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American Falls press. [volume] (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, January 07, 1921, Image 5

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NEW TRAIN SCHEDULE:.
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No. 24....
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No. 84.
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West Bound.
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W. G. SHADE, Agent.
No. 23...
No. 83...
NÄ. 19
No. 5.
No. 17.
V
LOCAL
BAPPENIIVG9
Miss Mary Kluck spent Saturday and
Sunday in Pocatello with relatives.
Frank Einberger of Rockland was
in American Falls Friday on business.
J. P. Voight left Sunday morning
for Chicago. He stopped at Sterling,
Colorado, for a visit' with Arthur
Smith.
Eat dinner at Beatty's Sunday,
saves work and worry—for only 50c.
Adv.
It
Cecil Johnson of Salt Lake City, re
turned home Tuesday morning after
a two weeks' visit with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Johnson, and sister
Mys. Chas. Hartley.
Miss Bertha Zimmerman, of Idaho
Falls, spent the holidays with rela
tives and friends in Ameircan Falls.
The Syringa Club will meet with
Mrs. S. L. Baird, Friday afternoon,
January 14th.
Don't spend Sunday over the stove—
Bat a special dinner at Beatty's for
50c. Hours 12 to 2:30.
Adv.
Miss Marion Sparks returned Mon
day morning to Sacred Heart Academy
at Ogden, where she is attending
school. She is the daughter of Wal
ter S. Sparks.
Beatty's 50c Sunday dinner between
12 and 2:30 makes the Sabbath a real
day of rest for all the folks at home.
Adv.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Noble entertain
ed at dinner New Years Day for Mr.
and Mrs. J. A. Edwards, Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Adams and Mr. and Mrs. C. O.
Thornhill. The evening was spent in
playing cards. The house was tastily
deorated in holiday colors.
Beatty's 60c Special Sunday Dinner
between 12 and 2:30 makes you want
to come again. Try it.
Adv.
SHOEMAKER MOVES SHOP.
J. M. Owen has moved his shop to
the Purrer Building , the store room
•»of which he has leased for a period
if years. Mr. Owen has been conduct
ing his shoe repair shop across the
street from the Falls Pharmacy for
several months,
will give him ample room for a shoe
;sftop as well as an exhibit room in the
front of the building.
His new quarters
BLOCK HAS NEW MIXER.
Fred Block, American Falls baker,
has purchased and now has in opera
tion a dough mixer that greatly facili
tates the bread making that supplies
American Falls stores.
The new mixer has a capacity of two
barrels of flour and is driven by a
motor. It cost $750 and is one of the
few such machines in this part of the
■state.
BLUE LAWS THREATEN.
A Sunday closing law for picture
shows and ail other places of business
or amusement will come before the
present session of the Idaho Legisla
ture according toJohnson Clark of the
C. & O. Amusement company of Amer
ican Palls. Mr. Clark will go to Boise
Monday to attend the annua! meeting
of exhibitors and incidentally to use
his influence against the passage of
the proposed blue law.
Real Estate
Loans
Insurance
Automobile
Life
Accident.
A
Hail
Fire
Sprigg & Roberts
Idaho
American Falls,
l
WOMEN WILL ELECT
OFFICERS JANUARY 1»
ICollected $1S6.50 for Campsite and
Spent $S0.7(> Old Leaders Resign
—Armenian Relief Rejected.
The American Falls Womens Club
will elect officers for 1921 at the an
nual meeting to be held January 19th
according "to 'the announcement of
Mrs. R. E. Austin retiring secretary.
Pressent .Mrs, (\ W. Thompson
has resigned due to her extended ab
sence in the east. Mrs. J. P. Voight,
vice-president expects to leave soon to
join her husband in Chicago. Mrs.
Austin resigned to enable the election
of an entirely new set of officers.
Business men will be pleased to read
the following account of the statement
of the Campsite fund submitted by Mrs.
Austin; Amount received in donations
$156.50, total expenditures $85.74. Bal
ance $70.76. The itemized list of ex
penditures follows: posts and lumber
31 pounds of barbed wire $2.50;
to fencing campsite $14,50; piping
water to grounds $8.69; wire and
posts $1.00 drayage on outbuildings $5;
two out buildings $17.50; signs $6;
delivery boxes for fuel 75c; adver
tising tor year book $10.
The Womans club collected $162 in
American Falls for Christmas seals.
They turned down the work of assist
ing the drive for relief in Armenia.
The nominating committee for Jan
unary 19 is Mrs. F. D. Durkee, Mrs.
H. R. Wallis and Mrs. George Cron
khite.
$ 20 .
CENTRAL SCHOOL AT ARBON
GIVES CHRISTMAS PROGRAM
Pies Auctioned Off After Program To
Aid In Raising Money For
Hot Lunches.
The Central School gave a fine
Xmas programme Thurdsay evening,
at the Central school house. After
the program pies were auctioned off,
for funds to help with the lunches.
The Xmas tree was beautifully decor
ated with trimmings, treats and pres
ents for the school children. One of
the candies which was lighted in some
way caught a Xmas bell afire on the
tree and in a few moments the top of
the tree was all ablaze. By quick
work of the men the tree was pulled
over and the fire extinguished, but not
until it bad burned about half of the
tree and a few presents. A strong
south wind was blowing which would
have soon taken the building if the i
fire had became much stronger. The j
proceeds from the pies amounted to
$14. The following program was ren
dered:
Song, Holy Night, by School. Reci
tation, Earl Bailey. Recitation. Grace
Bullock. Song, Girls. Dialogue, 14
children.
Song, Holy NTgth.by School. Reci
tation, Earl Bailey. Recitation, Grace
Bullock. Song. Girls. Dialogue. Four
teen children. Song, Margaret Bul
lock. Recitation. Melba Bailey. Reci
tation, Earl Davis. Song, Primary.
Annie Davis. Dialogue,
Solo, Grace Bullock.
Instru
Recitation,
Reta Bailey. Song, Girls. Recitation,
Mearle Bailey. Recitation, Tom Davis.
Dialogue. Three Girls. Instrumental
Duet, Margaret Allard and Mrs. Logan.
Recitation, Waldo Evans.
Mhy We Need The Hot Lunch.
Pa warms the milk for the little calf,
Ma heats the food for t hechicks;
The eat a hot dinner at noontime too,
But my lunch is cold as bricks.
We have a hto lunch at or school now;
There's soup that's hot as the dickens
We fill up our bowls as we pass along.
They've decided no wwe're as good
as the hickens.
Recitation,
Three Boys.
Recitation, -Fannie Evans,
mental. Constance Evans.
Officers of the local Chapter of the
A. R. C. are planning to send some
of the surplus funds in the chapter
treasury to the relief of the starving
children in Eastern Europe.
Seventy-three certificates have ar
rived from Seatttle for Power County
women who completed the classes in
Home Care of the Sick. Owing to the
danger of crushing in the mail. Mrs.
M. M. Myers has left the certificates
with Miss Houk at the Fall Creek
where the ladies will kindly
RED CROSS NOTES.
store.
call for their certificate.
A TIP TO THE PROHIBITION
OFFICERS—MYSTERY TO SOME
Charley Thornhill Knows Where Amer
ican Falls Gets Its Booze—Missing
Link In Evidence.
The "Little Brown Jug" is a rare
curiosity these days even to a total
abstainer like Charley Thornhill.
Charley isn't telling anything but he is
Just curious enough to want to know
who was in the closet in the old Burke
house across the river from the Power
plant, New Years day when he tried
to pry the door open and couldn't
Years ago the old place was the
gathering place of the young people of
the community who used to walk the
railroad bridge before the wagon
bridge was erected. As Charley passed
he recalled old times. The windows
were gone, the doors swung open and
the roof was caved in in several places.
Something drew Charley to the old
ramshackle building and he begun to
explore it. When he entered the front
door a little brown jug caught his gaze.
It was sitting in the pantry across the
house. Charley sniffed the contents
and said"moonshine." And he never
tasted a drop, he didn't (it really is
dangerous business these days.)
Mysterious Door.
All the doors were either off their
hinges or at least ajar except the one
leading to a closet in a bedroom. This
was indeed suspicious so Charley
pried in. The door failed to yield to
his weight so he procured a piece of
steel and became rough, still the door
would not open. Charley was in a
hurry so he left the siege and started
home. On the way he met a friend
and related his story. The friend was
sufficiently interested to continue the
investigation but when he arrived at
the scene of the mystery, the closet
door was open and sad to relate the
brown jug had disappeared.
This story is the sequel to that of a
barrel that mysteriously disappeared
from the same old rendevous. The
parties who discovered it sought to
sell it to a well known bootlegger and
found to their astonishment that he
had already paid for it once and was
quite indignant when asked to pay for
it the second time.
URGES LOCAL GRAIN HEALER
"BUT a BARREL OF FLOUR"
Movement Started Several Weeks Ago
In East and Is Believed Partial
Remedy for Low Price.
The "Buy a barrel of flour" move
ment has struck several communities
over the United States and comes to
American Falls this week from a local
grain dealer, who sees in the move
ment, a means of raising the price of
wheat to the farmer. The letter re
ceived this week says:
"A movement of this kind "Buy A
Barrel of Flour" started some thirty
days ago in the east and it was ex
pected that if every one cooperated,
the consumer would be able to get
flour at a relatively low price, the mil
ling demand for wheat would improve,
and farmers who have been receiving
If
less than the cost of production for
their grain for some time would be
benefited.
"The movement is a good one and
we think every household should do
its best by buying a barrel of flour.
Let every grocery store that adver
tises, carry a line in his advertisement
reading 'Buy A Barrel of Flour.'
the movement becomes nation wide,
watch the price our farmers will get
for their wheat and they need all they
can get. Some have voiced vigorous
objection to the movement and cite in
substantiation ,the fizzle of the "Buy
Bale of Cotton' movement at the be
ginning of the great war. They over
look just this vital difference. The
purchase of a bale of cotton was spec
lation pure and simple. The purchase
0 f a barrel of flour is food in final
hands. That is the eloquent differ
ence."
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Full yJssortment at
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The Hallmark Jewelers
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ESTIMATED SAVING BY
SQUIRREL POISONING IS *75,WK)
!
Five Hundred Seventy Farmers Used
Poison on 9s,(MIO Acres of Land—
Fourteen Tons of Bait Used.
Ninety eight thousand eight hund-,
red and eighteen acres of land were
treated with poisoned bait for squir
rels in 1920 according to a statement
recently issued by W. E. Crouch who
has charge of rodent control in the
state of Idaho for the University Ex
tension Division.
Over 14 tons of poisoned bait, were
used, the total saving estimated, is
$75.113.10 and the actual number of
farmers reported direct is 173. How
ever 570 actually used the poison and
returns for the whole number are bas
ed on those made by the 173 in the
county who reported.
Among prominent fanners who co
operated in the use of the poison were
C. C. Cotterell, J. F. Kosanke, Adolf
Winter, Henry Burgemeister, Osa
Creasey, Wm. L. McKnight, W. W.
Wall, Jr., F. W. Ertel, C. H. Schroeder,
| j, b. Bailey. J. X. Arbon, Albert Jenks,
John Rosen. S. J. Roberts, Young
, Brothers, Bert Schrimsher, W. C.
] Groom, J. F. Hautzinger, Andrew May,
I j Q e. E. May, Allen Pifield, Eph
| Ralphs, and W. A. Scott.
|
|
|
CENTRAL OFFICE OF WHEAT
GROWER'S MAY COME HERE
Local Men Hope to Make American
Falls Central Exchange for State
That the central office of the Idaho
Wheat Grower* Association with its
necessarily large exchange, will be lo
cated in American Falls is the belief
o fa considerable number of local busi
ness men who have been dwelling on
the development that 1921 in likely to
bring to this city.
The organization work, as ar as
Idaho is concerned, began at American
Falls. Ninety five percent of the wheat
merketed by the Association this year,
has gone through the American Falls
office. Organizers who are now out
over various sections of southern
Idaho, are from Power County, among
them Joseph May, Bruce Lampson.
Harry Nelson and S. L. Wixon .
J. T. Fisher, state secretary for the
Association lives a few miles from
American Falls and the executive com
mittee is within easy traveling dis
! tance of this city. So if state head
| quarters should come here it would be
quite proper and natural, it is pointed
I out.
Local executives of the Association
had no eminent to make regarding the
matter except to say in effect that this
seemed the logical location for such
an office, in the circumstances, and i
express the hope that such an arrange
ment could be brought about.
The centralizing of the market ma
chinery of the Association in Ameri
can Falls would mean largely extend
ed offices and the employment of sev
eral people for clerical work.
Wide Marketing Organization.
twelve and a half pounds came Wed
nesday noon to the home of Mr, and
Mrs. Hugo Rast. It is reported that
the stork that brought this bouncing
girl was fairly exhausted after its long
trip with such an unusually heavy in
fant. Five minutes after it was born
this young lady shouted in stentorian
tones for sauer kraut and a goodly por
tion was quickly provided. All re
cords for weight seem to have been
NEW BABY A WHOPPER.
A baby girl that tipped the scale at
1
broken by this arrival in the Rast
family.
j
1 ft!
ï'H'i
HR
There s A Long
Winter Ahead
Nature gives the squirrel a
Instinct
heavy winter coat,
makes him store up food. But
YOU must look out for yourself.
Have you a savings account
This bank offers complete facili
ties for all your banking needs.
Convenient hours, convenient
location and absolute safety.
First National Bank
anal
HEY, KIDDIES! PONIES
IN SILVER LININGS
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There was "a Shetland pony en'
very thing" In the silver lining to
,e dark cloud which hang over
;3 little boy and girl tor years.
s e world called their daddy a
[ audit and he was away from
oroe , leading his followers in
attle most of the time. They are
j panchlto and Lateito Villa, son
in( j daughter at the former Mex
ran bandit, who now leads the
.ife of a ranchman on the broad
,cres given to him by the govera
nent, one of the tame to bis aar
ender/'
|
!
H. W EATHERI ORD MARRI EN
MINS JESSIE CLARK AT STONE
Harold Weatherford of Rockland and
Miss Jessie Clark of Stone. Idaho were
married January second, at the home
of the bride s parents at Stone. Bishop
Andrew P. Peterson officiated.
Miss Clark lived at Rockland until
two years ago when her family moved.
She is well known in the valley where
the young couple will make their
Mr. Weatherford is popular
about his home town and is receiving
many
home.
the congratulations of his
friends.
CABD PARTY AT HORSTS.
Mr. an dMrs. George Horst enter
tained New Years eve
party in their home,
were
Wall, and Fred Horst.
with a card
Those present
Ivan Mock. Bob Alberts, W. W.
WOULDN'T THIS BILE YOU?
F. D. Enns writes the Press this
week of the wonderful sunshine, the
green grask, the orange picking, etc,
of sunny California.
We are having a" windless and snow
less" winter he adds while we gather
the folds of our coat tighter about our
shoulders.
Mr. Enns says he is greatly inter
ested in the development that has come
to American Falls and always takes a
great deal of pleasure in reading the
American Falls Press.
At ah? (Lbnrtbta
f
L. D. S.
Teachers' training class 9 a. m. Sun
day school 10 a. m. Secrament meet
ing 11:45 Sunday in charge of Bishop
J. W. Collings. Primary association
at 3:00 p. tn. every Friday, and Re
lief Society every Tuesday at
m. M. I. A. meeting 6:00 p. m. Sun
day.
0 p.
Bethany Baptist Church.
Sunday, January 9th, 1921.
Sunday School at 10 a. m.. Prof War
was, superintendent.
Junior Congregation at 11.
whole school in the upper room. Ob
ject Lesson.
Morning Worship at 11:10. Church
I and School together. Special Music,
j Every family in the Parish showed be
1 represented. It is much better to say
j to the children "Come" rather than
I "Go". The Sartor will speak on "The
I Way of Life."
Baptist Young Peoples Union at
r 6:30. A bright and aied program is
1 being provided. Songs essays and
brief addresses part of the program
j will be given in the service that fol
! lows. The "Star Tableau" will be pre
i senetd.
Vesper Service at 7:30. Orchestra
I and special music. The address will
I be on "The Open Door."
The
Lutheran Church.
Sunday School at 10 a, m.
Services next Sunday, January 9,
: w jj] |j e j n German, at 11 a. m. Our
next service in English will be January
I.;
You are invited to worship with us.
The First Methodist Episcopal Church.
Rev. Francis D. McCabe. Ph. D..
Minister.
Sunday, January 8th.
10 a. ra.—Bible School. Competent
teachers in every department. Last
Sabbath the Aeroplane was in the lead
in the Contest. All welcome to the
school.
11 a. m.—Regular Public Worship.
Minister's Theme "Dbet—How Incur
red and How Gotten Rid Of."
6:30 p. m.—Young People's Meeting.
Leader Mr. Fred Nelson.
7:30—Evening Song and Bible Les
son Hour.
j At a recent meeting of the members
i of the Masonic Order in American
[Falls, the following officers were elect
I ed for the ensuing year:
H. R. Wallis, W. M.: John T. Cole
man. S. W.; Richard Roberts, J. W.;
E. D. Nye, secretary;
strom, S. D.; C. G. Sprigg. J. W.
HARRY WALLIS LEADS MASONS.
G. S. Wenn

A Few Prices
For Your
Consideration
|
j
|
27 inch Percale
.23c yd
...,19c yd
llYzC yd
21c yd
36 inch Percale
27 inch Calico ...
27 inch Gingham
36 inch L L Muslin ...10c yd
36 inch Blea. Muslin W/i yd
9- 4 Sheeting
10- 4 Sheeting..
27 inch Outing
67c yd
...69c yd
..27c yd
Boys Khaki Coveralls 1.48 pr
.1.49 pr
.1.69 pr
.1.49 pr
.1.98 pr
.3.98 pr
33 1-3 off
Boys Overalls
Youths Overalls
Mens Overalls ...
Mens Overalls ...
Mens Coveralls
Ladies Coats .
Childrens Coats 25 per cent
Ladies Dresses 33 1-3 per
cent off.
off.
Ladies Hats 50 per cent off
Ladies Sweaters 25 per cent
off.
Ladies Waists 25 per cent off
Lea Vests 25 per cent off
Overcoats 25 per cent off
Sweaters 25 per cent off
Wool Shirts 25 per cent off
Wool Underwear 25 per cent
off.
Golden Rule
Merc. Co.

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