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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, August 27, 1917, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1917-08-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE BEniDJI DAILY PIONEER
a PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON EXCEPT SUNDAY
THE BEMIDJI PIONEER PUBLISHING CO.
E. CARSON
TELEPHONE 22
Entered at the postoffice at Bemidji, Minn., as second-class matter
under act of Congress of March 3, 1879.
No attention paid to anonymous contributions. Writer's name must
to known to the editor, but not necessarily for publication.
Communications for the Weekly Pioneer should reach this office not
later than Tuesday of each week to insure publication in the current issue.
SUBSCEIPTION RATES
BY CARRIER BY MAIL
One year $5.00 One year $4.00
Six month* 2.50 Six months 2.00
Throe monthi 1.25 Three months 1-00
One month .45
One week T..... .12
CMEMBER
THE WEEKLY PIONEER
Ten pages, containing a summary of the news of the week. Pnb-
Hiked every Thursday and lent postage paid to any address for, in
edranee $1.50
OFFICIAL COUNTY AND CITY PROCEEDINGS
The Dally Pioneer is a member or the United Press Association, and
to represented for foreign adrertlslng by the
W*
General offices In New York and Chicago, branches In all principal Cities.
BLAZING THE WRONG TRAIL
One of the leading farm journals of the south is authority for the
statement that in the rural high schools of North Carolina seven thousand
children are studying Latin, while only seven hundred are studying ag-
riculture.
The significance of these figures are not grasped until we learn that
of the pupils attending high school in this country not more than one per
cent ever reach the college or university.
When we assimilate the further fact that the high schools do not
and can not Impart a working knowledge of the Latin language, we begin
to appreciate the utter foolishness of an educational system that forces
upon children the study of a dead language from which not one in 7,000
will ever benefit.
The above figures may vary in other stateswe hope they do. But
they serve to call forcibly to our attention a glaring fault in the school
system of the United States.
Any system that requires boys and girls (who in many cases can ill
afford the time and means to attend even a high school) to waste from
a quarter to a fifth of their school life on a study that will never benefit
them in life's struggle, is not a blunderit is a CRIME.
Consider again. Of the 7,000 studying Latin, there are only 700
studying agriculture. These figures also may vary in other states, but
still any one familiar with the school system of this country knows that
the proportion of our rural boys and girls who secure a competent educa-
tion in agriculture is lamentably small.
And what is the conclusion? Why, that we are wedded in our
schools to a fossilized, petrified and antiquated system that ordains a
language that in order to acquire an "education" one must be conversant
with a language that is so everlastingly dead it has not been generally
spoken on earth in the last thousand years. And this while the crying,
burnings needs of the hour are sidetracked as of minor importance.
It is time for the rural population of our country to arise In their
might and DEMAND that the schools cease educating their children away
from the farm.
The professions are overcrowded, and the trades are in even worse
condition. The farmer's job is the only one in the land that promises
a career without the paralyzing competition to be met in other lines.
Yet instead of being trained for efficiency in this great calling our youths
are compelled to fritter away their_ time on a course of study that, to be
in any sense beneficial, must be followed through the college or univer-
sitywhich the very smallest per cent of them ever reach.
The day of the antiquarian, the dreamer, the mummy, is past in this
country. The age demands ACTION, and the mind that is not trained to
it in capital letters is doomed to be left at the starting wire.
D0NT TALR. PEACE TO THEM
In a dispatch sent out from Washington Saturday, it was stated that
peace talk didn't listen good to Belgium, Serbia and Montenegro, even
the Vatican explanation failing to move them. \ud one can hardly blame
these little countries who have felt the crushing blows of the powerful
nations of Germany and Austria. Of all the cruelties and misery and
ravages ever sustained by small nations what has been done to these three
helpless small countries is brutalit supreme.
Belgium, invaded and torn to shreds, its people outraged and taken
captive, suffering all the tortures of fiends, the word of Germany a "scrap
of paper," so confessed by her ruler, looking for peace with no redress?
The best she can expect is restoration by force after a thorough subjica-
tion of her violator? It's a hard problem but one which calls for more
than mere peace. Who of us would "turn the other cheek" In such a
problem?
The German people are not at fault but is the fault of the inhuman
monster who rules them with an iron heel and who should be made to
suffer for his sins, but no adequate punishment could be devised and
hell wouldn't have him.
OUR SENTIMENTS EXACTLY
Don't be a slacker if asked to assist in purchasing uniforms for the
home guardsmen, who are as necesary as an army in France.Interna-
tional Falls Press and Border Budget.
Our sentiments exactly. Any man who refuses to support his own
home guard for personal reasons has a lop-sided brand of patriotism that
will Bhrink in the wash and fade in the light of publicity.
The fellow who hired his children to go to bed without supper and
then stole their money while they slept is discounted for cussedness by
the one who cut all of the eyes from a load of potatoes before selling the
spuds.
Now that they find the stigma of cowardice firmly attached to them,
war grooms are explaining that they merely obeyed the call "to arms."
They further assert that as no particular "arms" were specified, it was
their privilege to make the choice.
If the kaiser wants to jump from the frying pan into the fire, he
might try the job of emperoring in Russia.
Old men are wiBe men, some times. But young ones, always.
E. H. DENU
ft
ft GRAHAM M. TORRANCE
ft LAWYER
ft Miles Block Phone 880
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TEE BEMTJHfX DAiX* FluNEEL
BUSINESS
AND PROFESSIONAL
DR. EINER JOHNSON
ft. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
ft Bemidji, Minn.
ftftftftftftft ft ft ft ft
ftftftftftftftftftft ft ft
DR. L. A. WARD
ft PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
ft Troppman Block
ft Bemidji, Minn.
jftftftftftftftft**ftftft*
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
AY. GARL0CX, M. D.
ft SPECIALIST
ft BTB EAR NOSE THROAT
ft Glasses Fitted
ft Gibbons Bldg. Phone 105
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
ftftftftftftftftftft *f ft ft ft
ft T9M SMART
ft DRAY AND TRANSFER
ft Safe and Piano Moving
ft Res. Phone 68 818 Amaiies
ft Office Phone 11
ftftftftftftftftftftftft
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
DR. J. T. TU0MY
ft DJBNTIOT
ft North of Markham Hotel
ft Gibbons Block. TeL 880
ftftftftftftftftftftftft#
ftftftftftftftft*ftftftft
DR. E. A SHANNON, M. D.
ft PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
ft Office in Mayo Block
ft Phone 886 Res. Phon. 887
ftftftftftftftftftftftftft** ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
DR. G. M. PALMES
ft DENTIST
ft Office Phone 184, Residence 846
ft Miles Block, Bemidji
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
DR. E. H. SMITH
ft PHYSICIAN AND 8URGEON
ft Office Security Bank Block
ftftftftftftftftftftftft
ftftftftftftftftftftftftft*
pmpi
u.ijr.jnvnH
DENTIST
ft
ft ft Office Phone S76-WBide.
ft Res. Phone 376-R
ftftft-ftftftftftftftftftftftft ftftft*ftftftftftftftftftftft
DR. D. L. STANTON
ft DENTIST
ft Office In Winter Block
ft ft ft ft ft 4'm ft-'-* ft
ftftft-Kftftftftftftftftftftft
DR. R. E. RICHARDSON
ft DENTIST
ft Office: Troppman Block
ft 1 .one 180-J Bemidji, Minn
ft ftftftftftftftftftftftft
*_*
A, DANNENBERG
ft First National Bank Bldg.
ft I remove the cause of scute
ft end ehronlc diseases
ft CHIROPRACTOR
ft Office hours: 10-18, 1:80-1 7-8
ft Phone 408-W
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
Office O'Leary-Bowser
DR. H. A NORTHROP
ft OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
ft AND SURGEON
ft Quite 10 O'Leary-Bowser Bldg
ft Offlee Phone 188
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
ft Hair dressing, manicuring,
ft face massage, scalp treat
ft ment, switches made from
ft combings 81.50. Corns, In
ft grown nails treated a spe
cialty.
ft MINA MYERS
311 6th St. Phone 112-W
ft ft ft ft ft -ft ft ft ft ft ftf ft ft ft ft
J. WARNTNGER
VETERINARY SURGEON
Office end Hospital 8 doors
west of Troppman 8tore
ft Phone No. 808
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
DR. C. R. SANBORN
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
OfficeMiles Block
ft
ft
ft ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft
DBS. GELM0RE & McCANN
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
ft OfficeMiles Block
ftftftftftftftftftftft****
ftftftftftftftftftftftft***
W. DINIS0N, D. V. M.
VETERINARIAN
ft Office Phone S-R Rss. 88-J
ft 3rd St. end Irvine Are.
ftftftftftftftftftft****
ftftMHCHHHCHHHCHH^^
DRY CLEANING
Clothes Cleaners for Men,
Women and Children
ttHHOHH&&HraHKHCHC^^
Let's Go!
WONDERFUL ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM
OFFERED DY MINNESOTA STATE FAIR
The Minnesota State Fair, September 3 to 8, pre-
sents a wonderful entertainment program.
"Modern Warfare," a gigantic fireworks spectacle
portraying scenes on the Western Battlefront, is
to be played before the Grandstand each evening,
300 persons taking part.
Two days of Auto Races, Wednesday, September
5, and Saturday, September 8, will present 21
speed kings of reputation to the public.
Four days of Horse Racing, Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday, will bring to the Northwest
a program of unexcelled reputation.
Twenty-two great Vaudeville Acts, put on by the
world's greatest artists, will keep people in a con-
stant uproar.
"Looper" Brown, an aviator with an international
reputation, will fly night and day, looping the loop,
flying upside down, and performing other heroic
acts.
Nearly a dozen bands will play at the fair the en-
tire week.
These are only a few of the leading features.
Do you think you can afford to miss the fair?
MONDAY. AUGUST 27. 1917.
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