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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, September 29, 1917, Image 1

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VOLUME XV. NO. 226.
iuA Prino
Chicago, Sept. 29.William D.
Haywood and thirty-five other lead
ers of the I. W. W. were arrested late
%esterday in a raid by United States
marshals in the local headquarters
of the organization. The arrests
were made as a result of indictments
returned by the Federal grand jury.
The arrests were the first to result
from the indictments and followed
hurried dispatch of deputy marshals
from the Federal building. The depu
ties jumped into automobiles donated
and driven by Chicago women, and
the prisoners were brought to the
United States marshal's office in th
same machines.
Besides Haywood the men arrested
Nkane,included
here William Brazier, Spo
Wash. Herbert R. Collie, San
Francisco James FusBe, Des Moines,
Iowa, and Earl Lewis, Huntington,
W. Va.
Indictments Returned.
Chicago, .SgPt. 29.Indictments
against I. WT^W. leaders were re
turned by a Federal grand jury here
yesterday afternoon. The names and
even the number of defendants were
omitted from a statement by Dis
trict Attorney Clyne for which he
termed the "obvious reason" that a
large number of the accused reside
outside this Federal district and are
^^to |ie.jUEated. MMated that
only Traders, regarded as directly Cul
pable themselves have been named.
Mr. Clyne said:
"The astounding feature which
stands out at the conclusion of the
investigation and which is well cal
culated to make patriotic persons
shudder with alarm, is found in the
disclosure of the number of men en
joying the protection of the govern
ment who are so far unmindful of
social duties and obligations as to
advocate openly the most vicious
forms of sabotage, particularly in in
/clustries engaged in furnishing war
munitions."
GERMANY RETICENT ABOUT
"^EVACUATION OF BELGIUM
(By United Press)
Copenhagen, Sept. 29.Germany
has not announced her willingness
to evacuate Belgium and territories
Bhe now occupies, Chancellor Mich
aelis is said to have stated, say Ber
lin dispatches.
fLAMING CABOOSE IS
BROUGHT TO BEMIDJI
TO PUT BLAZE OUT
The generally accepted way in
case of a destructive fire is to have
the fire squelching apparatus pro
ceed to the fire, but last night the
fire was brought to where it was
doused, and it happened somewhat
thusly:
A caboose on the M. & I. railroad,
used by the telegraph and linemen
crews, mysteriously caught Are be
tween Nary and Bemidji. The train
crew uncoupled the burning caboose
and brought it to Bemidji where a
quietus was placed upon the flames.
VERDICT FOR ELLIS IN
LAWSUIT OVER CEDAR
The suit brought to recover for
cedar claimed to have been sold by
Samuel W. Ellis to the American
3edar company came to a close in
district court this morning when the
jury's verdiot was announced in fa
vor of Mr. Ellis for $936.81.
After the sale of the cedar was
made by Mr. Ellis, the cedar was
destroyed by fire. The purchaser
had not inspected the cedar before
the fire and had failed to insure it
and the question involved was wheth
er the title had passed to the com
pany.
The jury found that the title had
passed and that the inspection was
be made merely for the purpose
%jf determining the total amount to
be paid.
Graham M. Torrance represented
Mr. Ellis in the case and Harrison
L. Schmitt of the law firm of Kerr,
Fowler, Schmitt & Furber of Min
neapolis represented the American
Cedar company.
HAYWOOD TAKEN
AFTER INDICTMENT
BYFEDERALGRAND
JURY WOMENHELP
GOVERNMENT ARRESTSI.
First Move to
OustTreason
In the Senate
(By United Press)
Washington, Sept. 29.The first
move to oust Senator LaFollette from
the senate opened today with an in
troduction by Senatof Frank Kollogg
of Minnesota. Resolutions, adopted
by the Minnesota Public Safety
mission, demanding LaFolletteTscom-
ex
pulsion, were referred to the commit
tee on privileges and elections.
LaFollette was not in the senate
when the resolution was presented.
He entered a moment later and dis
played no hint of feeling. Few mem
bers of the senate knew what was
in the resolution at is was not read.
It was presented SB an ordinary peti
tion. Most senators were: talkjttg
among themselves without knowl- ^_^ vj
edge^nVthe srgntflcanee otKen^T* $?&p^*^7^%
action. As the newB spread, ths Sen- ab
ators gathered in groups. lMlMl-.
lette's seat was completely isolated
Shortly afterward the senate went
into executive session.
TW" MORE DEATHS
(By United Press)
Washington, Sept. 29.Two more
deaths are reported in the American
expeditionary force under Genera!
Pershing, are announced by the war
department today.
CONGRESSEXONERATED
FROM CHARGES OF
KAISER CORRUPTION
(By United Press)
Washington, Sept. 29.A state
ment exonerating any members of
congress from charges of receiving
German gold was Issued by the state
department today. The state depart
ment has no evidence that would con
nect members of congress with the
expenditure of money by the German
embassy, Acting Secretary Polk de
clared today.
TOWNLY SAYS $1.90
IS WHAT FARMERS
GET FOR $4.06WHEAT
(By United Press)
St. Paul, Sept. 29.A. C. Town
ley, head of the Non Partisan league,
today stated the farmers were get
ting only 11.90 for their wheat which
cost many $4.06 per bushel, answer
ing charges that many farmers are
"profiteering" for higher wheat
prices.
BRITISH FRONT QUIET
(By United Press)
London, Sept. 29.Beyond artil
lerying, General Haig has nothing to
report today from the British front.
SUPPLIES. NOT MEN. ARE
NEEDED MOST BY ALLIES
(By United Press)
Washington, Sept. 29.American
troop transportation to Europe dur
ing the next six months may be offi
cially curtailed, owing to the frank
ness of the British minister on the
U-boat menace. The question has
arisen whether the United States is
crowding her side of the struggle
by sending over thousands of sol
diers, instead of moving supplies.
While the allied man power is
stronger than Germany's they would
have a better chance if well supplied
than if unsupplied and more Ameri
can troops were sent over. For ev
ery American soldier sent over his
weight In supplies must be sent over
every 30 days.
A
LETTER WRITTEN BY
OAINEY TO HIS PARENTS
"We are somewhere at sea, and all
is fine," was the word received this
morning by Mrs. Dan Galney from her
son, John, who is with the contingent
who is with the forestry contingent
that left for France with the Tenth
engineers some time ago. "I have
everything I want except a home,"
was his answer to a former letter
asking if there was anything fftat
could be sent him.
"I have not been seasick yet, but
most of the fellows have, and sup
pose I will get mine yet," was all he
said about the briny deep.
About twenty of the boys from
Bemidji are on the same ship with
Mr. Gainey. The letter was dated
September 12, which shows that the
boys are undoubtedly in France at
this time.
SEATTLE WORKERS STRIKE
(By United Press)
Seattle, Wash., Sept. 29.Ten
thousand shipyard workers and metal
workers doing work for the ship
yards, struck today.
SWEDEN PREPARING
TO REMOVE ALIENS
(By United Press)
Stockholm, Sept. 29.The foreign
office is preparing to send ships to
America to bring back Swedes who
do not wish to serve in the American
army, according to the newspaper,
Tidende. NORTHERN RUSS ARMY
ABSOLVED FROMSHAME
(By United Press)
Petrograd, Sept. 29.The Russian
army on the northern front is ab
solved from blame for the retreat on
the Riga front, in a report made to
day by the commiasaire there.
a*k buVHtSik*. SKS-
NOT YESTERDAYS NEWS, BUT TODAY'S NEWS TODAY-BY THE GREAT UNITEDrPRESST
BEMIDJI DAILY PIONEERv-
BEMIDJI. MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENINC SEPTEMBER 29. 1917
EXPERT AT THROWING HAND GRENADES
Ph(*o by American Prssa Asspctatlon.
Vtenctr.instructors are amazed at the accuracy of the American troops in
tomb throwing, -attributing it to baaehall. In the picture is seen one of
tat nan at an officers* training camp learning to throw hand grenades. He is
by ajcreen of netting from the' return throw of the man opposite
I ,t
NowCorporal
Camp Dodge
Harry Bowers, "No. 258" of the
drafted men, the first number drawn,
has written relatives in Bemidji that
he was successful in passing his ex
amination at Camp Dodge, and has
been appointed corporal.
BOUTELL, UMAPOUS
BOOSTER SORT
GIVES VIEWS OFBEMIDJI
\7. D. ilell of Boutell Bros.
.'leapolit, a good boster for Be-
r.k' i. He a booster of the right
(irt Mr -p- tell visited Bemidji
this summer on an outing and he has
just written a letter to Secretary
Lamson of the Commercial club in
which Mr. Boutell says:
"You have the best town of its
size I was ever in. Your streets are
well taken care of and well lighted.'
Mr. Boutell is one of the leading
business men in Minneapolis and is
widely travelled, and when he states
Bemidji is the best town of its size
he was ever in it comes froni Ottq
who is in a position to makte loom
parison intelligently.
Birchmont is "the best sumnter r.e-
sort in Minnesota. In fact it is a
credit to the entire state," adds Mr.
Boutell, and Mr. Boutell has seen
every resort in Minnesota worth
looking at.
And as the letter continues Mr,
Boutell frankly tells Bemidji a cou
ple of things which have been dis
cussed at length by Bemidji people,
and what he has to say brings home
what a visitor Bemidji asks to ct.me
encounters. He urges a good road
from the city to Birchmont and says,
"The road you have there is a dis
grace to any community." He also
calls attention to the road between
Bemidji and Cass Lake and says
"people come up one way and return
another."
That letter is worth careful con
sideration and should prove of much
value to Bemidji.
ANDTHE FORDSRAMBLED
RIGHT ALONG AT FALLS
Red Lake Falls, Minn., Sept. 29.
Charles Ford, Martin Ford and their
Ford car went over the embankment
north of the Red Lake River bridge
here. The Ford car sustained a
broken front wheel and a smashed
windshield but the other fords es
caped injury save for minor bruises.
GULF STORM LEAVES
WRECKAGE IN WAKE
(By United Press)
Mobile, Ala., Sept. 29.Pensacola,
Fla., and environs are lost to the
outside world, a 100-mile gale hav
ing cut off all communication. The
hurricane of yesterday left half the
wreckage along the Gulf coast and
is scheduled to sweep back to sea
again. Storm warnings are posted
from Jacksonville to Fortress Mon
roe. Fire destroyed the Chamber of
Commerce Cotton Exchange with a
loss of $300,000.
..fiLf. jtftf-Ata
#/AJ^?^
^S
"QUILTY," JURY'S VERDICT IN DUNNING CASE
.This afternoon, at 2 o'clock,
Dunning was sentenced by Judge
.Stanton to,two years in the Min
nesota, penitentiary. A stay of
proceedings was then granted
for 30 days pending an .appeal.
''Bonds were fixed at $2,000
which Dunning had no trouble
in furnishing.
The first prosecution under thp
new state I. W. W. law, enacted
April 13, 1917, tried in the state
Of "Minnesota, resulted in a victory
for Graham, M. Torrance, county at
torney of,Beltrami county, when the
jury which heard the case of Jess
Dunning, member of the Industrial
Workers of the World, returned a
verdict of guilty at 9 o'clock last
night after being out 30 hours, with
the recommendation that the court
extend cleniency.
Dunning,. Who was, until run out
of the city in the citizens' roundup,
secretary of the Bemidji branch of
the Industrial Workers of the World
and was" cbjjrjjed with,tpublicLy dis
.Ittg^boRS *B4d. JiienttUfc*^1
.antt advocating* sabotage, wh
Is defined by the Minnesota state
law as the malicious injury to or
destruction of the property of an
employer by an employe. It was at
the I. W. W. headquarters in Be
midji that Dunning committed the
offense, he being in personal charge.
Representative Jury.
The case was tried Wednesday and
Thursday before a jury composed of
men of every political belief. If
was a jury selected from every part
of Beltrami county and one which
weighed carefully the facts in the
case and the law without prejudice.
The case was conducted fairly in
every particular and without the
slightest incident to mar the proce
dure, and this fact has been the
source of much favorable comment
throughout the city.
Effect Far Reaching.
The result of the trial will have
a good effect upon Bemidji, Bel
trami county and the state of Min
nesota. It took County Attorney
Torrance and Beltrami county to
show the state where Beltrami coun
ty stands in upholding the laws of
the state and nation and co-operation
with the government in the defense
FIRST CONVICTION
UNDERI.W.W.LAW
BELTRAMI SHOWS
STATE HE STAND
'DESERTION' CHARGE IN
FAILURE TO REPORT
WHEN DRAFT CALLS
A person who fails to report to his
local board for military service at
the time specified in his order to re
port is a deserter, according to re
ports issued by Provost General
Crowder, and received by Sheriff
Johnson.
A reward of $50 has been offered
by the government and is payable for
the delivery of such deserters to the
nearest army post or a mobilization
camp.
If the person is found to be a wil
ful deserter he will be prosecuted
as such before a court martial If
not a wilful deserter he will be sent
to a mobilization camp.
TO WACO CAMP
Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Achenbach have
received a letter from their son,
Lester, stating that he left Camp
Douglas yesterday for Waco, Tex
He had been stationed at Camp Doug
las since July 15.
22 DEAD, 66 INJURED,
KNOWN WRECK TOLL
(By United Press)
Tulsa, Okla., Sept .29.Twenty-
two are dead and 65 injured, is the
known toll of a headon collision of
passenger trains on the Frisco road
last night. Disregarding orders on
the part of one of the engineers is
said to have been responsible.
fra.fr 'i"~fr i*t ^M.n^ SLrcji*
i,. '$*(.5if $3$
FORTY FIVE CENTS PEE MONTH
Beltrami County's
County Attorney
Graham M. Torrance.
of its honor, and throughout the day
County Attorney Torrance has been
the recipient of hearty congratula
tions upon all sides.
Stamp of Disapproval.
The prosectftion was conducted
aolely by Mr. Torrance from its in
ception He personally conducted
the investigation which resulted in
securing the evidence upon which
conviction was secured, and the re
sult plainly indicates that the people
of Beltrami county have forever
placed their stamp of disapproval
upon the teachings of a destructive
principle which would tend to para
lyze the efforts of the government in
carrying on the war to certain vic
tory.
Speaks for State.
The verdict will declare to the
people of the entire state that Min
nesota, its lawmakers and its entire
public officials offer no haven of
refuge to members of the Industrial
Workers of Ihe World or any other
organization that attempts to un
dermine the very foundations upon
which the government is built.
Beltrami Makes Good.
The entire community is to be
congratulated. The atmosphere has
been cleared and purged of an evil
that lias been eating the vitals of both
city and county. Beltrami county
will go down in the annals of Min
nesota as the first county to act un
der the new law, and Bhe made good
FISHING IN RED LAKE
HAS BEEN APPROVED
W. L. Dickens, superintendent of
the Red Lake Indian agency, has re
ceived a telegram from Washington
stating that the fishing matter has
been approved on the condition men
tioned in a letter from Mr. Dickens,
with the understanding Mr. Dickens
supervises the fishing to conserve the
rights of the Indians.
COOL LOWERSAMATEUR
GOLF COURSE RECORD
Ira Cool of the Country club has
lowered his own amateur record for
the nine holes on the golf course,
from 45, the course record, to 42.
The new record was made as fol
lows: 4-5-4-3-6-5-4-5-642.
Picked scores for the course have
been figured up, Mr. Cool's amateur
playing and J. A. Hopkins, profes
sional of the club. Mr. Cool's picked
score shows a total of 33 for the nine
holes, while Mr. Hopkins* score is 28.
The figures are:
Cool4-4-3-3-5-3-3-3-533. Hopkins3-3-1-3-4-4-3-3-428.
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