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American Falls press. [volume] (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, January 10, 1919, Image 7

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scans
«Conducted by National Council of tbs
Boy Scouts of America.)
SCOUTS HEAR INDIAN TALK
ter,
he
the
One night while camping on a spot
■where the Celebrated renegade Indian
Simon Girty, camped about the vvar
1800, the members of Troop No. 5 of
Wilkinshurg, I'a., were entertained
around the campfire by stories of those
pioneer days.
When their Interest had been roused
to a high pitch, they were startled by
seeing on Indian chief In full war cos
tume who suddenly stalked from the
-woods into the circle about the camp
fire.
It was several minutes before any
boy felt sufficiently nt ease to ask any
questions. The chief broke the silence
by expressing himself as being inter
«t-ted In the youDg pale-face scouts
and their work. He explained to tho
hoys the costumes and habits of In
dians from the time they were born
until they became warriors.
The scoutmaster, in Inspecting the
camp about midnight, was amused by
finding some stout clubs outside a num
ber of the tents. The scouts were pre
pared for any less friendly visit which
might be paid during the hours of dark
ness.
SCOUTS' FIRE-MAKING TEST.
The most Important part of the scout
test In fire making is to be sure that
th«! scout will never, under any condi
tions, build a fire which could get be
yond his control, or fail to extinguish
the flro even to the last spark before
leaving it.
Thousands of acres of valuable wood
land, scores of homes and large acres
of valuable crops have been destroyed
as a result of carelessness in starting
or leaving fires.
The scout should know how to lay a
fire under any conditions—on stony
ground, on heavy grass ground, in tim
ber land, and under these three condi
tions in a heavy rain.
He should describe the following
fires: The hunter's fire, the trapper's
fire, the Indian's fire. The question
of materials for the fire is one which
has troubled some scoutmasters.
Should the boy be allowed to use pa
per or dry kindling carried in the hav
ersack, or oil any other material
which he would not ordinarily find In
_ t he woods or on the plains? In most
^l^bases scoutmasters require the scout
to build the fire without any of the
products of civilization except matches.
Some have reported that they even
require the fire to be built without
matches.
SCOUT READING A MAP.
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figuring Out the Intricate Direction»
^Proves Interesting to Scouts.
WHERE THE SCOUT MADE GOOD.
Change is a pleasant and a restful
experience, but these are neither pleas
ant nor restful days. Unless scouts
and other citizens stick to their Jobs
like soldiers until the war Is won,
we will have a change all right—such
« change as Belgium and Frnnce ex
perienced four bloody years ago.
In al! their campaigns of govern
ment war work the scouts had a duty
to perform and they did it Joyously. It
means that the Boy Scouts of America
have arrived.
The United States of America looks
upon them as a part of its working or
ganization. The government makes
no more apology for commanding the
scouts thnn for Issuing orders to the
Atlantic fleet.
The scouts have earned this proud
^ distinction. If any scout persists In
asking a change, his scoutmaster will
tell him bluntly that there Is Just one
other thing to do—Join the slackers.
SCOUTS AID AT TRAIN WRECK.
An ^eight-coach train, pulled by two
engines, was making the Horseshoe
Curve south of Vanklrks, Pa., when one
of the conch«»* turned on its side. News
of the accident reaeh«»d the camp of
the boy scouts from Canonsburg with
|in a few minutes, and although th«
scouts had nearly two miles to run, they
reached the scene In a short time and
gave effective help.
The s«*outs were offered tips in vary
ing amounts by the passengers, but
not a scout accepte«!.
DDR«
Æ MART (IBAHAtlEKSEMjER
DOGS TALK OF SUMMER.
t
"Bow-wow, bow-wow," harked Bes
ter, the big black dog. In a very
friendly fashion, wagging his tall as
he barked.
''Bow-wow. bow-wow." barked Billy,
the dog with the brown, shaggy hair.
"Well, what sort of a summer did
yon have?" asked Buster.
"Fine," Raid Billy,
you? Did you enjoy yourself?"
"I most certainly did," said Buster.
"How lohg have you been back In
town?"
"For several months," said Billy.
"How long have you been back?"
"For about the same length of time,"
answered Buster.
Now both these dogs were city dogs.
Their mistresses did not know each
other very well so the dogs did not
meet often, hut sometimes they met
each other walking In the park and
often had a little frolic on a nice soft
part of earth which they called their
playground. In tlte spring this piece
of ground was soft and green but In
the autumn It was covered with leaves
which were brown and yellow. The
dogs always loved this part of the
park though, and very few people
seemed to come to It, so they felt It
was almost like having a private pnrk.
"It's strange we haven't met before
this autumn," said Buster.
"Well, my mistress has ha&'n good
deal of shopping to do," said Billÿ.
"So has -mine," said Buster,
haven't been coming to the park quite
so often and at the week-ends, or the
days at the end of the week, we have
been visiting various people who 'live
at the seashore or In the real country.
"We've had some fine visiting to do,
and we've done It all right," continued
Buster.
"We've had some good times too
since we've returned to town," said
Billy.
"Well," asked Buster, "please tell
me about your summer. Where did you
"How about
a
In
the
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But
to
lem
ing
Its
as
a
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,1»'
They Often Had a Little Frolic.
go? What «lid you eat? Of course I
know what you wore!" And at that
Billy wagged his toll and gave a bark
ing laugh.
"Yes, please tell me about your sum
mer," urged Buster. "Tell me If there
were nice dogs where you went and If
you enjoyed yourself."
"I had a fine time," said Billy. "We
went to a place—the name I don't
know—but we've gone to the same
place every single summer In my whole
five years of life."
"The name ma'xes no difference,"
said Buster.
"There wefe fine dogs where I went,
mostly old friends. There was a won
derful lake there too and I used to
swim and swim. Whenever I wns hot
I could always get cool, and on the
cooler days there were glorious long
country walks to take.
"Yes," continued Billy, "I had a
glorious time. I couldn't have had a
better time. I had splendid food, good
care, all the wonderful dog playmates
I could have asked for, and of course
my wonderful, kind mistress. And I
do love to have all the bathing I want
In the hot summer and the country and
the flowers and the great mendcilvs.
Sometimes, too, we hnd automobile
rides, and you know dogs are up-to
date enough to like automobiles !"
"Indeed we are," said Buster. "We
do like to ride ln automobiles, sniffing
the air, enjoying nil we see as we ride
by. Yes, we enjoy It hugely."
"I've told you about my summer."
said Billy. "Now tell me about yours."
"Well," said Buster. "I did Just
about the same things ns you did. I
bathed in the water—my water was
also a lake. And I had automobile
rides, nice playmates and good walks.
But there was Just one thing which
happened this summer I'll never for
get. My mistress had to come to town
day to do some shopping. She
one
came in an automobile and she brought
After I got In town I became
me too.
so hot, but in the shop where we went
•here was some water to drink and
there were bowls marked 'For TOgs.'
Wasn't that fine?" And Billy agreed
It was fine and thoughtful.
Watchful Waiting.
"In thinking of neutrals." said Gov
ernor Whitman of New York, "I can't
help thinking of two boys who stood
the other day and watched an enor
mous safe being raised up to the twen
ty-sixth story of a sky-scraper.
"The boys watched the safe »««•
slowly, and when It reached the twen
tieth story, the older lad turned away
In disgust.
"'Come on. Joe,' he said. 'We might
as well move on. They a n't sgoio' to
let her drop.'"
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View of Aleppo.
HEN General Allenby's Brit
ish troops entered Aleppo,
another change was ndded
to the long list of changes
that have come to the'ancient Hittite
city whose existence first was noted In
Assyrian, Babylonian and Egyptian
records under the name of Khnlep.
Aleppo, or Khnlep, was bandied back
and forth with the swaying fortunes of
those times, until It fell before the
world-conquering Alexander and his
Macedonian hosts. Th«»n Is when we
began to hear of it In authentic his
tory, says a writer In the Kansas City
Star. Seleucus Nlcator, was one of
the generals who aided Philip, the fa
ther of Alexander, In establishing the
Macedonian kingdom. He went with
Alexander Into Asia In 833 15. C. In
321, when he was twenty-five years old,
he was given the government of the
Babylonian satrnpy, which included
Khalep. He gave the city the name ot
Beroea, and as Beroea or Khalep-Be
:*en, It figures historically most of the
'.line for the next 900 years.
In 648 A. D. it disappeared from
European records under the Saracen
tlood that swept up from the south
last. When the wild tribes began to
assume a sort of settled state under
Moslem Influence, It reappeared as
Hulep, the gathering place of the groat
caravnns passing from Asia Minor and
Syria to Mesopotamia, Bagdad and the
Persian and Indian kingdoms.
and
w
Earthquake and Plague.
In common with most of the towns
of northern Syria, Aleppo suffered fre
quently from earthquakes. After a ter
rible shock late in the twelfth century
It hud to be almost entirely rebuilt.
But neither earthquake nor the plague,
to which It was also peculiarly subject,
could divert from it trude und pros
perity, and It betaine one of the com
mercial capitals of the eastern world.
The city pussed under various Mos
lem dynasties, being at one time the
northern cupltal of the famous Suladln.
The) Tartars held It awhile In the thir
teenth century. Then the Mamelukes
tame up from Egypt and took It, hold
ing It under their terrible swuy until
Its final conquest by the Ottomans In
1517.
Under the strong hand of Its new
rulers, the trade of AJeppo wus re
vived. The English had recognized Its
Importance as a commercial station
and It became the eastern outpost of
the British Turkey company as early
as the time of Elizabeth. It waa con
nected with the western outpost of
the East Iudla company at Bagdad by
a private caravan service. Its name
was familiar In the England of that
period. Shakespeare refers to It sev
eral times In his plays and It appeurs
frequently In the writings of his con
temporaries-.
Through Aleppo passed the silks of
Bambyce (hombazln«*sJ, the light tex
tiles of Mosul (mosullnes-musllns) and
many other commodities for the
wealthy and luxurious. The discovery
of the route around the Cape of Good
Hope to India was the first blow to
this trade. The second was the open
ing of a land route through Egypt to
the Bed sea and the third und final
one was the construction of the Suez
«»naL
Long before the Suez canal became
a reulity, however, Aleppo hud been
declining from Internal caus*.'s. In the
latter part of the eighteenth century
and the first years of the nineteenth It
was constantly the scene of tdoody dis
senslons between rival religious and
secular parties. In which the Ottoman I
government took port, first on one side
then the other, plundering both. Two
earthquakes and three visitations of
cholera between 1822 and 1832 ldft
the place a wreck with only half Its
former population. Tumults and mas
sacres of Christians occurred lu 1850
and in ,1862, accompanied by great de
struction of property. Its trade has
revived greatly In recent years, but
has been largely of a local nature.
Modern City on Ancient Site.
The modern city stands on virtually
the ancient site. The older sections
are partly within a wall built by the
Saracens. A medieval «-astle on the
site of the ancient citadel Is d«werted
and In ruins. It stands on a mound,
portly artificial and faced with ston«*.
The population of the city, about 130,
000, Is three-quarters Moslem. The
•;H-an reshJenta, the Armenians
to
a
a
I
I
for
She
and
Gov
»««•
to
and other native Christians and the
Jews all occupy separate sections of
the city. The exports are ruHtnly tex
tiles, leather and nuts. The nearest
senport Is Alexundretta, 70 miles nway
on the Mediterranean const.
A city so old and held by so many
peoples, with their various religions
may he expected to have Its share of
legends and holy pluces. Aleppo As
rather disappointing In that respect
There are few shrines of any sort und
all of any consequence arc Mohamme
dan. One of the mosques, of v'.ilch
there are many, contains a tomb re
puted to be that of Zacharias, father
of John the Baptist.
The Turks have long regard« d Alep
po ns one of the strongholds of their
faith and the probable capital of their
dominion should they he forced out of
Europe.
of
to
to
Oldtime Border Controversy.
There was once a border dispute be
the states of Mlehlgan und Ohio,
the p tl t it was peac«-ably sotth-d and had
no Pilous results. In 1835 a contre
It yprsy arose In regard to the boundary
)jne b Ptwe( , n the states and the right
t0 tt Btrlp of )an<) to w h|cli both laid
I rtalrn.
that year frarui-il a constitution by
w hlch Michigan claimed the tract. For
of awhile there was danger of bloodshed,
ldft t )U t it "blew over." In June, 1830. «Wi
Its gress passed an act admitting Mbhl
g a „ i n t 0 the Union on condition that
; K ), e relinquish her claim to the dls
de
has
but
the
the
130,
The
| big life Insurance?
Ostrich Eggs
in Liquid Form
The report of the British Imperial
Institute on a consignment of ostrich
eggs In liquid form gives the following
analytical data: Wuter, 75.1 per cent;
protein, 10.7 per cent; fut, 11.4 per
cent, and ash, 1.4 per cent Chinese
liquid eggs contain : Water, 70.7 p«'r
cent; protein, 12.7 per cent; fat, 12.7
per cent, and ash, 1.7 per cent. If the
above figures ure calculated on a uni
form busls of 75 per cent of water, the
composition works gut the autne In the
two cases, and It Is also seen that
liquid ostrich eggs contuln less pro
tein and more fut thun uv«'rage hens'
eggs, though rutlior less of these In
gredients thun ducks' eggs. The re
port adds that the strong odor of
liquid ostrich eggs may prevent their
use for edible purposes, hut that they
might be useful for technical pur
poses In the forms of egg albumen
and of preserved egg yolk In the
leather industry. — South African
Journal.
Wooden Pipes for Water.
In these days of Iron and cement it
makes one sit up to read the report
from tne New England waterworks on
wood pipe for water supply. They
claim It Is preserved and not rusted
or corroded by water; It 1» not cor
roded by any substance or destroyed
by adds or salts ; Its carrying capaci
ty Is 20 per cent greater thun eastlron
pipe and remains constant, while that
of metal pipe decreases with uge; It
does not taint or affect fluids going
through It ; It does not burst If frozen,
the elasticity of the wood preventing
It; It requires less labor and experi
ence to lay In place than metal pipe ;
It run, when service pipes are not
tnken off, be laid in shalhiwer ditches
than metal pipe, for It Is not easily
affected by frost ; while more or less
Joints show slight leakage when the
pipe Is first filled, they soon swell up
and give less trouble In the end than
eastlron pipe.—Los Angeles Times.
»et.'olt
A conv«-ntlon held nt
puted tra«-t. In consideration of
a mittler tract, known as "the Upper
Peninsula," was given her. These con
ditions were rejected hy one conven
tion. hut accepted by another held in
1836, and In January, 1837, Michigan
was admitted into the Union.
A Cheerful Quy.
Grump—I liuve absolutely nothing to
be thankful for.
Gay—You can be thankful you're not
dead, can't you?
Grump—What! And me carrying a
HIT BAD MAN
TAMED IN WEST
May
Sheriff's .45 Looks Like Cannon
to Chicago Safeblower.
nies
May
a
home
her
men
Rock
child.
of
In
were
agined
a
LION BECOMES LAMB
Official Say» Prisoner Behaved Him
eelf on Train Returning to Chi
cago—Always Conscious
of Llttls .45.
Chicago.—"Big Joo" Moran, safe
blower who some time ago escaped
from the Cook county Jail, Is more or
less securely locked up In the Joliet
prison and bitterly deriding "rube con
stables" and their "Wild West" stuff.
But It was the kind of taunting a
small boy does when he has a nice
high fence between himself and a
larger boy. "Big Joe" Moran wasn't
quite up to his tough reputation when
he was In the arid climate of Alama
gördo, N. M„ and under the cold eye
of the sheriff's "forty-five," according
to the story that drifted back to Chi
cago when Moran was brought back.
The man who brought him back was
the man who captured him—Deputy
Sheriff O. H. Haynes of New Mexico.
"Behaved All Right."
Sheriff Haynes Is as much of the
West us the alkali dust and cactus.
He Is tall and lanky and there are
wrlnklea about his gray eyes that
speak humor as well as long days
squinting across the hot, sunbaked
stretcher of the desert country.
Deputy Haynes grinned when he
was asked of (lie capture and conduct
of "Big Joe" Moran.
"Oh, the gentleman behaved all
right," he said. "I sort of knew he
was hiding out at this Mny Wallace's
place where we got hlm. I don't care
much about gun-play, so, when I weut
to take him with a couple of the boys
we pretended „like we were on a hunt
for slnckers. I went right up to May's
hack door and went In. She said she
was alone, but there were two plûtes
set on the fnble.
"So I start toward her room. She
runs ahead of me. When I get there
there Is Moron sitting on a chair and
a gun on the table In front of him.
He Makes a Deolelon.
"It really Isn't a gun, at that. More
like n pea-shooter. It looked like u
.22, hut I found out later It was u .118.
"I told him to come along. He Hald
he guessed he wouldn't and he told me
r
.
be
had
right
laid
by
For
«Wi
that
dls
.
i,
the
she
men
fied,
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ing
of
In
re
of
the
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;
not
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up
than
!
Æ
\ ■
Ha Said Ha Wouldn't Laava.
to go to—well, he swore at ine. So I
Just mov«Hl my hand toward my .45.
Then he decided to come along. He
wasn't so darned hostile.
"In the Juli I put a man to guard
him. Moran got a little braver and
said: 'There's a weuk spot In the Jail.
I'll get out.'
"Th«! msn who was guarding him
said: There's a strong spot, too.
"When It eame time to bring him
back to Chicago this Moran began to
act like he did here, aceordlng to what
they tell me. He said he wouldn't
lenve. So I unloeke«! the cell door and
went In and got hlm. I showed him
my .45 and he came along.
"He knew I had the old .45 with
me and we didn't even have to put the
handcuffs on him.
"Oh, y<*«, the gentleman behaved all
right. But he don't like me, nohow.
As for my .45—well, he Just can't tol
erate It."
GIRL BANDITS IN CHICAGO
Hold Up Saloon and Get Away With
$154 With Coolness of Sea
soned Crooks.
Chicago.—Two young girls suddenly
popped Into Patrick Farley's saloon,
In Chicago, and, pointing heavy re
volvers nt the bartender and two pa
trons, ordered them to throw up their
hands.
One girl stood on gnard at the door
way. She also assisted the other, who
did the actual robbing.
Tills latter had a sense of humor.
After emptying the cash register of
$150 she helped herself to a drink nt
whisky ami rang up "No Sale." Then
she relieved the two aw^l patrons of
$14.
con
in
to
not
a
"Don't overlook the bartender,
May," the girl nt the door said.
The girls hacked their way out of
the door and escaped In an automo
bile.
BABY TAKES )0Y
RIDE ON TRAIN
May Arnett Travels 280 Miles
While Parents Search
for Her.
Little Rock, Ark.—With n few pen*
nies clutched In her baby hand, little
May Arnett, three years old, enjoyed
a 280-mtle -allrond Journey frtnu her
home here to Bonneville, Ark., while
her frantic parents, aided by police
men and detectives, searched Little
Rock to find a trace of the missing
child.
Kidnaping, death under the wheels
of a speeding motorcar, or drownlug
In the creek near the fntnlly home,
were only a few of the calamities Im
agined by the little girl's parents.
4nd all this time she was sitting in
a speeding day coach on a Reck Island
railroad train, making frlenda with
-1
a
a
he
all
he
she
She
and
u
Hald
me
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jtSipp
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Making Frl.nda With tha Passenger*.
passengers, and yelling with Joy as
the strange vista of flylag scenery
passed betöre her delighted eyes.
Baby May left home early In the
afternoon Intending to buy candy.
Five minutes later her parents were
searching the house for her. Believing
she had wandered uptown, several
men went up and down the streets
looking for her. The police were noti
fied, hut not until after Hock Island
train No. 41 had gone west.
Anyway, the Hiutlou was the last
place the parents and police thought
|1> look for the child, But late In the
afternoon n telegram from Boonevlllu,
addressed to the chief of police, was
received. It read: "Have on train
No. 41, out «if Little Hock, a three
year-old girt. Think she wns deserted.
Can't tell where she lives. Ant send
ing her back to Little Hock on No. 44."
When No. 44 arrived at the station
Mr. ami Mrs. Arnett atood cloae te the
Iron gate ami watched the detraining
passengers. After watching aoms time
(heir hop«-» almost faded away, and
than they spied their baby In the arma
of tho conductor.
■ 4-+-M-+++4-++++++++++-J-++++4
:i WOMAN ROUTS THIEF
:: WITH A BROOMSTICK :
; ; 8t. IxraUt—Mrs. William Bau- |
> • er, arnmd with • broomstick, i
) [ drove a burglar out of the ]
• • home of her neighbor, Mrs. Aa- i i
\ rile Miller, while the latter was ] ^
■ 1 away. Mrs. Bauer, hearing a • >
! noise In the Miller home, 1 aveu J '
' 1 ligated. When she made an at- 1 1
! ! tack with the broomstick the ! ]
; ■ burglar heat a hasty retreat and J i
., <-SCHp«*d. I I
4-+++4-+++++++++++++++++-M-4*»
BABY RESCUED FROM WELL
Infant la Takan Out UnlnJurad Aftsr
Balng Imprisoned Twslvs
Hours.
nurkhennett, Tex.—After remaining
nt the bottom of a 85-foot well, a foot
In diameter, the elghteen-months-old
son of George Kays of this place was
rescued uninjured.
The child was playing and aertdent
ally fell f«!el-flrst Info tha well. Th*
mother tu-iird the cries from the well*
She obtained a garden hose and an old
pair of bellows and pumped air Into
the well until the neighbors could ar
rive.
A large crowd soon gathered and th*
work of digging the child out was be
gun, A large hole was dug along the
side of the well, and at ten o'clock;
that night It reached the baby. Tho
child was brought to tho surface and
an examination sh«)W«-d (hat it had
escaped Injury.
STOLE MONEY TO BUY DOGS
Odd Plea Is Mud« hy TalUr for Em
bezzling Forty Thousand Dollars
Bank Funds.
Dallas, Tex, -When E, E. Pollard,
teller In one of the strongest hank*
here, was arri-sted, charged with em
h«-zzlement of *46,000, he Is
have confetoted he stolp the money and
bought blooded dogs for his famous
kreiriels, the fin«>st In the state.
He entered n plea of guilty to
charges of embezzlement and wns giv
en ten years In prison. Ills enlary a*
bank teller Is said to have .".o-n %if
000 s year.
Id to
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