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American Falls press. [volume] (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, November 22, 1918, Image 1

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American Falls Press
s
AMERICAN FAXES, POWER COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 22. 191 H.
VOLUME XIX.
NI MBER U
METZ («IVES WARM WELCOME
TO LIBERATING ARMY.
Entry of French Army Under Marshal
Petain a Historic Event Consecrating |
Victory oi the Allien—People
Wild With Joy.
the
historic event accomplished at
when I
The
2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon.
Marshal Petain, commander of the
Fremch armies, made his entry into j
the great stronghold of Dor- :
and the pivot of Germany's ef- !
fort to crush France, more than any
other happening,helped consecrate the
victory of the allies in this war. Th<
occasion, in which the French com
mander figured for the first time as j
a marshal of France, also gave rise
of the most picturesque dem- j
carried out by the
Metz,
raine
to one
onstrations ever
people of Lorratue.
From early in the moruing all the!*
roads leading to Metz were crowded
with Lorrainers on their way to the
city to raise their voices there for j
Marshal Petain and for France. Peo-1
pie unaccustomed to any other tongue }
for years began ;
brushing up their
than the German
many days ago
knowledge of French, In preparation ,
for this occasion, and although the j
majority of the population undoubted- |
ly has a perfect acquaintance with
other tongue than German, Ht*
heard In
r.o
tie of that language was
the streets during the day
Statues Pulled Down.
Other things German had disap
ared overnight, including the stat
; of German rulers, which had been
hauled down by the citizens. William
I had toppled from his equestrian
monument, while Frederick III.
for many long years had pointed a
menacing finger at France from the
pedestal upon which he stood, had
come down with a rope around his
neck. Farmer Emperor William II
still left to figure grotesquely as a
the facade of the cathedral.
r f -
-, «
was
statue on
The hands had been chained during
the night and into them had been put
band with the inscription: "Sic
transit gloria mundi."
Signalling the approach of the mar
shal and his cavalcade, airplanes be
gan flying over the town about 1
o'clock and the air was soon full of
tri-color flags which the
.1
miniature
airmen dropped. .
A little later the cannon of the forts
around about the city began firing a
salute of 300 rounds. The famous
cathedral hgll. the motto on which
reads. "I announce justice," gave the
signal for the other bells of the city to
peal forth a welcome to "our libera
tors." as the people of Metz call the
French and the allied armies.
Cheer Petain and Staff.
When Marshal Petain appeared
mounted on a fine white charger, and
followed by the entire general staff,
with American and British officers
attached, a shout
drowned the whir of airplanes flying
overhead, and the crowd surged for
ard. breaking the line of guards in
places, to get a glimpse of the victori
commander of the French armies.
Still mounted. Marshal Petain took
up his position in front of the statue of
Marshal Ney, to review the troops
comprising the 39th division of in
fantry. with its artillery.under General
Pougin. a detachment of the 1 st corps
of cavalry under General Feraud.
other mounted troops under General
De Boissieu, two escorting squadrons
from the 1st Moroccan division and a
detachment of tanks.
The staff of the tenth army, which
General Mangin was prevented from
heading because of the accident he
had met with, was lined up directly in
front of the marshal, and
Fayolle, commanding
group of armies stood near the com
mander in chief just in front of the
Ney statue.which the various superior
officers saluted in passing.
People Wild W'ilh Joy,
Enthusiastic cheers of "Long live
France!" greeted every flag as it ap
peared. The dignity of the reviewing
ceremony, however, prevented the
people from giving free play to their
The case was different in their
that
went up
A
OllS
A
General
the central
jov.
contact with the troops in the streets
after the column had left the Esplan
Then there were three calunins
ade.
two of which were of citizens, march
ing on either side, hand in hand, with
the soldiers in the center.
JW511
Italy Appropriates Big Sum for Re
construction.
Italy has embarked on a definite
reconstruction program and nt'arly
three and a half billidn lire has been
appropriated to carry it out. Measures
have been adopted to permit all war
factories -to resume peace production
immediately.
One billion, eight hundred million
lire has been designated for railway
reconstruction: one billion for public
works and drainage of harbors: five
hundred millions for other works of
public utility, and one hundred mil
lion to cope with the situation created
by the large number of unemployed.
The dispatch also quotes Food Com
missioner Crispi as saying that be
cause of the addition of nearly five
million people to Italy's population
by reason of the Austrian evacuation
further restrictions on
tions will be necessary,
stock of food supplies accumulated
will be insufficient. Commissioner
Crispi believes, in view of this addi
tion to the population along with
the feeding of about 900.000 Austrian
nrisoners in Italy and the numbers of
\ustrians that are surrendering dally
•he armies of occupation complete
their task.
food
The large
ra
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The ban on public meetings
in Power county will not be lif
ted the 24th. The number of
influenza cases that have devel
oped during the week have cre
ated a sentiment against a too
hasty action, and reconciled cit
izens to a continuation of the
ban. It is said that fifty cases
have developed during the past
five days, the majority of them
being in American Falls. Fif
teen cases were reported in
one day. This is the high mark
of the week, and by continuing
the ban it is hoped to make it
the high mark for future weeks
and months. One and possibly
two cases have developed in the
county offices this week, and
many may have been exposed,
as there are many daily callers.
While all are anxious to have
the ban lifted as soon as it can
be done with safety, all are in
favor of going slowly in this
direction.
♦ I







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DID IDAHO START SOMETHING!
At the beginning of the great war
there was a call for volunteers Idaho
stepped forward with her full share or
more. WTien the draft was instituted
Maho of course furnished her full
part. The need of funds to equip, and t
feed and transport, and supply with j
munitions millions of men was very j
great. Money had to be raised. There
were four success-ie Liberty Bond
drives. Idaho did more than her a - !
lc ted share n each of them. In ad
dition two billion dollars were to he
raised by the purchase of War Savings ,
S amps. Idaho was allotted a quota
of between eight and nine millions.
The government is needing and count
ir 'S °. n ra\ m 0 n f y , fr0m th '** ourc t, . j I
Did Idaho start something which
she could not finish? And is she going
to be hacked up into a corner and
have to acknowledge it? This query
, , , . ,.
? f0 ? e ? l 'P° n U u s h l constderation of ,
the fact that she has accounted for
only three millions of her War Sav-,
mgs quote while she has much more|
than that to take up before the end
of the year. Of course, it is preposter
ous to suppose for a minute that Ida
ho can not do her full share in this
respect. It is simply a question of
whether she is determined to do so
or whether she is willing to have her
perfect record spoiled by falling down
on her War Savings quota.What an
anti-elimax it would be, especially at
one of the greatest moments in world
history, when the world'war has been
won and the Hun menace has been
hrought to its knees. As citizens of
Idaho, it seems almost too ridiculous
for words to suppose for a moment
that with the end in sight she will
he too lazy to finish her job in work
man-like manner.
;
I
BolsheTilii Get Licking.
Heavy fighting in the Dvina river
legion between Bolsheviki and allied
forces is reported to have taken place I
Monday and Tuesday. The Bolsheviki
attacked the allies on the front and j
flank Monday, penetrating several
villages and forcing their w ay to the \
Canadian battery positions, where they !
were held. American and British in
fantry then counter attacked, throw
ing the enemy hack with heavy losses,
The fighting was resumed Tuesday, I
the Bolsheviki being beaten with heavy j
loss««. _ ___
•*WsF
Memorial Trees for Hero Dead Mill
Be Planted Throughout World.
"Memorial trees" for the soldier
dead in the world war will he planted
throughout the l niteef States next (
spring, and probably throughout all !
the allied countries. Endorsement of
the idea is coming from all parts of
the country. It is planned to plant
"victory oaks." "victory walnuts"
and "victory elms" along the Lincoln
highway and other great roads.
I
_ __ „
NOVJ G-ET FvsGbA OUR SOLO E 1
ÔONS nmere ^i-AO Vo PRitqV j
'ENV JEEV SO SNE OOtqV &\V
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suae prooo of oua boms
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VHEhA all
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IDAHO MARINE ONE OF FEW SURVIVORS.
Archie Howell of Rogerson. one of the marines who helped turn
I + back the German tide at Chateau Thierry, is home on a leave of ab
sence. He wears on his left shoulder a red and green cord, indicative
of the six official citations of his regiment for distinguished service.
Up to the time he left the Twin Falls country, in December, 1917, Mr.
Howell had for some time been a truck driver between Rogerson and
♦ Jarbidge, Nevada. Twelve hours after landing at Brest, France, on
♦ June 6 , he was sent forward with other marines among the mem
* bers of 'he fourth replacement of the Fifth and Sixth regiments of ma
♦ rines. employed in holding the line on the western front.
♦ When the marines, with French reinforcements, had turned the
♦ tide of battle against the Germans and were driving them back. Mr.
+ Howell says, the enemy fought with the desperation of cornered
* beasts. "When their ammunition was exhausted they would call
♦ kamerad.' but for eighteen day* there were no kamerade' for the ma
♦ rines and the French. A blow with the butt of the rifle or a thrust
4 with the bayonet was the answer," he says.
♦ The severity of the fighting in this period is indicated in Mr.
+ Howell's statement of bis belief that out of the 1200 men In his bat
+ talion, he is one of the twenty-eight men who came out alive.
The Americans had. on their own account, sufficient scores to
+ settle with the Germans," Mr Howell said, "but what made us want 4 *
♦ to fight most was the sight of French women and children, their ♦ *
+ fathers and brothers killed in the war, returning ragged and ill cared ♦ +
4 for from the regions occupied by the enemy."
+ .
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VICTORY GIRLS HELP SWELL
UNITED WAR WORK FUND
The ^ have not enjoyed a monop
in the Unite d War Work drive,
The irIs have also been dolng lhe ir
Mr8 . R . B . Greenwood, leader of
t „ girla in the drlve , „.ports $123.50
subBcrlbed as follows:
h • , r îh
Emma , 8aak ^
^ Bootb
Rena Martin .
w Burrell
v « ar { on o rarlt< .
pauline g kfi
Helen Zarin
Pear , Lanham
Myrt)e p aa
I .eda Rosander
Ruth Snodgrass .
wagstaff
Hjlda Wimer .
$ 5.00
.... 5.00
5.00
5.00
. 5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
. . 5.00
. 5.00 1
5.00
5.00
3.00
Clara Russell .
frothy Wones
p r v, p i wisnn
He)en ' Wlertzba
Dorothv
j £net schütz
\i arearef Davis
horence Barber
3.00
3.00
3.00
. 3.00
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.00
Helen McKown
Frances Snodgrass
Silvie Allen
Helen McGhee .
F. Nettie Rice .
Daisy Miller
Nettie Houk
Laura Southwell
Zella Allen .
Lillian Glorfield .
Mrs. E. M. Travis
Anna Barnhart
Day Danielson .a
Gertrude Hughes.
Vrs. J. Sherman
2.00
2.00
1.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1 00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
j 00
. (t o
1.00
Ethel R. Myers
; Virginia Furrer
I Grace Reed
(Grace Herre
Esther M. Dawson
I Freda Howard
Alys Howard
j Jennie Davie
Catherine Davie
\ Lillie Butters
! Hedwig Bartel
Phyllis Ceilings
ichloris Collines
1: ez Schwarz
I Gladys Runnion
j Mvra Angellv
I.uln Schwarz
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1
1.00
1.00
1.00
1 00
1.00
1 00
1 00
Total
$125.50
, loKK TH \ \ THREE MILLION
BRITISH LOSS IN WAR.
(
!
. î
i
Men KID«-«I In Uampaiim on VII Front*
Missing.
Wounded
2.391,'It*«.
u ml
British casualties during the war
including all theatres of activities, to
talled 3.049 991. Of this number the
officers killed, wounded and missing
aggregated 142.034 and the men 2.9 rt 7.
357. The total losses in fighting on
I the Franco-Belgian front were 2.719.
t42. The total losses of Britislf killed
, in a u fronts during the war was 05S.
qj niese 37.S36 were officers and
î »120.S29 were men.
The total British wounded in the
! war was more than two million The
!, sses in missing, including prison
ers. totalled 359.145.
-'W55'
King Vlbert t lieered a* He Entered
Antwerp.
King Albert made his entry into
Antwerp Wednesday. His progress in
j to and about the city was enthusias
I tically cheered everywhere
j A Te Deum at the cathedral was at
tended by the king, who afterward
rode in an automobile to the various
sections of the town j
o'clock in the afternoon
The ciG zens of Antwerp gave up
the day to rejoicing over their lib
and the return of their mon
arch.
? a ' ■*
J W5f
Arrest Bolshevik Agents in Vienna.
Several hundred persons have been
arrested in Vienna on charges of con
I spiring with the Red Guards to pro
I claim a Bolshevik government, ac
—cording to advices reaching Copen
j hagen. The alleged conspirators, in
eluded Paul Friedlander, leatler of the
Communistic party, also planned to
occupy the government buildings and
I to arrest the cabinet.
GEN. FERDINAND FOCH
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Marshal Foch and Premier Clernen
ceau were unanimously elected by ac
c'amation to the French academy yes
terday They
being obliged to solicit membership
ere invited instead of
(E5!
Deniultilixation at ( amp Lewi* Begun,
Demobilization of troops ae Camp
i-ewis was begun Tuesday with the
'ransfer of men from the depot bri
gade into four training battalions and
one development battalion and the fil
ling of permanent camp organizations
to full strength Actual discharge of
the first men is expected to start this
week. Men who voluntarily enlisted
for the war emergency will be the
first to go home if they are not mem
hers of some organization to be re
Camp officials say they tan not
tell when demobilization will be com
pleted. Some men. it is known, w ill.
be kept for months, but for the most j
part they will be those who intend j
to remain in the army.
rained in service
1 < ir *' n supplie* to Meet VH De
tnands.
Supplies of grain held in elevators.
which will be available to meet the
î demands of this country as well as I
,n aid Europe, are far greater than
they were a year ago November .
there was on hand in primary e,e ' a U
tors 114.041.000 bushels of grain as
compared with 17.35b.00C bushels on
the same day of 1917. Wheat and corn
supplies especially showed an increase
over a year ago. There were 3.767.000
bushels of corn in the elevators on
November 9 as compared to 157.000
bushels a 'ear ago: 94.433.000 bush
e'« of wheat as compared with five
million bushels in 1917
JW5]?
| War Work Drive Reports Not
Complete,
Reports have been received from
but a third of the districts of the coun
t} -. but those received indicate that
n ' c b igh record will be broken when
tbe complete returns are in. The Vic
W |th her quota Crystal reports $42
Hawkins $2S, Hillhouse district $74
iiannock Center $150 50. Roy $S*>. Fair
tory boys and girls have made the
best showing American Falls is over
view $1S2.50. Ringe $47
Wi 1
General P«-r*hinsr to Report on *>tatn*
of Prisoners.
The war department has cabled
General Pershing to send quickly the
names of incoming prisoners, with a
statement of their condition. War
department officials
apprehensive over the possible i'o'i
dition of returning American prison
ers. in view of revelations about Brit
are somewhat
ish prisoners.
444444444444444444
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The German fleet surren
dered yesterday to the allied
grand fleet The American
squadron and French cruiser*
participated in the ceremony
Four hundred allied vesBeli
the biggest fleet ever assem
bled. are reported to have met
the Germans. The fleet inclu
ded five American dread
naughts. The surrender is un
derstood to have takeD place
at a point about sixty miles
east of May isle, just off the
entrance to the Firth of Forth,
on the Scottish coast.
The terms of the armistice
provided for the surrender of
twenty-four dreadnoughts, bat
tle cruisers and cruisers, fifty
destroyers and all submarines.
Compared with the allied
fleet the German vessels are
said to have shown a marked
inferiority in every way. and
naval men expressed the con
viction that had the fleet come
out to do battle it would have
been overwhelmed.

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♦Iafter
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_I
u. _ j
A K P®*, P , ' , . :
.t, ^
the bootblack pufTed at the end of a
•■lgar. Thinking to have a little fun 1
at the youth's expense, the customer
asked him if he always smoked cigars,
"Oh. yes. pretty often," declared the
youth.
"What brand do you generally
smoke?" was the next questioD.
"Robinson Crusoe, sir,'' came the re
+
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4
444444444444444444
ply. .
The customer ppndered awhile.
"I never heard of that brand." he
"It's a name I've given cm myself." ,
said.
said the youth. "You see. guv'nor. old
Crusoe was a castaway !"
Mud Specialist
Several officers from the front speak
of a famous bootblack in Paris who is
known as the "mud specialist." The
individual can tell every soldier client
what section of the trenches he hails
from merely by examining the mud on
his f%et. It is said that he rarely
makes a mistake, and cau spot a man's :
battle station where between
Ypres and Verdun with marvellous ae
curacy, apparently each section of the !
long in-- -nt Its charm.:
brand ,*f mud.
An Italian physician. Prof. Domenico
Lo Monaco, announces that he has
evolved a remedy for consumption,
The base of his discovery lies in his
Unding that sugar applied to the bron
chiai secretions caused the disappear
ance not only of the secretions hut of
tubercle bacilli as well. The Ympor
tance of this lies in that the bronchial |
I
A private in the quartermaster's
corps at Camp Pike decided that he
would sooner be in a more active
Cure for Tuberculosis Claimed.
secretion is held to be a necessary ve
hicle for the existence and growth of
consumption germs,
Joined the Army.
...
branch of the service, so ujjjied for and
received a transfer to the artillery.
After bidding him good-by. hls bunk
mate hung a service flag with one star
in front of their barracks. On being
asked what it all meant he said : "Our
bas j oiQed tbe army."
>
The author of "Trivia'' writes:!
'What a bore It is waking up in the
morning always the same person." We
shudder-giving thought struck u* that
we might wake up some morning and
fl Ild ourself the kaiser. And It would
be just our luck to be Bill on the day
retribution.—Boston Transcript.
. ....
-iisii
.. n r -f, n 1 )ar H* Preserve Re«-.
I rge* Draft Boards to Ire.rve Ke«
_ Marshal General Crowder
Frovost Maisnat ue.,era. «.rowoer
has urged a!! draf T boards to preserve
all data compiled on draft registrants,
>oth classifie«! and physically exam
ined. before the order was issued for
cessation of this work He explained'
that such date is Titallv necessary for
administration of the war insurance
act and future pension la»s
Cured.
had often fretted over this until the
Senator Borah has demanded that
there be no censorship of the news
of the peace treaty convention at Val
enciennes. It is said that President
Wilson has the same sentiments
The U. S. army yesterday rested on
the soil of four nations .France. Bel
gium. Luxemburg and German Lor
raine. Yesterday's advances resulted
ii* the occupation of a score of vil
lages.
King Albert and Queen Elizabeth
will make their formal entry into
Brussels today. The Belgian govern
ment was moved from Brugges to
Brussels yesterday.
President Wilson and party will go
to Europe on a big army transport
according to present plans The pres
ident will require a passport the same
as an ordinary traveler.
The knowing ones pick Elihu Roo*
as the Republican representative at
the pea«e convention.
UKRANIAN REPUBLIC
HAS BEEN OVERTURNEI»
4
jkie» Ha* Been Captured by Anti
BolshevNt Forces and a New
cmrnent Formed.
ItOT
I The I'kranian government has been
(overturned and Kiev has been cap
jtured by troops from Astrakhan, ac
cording to dispatches to Swedish
| r.t» spapers The Ukranian national
(assembly has fled and a provisional
j government has been formed by the
captors of the city, who are appar
l-ntly commanded by General Deni
al'tine. leader of the anti-Bolsheviet
*,'orces.
♦j The Ukraine became a republic
♦Iafter the overthrow of the Kerensky
♦1 government in November. 19X7, There
much fighting there bet Veen the
Bolshevik! and their
I was
opponents re
suiting in the defeat of the BolshevfkL
Ukranian
government roads
j peace with Germany at Brest Litorsk.
ia few days before the Russian Bol
shevik government also agreed to the
! German terms Austro-German Troops
then entered the Ukraine for the pur
pose of carrying out economic arti
les of the peace treaty
Ukranian i_
_I overthrown last May
j Shoropadski became dictator
: 'he title of hetman, but he has had
^ maintaining order there
a although assisted bv the
1 Germans,
commander of the Russian armies on
'be southwestern front. Previously to
The
government was
and General
inder
Austro
Gencral Denikine was
formerly
'hat he had been chief of statt of the
Russian armies.
■wsf
Huii Narrowly Mi*«ed Monster l.in
With Over 1M Mile Range,
■wsf
States would have had a monster gut»
shooting much further than the Teuton
, one which shelled Paris. The gun the
United States proposed to make was
to have had a range of probably 10 O
miles, but whether it will be developed
now that the struggle is over is un
certain.
Had the war continued the United
Like the mounting of big 14-inch na
\al guns for front warfare, this iong^
range product was to be the product
of navy brains Not that ordnance
men believed such a weapon to be of
military value but they did agree that
it might have a psychological effect.
The gun is understood to have been
Planned along lines similar to 'he Ger
man machines It was to be a en»
within a gun. in other words, a sub
:
! calibre gun
The explosive harge would cover
the area of the bigger gun but act
on a smaller tube within, thus pro
ducing a big power on a comparatively
small projectile.
Ordnance men say the German gute
and this
out sufficient ability to destroy
enemy to make 'hem mili'arily worth
while
planned to develop this weapon Vu
extraordinary work on depth
| rocket f.ares which vj î
IligqT up enemy craft without search
I lights and an aeroplane gun firing
from both ends
In aircraft the navy vas successful.
Gne of its craft has a span of 125 teet
-25 feet greater than the mammoth
Uandley-Page machine recently
'ilhitd before President Wilson,
one are both freaks, with
The nava! ordnance experts not only
ex
Gf'NFRAI. ORDERS COVER
DEMOBILIZ VnON PL tNS
• a re (ul Provision Made for Keeping
Permanent Record of Individual
*>erv ice.
Genera! orders by the war depart
ment cover in detail the process that
will be followed in the demobilization
| ff troops Careful provision Is made
retaining a permanent record of
j the service performed not only by ev
„ach mdHnduaT o°fficer man 'who
ccniposed j t
Particular attention is given to the
final physical examination of men
: called up in the draft for limited rr.il
tary service because of physical dis
ability in view of the possibility of fu
' ro disability claims To safeguard
, ?old;er? - Merest, provision is
' nad * for a medical board of review
d'snuted in this connection
xeon are d.sput.olm his connects,
(
noi.-xHETIKI IMPRISON
p |lir<>r CB i t8r Treadwell Held hv -i«
I Tl e ts vfter «. ( -l*nre While oa Way
to Volga.
î \ f the findings of the examining sur
U. 'S. REPRESENTATIVE
1
at
Roger Culver Treadwell, until re
cently a representative of the U S.
government in Petrograd, is a pris
oner of the Bolsheviki in Tashkend,
Turkestan, according to advices that
have been received at the state de
partment Steps are being taken to
obtain his release.
Mr. Treadwell was on his way to
Vologda to establish a United States
consulate when seized. Several other
consuls, representing allied nations,
are said to be his fellow prisoners in
Tashkend
( olonel Roosevelt ami (Vite to \ i*if
Heroic Son's Grave.
Colonel Theodore Rtxvsevelt and Mrs.
Roosevelt will sail for France to visit
the grave of their son. Quentin, »ithin.
t> few weeks if conditions will per
mit. Colonel Roosevelt is very anx
ious to visit France and will leave at
the first opportunity.

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