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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, August 27, 1917, Image 1

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YESIMDAY'S
LABOR ATTORNEY
FLAYSAUTOCRACY
IN HUGE MEETING
LOYALTY LEAGUE
Clarence Darrow, Most Noted Legal
Defender of Union Labor,
is for Peace.
BUT HE WOULD UNSEAT
KAISERISM, THEN PEACE
Gerard Lets Light in Upon Senseless
Attitude of Kaiser Shows
Emperor's Colors.
Minneapolis, Aug.-27."Until the
Prussian military machine has been
crushed there will be no freedom
for the workmen of the world. The
war now being waged against Ger
many cannot stop until kaiserism has
disappeared and the 'divine right of
kings' is a forgotten theory."
Thousands of citizens of Minne
nopils, representing organized and,
unorganized labor, were convinced of
these things when they Listened to
James W. Gerard, former ambassa
dor to Germany, the man who could
n't be bluffed by the kaiser, and
Clarence Darrow, attorney of labor,
speak at two gigantic mass meet
ings.
Put Bight on Issues.
Labor's Loyal Legion was respon
sible for the meetings. They were
called to put labor in general and
Minneapolis labor in particular right
on the issues of the war And they
succeeded in their object.
On The Parade more than 8,000
persons listened to the speakers. At
the Auditorium fully 3,000 crowded
into the hall. Thousands more Were
on the outside clamoring for admis
8ion
(Continued on Page Four)
V-f WHEAT PRICE FIXED
WEDNESDAY, REPORT
(By United Press)
Washington, Aug. 27The price
of this year's wheat crop, fixed by
the government, will probably be an
nounced Wednesday A Garfield,
president of the price fixing board,
claims ignorance of the price.
A. R. ROGERS IS NAMED
STATE RED CROSS MANAGER
Washington, Aug 27A R.
Rogers of Minneapolis has been ap
pointed as manager of the northern
division of the Red Cross, which in
cludes Minnesota, North and South
Dakota and Montana.
WEALTH CONSCRIPTION,
BILL STRIKES BUMP
(By United Press)
Washington, Aug. 27Efforts to
hasten action on the war bill will be
blocked by wealth conscription for
ces Senator Simmons has tried four
times to limit the debate on the bill
DUt failed.
The "Bemidji Band Day" at Itasca
State park yesterday was a success
and a great sig success The newly
organized band furnished music ga
lore and the people from Bemidji and
other towns were out in full force,
and even the old weather man did his
part bv keeping a big round sun
smiling in the heavens all day long
At least 250 cars were at the park
yesterdav and over a thousand people
enjoyed the music and games furnish
ed by the band Automobiles were
there from Bemidji, Staples, Wadena,
International Falls. Thief River Falls
Blackduck Park Rapids, Akeley and
other points
Though most of the visitors
brought th^ir lunches and gathered
together and had picnic dinners and
suppers, still Douglas Lodge at the
park was crowded to its capacity for
SSff^t*a.
ijl HI PllWIIIipillfl WlipillllllSMBMMMI
A
W. C. Robertson, president, and
Prank Gould, vice president, pre
sided at the Auditorium and Parade,
respectively. A parade, headed by
the First Infantry band, preceded the
meetings.
Thousands Get Clearer View.
The thousands from all classes of
life, laborers, business men, profes
sional men, who listened to these ex
ponents of the war and America's
part in it, came away with clearer
conceptions of why the United States
went into it, why America couldn't
have stayed out of it, why the peace
of the world demands that the fight
ing continue until an autocratic
military machine that has become
the cancerous growth upon the earth
Bemidji Band Day Largely
Attended At State Park
VOLUME XV. NO. 198. BEMIDJI. MINNESOTA. MONDAY EVENING. AUGUST 27. 1917.
America's War Aims
Stated By Speakers
N
In Forceful Brevity
By CLARENCE DARROW
I was a pacifist before this
war began, and I expect to be
one again after the kaiser is
licked.
There is no room on earth
for peace and Prussian militar
ism, and I am for peace.
The pacifist today is doing
the German's work in America.
The kind of German peace I
want is the absolute, uncondi
tional surrender of Germany.
The Germans, advanced
through Belgium toward
France, singing. They are go
ing back now, but they are not
singing.
I have never had but one
criticism to make of our great
president that he was too pa
tient. But no presindent since
the Father of His Country has
been more wise, more patient,
more patriotic than Woodrow
Wilson.
Any time I am ready to take
orders from the kaiser, I'll go
over to Germany where I'll be
near my boss.
By JAMES W. GERARD
The time has come when ev
ery one must be either an Am
erican or a traitor.
By their actions the German
leaders showed that they either
wanted war with us or believed
that we had fallen so low that
we would stand anything at
their hands.
When I saw the kaiser, after
nearly a year of waiting, on Oc
tober 25, 1915, he said to me:
"I will stand no nonsense from
America after this war Am
erica had better look out."
You can't conceive of the
hatred existing in Germany for
America.
No traitorous, disgruntled,
bribed propaganda minority is
"%omg to hamper the majority
of this country in winning this
war.
When we show the German
people that we are united be
hind the president, that there
is going to be no revolution nor
internal disorder here, then the
end of the war will be in sight
Where do you suppose Carl
Schurz and General Sigel would
have been in this war? Do you
think they would have been ad
dressing meetings at New Ulm,
Minnesota?
TWO STRANGE AIRSHIPS
SIGHTED OVER COAST
(By United Press)
Seal Harbor, Me., Aug 27 Fly
ing at an altitude of a mile and mov
ing at great speed, two strange air
ships were sighted by observers to
day. They were torpedo shaped
Army and navy officials refuse com
ment. ALSACE-LORRAINE TO BE ^nmr
M' DE A FEDERAL DUCHY
London, Aug 27 Despite Ger
man official denials, says the Amster
dam correspondent of the Exchange
Telegraph company, the German
newspapers assert that Chancellor
Michaelis has decided to make Al
sace-Lorraine a Federal duchy, with
Herzog von Uracil, a member of the
third ducal line of the Wurttemburg
house, the reigning duke
SOLDIERS WON'T ARE
(By United Press)
Washington, Aug. 27The Texas
congressional delegation will appeal
to the president to prevent negro sol
diers being sent to Texas.
both dinner and supper
The band furnished one concert
in the morning and two in the after
noon, while the saxaphone quintet
gave a concert in Douglas Lodge in
the afternoon Those who played in
the band are: Harold White and
Marie Cahill, cornets, Peterson
and Mr Hanson, clarinets Paul Fou
c&ult, piccolo, William Dugas, trom
bone, Arthur Breyette and Gladys
Loitved, alto Thomas Newton and
Norman Buckland, bass, Archie
Williams and Howard Moyer, tenor
drums, Clyde Petrie, bass, and El
ford Benson, baritone
Those who compose the saxophone
quintet are Arthur Brejett", so
prano. Emil Tuseth, alto, A Fen
ton, alto, A Nietert, baritone
Theodore Willits, contra bass, Mrs
A. Nietert, piano.
*A -*LSfe=iS^
NEWS BU TODAY S NEW S TODAY-B TH
Tomorrow morning, a new finan
cial institution will open its doors
in Bemidji, it being the Farmers'
State Bank of Bemidji, located at the
corner of Avenue and Second street
(Nymore), and its backers and many
friends predict success from the out
set for the new bank, it being offi
cered with prominent and substan
tial citizens and with more than 40
stockholders all of repute, being lo
cal residents, merchants and farmers.
The bank will be housed in a
small, yet complete brick building,
specially built for the bank, the fix
tures being all in mission, including
the furniture.
Latest Pattern Vault.
For safety of all valuables a late
pattern Victor fireproof vault has
been installed, together with a com
plete outfit of safety deposit boxes
The capital and surplus paid in are
$30,000
The people of the "East Side" have
long felt the need of a local bank
and the new institution hopes to
work in complete harmony with the
older banking institutions of Be
midji, and work for the upbuilding
of Bemidji and community.
Officers and Directors.
The bank is officered as follows:
PresidentH. R. Gillette.
Vice presidentEdward Paulson.
CashierJL LAR^y^BhwelUgw*4^
DirectorsH. R. Gillette, farmer.
Edw. Paulson, farmer.
O J. Tagley, merchant.
E. S Ingersoll, Engineer, & I
L. Bjella, farmer.
Knute Aakhus, farmer,
J. LeRoy Elwell, cashier.
Who the Directors Are.
H. R. GilletteMoved here from
Illinois only three years ago, lias
opened up a fine farm two miles
jsouth of Rosby station Has fine
set of farm buildings, half section
of excellent land, president of Rosby
Co-operative creamer Very pro
gressive farmer Chairman of Helga
township
Edward PaulsonAlso compara
tively recent settler four miles south
east of Bemidji well established on
improved quarter section Moved
here from Todd county where he
still owns fine farm property In
strumental in organizing the first co
operative creamery in Todd county
many years ago Took leading part
in organizing creamery at Rosby, and
holds office of secretary
O TagleyToo well known in
Bemidji to require comment, of Tag
ley & Wold, many years successful
merchants at Nymore Always ac
tive in upbuilding of east side, and
in village affairs His wide acquaint
ance in the surrounding country
should be of immeasurable benefit to
bank
E S IngersollM & I. engineer,
prominent in railroad circles, wide
acquaintance with workers on rail-
EIGHTH ILLINOIS TO
HOUSTON NEGROES
ARE FROM CHICAGO
(By United Press)
Houston, Tex Aug 27.More
negro troops are to be sent hero, de
clared Major General Bell today. The
Eighth Illinois infantry, negroes, are
on the way. "I will not recommend
their being sent elsewhere. I can
control them. "There will be no
more trouble," declared Bell today.
Houston "Het Up."
Houston, Aug 27 Citizens had
not relinquished hope today for the
return for civil trial the negro sol
diers who participated in the riot last
week. Word is waited from Wash
ington as to ihe resolutions demand
ing the return
Word reached here that while the
negro troopers were passing through
Richmond, Tex., a cartridge with a
piece of paper wrapped around it
was dropped from a car window, the
paper bearing the words, "We done
our part in Houston Are now on
our way to Columbus, New Mexico
The note is in possession of Briga
dier General Hulen
SUBWAY TIEUP AVERTED
(By United Press)
New York, Aug 27Danger of
another subway tieup was averted to
day by the arrival of coal.
THE BEMIDJI DAILY PJQ^KERSPRESDUNITETGREAE
Farmers' State Bank To
Open Tuesday A My more
EXTERIOR OF NEW BAKE BDILDtSG
J. LE ROY ELWELL
Cashier of New Bank.
roads and in mills.
L. T. BjellaVery successful farm
ejL4pur miles, east of JBemldji. Set
tled^ori'lioniestead To years ago in
Frohn township. Always hard work
er, popular and successful. Owns
large amount of land, and considered
one of the most substantial farmers
of Beltrami county.
Knute AakhusYoung farmer
three miles east of town, resided here
many years, and also is interested in
timbered lands near Deer River,
Minn.
The New Cashier.
LeRoy ElwellWill have charge
of the bank as cashier Banker of
long experience Cashier ot Fir&t
National -bank of Frederic, Wis 8
years prior to
1912,dwhen
to Balta, N D,
lie
an organizemoved the
Pierce (ounlv bank,
ctill wheies
**"$ST ^A* ^'r"J
h-
retains hisState interests Come to
Bemidji well recommended l'V his for
mer employers and associates, and
with the local support of the east
side people and interested farmers ex
pects to make the new hank a help
to the business life of the east side
and the surrounding country Mr
Elwell's family will arrive Thursday
and for the present they will oc
cupy the James Heneghan house.
Oreranizers of Bank.
The bank was organized for the
east side people by N Smith &
Co of Minneapolis, to whom much
credit is due for their efficiency in
carrying the organization to a suc
cessful completion, and making the
bank a going institution, housed in
its own new building, all within four
months' time
NAVYYARD EXPLOSION
WAS DELIBERATE ACT
Washington, Aug. 27The explo
sion at Mare Island Navy yard in
July, killing nve and injuring more
than thirty, is pronounced, in an offi
cial report made public by Secretary
Daniels, to have been the deliberate
act of someone unknown, and not an
accident.
REGULAR GRUABD DRILL AT
CITY WATT. THIS EVENING
The regular drill meeting of the
home guard will be held tonight and
all members are asked to turn out at
8 o'clock sharp.
BELGIAN WAR MISSION ENDED
New York, Aug 27The Bel
gian war commission officially has
come to an end. Baron Moncheur,
head of the mission, announces that
a few days will oe spent in New York
in an unofficial capacity
THIRD MINN. LEAVES
FOR DEMING TONIGHT
(By United Press)
St Paifl, Aug 27 -The Third Min
nesota infantry will be on its way
to Deming, N 9 o'clock to
night
-fe-r
IKS*?^'"!
w$
SQG\Q^L
IMAGINE U. S. PAPER
PUBLISHED IN GERMANY
ATTACKING GOVERNMENT
"Imagine an American paper,
publisned in Germany, print
ing attacks on the German
government," said J. W. Gerard
in his Minneapolis speech.
'There would be only one re
sultthe bare wall and the
firing squad."
FORMER BEMIDJI BANK
CASHIER FLEES BULLETS
IN DESPERATE HOLDUP
According to an account in a Colo
rado paper, Unruh, formerly as
sistant cashier of the First National
bank of this city, narrowly escaped
being lulled The article savs in
part:
"In an unsuccessful attempt to
loot the McCloud bank yesterday
forenoon, Unruh, cashier of
that institution, narrowly ecaped
with his life and one of the high
waymen lies dead in the undertaking
parlois of Kuck in this citv
At about 11:15 Wednesday morn
ing two macked men entered the
bank and opener fire on Cashier
Unruh. Unruh stooped down behind
the counter back of the cashier's
window and how he escaped being
fatally, wounded by the stream of lead
which was directed at him from the
other side of the counter is a mira
cle. The counter was filled with bul
let holes The cashier escaped with
a slight flesh wound in the shoulder
The paper states it is thought that
the man who was found dead was
either killed by one of his own men
to keep from "squealing" on the oth
ers, or he committed suicide, as he
was wounded in the heel and unable
to make his getaway
COUCEKTED MOVE TO RAISE
PAPER PRICES IS CHARGED
Washington, Aug 27 Charges of
concerted action to raise book paper
prices were made bj the Federal
Tiade commission in formal com
plaints filed against 2.) manufactur
ers and the head of their bureau of
statistics
There are approximately fifty-five
men who registered in Beltrami
county and who cannot now be loca
ted by the exemption board. These
are considered wilfull violators and
automatically become enlisted "as soon
as they can be "rounded" into the
fold They will not even be exam
ined by the local board, much less be
given an opportunity to make claims
for exemption.
According to the local board of
exemption, there were 714 men
drafted or called from this county
Of these 117 failed to report Of the
117 who failed to report thus far
about twenty have enlisted and are
St Paul, Aug 27 At least seven
native daughters of Minnesota from
the Red Lake Indian agency and girls
from other Indian schools will enter
the bread-making contests at the
state fair this year in a special event
which will be separate from the usual
bread-making competition in which
160 girls, representatives from each
county, will wage their skill in
cookery
During the past year bread-making
contests have been features of the
work of the various Indian schools
in the state, where free trips to the
fair were awarded as prizes. Walter
Dickens, superintendent and spe
cial distributing apent at the govern
ment school at Red 'Lake, decided
that the encouragement of state
competition was due the girls for
their interest, and with the co-opera-
"*?.r,
Zn PLEDGES
50 Men Called Fail To
Respond Judged Wilful
Violators By Draft Board
Red Lake Indian Girls Are
In Breadmaking Contest
jSv -*M*
,,*$^sjBKf,'S'*s'
RUSSIA FINANCIAL
ANDMATERIALAID
JAPS WOULD HELP
'Y FIVE CENTS PER MONTH
(By United Press)
Washington, Aug. 27 Expressing
American confidence in the trial of
Democracy, President Wilson has
sent to Moscow a pledge of both
financial and material assistance.
Japs Offer Shipyards.
Washington, Aug 27.Japan is
willing to grant the use of her ship
yards for building bottoms for use
on either the Atlantic or Pacific. Vis
count Ishii is expected to offer them
while conferring with the United
States government heads this week.
It is thought they will pass up the
question of the open door in China
until after the war\ They will ac
cept if the terms are satisfactory.
$350,000,000 for Naw.
Washington, Aug. 27 A new ap
propriation of at least $350,000,000
for destroyers is to be asked of con
gross by Secretary of the Navy Dan
iels
Would Modify Embargo.
Tokio, Aug 27 The Japanese am
bassador at Washington has been in
structed to negotiate with this gov
ernment for the modification of the
embargo on steel.
ROOSEVELT TO TALK
IN ST. PAUL SEPT. 28
St Paul, Aug 27Col. Theodore
Roosevelt will speak in St. Paul, Sep
tember 28, instead of August 28, as
previously announced, the Minnesota
Loyalty lyceum, which is arranging
a loyalty meeting, received a tele
gram explaining that through a sten
ographer's error a previous message
gave the date incorrectly
ELDER FOUND GUILTY
BY BRAINERD JURY
Urainerd, Minn Aug 27 The
jury in the case of George A Elder,
Dululh bond broker, charged with
endeavoring to influence official ac
tions of the county treasurer of Koo
chiching county, found a verdict of
mi ill The juiv uub out four and
a half hours Attorneys for the de
tense will make a motion for a new
Iruil, and if that is denied, the case
will be appealed to the supreme
court not obliged to report, leaving about
97 About a dozen have asked for
transfers to other districts, which
leaves approximately 85 who have
failed absolutely to get word to the
board.
The board received 27 notices
which were returned and which
would indicate tnat the parties moved
from the precincts or towns at which
they registered and left no forward
ing address Efforts are being made
to locate these men, but they are
as yet not considered wilfull viola
tors of the law But the fifty-five
whose notices were not returned are
so considered and will be dealt with
accordingly tion of government and state work
ers a contest for Indian girls has
been arranged
Medals to Be Offered.
Gold, silver and bronze medals
will offered by the state agricul
tural department to the girls from
the Indian schools, who will be a
part of the camp at the school of ag
riculture and will be given tripjs
around the Twin Cities during fair
week
Work in domestic science has been
conducted among the Indian girls at
Red Lake for three years under the
direction of Mrs Margaret Baker,
who is"~in charge of the girls' work
in Minnesota She reports that the
Indian girls are interested in sewing
as well as bread-making and are car
rying their training back into their
homes
W
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