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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, September 04, 1906, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1906-09-04/ed-1/seq-4/

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J. O. HARRIS FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS.
J. 0. Harris, the present register of deed?, is seeking renomina-
tion and is making the same quiet and clean campaign he did two
years ago. Mr. Harris is serving his first term and during that
time has made many friends. It naturally follows that one
whom has served a tirst term to the satisfaction f the people is en-
titled to a second. In voting for Mr. Harris, you vote for a man
who has always been at his post and ready to accommodate the
people.
CHAS. P. SCHROEDER FOB CLERK OF COURT.
Charles F. Schroeder of Grant Valley, who seeks the nomina-
tion and election for clerk of the district court, is a young man who
has been a resident of the county for eleven years. Coming here
in 1895, he engaged in the mercantile business, and was a resident
of the city until about three years ago when he moved to Grant
Valley. For three years he was village recorder, and at present
is a popular official of his town and school district. Mr. Schroeder
is of a genial disposition and a pleasant man to meet, and if elected
would make a good official.
M. E. THURSTON, CANDIDATE FOR SHERIFF.
W. E. Thurston, who Bee#ghe republican n^na
bus been a resident of the couS^ for the pa^t eight yeiiii and is
well and favorably known. U&pvk* firstAnwiflg the party Work-
ers, and having a wide acquj$pbca, is ir/T good position to ask
your support at the primarieS on September 18,1906.
1 sheriff,
BATTLE WITH ITALIANS
TWO MEMtERS OF PENNSYLVA-
NIA CONSTABULARY DEAD
AND ANOTHER DYING.
BARRICADED HOUSE IS DYNAMITED
ONE ITALIAN KILLED, A SECOND
WOUNDED AND TWO ARE
UNDER ARREST.
Punxsutawney, Pa., Sept, 4.Two
members of the state constabulary
dead, one dying and two others
wounded is the result of a fight with
Italians at Florence, seven miles from
here. One of the Italians is dead, an
other is slightly wounded and two are
under arrest, while the house in which
the rioters barricaded themselves is a
wreck from dynamite used by the
troops to dislodge the rioters. The
dead are: Private John Henry of
Philadelphia, shot through the heart
Private Francis Vahringer of Con
shoohken, body riddled with bullets
and rescued just before the house fort
was destroyed, and an unidentified
Italian, shot through the heart.
Sergeant Joseph Login of Dubois
went to Florence to arrest an Italian
charged with murder. Instead of cap
turing the man Logan tried to arrest
two others who were fighting. He went
into the house where the men board
ed and an Italian stabbed at Logan
with a stiletto and as he made his
way from the house he was fired upon.
Logan turned and emptied his revol
ver into the doorway, then ran. Help
was summoned from the state con
stabulary headquarters here and five
troopers were sent to Logan's aid. As
they approached the house they were
Fired Upon From Every Window.
Private Henry fell dead with a bullet
through the heart. The others re
treated, but Privates Chambers and
Mullen rushed up to bring back their
comrade, not knowing he was dead.
Mullen got a few buckshot through his
right foot and Chambers received five
shots, three in his chest and two on
the right side of his head. They stag
gered back and Chambers was caught
by his comrades and sent to the hos
pital, seriously injured.
With the arrival cf reinforcements
entrance into the house was effected,
but the trooi ers were driven off, Pri
vate Vahringer being left dead by his
fleeing comrades.
In the mrri}Vn the ho'i^ is rt~n T.
TWR BBMlDJt DAIttf PIONBEKjlTtyEfllDAir BVBNIKa, SEPTEMBER
1
A. L. HANSOM, Candidate for State Senator, 61st district.
For County Superintendent.
J. J. Regan, the present county superintendent of schools, is
seeking renomination and is conducting a vigorous campaign for
same.
Durfrig his term of office he has been painstaking and careful
with hit Work and the schools havo rapidly forged to the front
under his direction. His record as county superatendent is the
best and it is up to a satisfied people to give him a second term.
WILLIAM B. STEWART
Candidate, Superintendent of Schools.
mited and afne by the troopers,
who an-esi'ed two Italians in the house
before the flames gained headway. In
the house was found also a daad Ital
ian, with a bullet through his head.
The house was destroyed and with it a
smaller one standing close by.
BURIES COMRADE ALIVE.
I Chicago Youth Admits Causing Death
of Playmate.
Chicago, Sept. 4.Robert Gordon,
sixteen years old, has confessed that
he struck Joseph Reed, eight years
old, with a brick, stunning him, and
then buried him alive beneath the
sidewalk in front of his father's home.
The boy's body was found where Gor
don said he had buried it and after an
investigation by the police Gordon
was taken into custody.
Five other boys, ranging in age from
fifteen to twenty years old, who had
been drinking with Gordon at the rear
of the Reed home before the murdeit
became known, also were arrested.
The Reed and the Gordon families
are neighbors and have been friends
for several years.
DEED OF LONE BANDIT.
Yosemite Stage Held Up Near Ahwah
nee, Cat.
Wawona, Cal., Sept. 4.The Yo
semite stage was held up by a lone
bandit near Ahwahnee. The passen
gers were lined upland compelled to
give up their cash. Wertemer Bishop
of New York lost $7.50 and A. For
niishee of Brooklyn $13. The passen
gers secured snapshots of the robber,
who wore a black mask. The stage
was driven by Bright Gillespie, who
took President Roosevelt through the
park three years ago.
Trying to. ivm mm.
Mrs. BenhamI baked you another
cake today. BenhamI know what
von want: you want my life insurance.
:^^^^^itf&^Si^^^^^pl
GREAT NAVAL PAGEANT
PRESIDENT .REVIEWS. LARGEST
WAR FLEET EVER GATHERED
IN AMERICAN WATERS.
A ll KINDS OF CRAFT REPRESENTED
THREE COLUMNS OF FIGHTING
VESSELS, EACH ABOUT TWO
MILES IN LENGTH.
Oyster Bay, N. Y., $ept. fA salute
of twenty-one guns, fired simultane
ously by every fighting craft in a
mighty fleet of two score warships,
greeted President Roosevelt when he
stepped on board the naval yacht May
flower to review what is believed to
be the largest war fleet that ever as
sembled in American waters. When
the president stepped on board the
Mayflower the great .fleetvlay in three
columns, each about two miles in
length, with battleships and monitors
in the center column, the cruisers and
several other battleships in the o
shore column and a long line of tor
pedo destroyers stretched between the
remainder of the fleet and the shore.
Encircling the entire fleet was a
cordon of cutters, making a picket
line for the exclusion of the excursion
boats.
Dull and lowering skies, with fitful
showers of rain sweeping across the
sound, threatened to rob the display
of much of its beauty and put a
damper over the enthusiasm of the
thousands of spectators who were
gathered to witness it in every man
ner of craft conceivable.
Half an hour before the arrival of
the president Secretary of the Navy
Bonaparte boarded the Mayflower and
was received with a salute by the
marine guard and the ruffles of the
drums. Following him came Postmas
ter General Cortelyou, who was also
honored on the quarterdeck.
Naval Attaches See Review.
The naval attaches representing
foreign governments came on board
the Des Moines and were transferred
to the Mayflower in launches.
A large number of gnest3 of Presi
dent and Mrs. Roosevelt were on
board the Dolphin.
Followed by the cruiser Des Moines
and by the Dolphin the Mayflower
proceeded out of Oyster bay to the
head of the fleet off Lloyds neck,
where the battleship Maine, with Rear
Admiral Robley D. Evans on board,
lay in the central position at the head
of the fleet. The Dolphin and Des
Moines took up their positions re
spectively at the head of the third
and first columns and the Mayflower
passed down between the long lines of
warships while the roar of the pres
ident's salute of twenty-one guns again
burst from the 3-inch guns of each
warship as the Mayflower swept ma
jestically past. While the review was
taking place the clouds began to roll
away and before it was finished the
sun broke through and brought all the
splendor of the great white warships
and long black torpedo destroyers
which went tp *make the mightiest
fleet that the United States has ever
assembled.
After luncheon the president visited
several ships of the fleet. When he
returned again to the Mayflower the
review was practically at an end, al
though Mr. Roosevelt and most of his
guests remained on board to witness
the illumination of the fleet.
MINNESOTA STATE FAIR.
First Day's Attendance Estimated at
Eighty Thousand.
St. Paul, Sept. 4.If the opening
day be a true augury Minnesota's
forty-seventh state fair is again des
tined to eclipse its many successful
predecessors. Up to noon 48,780 per
sons had passed into the grounds, as
compared with 20,939 at the same
hour last year. This was more than
double the best previous record up to
that hour. A total attendance for the
day of over 80,000 was predicted.
The formal opening exercises took
place at 11 o'clock, when the mag
nificent new live stock amphitheater
was dedicated and turned over to the
State Agricultural society. The fea
tures of these exeicises was the ad
dress on agriculture given by James
J. Hill, which was heard by a throng
estimated at 8,000 persons.
REFUSE TO PRAY IN GERMAN.
Polish School Children in Province of
Posen on Strike.
Berlin, Sept. 4.The Polish school
?hildren in the province of Posen have
struck agaiust being compelled to say
prayers In German and answering in
German during the course of religious
Instruction. The movement is spread
ing from pchool to school in spite of
the punishments which the teachers
Impose. Owing to the increasing dif
ficulties of the situation the minister
of public instruction has sent a com
mission to Posen to confer with the
school boards and determine on^what
action Is necessary.
One Killed and Three Injured.
Joplin, Mo., Sept. 4.Frank Hanley
was killed and D. J. Stewart, Dan
Reese and Thomas Grlfllth were prob
ably fatally injured at Alba, near here
by the fall of boulders in the Jersey
mine.
Accident on Russian cruiser.
London, Sept. 4.Four men were
killed and eight were seriously injured
by an explosion on board the Russian
armored cruiser Rurlk, which is being
built at the Vickers-Maxim works at
Barrow. The accident is attributed
to the contact of a lighted naphtha
lamp with inflammable gases in a
tank where the men were working.
Miners and Troops Clash.
Petrosenky, Hungary, Sept. 4.As
the result of a collision between
troops and striking coal miners here
175 miners were Injured. ^__
M.
John Wilmann, the present county auditor, is a candidate for re-
nomination and deserves the hearty support of the people at the
polls Sept. 18, 1906.
Mr. Wilman has made an enviable record as county auditor and
we have always found him at his post of duty ready to accomadate
the people.
Mr. Wilmann had a very difficult task before him when he took
the office two years ago. The records were in bad shape and after
working hard day and night for the last year and a half he has
succeeded in straightening out the affairs to such an extent that
they were never in better shape than at the present time.
He has added thousands of acres of land to the tax list that have
for years escaped taxation.
His way of handling the forfeited tax sale last year met with the
approval of the state auditor, who made a personal visit to the aud-
itors office at the time of the sale.
The office of the county auditor is an important one, and a man
is needed there who is competent and willing to safeguard the in-
terests of the taxpayers and such a man is found in the present
auditor, John Wilmann who is seeking re election.
JOHN F. GIBBONS FOR COUNTY ATTORNEY.
For the office of county attorney no better selection can be made
than to elect John F. Gibbons. Mr. Gibbon's interests have Jong
been identified with the interests of Bemidji and the building up of
Beltrami county. Mr. Gibbons is an able attorney,, a well read
lawyer, and by his carefulness, has a faculty of making friends
wherever he meets people. The office of county attorney is an im-
portant one and the people will make no mistake nominating Mr.
Gibbons.
FRED KHODA FOR CLERK OF COURT.
Fred Rhoda, the popular and obliging clerk of court, Is
just completing his first term and is seeking reelection to this
office which he has held the past four years. Mr. Rhoda is one of
the most experienced accountants in the county and the accurac
of bis work has won for him many friends who are actively at wo
to secure his re-eelction.
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