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American Falls press. [volume] (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, January 03, 1919, Image 1

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American Falls Press
.'Y
f
NUMBER 1«
AMERICAN FAXES, POWER COUNTY, IDAHO, FIRDAY, JANUARY S. 191«,
VOLUME XJX
!
PESTS CALVE BIG LOSS
TO FARMERS OF COI N : Y.
If
More Than Third of a Million Dollars
Is Estimate of Farm Rnreau. Based I
on Reports Received From ->25
Farmers. _ _ to
I
Should anyone rob a farmer of the
county of $400, it would create a sen
sation. and the sheriffs office would
put forth great efforts to apprehend
♦he criminals. Should fifty farmers
be robbed, the news would be sent
broadcast throughout the state and
adjoining states and a dragnet search
for the criminals would be instituted. R
A bigger robbery than that has ta
ken place, a robbery far in excess of £
the total amount collected.as taxes
from all the people of the county, am.
it has created no sensation. It ha-,
been taken as a matter of course, aim of
has been going on in a greater or let
ser degree, for a number of years. 9
The robbery has not been committed of
by men, but by rodent pests-rabbPs
•ind 8Qui *rels
' The losses caused by these pesta
is astonishing. As a part of the cam
paign for pest extermination that has
been undertaken by the Power County
Farm Bureau, cards were sent out by
county agent to ascertain the ex
tent of the losses sustained. Fiv?
hundred and twenty-five of these P
cards, out of more than 1.00U sent out,
have been returned. A third of the
cards returned make no merition 0 f 1
losses sustained. The other cards es- !
timate losses totalling 113,376 bush
es, based on average yields. At pre
. vailing prices, this means a loss ol
* approximately *225,000 sustained by
about 350 farmers, or an average of r
about $643 for the farmers reporting. a
!
1
I
The most sanguine political reform- i
er who would propose to save the peo- I
pie of the county half as much, by the
arlontlrin nt anv reform would be !
aiXd at ye ti the pèopti believed I
that a tenth of this amount could be !
sated tw would be a unit for th
to?, h,,,, of Iv in Ihat aave such :
nrZZ But thev hivt overlooked i
' à?nn rfl î„ £ ,1 holds more!
l^fe ? ht n ;,nv nobtlcal nrom 1 se
losses have
1 hat such extensive losses navt
been shown is a matter of encourage-,
ment to < - -ni AC«wi. .ampsori. '* |
believes tha- it will »»ult *n toe or
ganization ot the fai mers to light t I
pests to the point of e * t * r " d " a,R>1 ?' j
whicii can be done it each farmer £"* j
do his part, but in no other way. the
IZTXrZniy clearing the*va? |
rant lands adjoining the cultivated |
)
the
The losses reported have been
checked by conservative men from the
different sections of the county, nd
it is not believed the reports are over
drawn. County Agent Lampson esti
mates, from inquiry and observation,
that not more than two-thirds of the
losses have been reported,
ing to his estimate the loss last year
reached a total of $351,000.
ft
Accord
i
areas,
County Agent Lampson is muca ;
y: eased at the co-operation he is re -1
" ceiving from the county commission- i
ers, who have placed an order
three thousand ounces of strychnine
at cost of about $5,200, which will ba
V-iold to the farmers at half cost. This
is an appropriation of $2,600 of the
county's funds to assist the farmers
in their fight. With such loyal sup
port, and with the active co-operation
of the government, the pests ought to
he cleaned out and kept out.
for I
!
SES
PATRIOTIC SERVICES.
Program Will Be Given as
Welcome fo Soldier Boys.
Special
On Sunday evening, January 12, pal
welcome to the
/
riotic services as a
soldier boys who have returned home,
will be held at the Methodist church.
There will be special music and a spe
for the evening. The
eiai program
program complete will be announced
in next week's paper.
Regular services, morning
ening, will be held the coming 8 m
day, January 5. The new 8undn.'
school officers will be installed dic
ing the Sunday school hours.
The flu plague is so serious that tne
churches are calling the public to
think of things pertaining to the s-'ul.
The American Falls churches invHe
the privilege of serving.
H. J. RICHARDS, Pasto:.
snd ev
PAYOR aid for soldiers.
Igrirnltural Engineers Urge
to Provide Farms.
Federal
Loans
adopting resolutions favoring
financial aid to provide
with
After
governmental
returning soldiers and sailors
farms, by means of long loans at low
rates of interest, the American So
ciety of Agricultural Engineers at
lAeir twelfth annual meeting Tuesday
a\ Chicago, elected the following offi
' 'wavmond Olney, St. Joseph. Mich..
.resident; L. F. Seaton. Lincoln Neb
vice president; H. E. Murdock, Boze
man Mont., second vice president ; r •
V. Ives. Ohio State university, Cloum
Ohio, secretary and treasurer.
ms
jWS§J
line I*lay at the Irene.
We Cant' Have Everything."
of De Milles famous Artcraft pic
will be shown at the Irene Sun
This film is adapted
written by Rupert
one
lures
.'ay evening.
the novel
■d is up to the standard of
One
.'S.
îfvtures presented at the Irene.
ravel picture«
hov.n the same evening.
JUNIOR RED CROSS WORK
CONTINUED.
4

*
County Chairman H. R. Wallis of
the Junior Red Cross school commit
tee, has addressed the following letter ♦
to the teachers of the county, seeking ♦

4

4


1
t
their co-operation :
. „ ,, T , .
American Falls. Idaho
„ ... Q . , |L anu ? ry '
p/"?" T h h ° TeacherS ' Po " er
that the armistice has been
, armistice has Been
^ ed there seems to be a feeling tha.
no a (k p,ac * k f ° r tha Ju "'° r
R f, ProB8 J n th * 8 ? b ° o1 i8 *
'"'staken idea. In he rehabilitation
£ the war-devastated portions of
Europe there is every demand for Re.l
Cr ° 8s s T erv , lce ' . _ , ,
Junior Red Cross has been one
of the most salutary agencies that has
ever f nteyad «* 00 ! work. Good lec
9 ° n ?J n a( * 00 ' are th ! ^ e8t IT ,den f aa
of tbe , Rad Cross s P lr f_ When „ ,b *
work of the Junior Red Cross ceases
we must contrive in some manner to
pr .°. vl . de ,. the incentives for helpfulness
which if gave.
Yo " r , flrs task is aee to L 4 ***
your school is enrolled as a Junto
Red r08s auxiliary. Ha
* /" nd suivaient to 25c per pa
I'«- « tbis m ° ney ca "" ot be ra,8ed ' a
P 1 ^ o( sa, ; vica be acce P ted in
its w « sbaI > use every endea
vor to have the Power County mem
1 oership of100 per cent,
! You will send the amount of money
raised for the Junior Red Cross to the
county treasurerMrs Rosa •
American Falls keep the school funde
>" one central fund, with each schoo
r f. ce *y r . i . ng , t8 frnni this
a " hills to be ordeied paid from h .
fund by voucher at the regular meet
ihgs of the committee.
While each school has the right to
! draw on the fund for an amount equal
to the sum it has paid in, minus the
1 er cent the committee sets for Its
overhead expenses, it has that right
only if it can make use of the money
for legitimate Red Cross purposes
I which are O. K.'d by thè committee.
i Th ls y ear fh e aIlotl " enta of
I will be made through the chapter. We
are in great need of fenthers for lhe
! allotment of 30 pillows. The Rock
I 'and school has done more than its
! «hare in furnishing feathers but only
two other schools in the country have
: contributed The allotment of bed
i «'de tables, handkerchiefs, etc., which
have been made has been assured by
'he schools maintaining a domestic |
-science and the manual ttraining de- ,
„artment
PartmenL ^ „ I1otn . efltj , are reC eIved
| wjn bp a dvised. However, en
^ ^ work help{ul To the com
I c'lean yards, neater road
j ddes, rubbish heaps done away with.
j j„ tprD jn erB destroyed, neat dress. |
manners, courtesy—all these
| ^gs may he -e = ts of a Red
| Uross school '.ours truly.
i ♦

H. R. WALLIS,
Chairman Chapter School Com.
;
-1
-iWSSL
-1
i
to
-iWSSL
I HOOVER RUSHES FOOD
SUPPLIES INTO BALKANS
First Steamer Beaches Triests Others
Will Follows Situation In Rumania.
Austria and Poland Under Investi
gation.
of the first
Arrival at Trieste
steamer carrying food suppies for the
Serbians and the sending of a special
! mission to Warsaw to organize food
relief in Poland, and another to Vien
to investigate food conditions there
announced In a cablegram re
food
!1 it
as
were
ceived at the
Tuesday from Herbert C.
Paris. A commission also has left for
Belgrade, to take charge of the situa
tion there.
Conditions in Vienna and also in
said to be desperate.
administration
Hoover at
Rumania were
Mr. Hoover said representatives of the
Viennese municipalities now at Berne,
Switzerland, staled that food supplies
for the 2.000.000 people in the Aus
trian capital would not last more than
10 days. The Swiss government, the
cablegram said, proposed to forward
at once a week's supply for the city.
As to Rumania, the cablegram said,
the Americans and allied jninisters
there had telegraphed that they were
convinced the food suplles would not
than another 30 days and
m
tne
to
ev
last more ,, „ .
i "that immediate steps for relief must
! be taken if the country is not to be
! submerged into Bolshevism."
I Mr Hoover's cablegram follows:
foodstuff«
of
"The first cargo
shipped through the co-operation o.
the war department and food adminis
tration has arrived al Trieste, and
other cargoes should arrive at ( attaro
and other points on the Adriatic sea
in the next ihre days. These supplies
intended for Serbia and the terri
recently amalgamated with Ser
-, where
The only
low
So
at
offi
r •
are
tory
bia in Bosnia and Montenegro
distress is very acute.
j is by railroad from the Ad
riatic sea. the Bulgarians haying de
stroyed the railroad from Salonika,
j. beyond the possibility of
inside of four months.
the
connection
ic
Greece
pair
-fwsa
Bis.mier« and Fires Distort. ( onstan
tinople.
at Constantinople con
pic
Sun
Disturbances
and great fires have broken out
Parmakkapol quarter of Pera,
the Golden Horn from the city
Kadi
from
one
tinue
in the
proper, and in the suburb of
Keui according to advices
Athens. The Turkish chamber of dep
uties is reported to have dissolved as
t oi opposition from Young
of
One
u
..'eputies.
TOBEl*********'»'»****** 4 * 4444444444444 ' 4444
4
*
TUESDAY ISSUE JOINS THE KAISER.


*
... ...
♦ mistice and went into retirement, along with the kaiser
♦ the war. and had no further reason for existence. Condition» in Amerl
♦ can Falls do not warrant and for more than a year have not warranted
4 the publication of a twice-a-week paper from a business standpoint.
♦ Therefore the advice of the war Industries board, to conserve labor.
4 has been taken and the Tuesday issue will appear no more for the
*
On the last dav of 11*18 the Tuesday issue of the Press signed an ar
It outlasted


4
4
4
4
4
4
The Friday issue will consist of eighteen or twelve pages, depend- *
♦ ing upon the demands made by news and advertising matter, and the ♦
1 „.MT^ll be mailed in time to reach the remotest part of the coun- ♦
t t P , on Fridays which wtil "qui« the edition to be printed each Thurs- ♦
» a ■ f r 4
' a The 'Tuesday edition was started in order to meet a demand for *
4 news of the war The war having ended, the conditions which brought *
* the Tu-sdRv naiier inti existence have ceased to exist It has tilled Its *
L , s " „„It „„„„eu . ut naturallv T
m Beginning in this issue is Irving Bachelor's new story. "The Light ♦
. riearinit" ard other features which will be appreciated. +
4 ThroughouT the session of the legislature the Press will endeavor to ♦
J Keep ill render* Informed about the things that will Interest them, and ♦
I a weekly digest of the bills introduced and passed. J
» furnisn a wees. y uigv 4
4444444 4+ 4444444444444444
i ♦ present.



4
***********
rg
w<j pa88ed 8PV( , ral
lar K e cit y of which
ute , y nothing—remained, not even a
hrlck ' wa „ four feet hfgh . isn't 1»
wicked and so unutterably useless?
If ^ cou ld see the desolation
, u ftvp i eft i
dpocrlb( , dIK j
Tfae pla ^, e we arrf in and the above
c j t were
eyory house mined
outs Kj r t s here, and so have houses.
The nlagn ifi cen t cathedral a, Noyon
is simply a mass of debris, with the
altar8 al , smas hed and great pillars
Iylng along the length of t broken
ln( o a thousand pieces. And the roads!
j hnd t0 kcep at top spe ed, for fear it
would be dark before reaching the the
brldge8 at La F ere, of which there are
ten all lltUp wooden ones, very nar
row and at sharp ' detours from those
tbat are blown up. They have hun
| drpds of Boch es working on the roads. |
, b ,„ , bpy spen , to make no progress, 1
and the French are so lenient with
' Yesterday the Prussian guard took
back „ mile country they had been
driven front in th.e morning, and got a
p oste de Seeour. in which they inur
| dered not only all the stretcher bear
e r S , but also the wounded. They are
running again noxv.
i
race
h.id
e\
Hu.
Cl
kett
******************
+
4
4 STORIES FROM THE BAT- ♦
TLE FRONT.
4444*'>****** + 44444

*

RUINS MARK PATH
OF TEUTON HORDES
(By Hand Fiteb.)
Paris, Oct. 29.—I havo
back from a run of ninety-four kilo
Between here and La Fere
towns and one
nothing—absu
just come
she
the
his
It is impossible to
altogether incredible.
destroyed scientifically—
We are on the
she
or
to
Drives a Tank
October 31.—This morning a whole
regiment of little French tanks came
from down the line. Meade and I
were each allowed to drive one.
was Ihe most wonderful little fleet of
tanks, none larger Ilian our car, man
ipulated by one man. camouflaged, of
course, and all looking like tremen
nnd Hirn look very ludicgous. I went
miles, an hour, and when they twist
nd turn look very ludicrous,
over a sewing machine standing in
ihe Held, and was not the least con
scious of having crushed it into no
thing. Instead of a wheel, there are
two hand levers on each side by which
one guides, so when going straight
ahead you sit with yourAiands in your
lap quite tranquilly, so If approaching
a boche one has free hands to Bhoot.
Peace at last!
All the suffering,
II
I
I went
in
at
Isn't
' November 12.
it loo wonderful?
hardship and misery of four
ended. Oh, It is sublime
St. Quentin the announcement of the
taken
years
Up here at
signing of the armistice was
quite calmly. The soldiers have been
^ln so long they seem to have lost the
Paris, Bngland
f rejoicing.
power
and America must be where one gets
the real thrill,
been in New York yesterday, just for
one hour, when it was signed!
I should like to have
How
we can, all
terribly few can say, as
our own safe!
Going to Germany.
November 26.—We came up here to
l,a Capelle two days ago, with the
First army, with Joy singing in our
hearts nnd our veins fairly bursting
with excitement, as we had the order
from General Debeny that we were :o
be one of the five ambulance sections
allowed to go victoriously into Ger
We came along, our twenty
cars in beautiful convoy. This is
first stopping point on the way to
Coblenz, and we are to wait here for
the other sections.
Coming tip was thrilling, as all the
places had been in hoche hands for
four vears. Every little village still
waved Its French flag although we
were ten days behind the inarch of
•heir liberators. French flags, by the
) ay. made in Germany and sold to
them by the boches, who knew they
The children looked very
.
be
o.
sea
many.
one
our
Ad
de
were lost!
oale. as they were never allowed eith
er the milk or eggs from their own
from America's supply Con
ic
farms or
sequently a terrific number of babies
. 'ed oÿ landlady told u» that when
-i calf nt hors died one morning, her
tm
14 year-old sotw got six month:-'
nrisonment 'at nard work
friend of hers was caught drinking
and was fined 100
Another time they said she
after her
her forty
out
city
Kadi
from
Once a
dep
as
milk in his t
marks,
t ad not properly looked
chickens and they fined
marks. The poor people had to suffer
th.s tyranny for four years.
I asked a boy of about 17 if there
and
the way of the explosion,
plosion never took place and she
saved her little house from looting.
Longs for Home.
Here si. T,a Capelle we are fairy
| comfortable. Wo still have *0 build
1 our >wn lires, though they supply the
wood: it our stove smokes horribly,
' khdh-'g - e-mtlr-al sooty
operations on the
i as any camaraderie between the two
nations, lie exclaimed immediately:
"Mats e'etait impossible avec un salle
race connue les boches." He said they
h.id nothing In common at all. they
were never good fellows, even among
thenwelves—always quarreling, and
e\ on- the lowest domineering to all
about him. He said they talked about
Hu. kaiser, but never mentioned the
Cl own prince, whom they all cordially
hated. Never at any time were they
vgaie comme les Français," so one can
imagine some of the misery of the
poor peasants conquered by them.
The people in whose house Plun
kett and 1 are billeted Just dug up twm
tv-autiful old copper pots they had
burled al the bottom of a well In 1914.
's-n-irt old things, some of these peas
told us tha*
be
rel
for
also
the
ail
not
to
if
put
1
all's! One old woman
she had a boche captain quartered
with her who was not quite as bad as
the rest.. When he left to retreat with
his reginiert, he told her on no ac
tionse, or she
So, when, a
count to leave her
would lose everything,
little later, a boche walked in and or
dered her to run, as the street was all
reined and was about td be blown up,
■T shall leave only after
she said:
von and your men are safely out of
The cx
2
•hlmney. However,
we have windows, doors and cleanli
ness. which were unknoyn quantities
or the Hllidenhurg line. There are
only four of us in this house.
Oh I do want to go back to you now!
fearful let-down after
ar, and begins
One has such
all the horrors of this
to long for a hot hath in a tub, a wenn
real bed, bedrooms that don't
scrap dumps,
shoes not
room, a
look like ammunition
fresh clothes, roals and
cawed with mud. chairs with hacks for
round-shouldered people, fireplaces to
wsrm one's hands and toes, motor
with self-starters, candy—oh,
cake and delicious
cars
I cuts of that!
desserts, untinned milk; above all, to
hear the voices of ones'
Though I never missed ajiy but the
lnnt during the whole six months, yef,
somehow, such a miracle of
gruity is the human mind, that we can
he and still are happy, despite our
beloved !
Incon
longings.
The army we have been with from
the first—the Third army—will
piece our present one, and we arc to
with them Into Germany We shall
he moving on In a couple of days.What
tremendous luck for our unit to he In
n' the finish! To enter with a victor
ious army Into a defeated country,
that has kept them at war for four
years—oh. the perfection of it!
re
go
1W55I
Tnwnley, Bankrupt. I« Freed of
000 Debt
A. C. Townley, president of the Na
tional Nonpartisan league, has been
discharged from bankruptcy by Judge
F. C. Amidon, of the United States dis
trict court. *
The order frees Mr. Townley from
obligations aggregating nearly $80.
000 against which he balanced assets
of less than $1,600.
to
Italian War Losses Show MtO.OOO Dead
The supreme command of the Ital
ian army has announced that Italian
losses on all fronts during the war
totalled 460.000 dead. Of this number,
16,362 were officers,
wounded, 33,347 were officers.
The number of men totally Incapac
itated by wounds and disease Is esti
mated at 500,000.
Of the 947,000
We still have thousands of homes
for the homeless - and land enough for
army of landless men coming home
from the war wiih no more of a Job
than a jackrabblt on a bat. The boys
returning from Europe like to rub it
in on us a bit by telling how the farms
there are tilled like a garden, and
this Is the way we will be doing it
some day «'hen' we learn how. Ex
an
: r
JW5^L
See "We Can't Have Everything" at
the Irene Sundav evening. This play
is adapted from the well known novel
by Rupert Hughes, and is one of !he
famous Artcroft pictures. A travel
picture by Burton Holme» will also
br shown.
President Wilson and party arrived
a
in Italy yesterday.
COUNTY AGENT MEETINGS.
Sixteen Meetings I« Be Held Daring
the Next Two Weeks.
ï
to
Sixteen fanners' meetings, begiu
ning January 6 and enomg January 17
have been scheduled by County Agent
Lampson, when he expects to round
up his pest poison squads for the wln
ter's work. In a letter mailed out to
the various communities he calls at
tention to the co-operation of the
board of county commissioners in the
campaign and urges the farmers to do
their par, His letter Is as follows:
To the farmers of Power county:
Five hundred twenty-tlve farmers In
Power county sent in thetr orders for
strychnine. These orders amounted
to nearly 3,000 ounces. The estl
ma ted losses (a considerable number
did not give estimate of loBsea) were
113,376 bushels of wheat, or over
*226,000,00.
At a meeting of the county conimla
c ionorB necember 30th, an ordinance
was passed to purchase 3,000 ounces
of strychnine for squirrel poisoning,
and to let the farmers have It at half
price. This will be purchased through
government bids direct from the fac
tory. One-half of factory price will
be about 90 cents per ounce for squir
rel strychnine and 76 cents per ounce
for rabbit Btryohnine.
The county is Co-operating
should secure the government help
mentioned In Mr. Crouch'« letter and
also the state help which will come
through the same office if appropria
tions from the state are made se
cured. We should get solidly behind
the bill which the legislature will bo
asked to pass, requiring the county 1
commissioners to poison squirrels on
ail deeded land, where poisoning Is
not being done and to charge the cost
to that land.
This is a very good beginning, and
if every farmer in Power county will
put his Influence behind this cam
1 algn, the county commissioners' ap
propriation will be added to by stale
appropriation and government appro
priations.
Meetings for this purpose will be
field according to the following sched
ule:
We
Prospertty Lincoln ■ school hoime,
January 6, 2 p. m.
Prosperity—School house. January
Hrh, 7:00 p. m.
PJeosunt Valley Schobl house, Jan
uary 7th, 2 p. m.
Cedur Ridge—School house, Junu
ary 7th, 2 p. m.
School house, Janu
Cedar Creek
.-try 8lh. 2 p. in.
Fairvlew School house, January
8th, 7:00 p. m.
Arbon Central school house, Janu
ary 9th, 2 p. 111 .
Crystal- School house, January 9th,
7:00 p. m.
Roy—School house,
2 p. m.
Landing—School house,
10th, 7:00 p, m.
Rockland -School
11th, 2 p. m.
Gurus—:_
7:00 p. m. '
Sunbeam—School
January 10th.
January
house, Juimary
Bchnol house, January 13th.
hosse, January
11th, 3:00 p. m.
Creasey <8chool
14th, 7:00 p. m.
Horse Island School house, Janu
ary 15th, 3:00 p. m.
Bonanza Bar
house, January 16th, 3:00 p. m.
Court house, Jan
Juii nary
house,
!
Fall creek school
American Falls
nary 17th. 2 p. nt.
Remember these date»
save Power county this enormous loss
by using your Influence in this cam
Yoilrs truly,
IIRIK'K LAMPSON,
County Agent,
and help;
to
In
paign.
-IWSSj
-IWSSj
THE SHERIFF SI ED.
of O. C.
The $20,000 damuge suit
Hall against Sheriff Jeffries will prob
ably cause the sheriff Utile more than
The 'arreat of Mr. Hall
unnoyanco.
was made under a special federal stat
e, and st the request of citizens who
believed that official Interference was
warranted Whether It was or not, I?
p.obably not material. An officer ,s
wide dine ration, and wisely so,
H Is
p ' ven
Ir the discharge of his duties,
t, c. duty of a police officer to safe
guard the public, to prevent trouble,
nd to make arrests. If deemed neces
t-qry, In doing so.
Mt. Hall suffered some humiliation,
whether deserved or not hut In any
v' nt he has placed a very high estl
the damages sustained
In
1 ate on
fart, It !» »o excen »Ive a» to be dan
^r.oufly near profiteering, and .Ar.
Ifnll may have much trouble In get
ting a court and Jury to take hli view
There are Ktatutea
protect officer» an well an
ditd m line dlacrtmlnatlone the officer
1* given tne benefit of the doubt. -In
other word», In order to w*n again»!
officer, the case mu»t be a Mtrong
to
he c-.ae.
citizens,
an
on*».
SWINDLER IN SENTENCED.
Brooklyn Medics! FaUr «et» Fine »nd
Imprisonment for Fraud.
Accused of- having manufactured
and »old to Influenza sufferer* thous
ands of boxes of aspirin tablets com
posed prjpcipally of talcum powder,
Joseph M G. Turkay. head of the Ver
andah Chemical company of Brooklyn
was found guilty Monday of th< viola
tion of the sanitary code and sen
tenced to three years hi the peniten
tiary with a fine of $500. The sentence
sit the mo»t »eyere ever Imposed in
Ihe country for such an offense.
(LOCKS TURNED BACK
BUT HEAL TIME ADVANCED
Business Men nml Schools Decide to
Observe Old Time, Regardless of
<'Image in Clocks — Meal Time»
Simply Come an Hoar Earlier.
Southern Idaho, west of Pocatello,
weht on Pacific time New Year's day.
Pncltlc time may be popular with the
ï »Proud administration In Washing»
ton. but It does not take well here.
While all dutifully turned their clock»
back nn hour, they have not made *
corresponding change In their habita
nor in their meal times.
Superintendent Wallis was union g
the tlrst to realise what the change
meant. Darkness not only came In
what appeared to be the middle of the
afternoon, but tile children also came
--some on mountain time, some on
l'acmé lime, and some on their own
time. There was no uniformity, un
less it we a go-as-you-please altitude
adopted by nearly everybody.
In order to uncertain sentiment, and
to secure uniformity, Mr, Wallis cir
culated a paper unionv business men.
bearing the following heading:
"American Falls, Idaho, January 2,
1818. Shall we observe the following
hours: opening at 7, lunch at 11, clos
ing at B. new time; yes, no."
This was circulated utnong the busi
ness houses, and with one exception,
all signed yes.
favored a ecu'.promise
two timeB, by openiug ut 7:30, and
closing at 6:30, new time. The senti
ment was so nearly unanimous as to
secure the ready adoption of the hours
üuggested. The schools have also
fallen in line, and will open at 8 and
close at 3, now time, with the noon
intermission beginning at U.
It seems a little strange to go to
lunch ut 11, and stranger still to arts«
6, but quitting work at B seems Ilka
healing the game.
get used to It, but the men who are
responsible for forolng the new time
us nre not very popular Just now.
1
Is
be
One of the signers
between tbs
a.
In time we m»T
on
SBS—
JAPAN STANDS WITH ALLIES.
Will Enter Conference Pledged to »
Policy of Peace With "Open Door*
In Ear Ka«t.
Japan will enter the peace confer
ence pledged to apollcy of pom e with
1 ho "open door" In the far
maintenance of which she will wel
come the co-operation of the
Baron Nobuakl Maklno
commission declared on his
nst. in the
11 les.
f the Jupao
ese peace
arrival at New York Tuesday with fel
low delegates, attaches ,w,d socretnr
le» on the way
His country's course In her foreign
relations, said the Baron, who >is a
member of the Japanese house of
peers and the advisory council of dip
lomatic affairs, will he such ns to In
sure the most effective partnership
with the associated powers in tin
work of reconstruction. Having es
tablished peace In the orient by clear
ing Germany from lu-r far eastern
buses and keeping the Paclttj open It»
commerce, he added, Japan is fully In
accord with Ihe uIIIch for a Just and
France.
lasting world peace.
Accompanying Baron Makinc on hl»
arrival on a special) train, with an ofr
llclal escort provided by the stale de
Titkeji
partmenl, were Lieut. Gen.
Nara and Vice Admiral Isamu Take
shlla, military ami naval repreganta
lives; Higo Fukai, director of ihe
Bank of Japan, and Klkusabura Fukul
and Matazo Klta, noted Japanese lin
anceers, together with a parly of si
laches and secretaries numbering 23
Marquis Hulonjt, senior delegate,
will Join the party In Paris, traveling
by way of the Buez canal. Baron Cbtn
du. ambassador to Kngland, is l_
third peace envoy of ambassadorial
rank.
loss
[he
rank.
Will Visit Washington.
Baron Maklno will go to Washing
ton to call on Viscount lshll, the Jap
anese ambassador, and wtih his psrty
will sail January 4 on the Cunurd
liner Cannanla, spending a few days
In London before going to Parts.
The peace commissioner expressed
regret over bis Inability to accepl a
luncheon Invitation of the New Vork
Chamber of Commerce, representing
bhslness men of the city
Our connections and internals are con
tinually drawing closer." In the days
of readjustment, he said, "we will wel
come In the far easl closer and mon
Intimate relations with the leaders of
industry, trails and commerce, who
have perhaps "done more than armies
or navies to win the war.
1 ast offers vast field for the co-oper
ation of the forces of reconstruction
and those forces must necessarily be
drawn from the ranks of the men who
Chamber of Commerce
ill) whom
The far
compose tile
throughout Europe, the' United States,
Japan and China."
-SSSr
BAKER IN TURNED DOWN
BY THE U. H. HEKATE
Unanlninus letion Taken by Commit»
tee on War Contraria \galnst Vali
dation of "Hoff" War Uontrart*.
A Washington dlspateh under date
of January 3, »tales that "the senate
military committee unanimously in
jected Secretary Baker'» recommend
atlon for legislation to validate Inform
al war contracts and authorize their
adjustment by the war departm<
and ordered favoraby reported Sena ■
tor Hitchcock'» bill, introduced ye»
terday. iagalizlng such contract», but
placing the adjustment in the hands
of a non-inlerested commission.''

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