors, he told me that
Towniey "arranged" for them. Norman O'Leary, who is Townley's prhate
secretary and stenographer. Williams told me. was one of these directors.
Be did not know who the others were,
In this connection a little arithmetic is interesting. Three hundred farmers
at $100 apiece would be $30.000. The total capital of each store is limited to !
$10,000. There remains, therefore, the handsome sum of *20.000. This is
used _ tb e farmers are told, to establish buying agencies, wholesale w arehouses.
apd P ropaganda work, either political or educational. On the expenditure of
^j g money there is no check whatever upon the directors. IT IS ABSOLUTE
!
I '
|
.. . i
the thirsty man. hut. when all the juice is sucked out. the orange is flung into
garbage can.
LY CONTROLLED BY TOWN LEY HIMSELF.
My object in recording these conversations relating to the Publication Co. 1
land the United Consumers' Store Co., is to show that Towniey believes that 1
he is absolute owner of the League. Rufus Wallingforh is only a babe in high
finance compared with Towniey. Y'es. Towniey owns the League, and. like
the mine owner, he digs into its bowels for gold and. when the vein is exhaust
ed. he will abandon it. The League interests him just »is the orange intere-ts
i . VT f
work without compensation. None of
the money entered as paid out Tor,
"personal service was paid to me.
, j
There may be other trumped-up ,
charges brought out against me. and
| I must ask you again to take my long
record in honest dealing in Idaho as!
j the answer.
: ,
| Some porch climbers or second
story men front the far Dakotas have
entered the Democratic house in
i Idaho, and they are starting their us.
ual tactics.
„„„„»ed ml
j Abuse of everyone.M>l>osed 0
fern 's proper ' " i
,hp N° n Partisan league or any of its,
, hP ive "n nerseoutu^* ^
and they thrive on persecution and,
" use ° 0 '
t^ble* and" have^efT a ^Xo-ManV
**— b "" r
j '
"I ask for the votes of the citizens
I ask for the votes of those
i members of the Nonpartisan league,
I who. thinking there is a wrong to he
I righted, can trust me to treat them
! with fairness and justice."
__Following
I of Idaho.
__Following
!
few hours train ride brought us to an
other port of embarkation where we
again went on board ship for our final
, ride to France, which was over in a |
few hours time. After getting onto :
French soil we lost no time in getting!
to our present location and it was a I
pretty well worn out bunch of boys j
that finally got billited in a big barn,
where we are as comfortable as can
be expected.
!
There are six boys from Idaho in
this company and several others in
the other branches of the medical
corps, some being from Cassia coun- !
r>. but we are scattered several miles 1
apart now and I never get to see
any of them.
I suppose the Power county farmers :
: are busy now harvesting and I hope
that all the grain crops are good
j there,
ing and I was out to watch one outfit I
at work yesterday. The way they go
; at it here is quite different from the
! methods used in Idaho. The heavy
, rains of the past week have bothered
j them quite a lot. and also made it dis
1 agreeable for us too. When our drill
The farmers here are thresh
+ + + + + + * + + + + + + + + + +
4"
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
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*
+
"Who »pends the millions +
collected?" I asked Ray Me- +
:ho stands high in
confidence, during +
+
Kaig,
Townley's
the Consumers and Produc- +
ers' convention last Septem
ber.
I
+ I
+ 1
*
+
+
+
+
+
4
4
+
4
+
*
are . ure
hinghat would carry us over the
faster than we can hike
! J£tLn & other tiSnten».
y (rucks apd ambu lances since
rye*been here I suppose this letter
* L for the first one so
Thanking vou verv
' f vour aper ! am ' '
j Yours respuectfully
, m Hall- 159 AmbulanC e I
6th Vpot Division American E.
• p j
• • ( _ 7 _ r] ;
- Hafis
+
"Towniey," he answered
"Is there any check on him +
at all?"
"None whatever," was the +
+
+
answer.
McKaig told me that Town- +
ley spent *65,000 of the mon- +
ey collected from the farmers +
of North Dakota to purchase +
the plant of the Courier News +
in Fargo, and in response to +
my question as to whether he ♦
gave control of this newspaper +
to the farmers whose money +
bought it. replied: +
"Certalnly not." *
McKaig said that he did not ♦
know who actually owned the +
paper, but that '.it is supposed" +
Towniey owns it, although he +
does not publicly appear as the +
owner. He said that the direct- +
ors are known as "dummy di- +
rectors."—Rev. S. R. Maxwell. +
+
I hav
+
+
*
+
+
I*
4 .
*+++++++++++++++++
field is too muddy we take a hike on
these dandy roads around here. They
fine and us boys would like
- Hafis
POWER COUNTY PEOPLE
DRIVING ALL OTHERS fl
-. one
» esu |f s j n >v ar Savings Stamp Cam
^ 8how for Themselves—Pow
er County Occupies Prominant Place I
-
An irishman witnessing a horse ! a
i race gave expression to his native wit if
by g ^ utln .. ru bet on the black
horse; he's driving all before him."
That s{ates Power county's place in by
| the War Savings Stamp
us* Six Thousand Power county peo
smaller population, has taken M.,850.-,
«2 Are we going to be content to re-,
m ®m at the bottom? This is the onlv ■ üj
undertaking that Power county has,
^ fal ' pd > n: and . w ® * w
e *j ^ e ^ ai,se ha e
December to make up oi q ■
is the amount subscribed ; v
! by each county, and the standing of I
!
. i
j
each:
Total sales Rank
to Oct. 1. for Sept
$ 47.850.62
153.526.44
228.398.26
330.010.56
220.123.S8
53.751.44
39,447.01
136.883.99
113.113.82
14.208.06
181.745.75
112.047.05
62.958.71
92.458.51
25.177.63
46.081.07
51.132.39
53.145.75
46.347.19
120.572.49
49.6S4.57
37.165.29
16.603.6S
17.967.39
40.291.23
106,604.45
47.006.43
71.968.75
57,281.41
22.704.79
County.
| B] a i n e
: p r( , mont
Shoshone
a I Ada
j Twin Falls
], t . m hi
[duster
1
-
10
9
20
15
1*
25
11 .
®
! Canyon .
Bonneville
Boundary
Bannock
! y e7 Perce
1 Benewah
Bonner
: Bern
4
IS
I j jata i)
go M ad j SO n
p;i„ lore
B 0 , se
p amas
i dnoo j n
12
Butte
-
,

j
-1
8 1
24
Gooding
Franklin
23
Lewis
19
32
28
31
if
1
3
33
r!
29
Kootenai
Bear Lake
! Bingham
j Washington
Adams
j Clearwater
j Oneida
Payette
Idaho
| Cassia
A'alley
, Minidoka
Jefferson
; Owyhee
Teton
Power
II
26.866.22
33,414.02
56.155.SO
56.346.80
:::
'.36
39.
'I
9.927.64
25.216.92
21.726.S2
11.561.33
9,627.14
9.428.28
3S
39
36
30
40
*2.916.307.94
Total
JW51 - -
! Call at City News Stand for daily
papers. W. H. Dark. Civil War Vet
eran
month.
month.
,^^,^,^,^^,^,^^^44444444
4
4
4
4
4
4
4 1
4
4
4 -
T
J
The Power County News has
failed to print the letter from
the State Liberty Loan Com
mittee. stating that Mr. Davis
received NO compensation for
his services, and received
NONE of the money included
under "personal service" items
in the report of the former
loan campaigns.
Is it the purpose of the News
to mislead and misinform the
people. Is that paper ASHAM
ED to print the letter after
having so unjustly accused
Davis ?
+
! +
4
4
i a
+
1 4
1 4
4
4
4
4
i
4
4
4
4 i
+
+
*
+ * + + + + + + * + + + + + + + + +
INFLUENZA CASES
GREATLY INCREASE
REMIND IS INCREASING TO STOP
AM, GATHERINGS.
Number of l aces in Rockland Large
ly Increased—Threshing Crew at
Vrhon All Have Disease^—Cases Re
ported From All Parts of the Coun
ty—Three Deaths so Far. and Sev
eral Serious Cases.
tiSnten».
Dr. Schütz. with a driver for his
car. is virtually sleeping on the road
between patients. It is heardly pos
sihle to see him to learn the exact sft_
nation. But the fact that he is gone
lall the time, and needing more nurses
I than are to be had. indicates that the
situation is bad enough,
j y trs j a cob y eu and l C Adolf
; are reDO rted to be down with it In
Pleasant Valley. Mrs. Chris Neu died
Wed: eu ay. reported to be from in
fl uen za One death in Rockland and
one jn Arbon make aU the deaths
known, but there are some serious
cages
I Dr. Schütz went to Pleasant Valley
lrst night and from there to Rockland.
! a fifty or sixty mile trip at the least,
if h . had no other calls.
A nurse came in from Burley last
night and was driven to Rockland by
by H. C. Allen, where her immediate
"ere in demand by a family
deHrioS" A
can Falls, all the family being ill. was
taken to the hospital yesterday, quite
■ üj John A. Brandt, living eas^ of
t()Wn is at fhe hospital with a mild
■ thorized local boards of health to pre
; v , nt a n assemblages, open air or oth
I
The influenza situation is growing
more serious, according to every re
port that comes in. It is difficult to
get accurate information, for the rea
son that it is assumed in the absence
of positive knowledge, that every case
of illness it influenza,
The Rockland situation is worse
than it was Tuesday, according to
street report. It was reported Tues
'i a >' f hat there were 114 cases in
Rockland and vicinity,
the mail carrier said there were then
156 cases, that there were only three
nurses to look after ali these, and
'bat one of the nurses was coming
down. Rockland has no doctor, but a
woman who has been a pretitioner, or
bas had some medical experience, has
taken charge of D.r I-ogan's office
and is using his medicines to the best
of her know ledge.
The Cotant threshnig crew of eight
men were brought in from Arbon
Wednesday, all ill with inuenza. They
were a - the Bullock place when taken
ill. A sister-in-law of George S. But
1er is ill. and presumably has influ
Yesterday
case.
The state hoard of health has au
! et wise.
Judge Guheen has discontinued the
hearing of all court cases in the dis-
rrict until further notice. *
Foui- county boards of health have
. i stopned open air meetings, public
j sales and all o*her gatherings. There
a growing demand in this county
far similar action
1
-
10
9
20
IW55!
l MF Rif A \ \ VI ATORS
System of Guarding Vgainst and \t
tneklne the G'-rman Vir Patrols At
tract* Attention.
VRE MAKING RECORDS
American aviators hv inaugurating
night patrols alone the Meuse have
attracted much attention among the
airman of other nations. Under the
present plan the air forces are always
subject to a call from the front, where
observers or listeners report by wire
,vhen ih° motor of a German airplane
is heard approaching the American
As soon as one of these forces is
heard, the American searchlights be
gi n sweeping the sky. The American
nigh* patrols arrive at the same time.
In event the German machine is locat
ed by the ray of a searchlight, the
American machines attack until the
enemy is downed or makes his escape.
On Friday night, when the system
was inaugurated, five aviators started
seeking any German machine that
might be about. When an American
searchlight picks up an American ma
chine. a prearranged signal is given,
eliminating danger that the American
might he shot down by his own men.
GOVERNMENT TAKES HOED
U. S. Health Department Takes Over
Influenza Fight at Kansas City.
Unied States Health depart
mem Tuesday took entire charge of
fight against influenza in Kansas City.
K:;n. This action was decided upon
at a meeting of the city commission
ers. two of whom are ill with influen
za. and followed by an investigation
of the Kansas City hoard of health
Lieut. C D. Shelton, who arrived iat
Tuesday, will have full control of th
steps to he taken against the diseas
which continued to spread with 1
- deaths and 255 new cases reported.
One hundred and seventy-six new
reported in
'influenza cases
Kansas City. Vo., 73 more than Mon
day. and it was said there was no
i lowering of the death rale.
!W551
were
We've just received some snappy
Fall
men's winter weight ovreoats.
Greek Merc

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