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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, September 30, 1904, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1904-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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'T
A Pioneer
WANT AD
Will Do It.
VOLUME 2. NUMBER E 139.
E
FINEST IN THENAVY
BATTLESHIP CONNECTICUT SUC-
CESSFULLY LAUNCHED AT
NEW YORK CITY.
BUILT IN GOVERNMENT NAVY YARD
TEST OF DEPARTMENT'S ABILITY
TO COPE WITH PRIVATE
ENTERPRISE.
New York^Sept. 30.As the bands
on the several warships at the navy
yard played "The Star ^Spangled Ban
ner" a new United States battleship
slid down the ways into the water and
Miss Alice AVelles, granddaughter of
President. Lincoln's secretary of the
navy, broke a bottle of champagne
over the vessel's prow, naming it
"Connecticut." Many thousands of
people witnessed the launching ot this,
the first battleship built in a govern
ment navyyard since the ill fated
Maine, large crowds gathering at the
navyyard and at various points on the
Manhattan and Brooklyn sides of the
East river.
The launching was without hitch of
any kind and was entirely successful.
The Connecticut is a sister ship of
the Louisiana and both vessels were
authorized by an act of congress in
1902. The Connecticut was built in a
government yard and under govern
ment supervision, while the Louisiana
was built by a private shipbuilding
firm at Newport ev,s Va. The con
struction of both ships has been lol
lowed with keen interest, as it was
recognized tluit it was a test of the
government's ability to cope with pri
vate enterprise. Much depended on
this competition of construction, lor ii
the Connecticut is completed bow
the Louisiana then most of the gov
ernment shipbuilding will be done
the latter and it is expected the New
York navyyard will be the shipbi/ld
ing center for government work.
The Connecticut when finished will
be the finest and most powerful boat
in the American navy and will rank
with the most powerful battleships of
the navies of other nations. Notwith
standing the fact that a new plant
to be created for the construction
the Connecticut this vessel is lui
per cent behind the Louisiana,
IBOUKH" litrCfao\yu \Tr7 nim*l"!-lfttf
The Connecticut is of steel, with
trial displacement of 16,000 tons anc1
a maximum displacement of 17,77
tons. The vessel is 150 feet on *V
load water line, 450.4 feet over
76.10 feet beam and 21.6 draught. T'-e
vessel is to be fitted for use as a flag
ship and when in commission will
carry 42 officers and 701 men. She is
not to exceed $4,212,000 in cost.
ACTION IN GURNEY CASE.
Judgment Vacated and Fines Imposed
Remitted.
Boston, Sept. 30.-After allowing
t|me for the communications in the
Phelps-Gurney case to reach Washing
ton Governor Bates has made public
various letters bearing on the subject.
The governor infoimed the state de
partment that the judgment against
Third Secretary Gurney ot the Biitish
embassy has been vacated and the
fines imposed remitted. He says that
Judge Phelps had expressed regret to
the secretary by letter, a copy of which
he forwards, together with a state
ment by Judge Phelps. Governor
Bates suggests that the attention of
the British ambassador be called .to
the breach of the laws of Massachu
setts under the belief that the ambas
sador will take such action as the
case may demand.
The governor also expresses regret
that want of knowledge of the law
has resulted in an error of judicial
authority in Massachusetts and ex
presses the hope that the statement of
regret by Judge Phelps may be recog
nized as a conclusive disavowal of any
Intention of Massachusetts courts to
ignore international law.
ASSASSINATION OF BOBRIKOFF.
8enator Schaumann Said to Be Impli
cated in Son's Deed.
St. Petersburg, Sert. .10.It is un
derstood in an authoritative quarter
here that strong evidence has been
discovered that former Senator Schau
mann, father of Eugene Waldemar
Schaumann, the assassin of Governor
General Bobrikoh, has boen found to
have been impli rued in the crime If
adjudged guilty he will bo subject to
imprisonment for two to sW yor.rs.
STEAL VALUABLE JEWELRY.
Bogus Telephone !r, ctors Prove to
Be Thieves.
New Yoil:, Sept. 30.Jewelry and
silveiwaro to the value of $15,000 has
been stolen within the past ten days
from twenty fashionable apartments in
this city by young men representing
themselves as telephone inspectors.
All the thefts took place in apartment
houses on Riverside drive and Central
park west in the exclusive residence
section of the city.
Wreck on New Haven Road.
Braintree, Mass., Sept. 30.A pas
senger train on the Plymouth division
of the New York, New Haven and
Hartford railway was wrecked on an
embankment about a mile west ot'
South Braintree. Engineer William
Adams wan killed and Fireman Ed
ward Cook had both legs taken off.
The passengers were badly shaken up,
fcut none of them were seriously hurt.
Large Number of Men Idle.
Meadville, Pa., Sept. 30.-The boiler
makers employed in the Erie railroad
shops here went on a strike during
the day. The men demanded the re
instatement of three members of a
committee who had been discharged
and on the reply refusing to grant the
demand a strike was ordered*. A
large number of men are idle. &*-
?,,r" '^'^^i\,'^sypp^e^f.^fHP
13 9
SEVERE FIGHTING
NEAR MUKDEN
RUSSIANS ABANDON DA PASS,
SOUTHEAST OF Ml'^fEN, TO
THE
Japs Drive in Kurepatkin,s Outpost
After a Severe Engagement But Rus
sian Troops Still at Mukden.
St. Peter?bur?, Sept. .'10Sharp fighting1
WAR DISPATCHES SUMMARIZED.
The Japanese have again resumed
the offensive and the dav's dispatches
indicate that sharp fighting may be
soon expected southeast of Mukden.
St. Petersburg hears that the Jap
anese have taken Da pass, a strategic
point in the mountain range about
torty-five miles southeast of Mukden.
Sevciiil other passes are now in their
hands.
it is believed in St. Petersburg that
Kuiopatkin is withdrawing his forces
to the less rugged countiy to the noith
west of Mukden, where he may de
cide to give battle.
Japan has amended her conscription
regulations in a manner which w.il
increase hoi available lighting lo
by about 200,000 men. A ne^ sclu .-0
oi dnibional oiganizatiou is also LU I
tem plated.
WITH LITTLE RESISTANCE
the result that the troops of Kuropatkin have forced, to retire from all outpost
positions. The General Staff declares that the Russian army is'still at
Mukden. No news is heard from Port Arthur.
lews has
Ikden io
have at
IQJ huve
ssing on
'this offi-
-ispatches
but the I
A&jjov.iFwcuf*-ia^oo I luiuiiaed by the!
genpial staff that all indications point I
to the news being coi reel. It is be
lieved the Russians abandoned Ua
pass without serious resistance. Sev
eral otiier passes of the Da range, I
east waul ot Bentsiaputze (twenty-five
miles southeast oi Mukden), are also
in the hands of the Japanese.
Kuropatkin is evidently diawing in
his iorces to the less mountainous
country northwestward, where he raaj
decide to give battle. In the mean-'
wnile snarp fighting is regarded as im
minent southeast of Mukden, whence
the Japanese are expected to deliver
their main attack, the flank move
men' iiom the west being of secondary
importance.
Da pass, or Ta pass, meaning great
pass, is situated about torty-five miles
southeast of Mukden and about the
same distance noitheast of Liaoyang.
It is about twenty-five miles south of
the Hun river.
The Japanese attacked Da pass,
which was occupied by the trooi of
Generals Mistchenko and Samsonoff,
on Sept. 24, but according to dispatches
rom Harbin were twice repulsed.
EMERGENCY ORDINANCE.
Japan Extends Service of Second Re
servists to Ten Years.
Tokio, Sept. 30.The emergency:
ordinance amending the army con
scription law was gazetted during the
day. It extends the service of the sec
ond reservists from five to ten years i
and abolishes the distinction between
the first and second reserve conscripts,
Reservists will be retired at the age of
thirty-seven.
A contemplated increase in the army
involves a new scheme of divisional i
has occurred near Mukden with
organization, the plan of which
not yet been disclosed.
At the foreign office it was stated
that the new conscription regulations
will augment the available Japanese
fighting force by about 200,000.
DUE TO DECAYING CORPSES.
Japs Around Liaoyang Reported Deci
mated by Epidemics.
Tie Pass, Sept. 30.The Japanese
armies mound Liaoyang are reported
to be decimal ed by epidemics, due to
decaying corpses,
The Japanese are said to have
dammed the Liao river above Liao
yang, flooding the country in order to
protect their left flank.
War clothing is being received by
tho Japanese from America.
Raiding parties from the Russian
army bring in many prisoners.
Beautiful autumn weather con
tinues.
Stopped by Jap Warships.
Chefoo, Sept. 30.The British
steamer Yiksang, trading in China
seas, arrived here during the day and
reported that she was stopped by a
Japanese torpedo boat destroyer out
Bide of the harbor of Chefoo. After
her papers had. been examined the
Yiksang was allowed to proceed.
Jap Warships Blockading Chefoo.
St Petersburg, Sept. 30.A special
dispatch received here from Chefoo
&ays three Japanese warships are
blockading Chefoo. This evidently is
under an agreement with China in. or
8or to prevent the possibility of any of
tho shins of the Port Arthur squadron
seeking retngo at Ghcloo. .-r~?^
Czar Will Go Hunting.
St. Petersburg, Sept. 30.Upon the
emperor's return from Southern Rus
sia he will go to his hunting lodge at
Bielovezh, on the border of Poland
between Vilna and Kieff, for a fort
night's shooting.
SWEEPING CHANGES MADE.
Sviatopolk-Mlrsky Slecomes Russian
Minister of Interior.
St. Petersburg, Sept. 30.Prince
Peter Sviatopolk-Mur&ky assumed ac
tive direction ot the ministry of the
interior during the day. It is already
apparent that there will be almost a
clean sweep of the old Von Plehve
regime. A number of the eM lieuten
ants willi the l'oi mer minister have
resigned Both the chiet of the gen
daimciie and the secretary of state for
Finland, which poweiful offices the
late Von Plehve accumulated, will bo
divorced from the ministry of the in
teiior, the new minister having firmly
refused to have any connection with
the polii M. Stischinsky, who, as
under spcretary of state pnd director
of the land department, acted in an
advisory c-aracity in dealing with the
Zemstvos. v. ill, it is understood, be
appoint'"! secietary of sl-ate for Pin
land. He is distinctly a man of mod
erate views. Geneial Rid/evsky, it is
also believed, will be rhosen chief of
the gendarmerie, which will become
an independent department. Rid
zevsky has just resigned the impor
tant position of chief secretary of the
minister of ther-imperial household in
order to be able to accept the position
of chief of the gendarmerie.
The speech of Prince Sviatopolk
Miraky nl his rpception of the officials
of the ministry of the interior is bound
to produce a deep impression in Russia
and be interpreted as the harbinger of
a mild and broad regime.
Will many Foreigners
Attend the St. Louis Fair?
Yes, thousands. They will come from
China, from Japan, from the Philippines,
from the interior of Asia and Africa and
Europe.
They will have their own little settlements
in which they will live just as they do at
home.
What's the best line to
ouis%
From St. Paul and Minneapolis the Rock
Island System is emphatically the best line
to St. Louis. Direct. Well built. Two
through trains daily. Reduced rates daily,
April 15 to November 30. ^$
Tickets at offices of connecting
7 lines or at '1^.,
322 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis
6th and Robert Sts., St. Paul.
W. L. HATHAWAY,
District Pass'r Agt., Minneapolis!
Wi
RockIsland
System
^*ppf T*r
The Bemidji Daily Piopeer
TO REPLY TO CHARGES
gONSUL GENERAL GOODNOW, AT
SHANGHAI, GIVEN PERMIS-
SION TO RETURN HdME.
DECISION IN CASE IS POSTPONED
OFFICIAL ALLOWED A PERSONAL
HEARING BEFORE MATTER
IS DISPOSED OF.
Washington, Sept. 30.Acting Sec
retary of State Loomis has cabled Con
sul General John Goodnow, at Shang
hai, permission to return immediately
to the United States to answer charges
preferred against him of maladminis
tration of the affairs his office.
All the papers in the case are in the
hands of Mr. Peli^e. the third assistant
secretaiy of state, who has just begun
the preparation of a report to the pres
ident on this subject. The enect of
the decision to allow Mr. Goodnow to
be heard personally will be to postpone
final action in his case until near the
end of the year. Meanwhile Mr. Peirce
will devote himself to the preparation
to that part of the report dealing gen
erally with the subject of needed re
forms in the American consulates in
the Oiient, lor it is clear to the as
sistant secretary from his personal ob
servations of conditions there last
summer that the whole consular sys
tem requires radical changes. To m
auguiate these will require congres
sional action and the president's ap
proval.
FORCED TO RESIGN.
Secretary of Minnesota Republican
Committee Steps Out.
St. Paul, Sept. 30.James A. Mai tin
of St, Cloud, manager of the pie-con
vention campaign ot Judge Loren Vv.
Collins for the Republican nomination
for governor, has been elected a mem
ber of the executive committee of the
Republican state central committee
and will take an active part in the
management of the campaign. Simul
taneously with the election of Mr. Mar
tin came the resignation o William
Verity-flf^Wadena as secretary and
thje^eie^i^Bufil-CLPir Warner ot Aitkin
to that position, Mr. Verity resigned
at the request of the members of the
nfefctopwwto^uae&M Jn%.relations_
with former Congressman Joel P. Heat
wole of Northfield, who, the members
of the committee have reason to be
lieve, is throwing his influence against
Robert C. Dunn of Princeton and Sen
ator Moses E. Clapp of St. Paul.
SPEAKS AT MISSOULA.
Senator Fairbanks Concludes His Tour
of Montana.
Missoula, Mont., Sept. 30.With a
stop of an hour at this point Senator
Fairbanks concluded his four days'
speaking tour of the state of Montana.
The early hour at which the meet
ing was held did not have the effect of
preventing a large attendance or of
diminishing tha ardor of those who
were there.
Senatdr Fairbanks made an argu
ment tor the retention of the Repub
lican party in power, saying that it
had shown its capacity by. the record
already made, and urging that its rec
ord in the past is the best guarantee
for the future. He contended that all
its -policy had been demonstrated to
the interest of all classes of our peo
ple, hence the unwisdom of a change,
which could but lead to experiments
aloijfi- lines that had already*proved
disastrous.
FARMER'S GREWSOME FIND.
Part of the Skeleton of a Man Who
Suicided by Cremation.
Shawneetown, 111., Sept. 30.While
hunting in the woods near here George
Porter, a farmer, found a part ot a hu
man skeleton and the charred remains
of clothing lying in a pile of ashes.
Hanging on a nearby tree was a coat
in the pocket of which was a note
signed by W. W. Hartin of St. Louis,
who disappeared from his home in St.
Louis about a month ago, stating that
the writer contemplated committing
suicide by cremation and that on that
spot would be found the results of the
attempt. SATISFACTORY TO BOTH SIDES.
Decision in Matter of Customs Stamps
on imported Cigars.
Washington, Sept. 30.After a num
ber of consultations with the presi
dent Acting Secretary of the Treasury
Taylor nas reached a conclusion in
the matter of the customs stamp on
boxes containing imported cigars.
While no definite information is ob
tainable as to what the decision is
there is reason to believe that it will
be fairly satisfactory to both sides.
Neither side obtained all that it re
quested.
Two Negroes Executed.
Philadelphia, Sept. 30.James Oscar
Webb and Samuel Archer, negroes,
were hanged here during the day.
Webb was executed for the murder of
his wife and her mother in June, 1902,
and Archer paid the death penalty for
killing Policeman John Donovan, who
was attempting to arrest him for rob
bery.
May Agree on One Ticket.
Wilmington, Del., Sept. 30.The
state central committees of the regular
Republican and Union Republican fac
tions met here during the day for'the
purpose of endeavoring to come to in
agreement upon a common Republican
state ticket in Delaware.
No Decision in Wisconsin Case.
Madison, .Wis., Sept. 30.The de
cision was not rendered in the La Fol
lette case during the morning and tho
politicians of both factions are com
pelled to wait with what patience they
can summon for another twenty-four
hows at least..^J^sfe i -&"
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, FBIDAT, SEPTEMBER 30.. 1904. j^^Ol^ST^
*&
9 9 9- 9
?21~X]!L-J|
GARMENTS
OXEARY & BOWSER,
Bemidji, Minnesota..
9999999 9 99999999999999 9 9999999999
PALACE
CLOTHING HOUSE
Famous
TE N
Money-Making 5
15he "Palmer" Garment
Is a Money-Maker
Because there's a style about this line not found anywhere else in
town style which attracts the buyer.
Because there's a quality of fabrics, trimmings and linings which sat-
isfies the most particular requirements.
Because the tailoring is done in a way that gives satisfying wear.
Because one sale this season makes two or three next season.
suits, skirts,raincoats,jackets
This is what we mean when
we say 'Palmer* Garment.
Styles are absolutely correct.
These are sellers. If you want
the best you can get, you
want the 'Palmer' Garment.
A Full a.nd Complete Line of
Kaufman's
K^aa^am
Cloth
In &.11 the latest styles and colorings
fust received.
The Kaufman Clothes
choice cloths in America, and are the most elegantly made
ready-to-wear apparel on the market. In fact, they are models
of perfection and the best values ever shown.
We have added to our already
complete line of Shoes the ._
WALK-OVER.
in all the latest lasts. For wear
f&4 style and satisfaction the Walk-
$*&* Over Shoes cannot be eqtraled at
The Pioneer Prints
MORE NEWS
than any other news
paper between Dulat
and Crookston. St Paul
and the North Pole.
TEN CENTS PER WEEK
are beautifully tailored, con
tain the finest and best
Linextz-
si
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