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American Falls press. (American Falls, Idaho) 1907-1937, May 19, 1922, Image 1

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American Falls P
i
Consolidated With The Power County News a nd The Rockland Times.
VOLUME XXII.
AMERICAN FALLS, POWER COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY, MAY 19, 1922.
NUMBER 3L
ELEVEN BID ADIEU
TO HIGH SCHOOL
HALLS THIS EVE.
SENIOR CLASS TO RECEIVE DI
PLOMAS AT HANDS OF DR. R. F.
NOTH, CHAIRIMAN OF SCHOOL
HOARD — COMMENCEMENT AT
AUDITORIUM THEATRE.
ALL PLAN FOR COLLEGE
Six Girls and Five Boys Included—
Attorney Maurice M. Myers To De
liver Commencement Address—MJss
Mary Pryde Valedictorian.
44444444444444444



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM. *
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4

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Orchestra, March, "Idealistic"
Invocation, Mr. Chas. Johnson
Salutatory Address ..


*


*
...Elna Coon
Girls Glee Club, "Amaryllis".
Orchestra, Overture, "The
Benefactor."
Address to Class..
.- Mn Maurice M. Myers
"Girls Glee Club, "Greeting
To Spring."
Valedictory Address.
*

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4

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... Mary Pryde ♦
4
Presentation of Diplomas .
.. Dh R. F. Noth
4
4
4
4
National Hymn
Benediction
4
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4
44444444444444444
The class of 1922 A. F. H. S. will
pass Into history tonight when eleven
seniors receive their diplomas at the
hands of Dr. R. F. Noth, chairman of
the American Falls School Board. The
class is of good size and representative
of local quality in every way. In the
class are six girls and five boys, the
latter bearing a higher percentage in
numbers than usual. They are the
Misses Alys Howard, Clara Cotterell,
Janet Schlitz, Mary Pryde, Fern Spaic
ing and Elna Cpon and Rolon Allred,
John Matson, Edwin, Staurt, Vard
Meadows and Wm. Isaak.
Every one of the eleven have mani
fested the intention of continuing
, school at a University, Normal School
» , or college. Some may bi unable to go
this fall but all firmly intend to from
at least one to ffve years The pro
gram tonight is as putlined above, At
torney M. M. Myers' delivering the ad
dres of the evening.
Miss Elna Coon.
Miss Elna Coon, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Coon of Americau Falls.
She spent four years in A. F. H. S.
and won many honors both scholasti
cally and in athletics. Last year she
was a guard of the state champiouhlon
basketball team. Scholastically she is
excelled only by Miss Pryde. She will
give the salutatory address at the Au
ditorium Theatre this evening. She
played the character of "Tung Waga"
m the well presented operetta, the
"Yokahama Maid.".
Miss Coon will attend the Idaho
"Tech" at Pocatello this sumer.
Miss Janet Schlitz.
Miss Janet Schütz, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. C. F. Schütz, will stay at
home this summer and join her sister
this fall at Ohio Weslyn University at
Deleware, Ohio. Specialized in scien
tific courses and will study music and
art
"Yokahama Maid" and was a member
of the basketball squad.
Miss Fern Spalding.
Miss Fern Spalding, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Paul Spalding. She pians to
go to summer school this summer at
Albion Normal and teach school this
fail. Next year she plans to attend
college.
She played "Kiss-a-Me" in
(Miss Mary Pryde.
Miss Mary Pryde, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Wm. Pryde of ' Reliance,
Wwoming, concludes her four years
with the highest scholastic marks in
her class. As a result she won the
right to deliver the valedictory address
at the commencement exercises this
evening. Miss Pryde was never tardy
at school in her life. She has not
been absent from her classes for two
years, a most remarkable record. Miss
Pryde will attend summer school
this summer and teqeh this fall.
She specialized in the classical course
while in High School and when she
continues her education at college she
will feature Education and teaching.
Rolan Allred.
Rolan Allred, son of Mr .and Mrs.
Irvin Allred. Only student to grad
uate from high school in three years.
Excellent student. Winner of foot
ball letters in junior and senior years.
Was graduated in Scientific course.
Plans to attend University of Utah and
specialize in industrial and commercial
chemistry.
Miss Clara Cotterel.
Miss Clara Cotterel, daughter of
Mrs. Mary Cotterel of American Falls.
Iq high school four years. Special
ized In business and commercial sub
jects. Plans to attend University of
Utah next fall.
Miss Alys Howard.
Miss Alys Howard, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. W. W. Howard of American
Falls. She will work this summer at
the First National Bank and attend the
University of Idaho at Moscow this
fall where her slater Freda is already
enrolled She specialized In business
courses in high Bchool an<l at college
will take up business and commerce
and music. She played basketball three
years and in 1921 was squad captain.
J
MURTAUGH DISTRICT TOTES
FAVORABLY QN BONI) ISSUE
An Indirect Endorsement of Big Irri
gation Bonding District.
Twin Falls, Ida., May 16.—By unan- [
lmous vote yesterday those interested
in the development of the Murtaugh j
Irrigation district including the fa
mous Ransén Butte, voted $3.700,000 in j
bonds to provide for the securing and i
delivering of water to the 37,000 acres
within the project.
The Hansen Butte project is not
within the proposed big irrigation dis
trict,' but depends for its full success
on the construction of the great Amer
ican Falls dam the erection of which
would be assured by the creation of
the big district. The Murtaugh irriga
tion district has assurances that if the
big dam should go it can buy water.
Hence, indirectly, but none the less
truly, a vote for the big irrigation dis
trict is a vota, for Hansen Butte devel
opment
bring hundreds of families and much
capital to Twin Falls county to help
reduce taxes and increase all values.
to
of
This development would
THIS WEEK PUN
Reclamation Officials Striving to Have
Documents Ready For County Com
missioners by Saturday—Twin Falls
People Working.
The' end. of the week hgs been set by
Reclamation officials and the man
agement of the Idaho Reclamation As
sociation, as the final date for submit
ting the irigation district petitions to
boards of county commissioners pre
liminary to the call for election for
the formation' of an Irrigation district.
Petition« for the Aberdeen Spring
field tract have been ready for ten
days or more. Twin Falls district just
began the circulation of hers the first
of this week and slow progess is re
ported in the upper valley. Practical
ly all the districts are strongly in fa
vor of thé formation of the big bond
ing district but action in many cases
is slow.
on
It
is
HOSPITAL DAY OBSERVED AT
BETHANY DEACONESS HOSPITAL
Nyringa Club Remembers OeeiiHslon
And Holds Regular Meeting
There.
Friday was national hospital day,
the occasion being observed in due
form at American Falls which has
probably one of the best hospitals in
the state of Idaho.
The Syrlnga Club which has fur
nished a room at the hospital for sev
eral years held It« regular meeting
there and entertained the nurses and
manager in loyal fashion. The hospi
tal was especially decorated for the
occassion and presented its usual
bright and cheerful appearance.
COME FOR COMMENCEMENT.
Mrs. Charles Cotant has as her
guests, Mn and Mrs. Wm, Pryde of
Reliance, Wyoming, and, Mrs. John
Christie of Rock Springs, Wyoming.
They are here to witness the gradu
ation of Miss Mary Pryde, daughter of
the former, who delivers the valedic-1
!
j
j
tory address tonight.
at
at
to
at
Wm. Isaak.
Wm. Issak, son of John D. Isaak,
was exempted from his senior exami
nations and is working now for money.
to attend Gooding College next fall.!
His course was classical and he will j
likely pursue the same course atl
Gooding. During his last year in A.
F. H. S. he made letters in football j
and basketball being a stellar player ;
on both teams. In addition he is
boxer of unusual ability. He played
the masculine role In the "Yokahama
Maid' 'and revealed unusual tallent in
in
!
John Matson. !
John Matson, son of Mrs, Mary Mat- 1
son of Salt Lake City. Graduate in the
scientific course, attended A. F. H. S.
four years. Won seven athletic letters
three in football, three in basketball
He will work In ' a
.
that operetta.
in
and one in baseball.
Salt Lake City this summer and then ]
attend either the University of Idaho 1
or the University of Utah this fall. He
will specialize in a course of business j
and commerce
Edwin Stuart.
Edwin Stuart, son of Mrs. Mabel
Stuart. He will work on a ranch this
summer and may go to the University j
of Idaho this tall. He wants to spec- j
ialize in mining engineering,
tended A. F. H. S. four years in the
scientific course. S'tuart was selected
by a committee of coaches for all con- j
ference guard in basketball where he
made an unusual record. He was cap- i
tain of the 1921 football team, one of!
the best aggregations ever turned out,
at American Falls. He made numer- i
ous letters in all branches of athletics '
and is regarded as on-e of the best I
athletes ever* turned out of " the local :
high school.
He at
of
of
Vard Meadows. >
Vard Meadows, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Meadows of American Falls
He attended A. F. H. S four years ;
wininntg letters each in basketball and
football. ' Was basketball captain In
1921, and president of his sophomore
and senior classes. While in school
he played a leading part in six oper
ettas and plays the last being the
"Yokohama Maid,
ual voice and plans to feature music
in *college. He will work on his
father's ranch this summer and attend
the Univerlsty of Utah next fall, spec
ializing in some branch of engineer
ing.
at
the
He has an unus
PLUS MES, WOMEN
NEED OF WORLD
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Professor Lewis of Idaho Technical
Institute Tells Senior Class the De
mands of the Age-Must Do (More
Than Expected
Men and women, if they are to be
successful must dp more than they are
told, must educate themselves to
meet rapidly changing issues, and must
let their thoughts dwell on the good
and great things of life continually,
according to Prof. Lewis of the Idaho
"Tech" who delivered the Baccaiaueate
sermon at the Auditorium Theatre
last Sunday morning.
A man may do only what he is told,
but if he does nothing but what he is
told he will most certainly be a failure,
said the speaker. He warned the grad
uating class that its members muet be
ready and willing to do much more
than was asked of them if they were
to be real successes, in life. They
must be men and women plus, to mea
sure up to the standard need« of the
world.
He stated that educated men aud
women were needed more than ever
before and that the rapid progress of
science, industry and commerce de
manded keener intellects than ever
before.
The theatre was well filled with an
attentive audience of students and
friends of the graduates. The churches
of the city participated in the service.
GOLFERS TRY OUT NEW LINKS
AT INDIAN SPRINGS COURSE
Five Holes Ready for Play, Others
Rapidly Nearing Completion.
The arrival of an ample supply of
golf balls and equipment has added
considerably to the enthusiam of local
golfers who have been practicing daily
on the few holes that are ready for
play at the Indian Springs course.
Complete equipment, including balls,
beginners clubs and reasonably priced
bags are being offered to charter mem
bers at very reasonable prices, an
item that was causing some concern
until the low cost was ascertained. It
It is believed that champion Von Elm
will be In the city soon to try the
course that he laid out a mouth ago.
FRESHMAN HAVE BEST RECORD
IN YEAR'S ATTENDANCE
Ten Members Were Neither Aliskret
Nor Tardy During Year- Twbitty
Two In All Score in Lincoln
Building.
The freshman class of High School
leads all classes in attendance records.
Ten of its members having never mis
sed a day or been tardy« They are
John Dahlen, Harold Mtsepheime'r,
Truman Pennoyer, Elizabeth Dibble,
Wm. Hanson, Laura Mae Johnson, Joe
Wagner, Lila Armstrong and Wm.
Wraspir and Howard Blackburn. The
records in the other classes are as
follows: First grade', Anna Mehihaff;
second grade, Kate Smith and Edward
Houdyshell; third grade, none; fourth
grade, none ; fifth grade,. Freddie
Meuhlen and Charlotte Jones; sixth
grade, Alberta Confer; seventh grade,
none; eighth grade, Ada Dibble and
Lucille Thornhill; tenth grade, Helen
! Wraspir; eleventh grade, none;
j twelfth grade, Janet Schütz and Mary
j Pryde.
,, . _
District Supervisor Howell of Den
j ver. representing the Loyal Order of
Mo ° 8 e, addressed the brothers of the
order at American- Falls, Tuesday
j evening in Wagner hall. A good crowd
; responded to the speaker anti enjoy
social hour in the lodge rooms,
DISTRICT SUPERVISOR HERE.
BANK MAKES IMPROVEMENTS.
The First National Bank is now well
! located in its new home. Considerable
! remodeling was necessary to make
1 room for added equipment and sate
room. A directors roome was built in
the alcove over the main floor of the
room and is nicely furnished with the
««ice furniture of the old First Nation
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Home Sweet Home" For Our Doughboys
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American troops step lively on the long miles of Germ*a roads as
leave Coblenz on their way back to the land of liberty. Soon they
b« back with their (ciks who» maybe, won't be glad to see them.
DOUGLAS AWARDED
Bid Was Fifty Cents An H*>ur—
Police Order Would Keep Cows Off
.Streets And Sidewalks in American
Falls.
Tim Douglas will do the sprinkling
for the city during the coming sum
mer provided he can meet the terms
of the contract presented by the city.
His bid was 60c an hour and covers
day and night work as needed. The
contract was let at a Special meeting
of the council Tuesday evening.
A police order was ordered drawn
to regulate the picketing of
within the city limita,
hopes to prevent cows from bothering
pedeatrains on the sidewalks
hides on the street.
cows
The council
or ve
MOTHER'S DAT PROGRAM
GIVEN AT L. D. S. CHURCH
Every Mother Presented With Cana- j
tlon by Members of Sunday School
An interesting program in remem
brance of mother was given at the L.
D. S. Church Sunday. Every mother
present was presented with a carna
tion. The program follow«:
Reading by Bob Hartley; solo.
Chester Hall; Reading, Analee Kohl
hepp; selection, Girls Quartette; talk
by Mayor Jesse R. Budge of Pocatello;
presentation of carnations.
I
LENL1E DUTRO VISITS FRIENDS,
-
Leslie Dutro, who at the age of |
seventeen worked as a telegraph oper
ator at the American Falls depot, and
went to school with many of the
grownups of the city, returned to his
home town Sunday from Long Beach,
Californla. Mr. Dutro has invented
and secured patent for an oil cup that
is recognized as an unusual success in
the mechanical world. Reports are
that he has a strong company back of
him supporting the sale of his invèn
tion to the trade.
While in American Falls he had a
long visit with his cousin Mrs. Bert
Blackburn and family and with his
cousin Earl and wife of Pocatello who
came down Sunday to visit with him.
.Vlr. Dutro drove to American Falls
from Long Beach and expects to re
turn to Long Beach by way of Port
land.
HIGH SCHOOL GIRL NEVER
TARDY IN TWELVE YEARS
Miss Mary Pryde Has Exceptional Re
cord—Has Not Been Absent In
Two Years.
Miss Mary Pryde, valedictorian of
the high school graduating class, was
never tardy in her life. She has not
been absent from school during the
past two years. As far as is known
locally she has the world's record for
school attendance.
Miss Pryde is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Wm. Pryde of Reliance,
Wyoming, but formerly of American
Falls. She is an- exceptional student
and has earned a great part of her
way through school.
LADIES AID (MEETING.
The Ladies Aid of the M. E. Church
eet this afternoon at the home
Carl Johnson. \lrs. Johnson
will be assisted by Mrs. A. Rosander.
"mS'
m
of
MEMORIAL DAY COMING.
Tuesday, May 30th is Memorial Day,
nationally observed in the United
States. As yet there has been no an
nouncement of apropriate ceremonies
for the occassion.
WARM DAYS ARE HERE.
Some people are claiming that we
have gone from winter to summer,
their statement being based on the
last few warm days we have had. It
is fine growing weather and is bring
ing the winter wheat out in a very
satisfactory manner.
WITH PERFECT ATTENDANTE
Thinl Grad«' Leads Wltli Four With
Honorable Mention — None In
Second, Fifth or Sixth.
There were eight, students in' the
Washington Grade school who were
neither tardy nor absent according to
the school records. In the first grade
are Joe. I». Christensen, son of Mr. and
Mrs John Christensen, and Harold
Wennstrom, son of Mr .and Mrs. G. S.
Wennatrom.
There were none in the second or
sixth grades, but in the third, there
were Olaf Anderson, John Pennoyer,
Evelyn Dibble and Mary Wallis.
In the fourth grade John Wraspir
was the only pupil that had a perfect
attendance for the year. Randall Wal
lis with the only member of the 7th
grade to have a hundred percent at
tendance.
IT
ed
his
j
Lewis Williams Speaks to Audience in
K. P. Hall—Advocates Abolition of
State Constabulary and Cabinet Form
of Government.
O. W. «Pollard is chairman, L. L.
Evans, Sr., is treasurer and A. J. Clark
is secretary of the the temporary
Democratic taxpayers organization
formed at the K. P. Hall last night by
Lewis Williams former collector of
internal revenue for Idaho. The or
ganization will meet at the Auditorium
theatre in about three weeks to form
a permanent organization according to
Mr. Williams who left the city
Thursday morning.
Mr. Williams is organizing the state
He is dwelling at length on the in
crease in state taxes and endeavoring
to show that the present republican
administration is responsible for the
raise.
"I would rather have the chewing
gum and face powder concession at
the state capital of Idaho than be presi
dent of the First National Bank of
American Falls" said Mr. Williams
fallowing his statement that the cap
itol building was filled with pretty
girls and handsome men, the girls of
which spent at least six hours a day
powdering their pretty faces«
Indirect Taxes.
Mr. Williams dwelt at length on the
indirect taxes paid stating that the
tobacco laws of the state alope im
posed an $86,000 Indirect tax on the
people of the state, that the real estate
license took another twenty thousand
not to mention license fees for doctors
dentists and other professional men.
Mr. Williams credited "Teddy"
Roosevelt for bringing about the elec
tion of Woodrow Wilson in 1916 and
compared the two to methods and
ability. He charged that Senator
Frank Gooding had voted for the
seating of Senator Newberry not be
cause he approved of Newberry but
I because Wilson didn't want Newberry
seated. Mr. Williams cited the state
road bonds as an extravagant waste
and asked for a correction at the polls
this fall. He stated that there would
be no third party as far as the Demo
crats were concerned and charged the'
Republicans with already attempting
to start a third party.
Power To. Taxes.
Mr. Williams proved to be an ag-
gressive talker, and an ethical poli-
tician. He lauded his opponents in
of | politics individually but criticised
them collectively. He devoted a con
siderable amount of time to Power
County taxes and showed that they
had coat during the last four years
$166,861 more than during the preced
ing four democratic years. Between
thirty and forty people heard his ad
in dress last night
His platform which he alledgeB will
of correct all the tax evils is as follows:
Platform,
We should demand a complete abo
a lition of the cabinet form of goverti
meat.
his We should demand the abolition of
the state constabulary,
We should do what the last repub
lican legislature lacked the courage to
re- dp fix a reasonable limitation on the
bonded indebtedness that may be rais
ed by the smaller units of state gov
ernment.
We should also fix a reasonable lim
itation on the amount of money that
can 1 be raised for taxation purposes by
j the smaller units of government, and
I provide that before this limit can be
j exceeded there must be a two thirds
j affirmative vote of resident tax payers.
I We should enter into a contract with
the people to reenact the direct Pri
mary Law.
We should pledge ourselves to re
enact the Non-partisan Judiciary.
We should enact a saae and work
able law for the insurance' of Bank
Deposits.
We should provide for a reasonable
tax exemption on the value of real
setate Improvements, where the pro
t perty is actually used for a place of
domicile..
of
at
an
we
the
It
I
We should pledge ourselves to re
affirm our faith in thp principles of
the Initiative, Referendum and Recall.
We should organize the State High
way Department to the end that its
affairs may be administered in an
economic and efficient manner.
We should pledge ourselves to ex
tend financial aid to the farmers of
i this state by way of securing for them
I terminal elevator« for the purpose of
1 marketing their produce in an order
j ly and systematic manner.
We should pledge our Legislature to
I amend the tax law of the State of
j Idaho so that developed mines, as well
\ as other industries should pay their
j just proportion of taxes for County
I and State purposes.
UNKNOWN FRIEND
CAUSED FALL OF
IT COST THE LATTER #200 AND
THIRTY DATS IN JAIL—GUILTY
OF UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OF
LIQUOR.
FIRST TRIAL FAILURE
First Jury Disagreed And Stecond Trial
Holiday Was Result—Defendant Ap
prehended at Horse Island, Febru
ary 22nd.
Jack McMahan of Pocatello was fin
ed $200 and jailed for thirty days by
Judge O. R. Baum following his con
viction Wednesday of violation of the
federal liquor laws. The case was a
retrial following a disagreement in the
jury at the first trial March 30th. At
that time the jury stood nine for ac
quittal and three for conviction. At
torney Cotant retried the case' in the
face of an adverse verdict from the
first jury and won.
McMahan admitted that there wan
whiskey in his automobile when it
was stopped by Sheriff Hanson near
Horse Island February 22nd. He said
that it had been left in his car without
his knowledge and that he did not
know who put it in the car.
amount was a quart in a glass fruit
jar.
The
KFV. HUSTON TO LECTURE
ON PROHIBITION SUSDIT
A union meting of the Methodist
and Baptist Churches will be held at
the Methodist Church Sunday eveniag
at 7:30 at which the Rev. Huston will
give an address in the interest of the
anti-saloon league of America. Mr.
Huston held revival meetings in
American Falls last winter and has
many friends in the city who will wel
come him again.
i
BURTON L. FRENCH
Private Companies Have Been Show*
Greatest Consideration and Should
Now Manifest Willingness to Coop
erate for Mutual Benefit.
Pocatello, Idaho, May 17.—The fol
lowing letter from Congressman Bur
ton L. French emphatically confirms
the position taken by the Idaho Recla
mation Association that the future re
clamation development of south Idaho
hinges on the immediate, intelligent
and concrete support of the American
Falls reservoir project by our own ci
tizen«.
"House of Representatives,
Washington, D. C„ April 17,
"Mr. Guy Flenner, Managing Director,
Idaho Reclamation Association.
Pocatello, Idaho.
"My dear Mr. Flenner:
"I am in receipt of your recent let
ter bearing upon the Americau Falls
irrigation project and want to thank
you for keeping me advised as to the
progress you are making.
Companies Should Organize.
"In my judgment it is very impor
tant that the private interests includ
ed within the American Falls project
organize and be able to show the
government that they are ready to fi
nance their part of the undertaking,
"I think you understand that the
Minidoka extension includes only
about 150,000 acres of new land. This
being the case, it is the highest im
portance that those people who own
private lands who desire to have the
project carried through should or
ganize themselves into such a district
as will make it possible to sell the
bonds and raise money to meet the
expenses necessary in reclaiming the
lands of private individuals.
"The whole project thus compre
hends public lands to a limited ex
tent, private lands to a much larger
extent.
Federal Aid Liberal.
"We have been able to make what
I believe must be regarded as satis
factory progress in obtaining Federal
authorization for the expenditure of
money to take care of the public lands.
This, however, is conditional upon the
private owners of laud bearing their
proper share. The amount of money
available for reclamation is limited
in comparison to the demand for the
expenditure of such money,
has been fortunate in obtaining gen
erous grants for irrigation work.
"The American Falls project, how
ever, Is one that contains so large an
area of private lands that I am sure
you will pardon me for stressing the
idea of team work upon the part of the
private owners of land which can be
obteined only through organization.
"It would be most unfortunate' if
for any letting down on the part of
our Idaho people we should lose the
opportunity which I believe is im
mediately before us to have the Gov
ernment undertake the great work of
reclamation that means so much to
the southern part of the State.
"Wishing you every success, I am,
• ' Yours very truly,
BURTON L. FRENCH."
Idaho

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