OCR Interpretation


American Falls press. [volume] (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, June 20, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063041/1919-06-20/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

à
American Falls Pre
/
*
> •
M'MIIKK 4«.
It AHO. I'HI It AY, JUNK 20. 1010.
AMDRIl'AN FALLS, POWER COUNTY,
\
VOLUME XIX
THIRD CHAUTAUQUA
CLOSES BEST SEASON
IN AMERICAN FALLS *

+


+
+
+
+
+
LOCAL PEOPLE UNITE YVITH MAN
AGEMENT IN BELIEF SHOW AND
CROYYD WERE BETTER THIS
YEAR THAN PREVIOUS.
+
+

+

*
: *
DIRECTOR APPRECIATES HELP *
+
+
Says Talent and Management Grate
ful for Interest and Reception—
Glen Frank's Lecture Makes Big
Impression on Business Men.
After a play and sports festival by
the children, a big joyfest by the Ha
waiian quintette, an da beautiful il
lustrated travelogue on scenic Hawaii
by Mildred Leo Clemens, the third big
Chautauqua in American Falls came
to a successful close last night. In
the opinion both of the business men
and the management of the show, this
has been the best Chautauqua present
ed here.
Nearly five hundred season tickets
were sold, the amount guaranteed to
bring the perf ormers, and Mr.
Fleischmann, superintendent for the
Ellison-White
practically pa
night's crowd was the record, there
being close to a thousand people in
attendance. "But," said Mr. Fleiseh
mann, "the show would have gone
over the to pif more of the single ad
missions had been season tickets."
Of the entertainers who appeared on
the stage the Mer rilees, Tom Cor
win, the White Hussars, and the Ha
waiian quintette seemed to make the
best impression on the audiences. Dr.
Rader, Madame Zehner, Major Mills
and Mr. Glenn Frank delivered lec
tures that were highly appreciated.
The business men particularly say
that Mr. Frank's lecture was excel
lent and well-received.
Real Appréciation Shown.
From the standpoint of the Chau
tauqua people, Mr. Fleischmann said
that "The people in American Falls
have shown more interest and more
the
six
, stated that it had
for itself. Tuesday
tVr
ly
real appreciation this year, than any
year before. And we believe that the
program this yea ris the best that we
have shown. The people of the town
have been very gracious to us in their
hospitality, and the Chautauqua cfer
tainly appreciates it, both the talent
and the director."
While the "Press" was going to
press, Mr. Fleischmann and Mr. C. Y.
Wilson were interviewing the busi
ness men of the city in regard to a
contract for a Chautauqua next year,
and they announced that tt was more I
than likely assured. There are over|
one hundred towns on the circuit of!
the Ellison-White Chautauqua Co. lo
cated all through the northwest and
central states and Canada.
BURYVELL FROM OVERSEAS
WRITES YANKS WELL TREATED
Yanks Happy When Long Hike Into
Germany Was Finished—-Says Ger
many and France Beautiful Coun
tries But U. S. Beats Alt.
Headquarters Co.. 4th Infantry, May
23, 1919. American Falls Press. Dear
Sirs:-—ThiR is a letter from one of
Power county's doughboys. I am*lo
rated in Germany with H. Q. Co.. 4th
infantry, 3rd division, and in the army
of occupation. I left home on the 26th
of June, 1918 and was sent to Camp
Lewis and then to Camp Kearney, j
where I was fille'd in to the 40th di
vision.
We left Kearney in July for France
and after we landed at Camp Mills,
X. Y. I lost the 40th division and I
remained in the states until Septem
ber 24th. I then sailed with the 414
casual company from Camp Merritt.
V. J.
We landed in France October 3. I
was sick with the influenza for three
seen.
Now we are waiting for peace to be
signed and then we will start on the
trip to the states. It will be a happy
day to the A. E. F. for I think all the
boys are ready to go back as soon as
the ships can carry them.
With best wishes to the Press. I re
A. y,. Moulton and daughter. Ruth.|
of Walla Walla, who have been vis
i'ine their daughter and sister.^Mrs.
Bert Scrimsher of Roy. left Monday
to visit m the east. Arthur Moulton
will spend the summer w ith Mrs.
Scrimsher.
weeks and then T was sent to the 330th
infantry, close to LeMons, at a re
placement, and November 8th we. were
sent to the 3rd division and this divi- j
sion was ready to start to the front. 1
When the armistice was signed and !
on November 15th we started our hike j
to Germany, 225 miles to walk.
On December 16th
Plaidt, Germany, the end of our hike.
re landed in
T here were some happy Yanks when
we were told our hike was • finished
Germany is a beautiful country and
France also. But the United States
has them all heat as far as I have
for a while.
main.
PVT. ELDRED BURWELL.
*
++++♦+++♦++++++♦+
*
+

*
EXTENSION' GIVEN WATER
USERS.
+
+



+
Tfie break which occurred In
the Aberdeen-Sprinfield canal
was about 15 or 20 miles
above Aberdeen last week was
repaired Tuesday and the wa
ter turned back into fhe main
canal. The water was turned
off a total of 60 hours. This
shortage will be made up to
the farmers who suffered from
the absence of the water by
allowing them sixty additional
hours beyond
which ' to irrigate.

+

*
+

+

+
MRS.

+

+


+
*


*
Saturday In *
*
*


+
+ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦
THIRTY-TWO GRADUATE
FROM COUNTY SCHOOLS
one
2nd,
day
ard.
G.
of
A.
she
cers
was
try
ing
the
on
er
a
is
est
to
I.
Record of Eighth Grade Students in
County Schools Much Improved
Tills Year—Miss Drake Goes to
Conventions.
Thirty-two students graduated from
the eighth grade of the county schools,
six more than last year's record, ac
cording to a list of the graduates is
sued last Tuesday by Miss Goldie
Drake, county superintendent of
schools. The average grade of all
the students who have passed was
87.1 per cent.
Forty-five took the eighth grade ex
aminations iihis year compared to
forty-six of the year previous. The
failures this year counted only 29 per
cent of those taking the exams, while
last year the percentage ran up to 46
per cent, "which only goes to show,"
says Miss Drake, "that the students
have been doing better work, especial
ly in view of the fact that they lost
about six weeks of the school year
during the "flu" ban. and have had to
make that up since."
Following is the list of those who
removed diplomas:
District Tnd. No. 2—Gertrude An
der son, Vera Anderson. Ruth Boley,
1,edema Hamilton, Tbeora Jensen,
Myrtle May. Paul Nelson, Bel va Nol
son, Ada Nelson, Una Pearson, John
Peterson, Pearl Thorne, Melvin Wal
ker and Olga Wa'ker. District No. 2
—Emil Mayer. District No. 7—Pau
line Criswell, Jesse Hutchinson,
Thomas Lish and Vera Peqk. Dis
trict No. 9—Ruth Teal.
Two in District IS.
a
I District No. 20— Emma Dille and Emil
of!
District No. 12-—Mary Bailey and
Paul Ripley. District No. 14—Enda
Burnell, Normen Hayden and Flor
ence Snyder. District No. 15—Ellen
Engstrom. District No. 17—Henry
Fedler. Bennie Grueneieh and Roy Mil
ler. District No. 17.—Mary Schild.
Wllske.
Miss Drake announces that she will
be attending conventions from the
23rd of June until a short time after
July 1. The first convention will be
held at Albion, from whence she will
go to Pocatello, finishing at the Ida
ho Industrial Training school in St.
Anthony.
of
RAISE OFFICIALS' SALARIES.
FIRE APPARATUS ORDERED
Raises in salaries to city officials,
bringing the salar yhudget tip to
$3.340. and an appropriation to buy
new- fire fighting equipment were
voted at the special meeting of the
city council last week.
of
Under the new scale the ,mayo"t will
4th rP( .pi V « $250 a year The counetlmen
w ||] gP | fyst) a year: eity treasurer,
* 12 n : el'v- attorney $120; chief of tio
ij ce $i 500 ; road Overseer. *120: city
j clerk. $200: police judge. $50.
di- The council authorized an appro
priation for a Forif chassis which will
cos t approximately $750. and other
f ifighting equipment This equip
I m ent will consist chiefly or some new
414
I
RETURNED SOLDIER VISITS.
be -- I
the Pvt. Wm. J. Monbcrg and bride
were the guests of Mrs. L. V. Atkins
the from Wednesday of last week until
as this Monday. Pvt. Nonberg is a f'ald
well boy, who left with the 2nd Idaho
re- when war broke out. later being
transferred to the 324th bascery com
pany with which he spent nearly 18
months overseas.
Ruth.| When he returned to Caldwell re
vis- cently, Monberg married one of the
loce| girls, and carpe to American
Falls on his honeyn-con tr p t-> «c»
Atk'ns, as old Ir ene nr h r H
Mrs. : nd hi father have a bakery and con-,
fecMonery store tn Caldwell.
hose and cheminai tanks. An nice,
trie siren will also he purchased un
der this order..and win i,e ..traDy
located in the town, c'ty orfidais
central offic- of the Mm. -am sta-c
re
MJI lltl'Fl. MEN ACE FAST;
j
1
and !
j soairrcl
Telep hone and Telegraph 1 - 0 .
DESTRUCTION VERY LIGII'I
The fanners of the coun»
menace, under control and |
i will suffer less this year than ever |
in j before in the opinion of Bruce Lamp
sop. county agent. In a f-w section:-, j
the poison has not been used as tho:-|
S oughly as it should have bee n and the
heat is suffering some. Sow Ih ih<
and time of the year w hen the damag -
will be the greatest
have 1 -!_
have fo
AWARD FRENCH CROSS
TO FRED A. HOWARD
AFTER DEATH IN WAR
MRS. G. A. HOWARD RECEIVES AN
NOUNCEMENT OF AWARD OF
FRENCH CROIX DE GUERRE TO
HER SON.
LAST GALLANT ACT HONORED
Citation Probably Made for C<Hid.urt
Under Heavy Machine Gnn
From Germans Before His Death
One of America's Flrsl 50.000.
Fire
Fred A. Howard of American Falls,
one of America's first 50,000 who was
killed in action in France November
2nd, 1918, has been posthumously
awarded the French Croix de Guerre
according to a letter received Tues
day by his mother, Mrs. G. A. How
ard. The letter making the award
reads as followts:
Washington, Juno 7th, 1919. Mrs.
G. A. Howard, American Falls, Idaho.
Dear Madam—This office is in receipt
of a French Crlox de Guerre post
humously awarded to your son, Fred
A. Howard, sergeant company F, 2nd
engineers.
Signed. Ralph Harrison, Adjutant
General.
The citation for tho award has' not
been forwarded to Mrs. Howard and
she is not Certain of the incident for
which the award was made. From
letters written by friends and offi
cers of the company of which Fred
was a member it is probable that tho
award was made for Che act of gallan
try that resulted in the death of this
soldier.
Because ot his seniority and train
ing and record under fire he, with a
comrade, was chosen by the com
manding officer of :his company to
reconnoitre a bridge preparatory to
the crossing of artillery. He went
forward under heavy machine gun
fir» from the German* and reported
on the crossing. A few aecotlds lat
er he was hit and instantly killed by
a high explosive.
Mr. Howard was not the only boy
from Power county to be among the
first 50,000 in the 1st and 2nd divi
sions of the regular army but lie Is
the first to receive a citation for gal
lantry in action. His record when it
is complete will be one of the bright
est chapters in Power county's war
history.
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Howard are
visiting in American Falls and vicin
ity for a few days before returning
to their home in Garfield, Washing
ton. Mr. Howard lias been In the
Bethany Deaconess hospital several
days with slight illness but is now
out and visiting with Mr. and Mrs.
I. J. Durkee.
Miss Day Danielson, daughter of
Mrs. O. V, Kelly, was married Tues
day after noon to Mel ville Neyman
of Pocatello. Judge R. O. Jones of
ficiated at the ceremony.
I
The church column begins in the Press this week on
». i mi l i* ii - h.
page live and will be for the purpose of telling all the
news about the churches and church people of Power
COUnty and American rails. In it you will find notices
concerning services for church and Sunday school and as
• <- i • <- i • h -i • 1 * • I i I I T -,
sociated interests in all the individual churches. Every
church in the county should have notices and news mat- i
y..„ înt-c IL,, „ * I . „ rn . i c !
ter into the 1 ress office not later than I uesday noon of
each week.
WHY GO TO CHURCH?
I
I
To begin the column the Press asked a layman and a
minister 0 f American Falls to write short articles on
, ,,, , ,,,, , r , , .
Why (jo to Church: You may have better reasons or
ones that you think are particularly applicable to your
home town. If you have tell them to the Press in not more
than 100 words, so that it can print them at the head of
the church column.
I he church is not a building but a
company of people organized to help
make the world better. It does not
claim to he perfect, hut it gives more !
valuable service to men for less mon- ;
ey than any other institution on
earth. It standR for character in th<
I citizen and law and order in the com
munity. Where church influence has
fallen down or where it bas become j
a mere instrument of the state civili
zation has suffered, but in landH
where the church tries to exemplify
the teaching of Jesus there will be,
found the beat types of men and the*
best conditions of society. The church
is therefore the most valuable asset
of a community. It helps the home,
it helps business. It promotes educa
tlon and re* pect for law and Justice.
It is the mother of every benevolent
institution tn the world Our free
school system would be Impossible
without the ideal* which the church
the church column.
!
BUY GO TO UHUIKJI.'
|
|
j
By
Itcv. Ford of the Baptist Church
American Falls
SIR DONALD MAC LEAN
*
+



is

+
*
It .

+

*
+

Hi
-< .

k
teH:
+

+
>■


: ■
V
i*
j
j
tho t
Unit
Sir Donald MacLean is the new
chairman of the liberal party In
British house of commons.
AMFDir AkI I CfîAM II/II I
AWIlKIIAN LCiUlUn IT ILL
MCUT IM DAICC IIIMC ^)C
lllLLl I Pi DUluL, JUIXEi L J ;
Large Delegation of I'ower County
Kwioldlers Desired
of Men Should Be At Once.
Registration


All ex-soldiers In Power county
should have their names in the hands
of Secretary T. C. Sparks not later
than July first if they desire to re
ceive the national official publication
of tho American Legion, The names
will all bo forwarded to stale head
quarters July second.
Secretary Sparks announces this
week that a large delegation 1 b de
sirabie in attendance at the convon
tion and urges all who can spare the of
to gq to Boise. There will bi
nt least 210 delegates there' and fhe
co nventlon hall should be an inspir
ing scene. ,
. Charters in the American legion
can be issued to county branches by
the state organization Immediately af
ter It has been formed, according to |
Information which comes from na
tional headquarters. I
The state convention will be held
in Boise June 25, when a state organ- 1
ization will be perfected. !
Rivalry between the several coun-1
ties of the state which will want the
honor of getting the first county char
ter Is anticipated.
Delegates are expected Dorn every
county and plans are being made to
entertain the visitors in a manne, r be
fittlnk the occasion. |
Meetings will be held at the Shrln-|,|
ers' Mosque, and although the com
plete program has not yet been ar
ranged many good features can he
counted on. Free tickets to the Nata
(Continued on page 8.)
.j
!
not tin- capital, and men of capital j
failed to support It. It* program has 1
beep limited because It needed effl- ]
dent men to carry it on, and men ;
were so busy with their own per son-1
a l concerns that they failed to heed
the call of the church. After all sv-.l
ery man must pay something for the |
church. He must pay directly for the \
good It brings or the wreckage It* ab- !
sence or inefficiency creates.
jf men want a better church let I
them cooperate with and give it the
Inspiration of their presence and sup-1
port \
j. a. FORD.
_
«HV GO TO UHURUH!
By
o r . 8. 8. Murdock
Chiropractor
American Falls
_
: The average non-reiigious man is
mentally but fifty per cent efficient,
. —-tended
(Continued on page eight)
has created. It has not been able to i
do everything, largely because J had 1
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦A
+
*

CHAUT AI OU A COMING
AO AIN NEXT YEAR
+








Chautauqua will he heri
again next summer. This was
made certain when the papers
were signed just as the Press
was going to press. Mr. C. Y.
Wilson, local business man.
and Mr. Fletschmann, director
of the Bhow, made the an
nouncement that fifty business
people had Signed as guaran
tors, and the show would come
back again to American Falls
next June.

+
*
*



+



*

+

*


+
*


+


SPORT FESTIVAL IS BIG
PLEA FOR PLAYGROUND
j Supervised I'lny and Stunts Given on
j Thursday Night liy Junior Chautau
qua Illustrate Good effects of Child
t Recreation.
ing,
M.
For tho purpose of entertaining the
older folk* and interesting them In the
establishment of some kind of play
ground system tn American Falls, the
Junior Chautauqua staged a big chll
(Iron's play and sport festival on the
corner lot across from the ohautauqun
lent last night. The events, which
under the supervision of Mi«R
ware
Boyd of the Chautauqua, went off in
fine style and showed what can be
done here In American Falls under
playground supervision.
Tho largest part of the girls took
part in a Swiss May dance,
were cast In a little pageant, "Sleep
ing Beauty." The chief stunts of the
boys were pyramid building and the
wheelbarrow
Others
races—Jap Oral) race,
race, and rabbit race. The games,
"Skin and Snake" and relay ball, to
gether with two special stunts by
Delmar Hartley and Sylvan Warner,
Edwin Stuart and Oliver Newman
wore captains of (he ball teams and
of the t,eams entered in the Jap Crab
Boh Kerr captained tho "Chin
race.
ese 'Skin the Snake." The pyramid
building was one of the most specta
cular events, and has required much
training lo come off so successfully.
Mert Lampson, Oliver
Wayne Gohlson and Edwin Stuart
worn the lenders in this stunt.
Newman,
productlon. Miss Oliver taking charge
of the "Sleeping Beauty" and Miss
Rice directing the Swiss May dance
Miss Boyd devoted a larger portion
o flier time 'o training the boys for
their special stunts. "Thny are n
lot of fine and Intelligent hoys," she
said pleased with the results, "and a
month of I raining and play like this
would do wonders for them, would
make them alert and bring out their
real qualities. Many of them still
stand around In some of the guines,
not having had any previous train
mg to put them on the atert ns they
Hhoulcl be."
mi« k noyd advised her audience
Tuesday afternoon that there were
Kails needed: A hoy scouts organ!
™"°n a,l,! » playground with play
it round ©auli»fn**nt RhA ImurMiM
h e r audience that supervised i»luy j
i »>"' » real interest in an organization |
! like the hoy scouts would bring out
no- boy*' finest qualities.
"Sleeping Beauty" Cast Good.
"'Sleeping
a number of the smallest
j n tltn little pageant.
umuty,
1()tg , )0 rformed and played their parts
vpry K , m( ] The character of the prim
0Pl „, WIIH takon bv Hazel Davis, liar
<(1( , ( ] rppno p i„ V ed the prince, Edith
N - P i son the old witch, and George and
Richard LnMnthe, the courtiers. A
numb er of others, repreaentlng the
fa | r |,» and the guests at the wed
dlnsr. completed the cant,
Irene Oliver and Miss F. Net
e Ru , f , !1HM |„ tP( , m| H b Boyd in the
ALEALFA WEEVIL DISCOVERED
PREVENTATIVE STEPS TAKEN |
-
Alfalfa weevil has been discovered j
In two places In the county, one near i
Landing and the other In the Rock
land valley. County Agent Latnpson |
and the owners of the hay patches are
I busy eradicating the pest and
let It spread if preventable.
I Lampson advises
.j when the weevil
! -ince, the hay should be cut Imme
diately and the stubble dragged and
harrowed thoroughly. This procedure
j drags the weevil Into the ground and
1 destroys it quickly. Bo far the wee
] vil has not appeared north of Amerl
; can Falls or west of the river,
| The Idaho Htate Bankers' eonven
\ tlon was held at Burley on Monday
! and Tuesday, June 18-17.
I hank; H. C. Allen, cashier of the
H>van* State hank, and C. Lee French,
county clerk from American Fall*
\ an( j j ag Ogden, cashier of the Rock
land State hank, attended from this
county
- Mr. French reports that this con
vention wa* one of the moat succeas
ful convention* held, there being a
larger number present rnan at any
previous
were present from many of the large
is banks ! nthc cast, including New
York and Chicago, and other* at
from Washington, Oregon and
Utah as well as Idaho.
III not j
Agent
as a remedy that
makes Its appear- '
i
1
BANKERS MEET AT HURLEY. |
Gus Wenn
strorn, cashier of the First National
meeting. Representatives
HUGE $500,000,000
RECLAMATION BILL
FAVORED BY SENATE
MANY PROMINENT IDAHO MEN l*
WASHINGTON TO BOOST PAS
SAGE OF BILL AND ADVANCR
GEM STATE'S INTEREST.
COMMITTEE ASKS MORE MONEY
Additional <,'>0,tMHI,(>00 Appropriation
Reported Favorably from Senate Ir
riirntlon Committee for Improve
ment of existing Projects.
Tho big $500.000,000 reclamation
hill Introduced by Secretary lame I*
on its way through tho senate and so
tfitr hHH shaken off all attempts to
load It with questionable riders. Gov
ernor Davis, former governor Good
ing, former Congressman McCracken,
M. J. Sweeley and Frank Uagenbarth.
formel - Gover nor Hawley and B. P.
Shawhan are all in Washington or on
their way to boost the passage of the
hill ami look after tho Internets of
their home state.
The Reclamation association of the
Snake river valley of which Fred R.
Reed Is secretary. Is wasting no ef
forts to make the importance and
availability of the Snake river valley
felt in Washington. All valley eitle»
are behind the movement to bring de
velopment to our front door and are
going the limit In money, time and
publicity. Last week a big delega
tion of business men toured the Du
llols project and It wa* given pub
licity over the entire west. Should
the DtiBots project he developed It
will mean hi development to the en
tire valley. Should the Bruno pro
ject with the proposed dam at Am
erican Fall* go through It will also
mean big things for the entire valley.
What will hrtp u part will also heit*
tho whole.
LochI Committee Busy.
The local reclamation commltteei
has sent considerable money to Sec
retary Herd and Is ready to send mort*
when the demand comes. Mnurict*
M. Myers, chairman of the reclama
tion committee of Power county ti*
watching tliu work of the booaters In
Washington and limy Ibhiio another
call soon lo help the work along at
He says the big idea now iw
to got tho money appropriated by con
gress and then persuade the reclama
tion service that the hoHt place to
spend It Is In southern Idaho an<t
that the best place In southern Idaho
Is near American Falls,
The committee has sent $5<>0 to
headquarters lo finance Power coun
ty's share of the boosting and imb
Belly. Mr. Myers Is wall satisfied
with the work that has been dona.
"We have been somewhat handlcap
ped,".he said, "by the man who teilt*
ns that 'I can't see how I am goto*
to be benefltted any.' Every farmer
and business man of the county should
realize that any appropriation made
for reclamation work along ttt«»
Snake river will benefit the entire:
valley. The development of the llu
tails project will bring more water
to llie Aberdeen-flprlngfleld canal and
extend the water hack t<> the '»vas.
nn<1 very likely brink u> nur iront
doors the development of the Fort
n»J>
water for projects down the river and
fr«"' ,<,r ,,u '' " K '' , , ( h 1 ,, n u"i ,r 'r. 1 .
wai**r in jackhou hoi«, wr can • noil»
j I>iit win so let's boost to the limit."
|
home,
PICTURE SHOW AT IRENE
will cost just two cent»
The Irene tbeats-r in cooperation
with the business men of American
Falls will stage a picture show every
Saturday afternoon beginning at 3
o'clock that will cost the farmer only
two cents. The first show will bo
given tomorrow,
The program as announced Is tin*
first, of Its kind to be given In Amerl
can Falls and Is expected to attract
ja largo attendance. Townspeople at«»
invited to attend the kliow hut will
be charged the regular edtiilsshiti
price while tickets will be Issued out
of town people free of charge, ex
cept that they will he. required to pay
the two-rent war lax on their ticket.
Free admission tickets arc avail
able at. any of the stores listed below:
Oliver McKown Hardware store,
Grand Union Teas store, th< Corner
Cigar store iiu- Model, Fall Creek
Mercantile company. Swift Cafe,
Evans Mercantile company, Power
City garage, American Fall* Milling
company. Northern Grain and Ware
house company and Beatty's Pastry
Kitchen.
GRAIN GROWERS TO MEET.
The Power County Grain Grower»'
association will meet at 10:30 Satur
day morning, June 28th in the court
house ta elect officers and organize
a permanent association. Director»
will be appointed and plans discuss
ed for the Installation of scales »■■<)
the procuring of a fédéra [grain In
spector. F. A. Ziek of Cedar Ridge tm
tern porary chairman of the Grain
Growers' association.

xml | txt