OCR Interpretation


The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, September 21, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1917-09-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

^jp-apcav
r"
(By United Press)
Washington, Sept. 21.Former
German Ambassador Count von Bern
storff to the United States was an
active anti-American while Germany
and the United States were on friend
ly terms and von Bernstorff was rep
resenting his country in Washing
ton.
While the German nation and the
United States were at peace von
Bernstorff asked the Berlin office for
$50,000 on January 22 to influence
congress "as on a former occasion."
The state department made this
public today in announcing the text
of the message of von Bernstorff on
that date.
The secretary of state today is
ued the following text of the mes
sage von Bernstorff sent to the Ber
lin foreign office January 22:
"I request authority to pay
oat up to $50,000 in order, as
on a former occasion, to influ
ence congress through the or
ganization you know by which
we can perhaps prevent war. I
am beginning in the meantime
to act accordingly in the above
circumstances.
*-'A public, official -German
declaration-tn favor of Ireland
is highly desirable in order to
get the support of Irish-influ
ence here."
Has a Good Idea.
Washington, Sept. 21.The state
department indicates that it is con
vinced of the identity of the organi
zation Bernstorff referred to, al
though no definite announcement is
made. It is intimated money was
fcpent on telegrams furthering the
propaganda rather than directly up
on congressmen directly.
Congress is determined to unearth
the organization through which
Bernstorff worked the house. The
senate is astonished.
ti
J.
"OUTING" PARTY FAILS
TO ARRIVE COMING
EARLY TOMORROW
The Outing magazine party which
was to have arrived in Bemidji this
morning and leave for Red Lake in
company with a contingent of citi
zens, failed to arrive owing to have
missed a train. They will be here
early tomorrow morning and the
trip made as scheduled for today.
QUAKER CITY MAYOR
HELD $10,000 BONDS
(By United Press)
Philadelphia, Sept. 21.Mayor
Smith of Philadelphia was today held
in 110,000 bail to await a hearing
on a conspiracy charge of murder
and other crimes.
incinnati, Ohio, Sept. 21.Chi-
cago won the toss for the opening
rame of the world's championship
series at the meeting of the National
Baseball commission here.
The umpires for the world's series
will be: O'Loughlin and Evans of
the American league and Klem and
Rigler of the National.
Prices: At Chicago: Boxes $5
lower grandstand reserved, $1.50
pavilion, $1 bleachers, 50 cents. At
New York: Boxes, $25 upper grand
stand, $3 lower grandstand, open,
$2 pavilion, $1.
The commission also announced
*that purchasers of tickets must buy
them for three games. One per cent
of the commission's revenue of the
series will go to the Bat and Ball
fund for soldiers in France.
The world's series players will be
instructed to play an exhibition game
at either Rockford, HI., if the series
finishes in the West, or at Camp
|ffilla Mineola, L. L, in ease it fin-
5W#U-,J*I$- -*w
JI/I nuniiiiiiiii *^mmmdmmmmmmmmm
GERMAN INTRIGUE
IS AGAIN EXPOSED
U.S. BARES PLANS
TO BUY INFLUENCE
World's Baseball Series To
Open In Chicago October 6
BEMIDJI DAILY
VOLUME XV. NO. 220.
BEMIDJI. MINNESOTA. FRIDAY EVENING. SEPTEMBER 21. 1917
BEMIDJFS FIRST QUOTA
RELIGION BARRED
AT PEACE TABLE
VATICAN CIRCLES
HINT AGREEMENT
England and Italy, at Least, Are
Understood to Have Entered
Into Understanding.
GERMANY, HOWEVER, EXPECTS
TO INITIATE PEACE MOVE
Diplomats Believe Teutons Will
Start Overtures to End War
Before Next Tear.
Washington, Sept. 21.The Va
tlcan realizes that peace or further
negotiations at present are impos
sible. President Wilson's rejection
of the pope's last peace offerwnfoh
rejection was heartily approved by
the allieshas convinced the Vati
can -the allies want no peace which
will leave the central powers under
their present rulers.
It is realized by the Vatican that
the allies, with America's vast re
sources now thrown into the balance,
now have the upper hand and can
wring from the central powers a
peace acceptable to the democracies.
Any further proffers from the pope
would be foredoomed to failure
even as the last wasit is admitted.
Vatican Reported Barred bv Stipula
tion of Italv.
Official cables state that Vatican
circles uirow out the suggestion of
an understanding, at least between
England and Italy, that no peace
proposals emanating from the Vati
can shall be seriously considered and
that when peace negotiations begin
the church is not to be admitted in
to the pourparlers. These hints go
so far as to say that Italy's entrance
into the war hinged upon acceptance
of this condition, two years ago. It
is added that this has never been de
nied by the allied powers.
Germany, however, is expected to
Initiate another peace move this win
ter. The basis of this is seen in
vague outlines of terms set afloat first
in Washington three weeks ago and
now seeping through the British cen
sor.
Diplomats here who are in inti
mate touch with the international
situation say there is positive knowl
edge that Germany will move again
to end the war before 1918
BACK FROM HUNT
Mr. and Mrs. J. Koors have re
turned from a successful duck and
chicken hunt at Fosston. They re
turned last evening, having been
away since Saturday.
ishes in the East, in order to give the
soldiers a chance to see the tams
play.
Official Bates.
The official dates for the world's
eries as selected by the National
Baseball commission are:
At Chicago: Saturday, Oct 6. and
Sunday, Oct. 7 at New York, Oct 9
and 10 Chicago, Oct. 12 New York,
Oct. 15.
The commission announced 'hat
the Chicago Tribune and New York
Herald would wire a 1,000-word
story to the American soldiers in
France at the commission's expanse
after each game.
Special invitations will be ex
tended to President Wilson and Gen
erals Barry, Carter, Bell and McCain
to attend the world's series games.
A block of 1,500 seats in the pavil
ion has been set aside from the first
game of the series at Chicago for
officers and soldiers at Fort Sheri
dan. These will be paid for by the
soldiers.
ENSIGN M'DONALD
ORDERED TO FRANCE
ABOARD TRANSPOR*
A letter was received yesterday by
Mr. and Mrs. John A. McDonald of
Dewey avenue from their son, Ensign
William McDonald, who left with
the Bemidji naval division in April,
to the effect that he had been trans
ferred from the Philadelphia navy
yard barracks to the position of se
nior naval officer of a transport at
Norfolk, Va., which is expected to
leave soon for France. He telis his
parents not to worry as the govern
ment is taking every precaution to
guard transport ships and that a
transport with the usual convoy of
protecting vessels is as safe as the
Massachusetts in the Philadelphia!
navy yard.
$50 FINE ASSESSED
FOR ASSAULT GRIND
OF DISTRICT COURT
One more case, that of Oscar Swen
son, was settled today without trial
in district court. Swenson pleaded
guilty to a charge of assault in the
third degree and was sentenced to
pay a $50 fine or spend a 30-day
term in the county jail Although
the fine has not as yet been paid it
is expected that Swenson will pay it
some time this afternoon.
The court this morning started on
the case of the State vs Alex Mon
roe who is charged with robbery in
the second degree The jury had
not been completed by noon.
300,000 SOLDIERS TO
FRANCE.CHINA'S OFFER
Peking, Sept. 21.Announcement
is made in governmental circles that
the Chinese cabinet, provided the
Entente powers approved, is willing
to send 300,000 soldiers to France
in compliance with the French re
quest.
An appeal has been made to the
United States to aid China financial
ly to equip her troops.
REWARD FOR CHINA
FOR ENTERING WAR
(By United Press)
Tokio, Sept. 21.China is to be
rewarded for her participation in the
war with the allies, Pekin advises.
It Is said the reward will be the post
ponement fthe Boxer Indemnities
for ten years and the appointment of
Chinese and allied officials to inves
tigate and revise the tariff.
DEHLY RETURNS.
Deputy Sheriff George Denley re
turned this morning from Baudette
where ae went Wednesday on official
business.
NOT YESTERDAY'S NEWS, BUT TODAY'S NEWS TODAY-BY THE GREAT UNITED PRESS
THREE FIGHTERS FROM THIS HOME
Photo by American Press Association.
A new flag authorized by the government which marks bouses of men
serving the country abroad. Each star means man.
SALESMAN WITH I. W. W.
1NITIAXSGETS BEATING
AT THIEF BJVEE FALLS
w*~?r ji
'Thief', RJver 'Falls, Minn,,
Sept. 21.The initials I. W.
W. on a suitcase belonging to
I. W. Ward of this city nearly
cost that gentleman his life
while making his usual calls
on his North Dakota trade.
Some one spied the marks
and when the owner returned
for his suitcase he was set up
on and before he could explain
things he was severely beaten.
TEXAS LIVE STOCK
MEN ARE MODEST
(By United Press)
Washington, Sept. 21. Lower
rates and a devision of traffic rules
of live stock transportation is virtu
ally all the railroads requested in
their complaint filed with the inter
state commerce commission by the
Texas Live Stock Exchange. Three
of the largest shipoers in the coun
try are represented.
COCHRAN WILL LOG
TEN MILLION FEET
ON BIG CONTRACT
George W. Cochran was in Park
Rapids yesterday and closed quite a
big contract with Connor & Wilson
to log 10,000,000 feet of timber this
winter near Benedict on the M. & 1
railroad.
The timber is owned by the Pine
Tree Manufacturing company of
Little Falls and is to be loaded on
cars and shipped there Mr. Coch
ran txpects to start work at once.
BAGLEY DOES HONOR
TO FIRST DRAFT QUOTA
(Special to Pioneer)
Bagley, Sept. 21. Clearwater
county's first draft quota will en
train this evening for Fort Dodge
and the members were the guests of
the people of Bagley today in a
fitting celebration ere their de
parture
All Bagley turned out to do its
bit. The boys were given a big ban
quet at the Clearwater hotel this af
ternoon by the civic organizations,
the Red Cross, village and other of
ficials. The hotel was profusely dec
orated and the business district is
flag bedecked.
Each of the members of the quota
was presented with a "joy" bag and
a five-dollar gold piece.
Following is the personnel of the
quota: Edwin Knoxvold, Odin Furu
seth, Peter Lindgren, Harry Gnne
lius, Daniel McBain, Edwin Larson,
Conrad A. Stockman, Willie H. Wil
lison. Car) L. Aask.
^&*
EXTRA!
Greetings
From Quota
AboardTrain
That Beltrami county's first quota
of called men for the national army
which left Bemidji this morning are
not forgetful at this eventful time
is evidenced by the following tele
gram received by the Pioneer at 3
o'clock this afternoon:
Bemidji Pioneer,
Bemidji, Minn.
Drainerd, Sept. 81.Citizens
of Beltrami county, greeting and
sincere appreciation of farewell
given ns. All are well and
happy and going big. All towns
on the way have given ns a cor
dial welcome.
(Signed)
SELECTED MEN.
has been shipped into this city since
last springand that was received
last week only after frantic appeals.
Last season approximately 1,000 tons
had been received up to this time.
ANOTHER LUMBER
INDUSTRY LOOKS
AT RUGGLES TIMBER
Bemidji may secure another lum
ber industry, H. Stagberg of Stag
berg Bros Floodwood, being in Be
midji, a guest of J. J. Opsalil, while
looking over the Ruggles timber
with a view of erecting a saw mill
here and logging the famous Rug
gles holdings
Stagberg Bros, have for several
years been in the lumber business at
Floodwood but the depletion of tim
ber are seeking to move and have
two propostions, one being the Rug
gles timber were on a tract north of
Virginia
BELIEVE GOVERNMENT
SHOULD FIX PRICES
(By United Press)
Atlantic City, Sept. 21.Price fix
ing by the government of all essen
tial products is recommended in a
resolution of the war convention of
the American Chamber of Commerce
today.
SPECIAL ELECTION
FOR SCHOOL BONDS
There will be a special election for
the issuance of $8,000 in bonds for
completing the new Lincoln school
in the Fifth ward tomorrow evening
at the Central school. The polls will
be open from 7 to 9 o'clock.
The bonds are to be used to fully
complete the building to make it
adequate for itc needs and properly
heated and equipped.
TJ. S. TROOPS PREPARED.
Washington, Sept. 21.American
troops in France are to be supplied
fully with trained forces to deliver
gas and liquid fire attacKs, according
to army general orders made public
today, giving the organisation of spe
cial engineer units to handle- these
devices of modern trench warfare.
^___
THRONG AT DEPOT
BIDS GOD SPEED
63 ANSWER FINAL
THIEF RIVER FALLS FACES
SHORTAGE OF HARD COAL
Thief River Falls, Minn., Sept. 21
Only forty-three tons of hard coal" might battle forthe Stars and Stripes
HECOLORS
MORE HONOR MEN
In addition to the names of
the men who reported to the
draft summons yesterday as
published in the Pioneer, the
following were summoned to
fill the official quota and left
with the contingent for Fort
Dodge:
Reuben W. Service.
Warren H. McLane.
John Hilton David.
Otto M. Nelson.
George C. Khingness.
Arthur Gish.
Albert Dannenberg.
James H. Klungness.
Bemidji sent away her first quota
of the Beltrami county draft to the
national army this morning. Bel
trami county sent 63 of her young
men to Fort Dodge, Des Moines,
Iowa, where they will be moulded
into soldiers. Bemidji waB at the
depot when the squad left in charge
of John M. Herbert, designated by
Sheriff Johnson, and there was little
splurge incident to the boarding of
the train for the cantonment.
It was different than a uniformed
company of a national guard, famil
iar to all. It was a contingent of
young men drawn from various
walks of life, many of whom had
not the slightest idea of military
service. In six months, from a mot
ley group they will be hard trained,
alert and efficient soldiers ready for
finishing in modern methods of war
fare. It was the call of the govern
ment to its people and they were
responding for instruction that they
as finished fighters.
The train left the M. & I. depot
at 8:15, two coaches being set aside
for the boys. The depot was the
apex of long patriotic streamers and
with bunting festooned across ite
face. A large crowd was there at
an early hour and as the time for
departure neared the crowd had in
creased to large proportions with!
autos banked at the curbs far up
Beltrami avenue.
There was a halt at the depot and
a general shaking of hands and be
fore the men boarded the coaches.
As the train pulled out there was
a waving of hands, hats and hand
kerchiefs, and a few scattering
cheers, was an that punctured a
deep silence with the band playing
the national anthem. The crowd
stood as though stunned, it dawning
upon them at the finale the deep
significance of the occasion
As the train was waiting Morris
Kaplan placed aboard the coaches
carrying the boys three large boxes
of peaches, one case of plums and six
large baskets of grapes
Yesterday's Demonstration.
The demonstration yesterday was
the greatest in the history of Be
midji in many ways The parade
was fully a mile long and at Library
park, where the speaking was held,
a conservative estimate of several
placed the crowd at 3,000, said to
have been the largest gathering ever
in Bemidji
The Home Guard did not take part
in the parade owing to a misunder
standing of part of the committee on
arrangements. Captain Swinson was
ready and anxious and so were his
men to participate and fully expected
to be a big factor in the line.
Thanks to Bemidii.
Supper was served the drafted men
at the Presbyterian church by the
Red Cross. On behalf of the Red
Cross ladles, G. W. Harnwell, presi
dent of the Commercial club, pre
sented to each soldier a "housewife,"
a compact roll of flannel containing
an assortment of needles, pins, etc.,
handy for the men at any time. In
response, Roy Wheelock on behalf of
his comrades heartily expressed their
appreciation of what Bemidji had
done for them. About 90 were
served.
The evening was spent as the men
desired.
STORK BRIHQS TWO
Twin daughters were born to Mr.
and Mrs. William Davine at Hal
lock, Minn., Thursday of last week.
Mrs. Davine was formerly Miss Min
nie Olson, teacher in the Junior high,
school here two years ago.
.a
1
1
1
i f
i
i-
4
-s* ^/#i?^iJawC's"

xml | txt