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The Lamar register. [volume] (Lamar, Colo.) 1889-1952, June 07, 1905, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063147/1905-06-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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8 Pages
VOLUME XIX.
County Notes.
I From tbs Holly Chieftianl
O. M. Stanley was down from his
Kiowa ranch Monday. Ue says he
never saw so mnch rain in this coun
try. It is actually too wet to plant
seed. He thinks the ranchmen of
his section will be able to cut hay
from the range this year.
• ••
810 JOB.
C. H. Adams built a ten barrel
water tank for John Duncan the
first of the week. He was assisted
by Chris Clasen, John Gores, Hiram
Pettee, “happy Jack” Griffith, S.
Harden and several others.
* * *
P. E. Deweese and O. P. Lane of
Rocky Ford have rented the build
ing corner Cheyenne and Fourth
streets owned by Mrs. Wm. Simpson
ank fitted it up for a pool and bil -
liard hall. They have three pool
and one billiard tables, all brand
new, and have their place fixed up
very neatly. They will carry a
stock of cigars and all kinds of soft
drinks.
• • •
[From tbs Amity Optimist.]
Good farm labor is a very scarce
article in these parts just at present
and commands excellent wages.
Some of our farmers are going to be
badly handicaped when haying be
gins.
S • s
Colonel Higgins, chief secretary
of the Salvation Army, will arrive
tomorrow to confer with Colonel
Holland and Staff Captain Koerner,
upon matters of importance to the
colony now pending solution.
While W. F. Thero, the Holly
horse buyer, was driving on the road
leading north Saturday afternoon,
the neckyoke slipped off the end of
the tongue, causing the team to run
away. A fine mare broke her right
fore leg just above the hoof. No
one was hurt in the accident.
• • •
[From tbs Granada Times. 1
A. N. Parrish was a Granada vis
itor, yesterday.
. • •
Hopkins & Renick finished their
oontract on the XY ditch, yesterday,
and it is expected that water will be
run through the ditch today.
I
The Arkansas Valley.
The Sugar City factory is to be
enlarged to 1,000 tons capacity in
time for the 1900 crop. The propo
sition was favorably voted on at the
last directors’ meeting.
A Syracuse real estate firm is try
ing to put a little life into the busi
ness men there by offering {l5O to
wards the expense of putting a fresh
coat of paint on the business section
of the town.
The Mayor of Newdale was in
town last Saturday. He is just
resting up from the severe labor and
trial of replanting his entire crop of
cantaloupes, which were devastated
by the hail storm last week. The
mayor says that within thirty min
utes after the bail storm he had his
entire cantaloupe patch replanted,
and now has just as good a prospect
as he ever had. The mayor is
probably one of the swiftest agricul
turalists that ever came down the
pike in this section, and has a repu
tation for truthfulness almost equal
to that of Baron Munchausen.—La
Junta Tribune.
• • •
Mrs. F. R. Mathews brought up
two cans from the cellar the other
day and fed the contents to her Hock
of a hundred or more chickens. She
said the cans contained tomatoes,
but after witnessing the unseemly
conduot of the chickens the neigh
bors are rather skeptical, although
Mrs. Mathews is a strict temperance
woman, and would not permit even
a chicken to take on a jag. In a
short time after eating the contents
of the cans the entire tlock begun to
stagger around, stately old flock
matrons made attempts to crow,
roosters took possession of the nests
of setting hens, the young fry es
tablished a gymnasium on the lawn
and turned somersaults and attempt
ed to stand on their heads, and the
The Lamar Register
The Finishing Touch of a Nan’s
Education is
EXPERIENCE
and the more experience he has, the more finished his education.
So it is in the drug business. Years of experience, added to a
thorough knowledge of pharmacy, make a druggist more and more
proficient, and in the same proportion add to the safety and accu
racy with which Physicians’ Prescriptions and Domestic Recipes
are compounded.
THE UP-TO-DATE DRUG COMPANY
The largest institution of its kind in the Arkansas valley. Postoffice Building, Lamar, Colo.
belligerent ones soon turned them
selves into gladiators. Then all lay
down and went to sleep. At this
time a neighbor came along and
found the lady in tears over the sup
posed death of her chiokens, but he
had no difficulty in seeing that they
were merely sleeping off the effects
of their jag, and so comforted the
lady. The bibulous habits of these
chickens has brought discredit on
that part of town and the neighbors
are justly indignant.—Garden City
Herald. [Mr. Mathews often visits
Lamar, and this may account for
the strange notions caused by the
contents of those cans.]
• * *
The Las Animas Leader started
last week on its 33rd year. The
Leader is certainly the pioneer in the
newspaper field for the valley and
there are only a few older in the
state.
. • •
The city election contests have all
been dismissed and the aldermen de
clared elected at Canon City and
Rocky Ford will not be disturbed.
License wins at Canon City and no
license at Rocky Ford.
• • •
Last week the Rocky Ford country
hod the unusual experience of two
bad hail storms within three days.
The first came very suddenly Thurs
day night about eight o’clock and
covered a wide scope .of territory
but was not equally destructive in
all localities. The heaviest hail was
along the central part of the valley.
The cantaloupes, fruits and tender
garden vegetation suffered worst.
Sugar beets which had attained fair
size will doubtless come out all right
being only slightly delayed by the
pounding received.—Enterprise.
Empire Valley.
Mr. Ira Swadley is confined to his
room from au attack of rheumatism.
Little Allen Swadley, while at
tempting to climb into a pony cart
last Wednesday, in some way got
his right leg broken just above the
knee.
Some parties with a state license
for the catching and selling of fish
from the reservoirs are making pre
parations to supply a large territory
with fish this summer.
The Misses Georgia Thurston and
Vernie Stream are visiting the Coates
family and other friends at Amity
ville this week.
OFFICIAL 3;TB-SXrsr»Js.l»Eia OT CO'O’N'TT
LAMAR. PROWERS COUNTY. COLORADO, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 7, 1905.
Mr. Jesse Rose is attending the
oommenoment exeroises at his alma
mater, the S. W. Kansas college at
Winfield, Kansas.
But little haying was done last
week, owing to the unsettled weath
er.
A dance was given as an evenings
entertainment at the residence of W.
P. James, last Thursday eve.
Rio.
The Arkansaa an Ungrateful River.
The Arkansas river, says the Hut
chinson Bee, has always been called
tbe friend of southwest Kansas. We
have dug its sand out of our eyes,
watched it overflow our crops, con
tributed a few bridges to its maw, but
always stood by it. When the irri
gationists took its moisture out to
enrich eastern Colorado we took it
for granted that the river was not a
party to the robbery, that the water
was purloined while the river was
flat on its bed, so to speak. But
now that the state of Kansas is try
ing to regain from Colorado the pur
loined gems of radiant moisture, the
river refuses to turn state’s evidence
It has, in fact, become an accomplice
of Colorado, for every time the com
missioners go on a trip through the
valley securing testimony, the river
fills up on Colorado rainwater and
goes on a tear. Today the Colora
do investigators are holding a session
in Hutchinson before the United
States commissioner, and the Arkan
sas river is just neatly finishing a
eoup in which enough Colorado
rain was used to flush the river val
ley from the mountains to the Miss
issippi river. Inconsistent river!
And Why Not?
The value of advertising in all
forms of commercial activity is ac
knowledged. There is no longer
any need of putting forth that queer
old picture of our youth, represent
ing two faces, one wreathed in smiles
with “I advertise” issuing from its
mouth, the other —arrived at by
turning the first upside down—the
acme of disappointment and rage,
saying “I don’t.” It matters not
nowadays what you want to dispose
of, whether your corn, your whisky,
your hair or your voice, publicity is
the agent that does the trick for
you.
If this is true in business, why not
also in politics ? Is it unprofessional
that a man should urge his claims to
offioe in the newspapers at so muoh
per line? The practice is common
in the South, and is seriously re
garded. Now we find it in the state
of Pennsylvania, where a couple of
candidates for city treasurer of
Reading are using the advertising
columns of the local papers to boom
their campaigns. One of the con
testants thus sapiently discussses
the value of the scheme:
“No matter what the subject, if
you want the attention of the people
in general attracted to it the best
way is through the newspapers.
While it appears to be an innovation
I believe that political advertising
will beoome as universal, natural and
indispensable in making the candi
dates known and familiar to the peo
pie as by posters, letters, charts,
cards, buttons, etc., and that money
spent in that direction is money well
spent.
“One particular advantage in
newspaper political advertising is
that your announcement of aspiiing
to a high office in the gift of the
municipality reaches practically
every fireside within the city’s limits
and can be seen by that class of
voters who do not take an active
part in politics or get to places where
they are discussed and other adver
tising devices are displayed or pass
ed around. They seethe announce
merit and pledges in their own
homes.” —Boston Journal.
A New Era for the West.
The story is told of a Britisher
who yisited a friend in Montreal.
Tbe latter remarked that he was
compelled to go to Denver, and ask
ed the man from England to accom
pany him. The Englishman con
eented, and then asked how soon
they would be hack. When told
that it would take a lay to go from
Montreal to Toronto, a day and a
night from Toronto to Chicago, and
two days and a night from Chicago
to Denver, and the same length of
time to return, he said:
“I cannot go; I must start for
London tomorrow night.”
THE FAIR
Queensware
Glassware Chinaware
Granite ware Copper ware
The truthfulness of the story may
bo questioned, but the ignorance
that it portrays an to tbe size of the
United States is not overdrawn, nor
are tbe eastern citizens of this conn
try who are littleor no wiser as bard
to find as might be wished.
Year by year, however, the tide of
travel westward, for education as
well as for business, is increasing.
There is a growing desire in Arneri
cans to know more about Amorica.
And there is reason to believe that
the tendency will be observed in
constantly increasing strength until
an appreciation of the true import
ance of the west becomes general.
One of the transcontinential rail
roads has announced three daily
through Pacific coast trains for the
approaching summer, with the state
ment that the movement of people
westward to make tneir homes, after
they have been west to look the
country over, probably will make
this service pormanent. T|{» Lewis
and Clark Ceuteuial will be instru
mental in attracting tens of thou
sands of inhabitants to the western
states from eastern cities. To visit
the land of promise and see it blos
soming as the rose will be sufficient
inducement for many Americans
anxious to better their condition to
go in and possess it.
It is likely, also, that ths influence
of Theodore Roosevelt, though him
self born an easterner, yet a wester
ner of the most progressive type, is
turning aud will turn toward tbe
west the attention of multitudes who
until he became a national figure
never had given a thought to any
thing west of the Mississippi. His
interest in western projects and his
frequent visits to western states can
not fail to have the effect of a per
sonal indorsement of a strong west
eru movement,
With the railway facilities now
availiable and projected, with the
government aiding in converting the
desert lands into farms, and with the
most cultured families of the east
represented in every western com
munity today, the pioneer epoch in
the history of the west is ended. —
Colorado Springs Telegraph.
™ YvL Epoch-Making
SHOE
If you condense the last ten years] into paragraphs
describing woman’s progress, one of these would be
‘Queen Quality Shoes."
They are worn today by thousands of women who
find in them the Exact Duplicate of a Custom-Built Shoe.—
the same materials, fit and style, only at less cost The best
expert cannot tell the difference. To all appearances it is a
custom shoe to ordered measurements. Try it once
Boots $3.00 Oxfords $2.50
Special Styles 50c extra Past (Sslsr Eyelets ns#4 exclaslvsly
Our Queensware Department
Is complete and up-to-date. You can find just what
you were looking for. Come and see for yourself.
Our Prices Are Right
CHURCH BROS. & EVERETT
gift Cole’s Hot Blast Stoves
jAHsk Latest ImprovedJHeating and
Cooking Stoves are found at
H CARL BROS.
Also Carries a Large Stock of
Furniture, Hardware, Tinware, etc
8 Pages
NDUKI 58.

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