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American Falls press. [volume] (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, January 07, 1921, Image 4

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FALLS,
Farm Bureau News
Power County
• •
• •
CALE HIDE MC;
SHOES COST JIO
Farm Leader .Says .Ufiti Can't Carry
Enough Wool on Raek to Pay
„ tA . ... J
suit of ( mills» Rust I nlte to i
tide Remedy.
Chicago, Jan. 6,—Today the farmer
receives only 14 cents for the calf
tvhlch enters in a $12 pair of shoos,
the skilled workman gets $1.60
making them, so that the cost in reach
ing the consumer I» over $10.
A big strong man cannot pacy
enough hides into a shoe shop today
pay for one pair of shoes.
An ordinary bag of w'ool weighs
pounds and one man cannot handle
If he could the entire lot would not
buy a suit of tailored clothes weighing
3 i£ pounds
' It takes four bushels of my corn
present country prices to half sole my
shoes, and half a wagon load to pay
my hotel bill here for two days.
1 could not carry into one of your
thirst parlors enough cabbage to pur
chase a glass of soda water.
thousands of bushels of apples are
rot ng in Ohio orchards this minute.
while apples an- sold at ten cents
apiece by your Chicago fruit vendors.
Dark Virginia tobacco of good grade
Is down as low as a cent a pound, as
testified before the Senate Agriculture
Committee.
Big Loss in Sheep,
Two thousand sheep sold recently in
a Chicago stockyard, and netted the
shipper only 34 cents a head,
A furniture salesman told reeontly
of two trips he made from Toledo to
Detroit. In May. taking two days to
do It he booked $26,000 In orders; in
November, his business over the
route amounted to Just $23.76.
The average farmer In America has
not made as much this entire year as
the average coal miner has In one day.
Idaho hay. along the linos of the
Union Pacific, can't he marketed be
cause the freight rate Is almost equal
to the selling price In Omaha. Add
ing the cost of baling and hauling to
the selling price, the cost has exceeded
Ibe value of the hay ut the Missouri
river market The hay stays in
Idaho while the railroad hauls empty
cars past the ranches and loses all
revenue.
Thus George M. Wilber. Marysville,
Ohio, farmer who may be called into
the next United States Cabinet as Sec
retary of Agriculture, pictured rural
conditions today to Chicago business
men in an address delivered Wednes
day noon at the Association of Com
merce luncheon at Hotel La Salle.
His subject was "Country Economy vs.
City Extraagance."
same
"Government crop re-1
ports scarcely a week old tell of yields
approximating records In almost every
line The surest argument for a
.»pending Must Cease.
Declaring; that spending orgies of
city people are bound to cease, as al
ready is the ease in the country, Mr,
Wilber insisted that he can see health
coming back to business. He insisted
(bat its return will be hastened by
general adoption of a get-to-work pol
icy.practice of economy to the same
degree as before the war and the turn
ing of money to the succor of legiti
mate enterprises.
"Fudamental conditions are sound" |
tie asserted.
Mr. Farmer:
How About Your
Income For
1921 ?
The Press Publishing Company has a book
that it is allowed to sell for five dollars that
permits of all the bookkeeping done on a
farm. Complete instructions come telling
how the book should be kept. It gives a com
plete summary that allows ready calculation
of the statistics needed in making out your
income tax report.
Inquire of the Press.
Press Publishing Co., Ltd.
i
Jl
confinement among all classes,"
' What wc must remember Is that
amount of work or talk at Wasblng
1 Ion. where recently elected
will take charge soon, can solve
situation unless you and 1 do our
share. If, we produce more, sell
I narrower margin, recognize that
ain losses are inevitable, and therefore
! tin sooner accepted the sooner
b > 1,10 time the violets bloom In
for i •? rlnß ' you w 1 Ul back ', D ,he ,wi
lof commercial activity and reasonable
ro- | earnings which will make the next
years ones of success and happiness
for all.
"To the extent that the middle
performs a neccessary service he
an aid to business. W'hen he does
add to the value of the cotnmodity
handles or the convlence by which
reaches the consumer, he becomes
liability. Then he should be éliminât
cd."
and
for
to
200
It. ." "'" l ? 11 '»•'■illations that they
^ a,,I ° l ° K ° a l ,rotu or al
1 w ' tho " t l08S - }f bor , to °- 1,,U8t 8Wil
nto ** nc * avo| d useless expenditure
at 1 and , bc wlllln « to work for wages
can af t (,r d to I ,a y added
' Vlr ' ber '
\ KM KBS AT RI PFRT REPORT
/ARGE ( HOPS WHEAT, WAVE
Retail business men were admonish
ed that some of them are entirely
I
harm Bureau in Neighbor County
; |M , r(N Best Season Vet—Bumper
Props Raised In All Lines,
I
Rupert, Idaho.—At the close of
most successful year of the Minidoka
county farm bureau the county agent,
Grover Burnett, submits the following
statements regarding accomplishments
during the past year.
The crop inprovement work for
standardization of grains was carried
on by 19 farmers in growing Trebl
barley, representing 193 acres of this
crop. These farmers have stated that
a five bushel increase in yield per
acre is not uncommon. The increased
yield alone when sftld for seed at
per hundred, would represent a profit
of $963. Eight thousand pounds
this barley marketed at 59 cents per
cwt. increase represents a profit
$400.
'
Crops Are Largo.
Seven farmers grew 70 acres of cert
fied Dicklow wheat at a five bushel in
crease per acre, while P. R. Coon, of
Paul stated that on three acres where
common seed was used he raised 120
bushels and on three acres where cert
ified seed was used the yield was 180
bushels. At $1.80 per bushel on the
increase the amount of $603 would be
noticeable. Since the estimated 4000
bushels will be sold at an Increased
price of 50 cents per bushel for seed
ing purposes an additional increase of
$2000 for seven formers would be re
ceived.
This farm bureau assisted In stimu
lating Interest in dairy stock and as a
result farmers of Paul purchased 87
head of high grade dairy cows.
Much Wool Raised.
Sixty-five thousand pounds of wool
was consigned by 153 farmers, but
owing to unfavorable market condi
tions this wool has been hold at the
request of the farmers wailing for a
better price.
carried on shows that 3330 acres of
private land and 6240 acres of public
land was poisoned with 3296 pounds
of poisoned oats for the extermination
Farmers estimated a
saving of $2.60 per acre, which would
represent $8325. Deductig the cost of
the poison,$996, a saving of $7330 is
noticeable for the 45 farmers who han
of squirrels,
Rodent control work
no
7000 SIGNERS TO
, FARMER PETITION
officials
the
full
at a
cert
ended
the
" K
few
man
is
not
he
he
a.
1
0
ft
•>
oo
*
ft
0
à
o
erson
will
1,a8t
'K
that
/
K
r '■ /
V\ ■' :•//?
.
m
;
< '
A
'1, \
1 Æ
Re
r ~* "
Minnesota farmers believe In
fighting hard for the things they
want. They now want the fed
eral legislation before Congress
passed, for the Immediate finan
cial relief of agriculture ctiused
by the sharp price declines. So
this Is the way they Impressed
Congress—by sending a petition
signed by 7000 Minnesota farmers
to their congressman, Sydney An
derson 1 Congressman • Ande
la shown holding the petition.
the
the
$2
of
is glvin for the 6240 acres poisoned bv
federal aid.
In addition to this 326
ounces of poison was used for poison
ing rabbits, at a cost of $521.60.
low estimate of 100 rabbits killed for
each ounce of poison used would show
32,600 rabbits destroyed in this
nor.
A
man
in some cases as high as 900
rabbits have been killed
ounce of strychnine.
with one
In February 450
pounds of rabbits hides were pooled
by 17 farmers,
per pound was made on these hides, or
a value of $360.
1 he work done by the home demon
stration agent. Miss Nina Huyck. has
been chiefly along clothing nd poultry.
The women have taken up millinery
and othre clothing work and have es
timated a saving of $4099.20. Poultry
work as reported by the farmers has
resulted in a saving or profit of $4582.
A total of the savings or profits for the
county agents' work is $17.749, and
the home demonstration agent's rep
resents a saving of $8681, or a total of
$26,429, at an expence of $4700,
An offer of 80 cents
LOST— Wednesday
morning,
nose glasses with chain in black
Notify Mrs. Stuart, Fall Creek Dry
Goods dept. Reward. 1 - 7 *
pair
case.
||llllllllllllllllllllllllllllli:„iiiili,'|,i, lüii.ilülllllülllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllf
I Regular Prices at Mayne's Always I
Mean Special Prices To You—
Compared To Other
Stores 1
=
■,
«
T
Y
•îi
- J
= 7 oz can Sardines in Spiced Tomato Sauce 5c
p| Walnuts, per pound.
ig Horseshoe Tobacco per lb
EliH Corn Meal, 9-lb. package ...
H Oat Meal, 9-lb sack.
Peanut Butter per lb.
H Jello, two pkgs.
H Pink Salmon, 2 1-lb cans...
H Blue Label Karo, per gal.
H Fresh Cheese, per lb.
I71/2C
.81c
55c
65c
25c
25c
35c
,98c
35c
Maynes Cash Grocery
älllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM
BAPTIST PEOPLE
EAT AND LAUCH
Church Year Closes With a Room—
Knehiisiustn for 1921 Abounds—
Feast and Business Meeting
bined Very Successfully.
(By Rev. J. A. Ford)
Thursday evening, Dec. 30, was
festive occasion for the friends
Bethany Baptist Church. An unpleas
ant night secured, for a time to
disaster to the annual gathering,
it was found that bad weather had
terrors for a people who had decided
to close their church year with a boom.
At six o'clock a goodly company gath
ered in the upper room while the
chestra played several pleasing selec
tions. At 6:45 the pastor announced
that supper was ready, and led the
to the dining room where a bouneiful
and appetizing feast awaited the guests.
Fifty Dined.
Fifty guests sat down at the first
three tables and twenty at the second.
It was a joyous occasion and mirth
good fellowship prevailed. There were
members of the church, officers and
teachers of the Sundayschool, young
people from the Baptist Union, gener
our contributors from the congrega
tion, and inited guests—all mingled
together, like a large, happy family
a care-free, social hour. Bright young
lady waiters swiftly supplied the eag
er guests. At 7:30 the etire company
adjourned to the upper room where
the business meetirtg was convened.
The pastor. Rev, J. A. Ford, in the
chair. The spirit of the meeting was
excellent. The chairman encouraged
a feeling of hopefulness and cheer, and
gave a happy illustration of how a bus
iness meeting could be conducted,
not only (without friction, but with
cordial and brotherly spirit.
Report on Benevolence.
Mrs. R. B. Greenwood read the re
port on General Benevolence, Mrs. O.
W. Pollard presented the report of the
Ladies Department, Miss Martha Noch
tingal reported for the Baptist Young
Peoples' Puion, Mrs. J. A. Ford gave
statement covering the work of the
Home Department and the Cradle Roll.
All these societies were found to have
done excellent work. Mr. Charles Tor
rence presented a statement tor the
New World Movement Fund. Prof.
Warwas read the report of the work of
the Sunday School. This was a docu
ment of universal interest and it show
a record year ingeneral contribu
tions. The highest offering for a giv
Sunday was $7.70, and the average
offering for the year was $5.50. Over
$70.00 was contributed by the School
for sufferers in Europe an dthe Near
East. The birthday offerings for the
year reached a total of $25.00. The
entire amount raised for all purposes
the school for 1919 was $365.00.
This too is the face of the fact htat
numerous removals ifrom the town
caused a considerable decrease in the
average attendance.
Rosy Financial Report.
Mr. R. B. Greenwood read the treas
urer's report. It was feared that
financial stringency of the year would
make this report discouraging but
treasurer relieve all fears by saying
it was one of the most satisfactory
ports he had ever been able to
sent, It showed all bills paid
$125.00 in the treasury. The pastor
spoke of the great satisfaction of serv
ing a ohurch that paid its bills
promptly and conducted its affairs
a business basis. He pointed out that
the church was supported entirely
voluntarily contributions from its own
constituency and without the aid
sales or suppers. The buget for 1921
was then submitted and pledged in less
than ten minutes.
A vote of thanks was moved by Mr.
Philbrick, seconded by Mr. Bickelber
ger and extended to the ladies who
had so generously provided such
"splendid banquet" for the occasion.
An enthusiastic standing vote was
given. Mrs. D. B. Nichols and Mrs.
Sandford were the committee
charge.
The young ladies who waited on the
guests were; Misses Fern Spaulding,
Pearl Spaulding, Myrtle Warwas, Erna
Rroll, Caroline Lounsberry, Vera
Decker and Delia Waggner.
The youngest guests of the evening
(not counted in the 70) were: Darwin
Nichol, Bruce Edward Vaughn, Roland
Deaton, Charles Reed Miltenberger
and Esther Nochtingale.
a
of
but
no
or
WOULD ISSUE BONDS TO
FINANCE WHEAT GROWERS
Washlnton and Idaho Farmers' Union
Have Finance Schemes Whereby
Producers Will Profit,
The scheme to finance the wheat
grower by wheat bonds issued against
warehouse recipts was presented to
the farmers' Union at Washington and
Northern Idaho in sesiaon at the Y. M.
C. A. in Spokane Tuesday by George C.
Jewett, general manager of the Wash
ington and Idaho Wheat Growers'
Association.
"The plan contemplates that the
wheat grower shall put up his wheat
tickets with a trustee." said Mr. Jew
ett, "and that six months bonds shall
be Issued by the trustee against these
tickets. This is not a wheat holding
scheme. It simply proposes that
wheat shall be marketed in an orderly
way over a normal wheat selling per
iod of eight months. We would stop
the 'dumping" process and relieve
forced selling.
en
Aims To Assist Banker.
"We are not aiming to fight the bank
er, but to assist the banker. We would
take off their hands the sole burden of
financing the wheat growers. In r
sections the banks are obliged to
tend themselves during the growing
season and, during the harvest time,
they are forced to require the farmer
to pay. We want to enable the farm
er to satisfy his banker and at the
same time not be forced to sell his
wheat on a market that is below his
cast."
many
ex
Oregon. Montanna Represented
About eighty farmers of Washing
ton and Idaho attended the meetings
during the day, including a dozen wo
There were a number of Mon
tanna and Oregon farmres present.
A. R. Shumway, president of the Ore
gon farmers told the convention that
Oregon farmers had adopted the
cooperative plan in effect in the North
ern Farmers' Union. Dwight R. Cre
sap, of Lewiston, Mont., chairman of
organization committee of the
Wheatgrowers association
men.
same
the
Montana
was present.
NOTICE OF SALE ESTBAÏ.
Notice is hereby given that the fol
lowing described animal
. will be sold
public auction to the highest bid
der at the ranch of T. B. Evans, Arbon
Valley, February 17th, at twelve o'clock
noon: one bay mare branded P 2
on
the left thigh.
GEORGE H HANSON, Sheriff.
Y • H. TORRANCE, Deputy.
1-7 1-2S
OPPORTUNITY
that fact, vou will find'," aS exce P tional b' large and because of
have decided to close out THp™ 5 exc, ? ptional values in lines that we
laities, bric-a-brac and evvThv re nf a "1, C ?? IPe •" '^ther spec
take advantage of the OPPORTUNITY this sale^aTfords.^ ° NCE ^
WESSELTON BLUE WHITE
DIAMONDS
Rudman & Gottberg
LEADING JEWELERS
308 West Center SL
Pocatello, Idaho.
f
1
■<r.
M
>■ -
Ö
fir' Jr
rat me»
Awe bican Falls, Idaho
■ii
We are now making City Loans through the
Equitable Savings and Loan Association.
No Delays Prompt Remittances
A
so
a
QUACKLESS DUCK NO
SWIMMER EITHER J
\
r
if
M
if
if:
(O
-YM
and
The
'quackless" u.
less" duck has arrived
the Muscovy type and
shown at the
water
It Is of
Is being
Californio K ,. P0Ultry Sh0W8
California by Mrs. Anne E. Frary
of Ban Francisco. It Is said the
quackless" duck Is a better egg
inT ' han otber breeds lay 8
•fig almost continuously it
quires little water—being
0 dr ink like a chicken !
der a poultry
re
content
.. wan
runway.
LIBRARY MEETING.
The annual meeting of the Ameri
can Falls Public Library Association
will be held in the Library, Tuesday,
January 11, at 5:00 p. m. At this meet
ing the new Directors will be elected,
and the officers for the ensuing year.
A full attendance of those interested
In the welfare of the Library is desired.
F. NETTIE RICE, Secretary.
1-7
Report on Jackson Lake Storage.
Burley, Jan. 3.—Report from Moran,
Wyoming, at the outlet of Jackson
LSke reservoir shows the following
conditions;
Jackson Lake Storage
On Dec. 25, 1920.
Same date a year ago..
For week ending Dec. 25, 1920....
For same week a year ago.
Percipitation
Fop .week ending Dec. 25. 1920.0.60
For same week a year ago..
From Sept. 1 to Dec. 25, 1920
For same period a year ago....
Acre-feet
239,160
74,710
7,750
6,480
Inches
.0.08
.7.18
.7.14
GOOD OPPORTUNITY.
A well established wholesale and re
tail business for sale (Hay, Grain and
Produce), large warehouse. Address
for further particulars, J. G. Teuscher,
Ogden. Utah, Box 462. Adv
CLERKS, (men, women) over 17,
Postal Mail Service. $130 month.
Examinations in January. Experience
unnecessary.
For free particulars,
write R. Terry, (former Civil Service
Continental Bldg.
1-7 1-14*
Examiner)
Washington, D. C.
743
POSITION WANTED.
Young married man wishes steady
position in City. Employed at present,
best of reasons for wishing change.
Have some experience as grocery clerk
will take anything.
City.
Address Box

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