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The Lamar register. [volume] (Lamar, Colo.) 1889-1952, October 04, 1922, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063147/1922-10-04/ed-1/seq-6/

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REPUBLICAN TICKET
CONGRESSMAN GUY U. HARDY
JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT—
Long Term JOHN W. SHEAFOK
Short Term _ —— JOHN CAMPBELL
GOVERNOR - BENJAMIN GRIFFITH
LIEUT. GOVERNOR - ROBERT F. ROCKWELL
SECRETARY OF STATE CARL S. MILLIKEN
AUDITOR ARTHUR M. STONG
TREASURER HARRY E. MULNIX
ATTORNEY GENERAI WILLARD B. GORDON
SUPERINTENDENT KATHERINE L. CRAIG
REGENT CLARK G. MITCHELL
REGENT C. F. PARKER
STATE SENATOR - JOHN S. HASTY
REPRESENTATIVE N. GOMER JONES
COUNTY CLERK J. W. OVERSTREET
SHERIFF JOHN A. SIMPSON
TREASURER J. RUSSELL MAYFIELD
ASSESSOR A. J. DAVY
SUPT. OF SCHOOLS - - PAULINE GILBERT
SURVEYOR FRANK W. SMITH
CORONER DR. L. E. LIKES
COMMISSIONER 2D DISTRICT H. F. DECKER
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE J. T. KIRKPATRICK, A. DEETER
< (INSTABLES GEO. A. WATSON, JOHN R. BARNHILL
THE LAMAR REGISTER
Published Weekly by
GEO. B. MERRILL
Editor and Proprietor
Subscription price $1.50 per year
Entered at the Postoffice at Lamar,
Colorado, as second class matter.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1922.
S. S. Rally Day.
Last Sunday was rally day with a
number of the Sunday Schools of La
mar and the meetings of the day were
opened with a big joint gathering in
th« Central School grounds. The La>
mar band with a fine program of mu
sic helped materially in the success of
th; day, and the address by Rev. Oc
cur Grimes of the Christian church
was a feature of this meeting. The
Methodist, Baptist, Christian and Pres
byterian schools were represented in
the order named and all told the at
tendance at the four Sunday schools
totaled 1082. The Presbyterian showed
the largest per cent of gain, however,
and carried off the banner.
SSL
SSj]
Good Clothes
are not deceiving
They show their real worth
—when worn out as well as
when new.
Capps 100 Per Cent Pure Wool
Suits and Overcoats
$25 TO $5O
are good—not only at first, but
for a long time. Style and
quality are woven and tailored
into every garment, and they
are priced to meet the present
day demand. Money back
when you are dissatisfied.
Johnston’s
REPUBLICAN PLATFORM
Industrial Peace, Law and Order, and
I-awh Encouraging Agriculture
the Keynotes of the
Platform.
Denver, October 2. —In a platform
declared by political observers to be
the plainest, firmest and most satis
fying to all groups prepared in many
years, thr Republican Party of Colo
rado Sunday declared its plans and
principles for the approaching elec
tion.
A firm stand lor law enforcement
and the maintenance of the State
Rangers for tliis end is the first car
dinal point in the platform and the
issue in which it moat widely differs
from the democratic pla.form.
Calling attention to the fact that
the taxpayers have still to retire a
$1,658,000 debt contracted for past in
surrections, the Republican platform
points out that the Rnngcrs are a force
designed to prevent such violance by
acting in time. This is in striking con
trast to the democratic plan of allow
ing trouble to break first and then de -
claring martial law.
“The first duty of any government
to its people is to render them secure
in their persons, their employment
and their property,” the platform
states. "The right of every man to
work when, where and for whom he
chosen is beyond dispute. We pledge
the Republican party and its nominees
to see that every individual is pro
tected in these fundamental rights.
“All thinking citizens know that
since the enactment of this Ranger law
they have enjoyed industrial peace
without fighting for it. Our state
police force has been and will continue
to be a guaranty to our people that
peace will he maintained under any
and all circumstances.”
In its dealing with agricultural pro
blems. the Republican platform is abl>-
to point tc monumental achievements
in behalf of the fanner and purposes
further efforts to improve farm condi
tions if it is retained in power.
Recognizing in black and white that
“the prosperity of our state is depen
j uert on the prosperity of our farmers,”
the platform pledges the party in this
state to seven definite measures for
the farmer. These are the extension
of additional credits to fanners and
stockmen, state and federal loans to
finance co-operative warehouses, the
.strengthening of the cattle tubercular
law, state aid in destroying plant and
cuttle diseases, elimination of discrim
inulory trade practices, improvement
in tnmsportation, and the bringing of
the producer closer to the consumer.
As proof that the Republican party's
promises to the fanner are not false,
the platform points to the fact that
the present Republican administration
has loaned $1,000,000 to farmers and
reduced their taxation by courageously
enforceing law in the state. It also
ci-lls attention to the six great meas
ures passed by the present Republican
congress for agricultural relief.
Where the Democrats propose to
erect state-owned warehouses without
explaining where the money is com
ing from,the Republican platform pro
poses that the farmer own his own
warehouses thru co-operative associa
tions, and pledges itself to arrange
state loans to help to this end.
There are 14 other explicit points
in the Republican platform, beside?
peroration reviewing the enviable re
cord of both national a and state ad
ministrations under Republican control.
The platform declares for:
Laws to make advocacy of the de
struction of life or property a felony.
All measures for betterment of la
bor.
A living wage for workers.
The present industrial relations act
and workmen's compensation law.
Economy and efficiency in public of
fice.
Equalization of taxes.
Strengthening of state budget law.
A consittutional amendment prohib
iting the issue of tax einempt securi- ,
ties.
Rigid enforcement of the dry laws.
More and better highways.
Adjusted compensation for ex-serv
ice men.
Equal rights for women.
Legislation to make the Shepherd-
Towner bill effective in Colorado.
Highest standards in the public
schools.
Preservation of Colorado's right to
first use of its waters.
Keep peace in Colorado.
WANT OUR MARKETS
Foreign Manufacturers and American
Importers Are Grouchy About
Tariff.
European countries have been con
ducting a propaganda for over a year
against the enactment of an American
protective tariff.. In this they have
been aided by the international hank
ers in this country, the free traders
and the importing interests, all of
whom place the prosperity of Europ
ean manufacturers above the prosperi
ty of American manufacturers and the
welfare of American working men.
Since it became a certainty that a
protective tariff would be enacted this
session of Congress, European propa
gandists have redoubled their attacks
upon the United States and upon the
protective tariff. They are now claim
ing the tariff will ruin them and will
make it utterly impossible for them
to repay any of the loans made to
them by this government during the
war.
Metropolitan papers are reprinting
editorials from British, French, Ger
man, Italian and other European news
papers berating the United States for
protecting its own industries, safe
guarding its own markets and afford
ing steady employment to its own
workmen.
They denounce the tariff as a selfish
policy. This in face of the fact that
every European nation has written at
least one tariff (some of them have
written three or four) since the arm
istice, each one being higher in its
rates than the preceding one, until to
day, in many European countries, tar
iff rates practically amount to an em
bargo.
All of this propaganda is finding
ready echo in Democratic newspapers
and from Democratic members of Con
gress and other Democratic leaders
who are on the stump. They are all
fearful that the protective tariff is go
ing to throw some European working
men out of a job and deprive some
European manufacturers of a chance
to exploit the American market. Ac
cording to their theory, it is very self
ish for this country to adopt a policy
which protects its own industries and
its own working men. They would
have the country ‘altruistic” to the ex
tent that our working men would be
walking the streets, our manufacturers
without business, our American farm
ers without a home market for their
produce all in order that European
nations might fatten on our adversity.
In this connection it is very profit
able to recall the sentiments of Presi
dent Harding in his annual mes sage
to Congress last December, wher he
urged the enactment of a protective
tariff. In that message he took cog
nizance of just this propaganda and
gave his opinion of it thu6:
“Sensible of every obligation of hu
manity, commerce and finance, linked,
as they are, in the present world con
dition, it is not to be argued that we
need destroy ourselves to be helpful
to others. With all my heart I wish
restoration to the peoples blighted by
the awful World War, but the process
of restoration does not He in our ac
ceptance of like conditions. It were
better to remain on firm ground,
strive-for ample employment and h ; gh
standards of wage at home, and point
the way to balanced budgets, rigid
economies and rosolut®, efficient work
as the necessary remedies to cure dir
aster. • • •
“It is not an unworthy selfishness to
seek to save ourselves when the pro
—————
■Keep Peacein Colorado-1
II Griffith for Oovernor 1
GR.IFFITH \ J —7 / gu7U7 HARDY l\
7 For Oovernor r for Congressman District p
The question which the voters of mine the governmental structure
this state must decide on November to-day.
7th Is this: whether Colorado shall Preservation of peace is the plnt
contlnue on the forward path of In form on which the Republican
dunrrlal pence iiu! increasing pros- party securely stands, proud • ii«
perilv f'i nil ... ivlietlmr ii ahull nchlavenu.nl. cimfl.len. of Hr ft.
return lu .am-fllon. that hruunht "'«• De ? tr " " ver
. , \ ill vield when constituPotiul gov
“*»'*• r "‘" “ ..rnnirnt and the anf-i. ..r Hi. . .....
and ahal.r •« •■lllara cl*h. „ re il„.n
years hio that. It never permits a condition to
Colors it uss Dot yet paid ill full arise which puts the peace and hup
the price of the civil \\ur which id pine** of the people In Jeopard*
moat ,-auaa.l thr ~.,lh.|..r ..f thr tlHaw I, Hiar ; llrujai.iln llrif
atr.tr eminent In 1914. fllli, thr Republican ni.mlnrr for
.rear, ba .ua- ll.r ...liolnlalrutloi. |„ ... r
-aa onol.lr or unwllllnr ... pu. I|le „..,. ur | tv „ f
down ar.onl rebellion, thr rm.ro »o ~,, tll „
.dal fabrl. war ahakrn : .pen Ln „„. lhat |ir„|,„„hi flrlf
en and children uerralaln : ll.r 1..». ,« „ „ f „. orrt Th ,
Hi proper.} In «a*e» and In re.e Republican nominee, are
aua ran Inlo rhe million. .lea n. high-minded, and a 1.....
During its year of a.iffrrinu an.l Ideally fitl.-d to a..l»> Mr flrllftth
distress, .’olorado became in. i.ora in cl. Inc .'olorudo safe anil ..-nsl
■llae of .lie M.clal aaltalor ll.r rad hie i|Ovem>lM-n>.
leal, the disturber. The suiue forces They can be depended upon to re
which almost wrecked the state In *l*l any attempt foist socialistic
1914 are aguln attempting to under theories upon tins stale.
iiffifjSlS
jlfot
ARTHUA nSTONOj [HARRY E.MULNUt
for A editor r ° f TreaSUfer
S*GO PdJ^Ua THIRINE fxRAIG^
For fH /
I Attorney Oe- nerd j ( Public jn struct tor/
(for BegentS-University ©I Colorado '
CLARK G.MITCHELL C.F, PARKER
Rummage Sale
The P. E. O. Sisterhood will hold their Annual Rum
mage Sale this year on
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6 and 7
at the Eagles Hall. A large supply of second hand cloth
ing will be for sale at low prices.
cesses of that salvation are not only
not denied to other, but commended io
them. We seek to undermine for others
no industry by whicn they subsist; we
are obligated to permit the undermin
ing of none «»f our own which make
for employment and maintained activi- 1
ties. • * •
“Much has been said about the pro
tective policy for ourselves making it
impossible for our debtors to discharge
their obligations to us. If we must
choose between a people in idleness
pressing for the payment of indebted
ness, or a people resuming the normal
ways of employment and carrying tl.«
credit, let us choose the latter.”
Not Swivel-Chaiar Crowd.
Nobody is surprised at the announce
ment that several thousand swivel
chairs are for sale in Washington.
This is not a swivel-chair administra
tion, but you didn’t hear of any bar
gain sales of this kind between J 912
and 1920. —Kansas City Journal.
MONEY TO LOAN
We are now able to take care of
your farm loans. Drop in and see us.
Tavlor & Frick. Fli W. Gregg. Mgr
Rubber stamps; daters; 'seals. C. A.
Hansen, 112*4 South Main. Call af
ternoons.
ilgjjigjSj
KM• L/ / C rr*> L
|Tb
I Alright I
AB ■ mill!. veget..c’* lut.itiwo to
Iff! relieve Const;; a and BIU-
H outness and ki?cr t - !ig .-stive .oJ
•limlnstlvefum. c . nort..aL
-t. l cf fur C •<r ■
dD Lite. N?s
I ® ,le the B
dose. Mail! of
ttfr -ar..-
then candy coated.
children an! uduit*.^^^^B
w. A. ZIMMER DRUG CO.
Office door signs; enameled, brass.
Call and see sample. C. A. Hansen.
1121a So. Main. Any afternoon.
FOR SALE—Five Passenger Essex
Car. See W. J Johnston.

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