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American Falls press. (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, December 09, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063041/1921-12-09/ed-1/seq-6/

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Consolidated With The Power County
Hews and Rockland Times.
Published by
THE PRES8 PUBLISHING CO., Ltd.
K. E. Torrance, Editor and Mgr.
i
I
be
for
ity,
ey
Official Paper of American Fall* and
Power County.
,
j
Entered at the Postoffice at American
Falls, Idaho, as second class mall
matter.
Subscription, $2.00 per year, payable
1 b advance.
I
TAXEN ARE HIGH THEY ARE
HIGHER ELHEWHERE.
Taxes are high. We make an awe
ful fuss when we pay them. Vitupera
tions flow when we see the statement
for next year. Wow! Lead us to the
tax eaters .
But listen. We're lucky, very lucky
indeed even fortunate. Out of seven
teen cities of the size of American
Falls, In the state, our tax ia lowest
with one exception. That Is our neigh
bor, Malad. Out of all the counties In
the atate, wo are lowest with the ex
ception of one. The state tax Is the
same In all. The federal lax Is also the
same. The city and county tax In
.
some counties end cities Is twice as |
large as our own. j
Considering our excellent roads.
our fine schools, our farm bureau aei ]
vice, and the cooperation and service
we gel from our various departments
of county, state and municipal govern
ment, wo are In a remarkably favored
situation regarding taxes.
They should he lower—that's true.
They will ho lower If you and your
neighbor and all of uh Inalst that they
be lower. The county commissioners
have done remarkably well In keeping
down the taxes and should be com
mended for their efforts. The county
officials are keeping running oxpenscs
unusualy low. In this they ure un
doubtedly setting a worthy and ap
preciated example,

CHARITY BECOMING
TOP HEAVY.
Five charity drives durlug the last
eight week« Impresses one with the
present top heavy condition of the
business of gt\lug Five organizations
are doing what might hotter he done
by one. Five men or women aro do
ing what perhaps eould more efficl
clently bo done by one. Five organi
zations with their field secretaries gen
eral offices, paid organizers, and largo
individual overhead ure collecting
money In the name of charity for the
relief of the distressed. The burden Is
too heavy. People will not. In fact
are not, contributing to such a complU
sy* am
C 0 ?nty wlthT.""^ tU" lUdlef
Campaign for wheat P»rmers were
asked to give a bushel or ten ushels
to famine stricken Russia or the l a
kR .T„? 1 A^m *1 mm for the li«.me
s s&tsKS£ B
SSESiE
the relief of Tuberculosis. All are
meritorious and deserving of support.
säsKSä
er for It. The Salvation Army oh
tallied a very small .quota, probably
dld not i*ay the ex lieuses of sending j
h campaign director here The
$
Furniture Lasts
x
x
X
I
That is why it is most desirably for Christ
Nothing perhaps brings more joy and
mas.
pleasure to the home than a SONORA and
Several Good Records. Hear and see us Dem
I
x
X
onstrate it.
No matter what it is—so long as it is fur
niture—we have it for you.
Barton Furniture Co.
] Cross collected a reasonable tol> for
Its merciful work. And hundreds of
dollars of Christmas Seals are being
sold
i There should be a clearing house for
I Charity somewhere. In time there will
be so forceful a reaction that the so
licitation of funds by so many sepa
rate organizations will ruin the Held
for all. Let us have organized char
ity, but let us not spend so much mon
ey and so much time In duplicating
work and effort.
Missionary work is fine -- we do not
criticise It ut all, but we simply can't
overlook many of our own sad little
hairns at home, and the costly me
thod that ia used to raise the money
that we send away from home.

KEEP THE TROOP
(«ROWING.
Nine new recruits during the past
two weeks speak volumes for the
change in moral In Troop "A" of the
Idaho National Guard and the rosy pos
, slhlllttea of the Future mouths,
j The troopers merit a united support
from the people of the town. Their
presence here Is a tangible benefit
and booat to American Falls and they
should at all times be regarded as
such.
I
HOW EVERY MAN
FAN HELP.
How many of you men under whose
eyes these words fall, know of u boy
Just growing up who seems to have
no ambition; who either goes dolly
through his days or Is plainly as
reckless of tho things of tomorrow ns
he was of the tilings of yesterday.
Are you, who knows such a boy, too
busy, h1i\ to take a real Interest In
that growing young follow? Don't you
. know that what, that hoy needs as
| much aM anything else at his stage In
j Hf 0 ) 8 a friendly advance from some
|, ()( |„ 0 1«1 «t; that he needs advice not
] K | von n8 mere ndvlce but quite plainly
from a sincere desire to be of HER
VICE to him nnd to his future?
Don ot feel that the boy's father and
his mother are enough. God knows
that they try to do their best by their
boy, hut the fact is father and mother
have been advising and governing hint
al his life und the young felow takes
It from them as a matter of mono
tonous duty and dul home routine.
When he Is 1« to 18 or 19, he needs
something more; he needs a rub from
the would without, and If the vub is
friendly, good-natured and manly all
the hotter for the hoy.
Man, tho touch you give that hoy
acquaintance may mean a good citizen
or a bad citizen a few years hence.
Eoregt his surliness; forget even seem
ing stupidity —they may he murks that
eover the yearning for an understand
ing heart.
Hut whatever you do, Mr. Busy Man,
take notice of your neighbor's growing
tioy when he Is In your vicinity or
when you meet him. A cheerful wor
and a smile wll go a long wuy even If
you haven't time to stop anil talk to
him uh one man to another.
-♦-
HOMEY PHILOSOPHY Hill 1921.
the
do
the
Is
fact , rHm . 4 , , M H , HVury whercaoevei
ex , HlH Ab nn example, tho
Ignorant Russian masses are Hlaves or
and
J^ d on the other hand, there I«
m q tor lgnopuno# ln u demo
cr#cy where all men are equal, every
'»*" «hould Iks educated lu order that
»äääm
5ÄÄÄ
are th *J r liKl " u * l J *' voU '
wl11 kpeed tty put au end to that.
» j» « »•. .rrsas
oh- i' 1 " 1 time und a half iwy for »\ertiin
*«>U0ea the railroad men to make ,x
j tra efforts to get trains in when the
***•
Poem h?
Uncle Jofcn
«I
bi
THE JOY OF TRAVELER'
Every bend in the road brings a vision of joy to the heart that's in tune
with the ride; The reward measures up to the means we enjoy, as we
treasure the things that abide ... And the distance we go as our vis on
expands, lends judgment with wisdom replete, if we pause not to wail at the
uncertain sands, which cumber the way-farer's feet.
So onward and upward we travel each day, unconscious of shadder or
, While the starching of love adds its wealth to the way, and
ripeness gives strength to the years. . . When wisdom encounters the
bend in the road, no grim disappointments ensnare,— Tis only the wean
ling that bends from Ihs load, or slnksin the Bands of despair
tears
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à J £>r #-» firs'
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*
American Kail« Idaho,
Dec. 3, 1921.
Mr. Editor:
In reply to Mr. Peterson's letter of
the 22nd of last month relative to clos
ing the creamery, I agree that some of
what he said was true about the man
agement, especially relative to the
keeping of accounts. Some time in
June tho Creamery board turned over
the entire management to Mr. Drost.
At that time we were making between
three or four thousand pounds of but
ter a week.
Strom set up a set of books for Mr.
Drost.
I insisted that the directors meet at
least once a month and Mr. Drost was
to furnish us a record in condensed j
form of what was done for the pusl
. ,
am.cream receipts had ... way |
off. Mr. Drost had it figured out if we
At that time Mr. Wenn
month.
We met about the last of September!
could hold the last half of September |
cheek we would lie able to pay up our
entire Indebtedness, and have about
... ;
four hundred dollars to divide up j
among the patrons on their next check.
In about a week afterward Mr. Drost
called me up saying he was short at
n
CHRISTMAS
SUGGESTIONS
i
•*:* v*;*v t i
:
x
x
A
t.
i
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:*
V
!
A
V
X
X
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X
A Different Kind of
A Christmas
$
Most all Xmas suggestions are about GIVING. t
We all know it is more blessed to GIVE than re- |
eeive. „ ,
However, one must first GET to GIVE—and it s
abuot the getting we talk.
We have two Christmas Suggestions for every
body in American Falls this year.
FIRST—To do away with that scrimping and
scheming to get through your Xmas list—Start
NOW to thinking about our Christmas Saving Club.
It is organized for the sole purpose of relieving mon
ey anxiety at Xmas time.
' SECOND—What could be more appropriate than
first deposit to Christmas Fund membership as a
gift to some member of your family or intimate ; ;
friend. 11
Maybe a bank account in our regular Saving De ; ;
partment would please better. A $1, $2, $5 or $10 de- ; ;
posit and we will furnish a bright new bank book— : :
and it makes an ideal Christmas box.
x
x
X
I
I
x
X
a
First National Bank
+♦
+
■ H I Mi l
+++•
+++
+++++

, .
the Hank and they were turning down
the checks. I went down and put a
two hundred dollar note in the bank
for the Creamery to check against.
We then became suspicious and we
hlred Mr - ,3rowu to Btral B h r tea °" 1 J" B
(Mr. Drost's accounts. We told him |
to go to the stores and get their ac-|
counts from the time Mr. Wennstrom ,
started the books for him. Mr. Brown i
found him absolutely square as far j
as appropriating any money wrong
fully. He didn't seem to be a , e 4 i
keep his cream records straight..
There's where the greatest part of the
mismanagement came ln. I admit that
it was a hud bargain that Mr. Drost
more
j to.)
. , „ _ _ _ . .
agreed to furnish Swift & Co. twenty
thousand pounds of butter at a Bet
price at about the time cream produc-1
tlon began to fall off. After furnish
tug ten thousand pounds he got oil.
So that doal that Mr. Peterson spoke
of didn't hurt us. We got a bettet
price from Swift (and we sold him
afterward than we did to any ot
the commissioned merchants we soul
wonders why we did
not get a better market than sel
, ling our butter here and there, thru
| merchant«. ! will nay
Mr. Peterson
that we were obliged to sell where we
| coul( j get t j, e quickest returns in or-|..
^ U) t money to p ay f or the cream,
; us we could not raise a dollar In the
j i )an ij g . Several times we could have
slll . )pe( j witl h the Caldwell Creamery
ftnd made high as eight cents
_
pound more than we were getting, but
couldn't wait a month or six weeks for
returns.
I claim the reasons for failure, 1st—
Lack df money to carry on business
so as to get the best price for the but
ter. 2nd—-Everything we had to buy
or labor done cost us nearly twice
what It should. 3rd—Lack of loyal
support in some of the men that sign
ed up cows. This is the kind of sup- |
port we got from some. We gathered
cream on a route out of Aberdeen. We
came to one man who had signed up
two they had signed up and said they
pounds of cream a week. The woman
said they were milking six cows but
would only 'furnish cream from the
two they had signed upand said they
were about dry. She admitted that
they were selling eight gallons of
cream a week at Aberdeen.
Then in organizing they were not
careful enough in having all the pa
pers signed and taken care of. One
man signed up five cows but refused
,p a t ron | 2e U8 unless we paid him
j or jjj g cream ag jt came in. The board
decided to make an example of that
man but COU ](j not find his contract.
Mr. Peterson says the Creamery paid
ithe market price part of the time. I
| w jjj we p a | d the market price all
^ y me ftn( j m ore some of the time,
, except the last c h e ck. I will say the
i parons that patronized us from start
j finish altho they lost the last check
we are n ot able to pay, but on
i the w j WJ i e th e y are ahead on account
| Q j t j ]e creamery running this summer.
Ag p r j ce 0 f cream was held up in
th , 8 locaWty beUer than any other lo
. callty In the state, except the Farmers
creamery a t Nampa and Caldwell. The
j price of butter fat went up 2 cents as i
soon ag we advertised to start up the
creamery an d i don't need to tell the
patrons where It wont to as soon as
i we clo8e< j
jj r p e t e rson says that the ranchers
1 were no t to blame for not patronizing
(lg We caled a meeting of the pa
j runs at Rocland about a week before
; we dosed in order to talk over with
i them the situation and 'find out what
■ >
f
< •
all
For your family 9 s sake
Make no mistake
a
- •
A ?
Use Yellowstone and
Sunny Valley Flour for
Best Results.
i
r
V
t
The Oneida Elevator
Distributors
AMBROSIA
;
11
;
;
:
"The Best
You Can Buy
For The Dough"
I
Made in American Fails by
T
American Falls Milling
Company
I
%
they wanted to do and only two came
out.
I ert.111 believe that the Creamery at
the Falls could be made a success by
some man that understood the business
and is not afraid to work.
Yours truly.
|
E. E. GEESE Y
13 Years Ago
Taken From the Files of The Press of
December 12th, 1908.
HEW STOKE.
F. A. Bussell expects to open his
store Monday. It will occupy the new
building adjoining the Auditorium,
and will be known as the Queen. His
opening stock will include a large line
of Christmas Goods. His regular lines
will include furniture, dishes, under
wear, notions, stationery, and con
fectionery. Mr. Russell began build
ing about six weeks ago, on a tempor
ary building 25x60, which he will oc
cupy until next summer, when he ex
pects to remove It to the rear of his
lots and put up a substantial struc
ture, using the present building for
a warehouse. He has a good location
and should enjoy a good patronage
from the beginning.
Miss Ella White returned from Po
catello Sunday.
J. L. Burke left for Portland yes
terday to make his home there. He
says his father has improved rapidly
since going there. *
Mrs. Duncan Mlaclnnls left for Pasa
Oalifornia, Wednesday even
i
spring,
delta,
lug, having ben called there.by the
illness of her daughter Jean, who is
attending school there.
J. D. Heppner, of Darfur. Minn ,
left for home Wednesday night after
having made a homestead filing,
also purchased forty acres adjoining
his homestead. He will return in hte
He

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