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American Falls press. (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, May 30, 1919, Image 9

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063041/1919-05-30/ed-1/seq-9/

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FINDS CHILDREN
AFTER LONG HUNT
Father's 22-Year Search Is
Ended by a Chance Meeting
With Old Friend.
MAN IS HAPPY AT LAST
For Score of Years He Wandered
Over Country Looking for Children
From Whom He Parted When
Wife Died.
Corcoran is the
Chicago—John
happiest man in the United States.
He has fourni his folks.
For 22 years
the United
he has wandered over
States and Canada looking for his
children, from whom he parted when
their mother died and they were little.
Now he has met them again and they
He found them
were glad to see him.
grown to be fine young people, such
as any father would be proud of, and
John Is all smiles.
It was this way:
Twenty-two years ago John Corco
then a young man, packed his
ran,
traveling bag and shook from his feet
the dust of Dunnvllle, Ont., where he
He could no longer
had been happy,
he happy there. Dunnvllle had become
him because in Dunnvllle
hateful t
Ills young w T ife had died, and with
her gone life meant little to him.
Told Favorite Child Was Dead.
The children, Ella Loretta, a tod
dler of 2; Mury, aged 0, and John
Frederick, 4, were to he eared for by
Mr. Corcoran's stepsister, with whom
he had some legal difficulties over the
settlement of his father's will,
cording to his story, after he had
been away some months this stepsis
ter died and when he received the
a friend told him his youngest
Ac
news
daughter had also died.
"I don't mind telling you she was
my favorite," lie said, "and when I
heard site was dead it kind of upset
me. I lost track of the others then,
although I knew that they were being
cared for up in Canada somewhere by
another sister. Sin* moved away, and
when I went to look for her she was
gone. So for nearly twenty-two years
1 heard nothing from them.
"The other day I was up in Buf
falo—motored up there from Chicago
Went into a hank to
;. Just ns I came away
I saw a stranger looking at me pretty
on husine
cash
I LI
l!|
!T
Ill
I
Sir
S'
I
a
T
Æ
\i
J
Rushed Up to the Girl's Desk.
I thinks to myself, 'That's one
of those friendly guys. He saw me
get my roll and he wants to help
liant.
*p< ml it .'
A Friend From Dunnviiie.
"So when he came up and slapped
tue on the hack and says, 'Hello, John
Corcoran : come and have a drink,' I
said. 'Nothing doing, stranger.' Then
he tells me who he is—an old friend
from Dnnnville that I hadn't seen
He says, • Spose you're
since 1 left,
down here to see your children.' "
The friend then told the excited Cor
daughters were liv
ing right there in town. The favorite
daughter hadn't died, had only been
corau that his twi
dnngeroiiKiy ill.
"She thought It was kind of funny,"
Corcoran said in telling of the reunion.
"I broke right into the place, rushed
tip to the girl's desk and said, 'Hello,
Ella, I'm your daddy.' "
This daughter is Mrs. J. H. Bieden
The other daughter, whom the
weg.
father next discovered, is Miss Mary
nurse in the general hos
:ara Falls. He also found
Corcoran, a
pltal at Nil!
his son, John Corcoran, grown to man
hood.
"It took a long time to find them,
and IM just about given it up," the
fntlier seid, "hut luck came iny way
at Inst, and now I'm never going to
lose them again. It's a pretty small
■world, after all."
Yelled for Soap One Hour.
Cleveland, O.—Cleanliness may be
next to gislllriess. hut the city does
rot pny firemen to he godly. Director
Spresty of the fire department, de
clares. He has fined Richard Benja
min ten days' vacation because Ben
jamin. lie says, sat in a bathtub in the
station am! yelled for soup for a wle.Ie
hour one night
He doesn't say
whether Benjamin got the soap or had
to be content with a latherless scrub.
T
61
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MEMORIAL EAJ1U3INC
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r TOBe Erected atthe
* NationalCapital and
Dedicated to Our Bous
Who Have Fought, Suf
fered and Given Their
Lives for the Freedom
of the World.
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The men of 1917
lutve maintained the legacy left by
the. men of 177(1, and have paid the
The odd coincidence
EN of T7 and '7t'> !
M
debt Incurred,
in numbers stands us tbe symbol of
a real bond.
Washington born
men and the money that saved the day for the
Wilson sent hack to
France the men and the money that saved the »lay
for the freedom of the nations.
ed of France the
freedom of the colonies.
We repaid La
fuyette with Pershing.
There is n universal eagerness to build a fitting
memorial to the heroes of the war of wars. Monu
ments will spring ui> all over the United States to
individual men, officers and organizations. But
there Is an Insistent demand for one great national
memorial.
The only place for It is. of course, the capital of
the country, and Washington has been and will be
In a large sense the capital of the world.
No memorial will be appropriate which has not
a lasting value and a dignity of usefulness ns well
as beauty and splendor. No statue or group of
statues could he reared which would express what
this memorial must express. No column of melted
cannon, though it were made of steel barrels a mile
high, would convey the message. An Imperial arch
would imply nothing more than a gateway for con
querors and would act simply as an obstruction
to traffic.
The right nioirmrinl must he a temple, n temple
of architectural grandeur, a museum for statues,
busts, tablets, archives and Interesting relics, a
pince of dully resort, and a meeting place for
nntlonnl gatherings.
It Is an amazing fact that Washington—the seat
of our national government, the center of world
activity, the mecea of congresses—lias no large and
dignified meeting place, no convention hall of any
dimensions.
The memorial described will therefore meet a
to
of
pressing need.
What Ideal should this memorial most vividly
•ss? Of what religion should the temple be?
expri
Surely, the religion of freedom, of democracy, of
equality, and of opportunity.
It should express the triumph of the Ideals of
Washington and the founders of this Ueputillc ns
those Ideals have spread through the world and
united in the recent bloody victory over the spirit _
of autocracy.
By strange good fortune these ideals can he Im
mediately realized. Construction can begin at once.
Since tleorge Washington would nrcept no money
for his services to the nation two gifts were voted
to him, one consisting of n sum In cash, which he
disposed of as an endowment to the university
Washington and Lee; the other a
now known ns
number of stock certificates valued then at $25,000.
The latter amount he set aside in his will to he
cumulative fund for the diffusion of
In the vicissitudes of time the stock
used as n
knowledge.
he bequeathed lost Its value and the dying wish of
•emed likely to rtynaln
the father of his country
forever unfulfilled.
movement was set on foot to fulfill
Recently a
>rge Washington Memorial asso
The G
the wish.
cintlon was formed und various projects *ere ad
vanced, among them the foundation of a university.
But the country bad now fully blossomed with
«täte having Its own. Mrt
universities, every
Henry F. Diinnck. sister of William C. Whitney,
of the navy won the title ol
secretary
of the New- American Navy," was elected
blent of the association.
With characteristic energy. Mrs. Dimock hns set
the accomplishment of the Ideal. A national
who as
"Father
pres
abont
committee. Including eminent men and women from
ell sections of the country, has been formed and
nearly half a million dollars already collected, In
addition to a still larger amount pledged.
The association has procured from congress the
grant of an Ideal tract of land w hick was formerly
occupied by the Pennsylvania station, and at pres
ent covered in part by temporary buildings of the
war department. Th!« 1« almost the only desirable
site remaining unoccupied in Washington.
A competition In designs for the building was
participated in by a dozen of tbe foremost Amer
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lean architects. The committee of award selected
from these n plan of such Impressive beauty us to
silence criticism.
This majestic structure will be spacious enough
to house n multitude. Tbe main uuditorlum occu
pies a floor space of 38,500 square feet, with a gal
lery of 10,000 square feet, giving u seating capacity
of 7,000 persons ; It will furnish room for Inaugural
receptions, national and International conventions
and conferences, orchestral concerts and celebra
tions. Several small halls are grouped about It to
accommodate meetings of smaller bodies—military,
patriotic, scientific, educational, and similar con
ventions.
On the second floor Is a banquet hall with serv
ing rooms, seating «00 people. Here also are rooms
set apart ns the permanent national headquarters
of societies of vetertins, of reserve officers and
other patriotic societies. The third and fourth
floors are planned to accommodate a museum and
library for the care of precious relics, souvenirs,
historical documents and the personal histories of
A spacious chumber has been set
_
our soldiers.
upart for the exclusive use of each sovereign state
of the Union and onr outlying possessions.
The plans have received the Indorsement of the
highest authorities. President Wilson writes:
My Dear Mrs. Dlmock : I have noted with
genuine Interest the plans of the George Wash
ington Memorial association for a memorial to
the boys of 1017 ns well as those of '7«. No
one could withhold approval from such plans.
They undoubtedly express what the heart of
the whole country approves. Cordially and
sincerely yours.
WOODROW WILSON.
Committees of prominent men und women rep
resenting patriotic societies are collaborating.
Collective amUlndivldual subscriptions In large and
small amounts are being .received. Every child
who contributes ten cents receives a button carry
ing the legend: "This pin meanr, « brick In the
memorial building." The name of each donor will
he entered on the records.
Such a building is very much needed, and If
•cteil would contribute very materially toward
tbe process of conference, consultation, discussion,
keiilng of public Interest and conscience, recon
ciliation of views, recognition of abuses—the
through which a great self-governing peo
en
awn
process
pie works out Its problems and reaches its result*.
No better tribute to the memory of Washington,
who led the men of '76, anil to our hoys of '17.
bo maintained the freedom which he established,
could be devised than such a national memorial.
The number of association* and organization*, per
manent end occasional, which seeks to bring peo
ple together for worthy objecta In this country Is
-
enormous.
One of the most urgent needs Is a suitable meet
ing place for national and international societies
and conventions in Washington. Under existing
conditions we are Justified In inviting large socie
ties and congresses, especially those of an iuterna
ing
lie
nue
Ami
tlomil character, to meet In this country; for the
natural place Is Washington.
The control und administration of this building,
when erected, will he the board of regents of the
SmitliMontun Institution, of which tho president of
the United States Is the presiding officer, ex-olllclo,
and the chief Justice the chancellor.
Such a building will aid In advancing t lit» cause
of education, put riot Ism, science and the urts, as
well as providing h lasting evidence of our loyul
devotion to the memory of our hoys who emulated
the example and noble character of our greatest
commander and first president.
at
a
by
ORGANIZATION PLAN OF GEORGE WASHING
TON MEMORIAL A 88 OCIATION.
President—Mrs. Henry K. Ifitnock, Washington,
D. 0.
Treasurer—Mrs. Frank Northrop, New York.
Trustee of Permanent Fund—Chariot J. Bell,
Washington, O. C.
The National CounolL
The president.
The vice president.
The cabinet members.
Members of the Supreme cOurt,
Members of congress.
Governors of states.
Prominent and representative lenders from va
rious fields of activities, Including the church, edu
cational Institutions, cofnmerce, finance, literature,
the arts and the stage.
State Organization.
The governor iim honorary chairman of the state
council.
Mayors of cities.
State senators and representatives.
County school officials.
City and Town Organization.
The mayor or nominal head as honorary chair
man of council.
lepnrtmental heads of the actual
of
Council
irking organizations, locally paid by municipality.
Including teachers, firemen and policemen.
A general committee In each city acting In co
Ith tlie above council will Include the
w
operation
leaders in all local activities which are in contact
with the mass of people. This will bring In labor
unions, commercial clubs, civic and other organiza
tions, and churches, fraternal organizations and
clubs, as well as organizations having national
connections.
will engage In this work of honoring our first pres
ident, our Illustrious soldiers of the past and our
victorious soldiers of world redemption, who will
be the bulwarks of our future economic position.
Tlie children will be locally organized under the
an<l guidance of neighborhood groups corre-<
s ponding to parent-teachers organization.
Also, prominent men and women who
care
FREEDOM.
"What Is your Idea of freedom of the seas?"
"A chance to make a trip across without being
abut up In my stateroom with seasickness."
NEW TEMPEST
IN OLD TEAPOT
Alas, Poor Yorick! The Women
Simply Go Wild About This
Chicago Man.
Chicago—Nature, which moves In
mysterious ways her wonder« to per
form, as we gleaned from the third
reader, performed so wondrously well
In the case of Yorlck Owen Henry as
to render him Irresistible with mem
bers of the other sex.
Alas, poor Yorlck ! Until yesterday
the custodian of two adoring wives,
singing In happy chorus, "Blessed Be
the Tie That Binds," he found him
self last night In a cell.
"I can't help It," Henry admitted,
"What's a man to dot They go wild
about me."
After Henry's curses on his fatal
beauty had somewhat abated the re
porter learned from the desk sergeant
that he was charged with larceny, big
amy, anil forgery ; also that sometimes
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On His Honeymoon.
his name Is K. J. Pinner, Fred U
monte, or lignin Adolph Henry.
Last year lie was employed by the
(Mourn. b White company, wholesale
He met MIhn Boko Lull
eiiemlsts.
stenographer, mnrrlod her,
Inger,
and condueted her to tils home, where
a
she met the other Mrs. Henry, also
the Ileiiys' little Henry.
The two Mrs, Henrys lived In con
tent and comity—Mr«. Henry No. J
even Rceompnnylng Mr. Henry and
Mrs. Henry No. 2 on the honeymoon
trip to Peoria. About this time the
Stearns b White company reported
to the police the disappearance of
$700 worth of chemicals. They lic
ensed Henry.
Everything would have been all
right at I hat, because Henry wn* liv
ing under the name of Istmonte, hut
lie decided to return to Chlcugo.
rented rooms ut 10 West Hriind ave
nue and Installed his establishment.
And then the two wives quarreled.
Ami one notified the police.
of
as
lie
GIRL SAVES HER GARTER
Police Petrol Driver Is Qlven the
Scsre of Hit Life In the
Rescue.
Oakland, Util.—A garter that slipped
at the wrong moment nearly wrecked
Oakland's $«,«<H) patrol wagon!
The wagon was answering a hurry
call. At Twelfth street and Broad
way, In the center of the downtown
district, a girl gowned In silk and
furs started across the street. Half
wuy over she halted, turned pale and
made a wild dutch for lier knee.
Pedestrians shouted n warning, hut
the girl wus oblivious,
over and began to fumble. Tbe pa
trol wagon opened Its siren, executed
a farcy curve, missed the girl by an
Inch, careened past a telephone pole
by a narrow margin and righted again.
Then only did the girl straighten
up, bring something blue into view and
continue modestly on her way. She
got the garter, but the patrol wagon
driver got the scare of tils life.
va
edu
8he stooped
state
Ventriloquist Admits
It's a True Story
co
the
lest Angeles, Cal.— "Please let
me down easy, mister." came a
deep voice, apparently from the
casket, ns Andrew J. Wilson, a
negro employed t»y a Long Beach
transfer company, was eu-'
gaged with another workman In
unloading at a freight station
there a coffin containing a body
that had been shipped to Long
Beach ftir burial from a town In
the middle West.
labor
and
pres
our
will
the
corre-<
who
an J 5 *t letting his
Wilson
end of tbe box down, with about
He let it fall
two feet to go.
the two feet with a hung, and
with a (tying start he sprinted
down the *treet.
Police Sergeant Clyde Allen
of Long Beach, who was stand
ing near the scene with a Ven
triloquist friend, vouches for the
story.
being
t

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