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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, March 01, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1918-03-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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BEIN PERFORMED
BY HOM E GUAR
MRGOVERNMENT
Meeting Trains Night arid Day to
Ascertain Whether Men Are
Complying With Orders.
BETWEEN 3(50 AND 400 MEN
HAVE BEEN "SET EIGHT"
& Two Alleged Slackers Brought in By
,J Company Officers Deserters
I Held On Wire.
1 Thomas Swinson, chief clerk,
Beltrami county draft board,
I Bemidji Minn.
Minot, N. D.," March 1.Jesse
Eastwood, Minot, N. D., held a de
serter by his local board. Hold.
14 Harley Eastwood is a delinquent
v-.iarid
fleV~"
his board orders him sent to the
nearest department of justice.
Ward County Draft Board,
Minot, N. D.
What is authoratively conceded to
be the beat work being done by any
company of the Minnesota Home
Guard is in full swing in Bemidji
and vicinity by Company of Be
midji, commanded by Captain Thom
as Swinson.
The company has for the past sev
eral days been hard at work day
and dight straightening out scores
of men who have been unintention
ally negligent regarding their ques
tionnaires and draft registry duties
and the results have been of inea:
timable value, not only tp the men
themselves but to the state auth
orities.
In fact, between 300 and 400 have
been looked' after in this matter and
the work is sflll progressing. With
few exceptions, the men who have
been dilatory have had no intention
*Tof not complying to the letter with
the spirit of the government and
'.^.itliese are given the information they-
***'"''heretofore were not. aware of.
Another Phonv Report.
.There are also many who have un
intentionally not complied with the
draft order and the questionnaire
and these have been enlightened. For
some -unknown reason it seems word
had reached St. Paul that hundreds
of woodsmen were leaving their work
in this vicinity, but only two were
discovered leaving and they were on
their way to thejr home city to again
register as they supposed. It was
explained to them and they return
ed. Others had no papers -at all.
Some had them at their homes. Oth
ers were given instructions about
registering at their home places and
others registered here. It has been
a good work.
Two Alleged Slackers.
Yesterday, Sergeant Harry E.
Reynolds, Sergeant Bert Barker and
Corporal Archie Naugle of the guard
drove to a point near Wilton and
brought back Harley and Jesse East
wood, who had registered at Minot,
N. D., .as slackers. They were lo
cated in the woods near Wilton and
the party arrived home about 10
o'clock.
Holdine Alleged Deserter.
Curtis Adder is being held at the
county jail on a charge of desertion,
he being rounded up on a wire from
Helena, Mont., and an officer will
come for him. Adder, it is claimed,
was called in August but failed to
respond.
There are nine men in the county
jail, taken by guard members, await
ing investigating.
AMERICAN CONSUL
LEAVES PETROGRAD
(By United Press)
Washington, March 1.(Official)
A state department message today
says American Consul Treadwell and
staff1
at Petrogra have left for Vol
ogda, turning over the affairs of the
United States to the Norwegian con
sul.
IN GERMAN HANDS
London, March 1.Pskoff is in
German' hands, despite contrary ru
mors, says an Exchange Telegraph
dispatch today.
ALLIED ENVOYS ARE
LEAVING PETROGRAD
(By United Press)
Tokio, March 1.-The Japanese
ambassador at Petrograd has notified
his government that allied envoys
are leaving Petrograd.
United States Puzzled.
Washington, March 1.The..gov-
ernment is finding some difficulty in
determining its course regarding
Japan's action in Siberia. It is likely
an answer will soon be sent. The
authorities here are also puzzled over
Germany's intent in Russia.
Profiteering
UnderU.S.Eyes
(By United Press)
Chicago, March 1.At today's
session pt' the federal trade commis
sion probe of the packers, Francis
Heney, attorney "for the commission
again struck at the fpod administra
tion.
Heney read into the records letters
alleging that J.' P. Cotton, head of
the food administration's meat com
mission, and E. Dana- Durand, an
other Hoover official, and professor
at the University of Minnesota, gave
secret information- to the packers
for their personal advantage.
Heney plainly intimated that food
profiteering was going on under the
eyes of the national food administra
tion.
Probe to Continue.
"Chicago, March 1.The packing
industry probe will continue, despite
the pleas of the packers /that it may
hamper the work of the war, Counsel
Heney for "the commission said today.
IITII BATTALION BAND
OF BEMIDJI ORDERS
MILITARY UNIFORMS
Today the Bemidji band placed the
order for its new uniforms as the
Eleventh. Home GUard |b|attalicn
band and expects to receive- them in
a few days. The uniforms will be
of the regulation khaki pattern of
guard members and will be worn by
the band on many occasions.
The band is planning tanothor
concert March 7 as a band benefit,
the money derived to be used as :i
fund with which, to make purchases
for the band' in the way of equip
ment. It'is the intention to have
the concert an entirely local talent
affair' and the band will take a
prominent.,, part,.,v A feature already
arranged for.is'a hoys' choir of eight
voices. There will be other features
to be announced later.
AMERICAN DESTROY TRENCHES
FROM WHENCE CAME GAS FIRE
(By United Press)
With the American" armies afield,
March 1.With the aid of French
observers the Americans tore the
trenches from whence came the gas
attack of the Germans to shreds
with artillery. The Yankee gunners
kept shells screaming at the enemy
trenches at the rate of one a minute.
The casualties resultant from the
gas attack now number six, one more
Sammy "carrying on."
RUSSIA NS DEMAND
HOLYWAR DECLARATION
(By Joseph Shaplen)
Correspondent, United Press
Petrograd, March 1.^Soviet com
missaires arriving from many Rus
sian cities are demanding a holy war
proclamation against the German in
vaders. They are advocating arming
the entire Russian populace.
District commissaires from the
larger cities are protesting against
the signing of the German peace.
Smaller cities and villages are in
favor of the German peace.
The enemy threw large forces
against the Orsha front and thou
sand armed Russian workmen are
digging trenches several miles be
yond Orsha. A battle is expected
momentarily. A Bolsheviki official
comminique says the German offen
sive has slowed down on account of
Russian resistance.
BEMIDJI MUST HUSTLE TO
SECURE SHORT TURN TRACTOR
A meeting of the subscribers to
Short Turn Tractor stock met at the
Commercial club rooms yesterday
and discussed with President Dahl
the details of the present organiza
tion and the prospects of locating
their plant in this city. Those pres
ent were very favorably impressed
with the merit of Mr. .Dahl's inven
tion and the opportunities it pre
sents for the location of a successful
industry in this city. At the meet
ing, Mr. Dahl read letters showing
that the Canadian government had
removed the duty on farm tractors
shipped into that country from the
United States and also a letter in
dicating that the federal i govern
ment was disposed to make an in
vestigation of tractor companies in
this country with a view to formul
ating a plan that would enaule them
to secure financial aid to further in
creased production of farm tractors.
Mr. Dahl leaves for Superior to
day to meet with the Commercial
club of that city which has become
interested in the possibility of lo
cating the Short Turn Tractor com
pany in Superior. At the request
of Bemidji subscribers, Mr. Dahl will
return to Bemidji the first of next
week and will defer his decision in
regard to the location of Ills plant
until his return.
111. YOU CAN'T GET TODAYS NE WS OUT OF YESTERDAYS PAPERS-READ TH
BEMIDJI. MINNESOTA. FRIDAY EVENING. MARCH 1.191 8.
MMM'******
DURING THE SNOW SEASON ON WEST FRONT
ilotorcycle well loaded with American soldiers making Its way through ft
Snowstorm back ol the lines in France.
NEGRO PUNS BUSY LAST
14 MINUTES IN TRENCH
Camp Funston, Kan.A big
negro of the Three Hundred For
ty-ninth supply train of the
Ninety-second (negro) division,
stationed here, was told that 14
minutes is the average time of a
man In the trenches, handling a &
machine gun.
"Ah'm goin' to pray de fust
two," he said, "put dem Germans
outen de way de next fo', spen'
fo' mo' in gettin' de kaiser and
den spend the last fo' in getting $
the goat of de crown prince."*
i
I I
i
!H"H"I"H'
I
I
I
QUINN HELPS 'PIONEER'
SECURE OFFICE DESK
FOR RECRUITING WORK
Would some one kindly loan a
desk to Raymond Magaurn, just ap
pointed Canadian recruiting officer
in Bemidji, as asked in the Pioneer
last evening. Would they? Well
WOULD they?
Tim Quinn of Nymore read the
appeal of the Pioneer in behalf of
Mr. Magaurn and in less time1
than
it takes to tell, Mr. Quinn was on
the phone and offered the use of the
desk for recruiting purposes as asked.
The desk is a good one and has
roll top and is well suif,ed for the
purposes desired, and the Pioneer ex
presses its appreciation to Mr. Quinn
for having co-operated with this pa
per in aiding Mr. Magaurn in his
patriotic duties.
WILL EXPLAIN TRACTOR
Howard A. .Farrell of Cokato will
be at the Commercial club rooms at
2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon to ex
plain any points about the Short
Turn tractor to any one interested.
Mr. Farrell has used one of the trac
tors on his farm fori the past year
and has been asked to tell the people
of Bemidji his experience with tht
tractor and what he thinks of it.
He has consented to come and will
be glad to answer any questions.
DIES I N WEST
Mrs. Jack Falls has received the
sad news of the death of her cousin,
'Louis Villemin, age 17, who died in
California Wednesday. Mr. Ville
min was in perfect health when he
enlisted only a short time ago, and
it is thought the various tests he
had to go through and the different
serums used in the tests caused spi
nal fever, from which he died.
PEACE OF FAR EAST
TO BE SAFEGUARDED
(By United Press)
London, March 1.Announce
ments are published in Tokio, citing
the necessity for safeguarding the
peace of the far east. Some quar
ters are apprehensive of enemy sub
marines and aeroplanes operating
from Vladivostok.
Resent Infringement.
San Francisco, March 1.Col
Nicholai Alexandrovitch ,istshe
vevsky, Russian guard here, enroute
to Washington, stated that 80,000
Siberian cossacks will oppose any in
fringement on Siberia's sovereignty.
He says Siberia is not occupied by
anJan with bloody and stubborn re
sistance.
More radical elements in Vladivos
tok threaten to burn the city and
the immense stores of munitions
there, rather than have them cap
tured.
DAILY PIONE
Bill Favored
For Control
O Lumbering
(By United Press)
Washington, March 1.The sen
ate military affairs committee today
reported favorably the bill placing
the lumber industries in the presi
dent's hands.
DETROIT QUINTET MEETS
BEMIDJI AT THE ARMORY
At the armory tonight the "Be-
midji high school basketball team is
expecting to meet the strongest op
position of the season when the fast
Detroit five is planning to carry
away the long end of the score.
If Detroit should win it will be
the first time the local quintet has
beerf defeated on the local floor this
season and every member of the lo
cal team will enter the contest with
grim determination to win and each
player is in top-notch condition and
fully able to go at high speed the
entire forty minutes. Game called
8:15 o'clock.
HAYNER STILL RETAINS
OLD TIME SKILL HIGH
POINT WINNERONTRACK
Harold Hayner of Bemidji, former
star all 'round athlete of the Bemidji
high school, still retains his old time
skill and prowess, and in a field meet
held at Fort Crockett, Galveston,
Texas, he was the (biggest point win
ner for his company in the Eighth
regiment of marines in station there.
Hayner is now Corporal Hayner.
The Bemidji boy cleaned up the
100-yard dash in a strong field, ne
gotiating the century in 10:2-5.. He
also stepped the 220 in 23:2%, in
hot competition, and crossed the tape
by a. comfortable margin. He step
ped the fastest mile in the relay in
4:2 2-5, and took second in the run
ning broad jump with 19 feet, 3 in
ches, short just three inches from
the winner.
There were over 3,000* entries in
the big meet, all the companies being
represented in a program of events.
In a letter to his father he asks for
his track shoes, so it is evident ho
will be heard from again in athletics.
GERMAN REPORTS CAPTURE
TEN AMERICAN PRISONERS
(BULLETIN)
(By United Press)
Berlin, March 1.(Official)
Near Chavignon our storm troops
captured ten American prisoners.
HOSTESS AT TEA
Mrs. A. T. Carlson will be hostess
at a missionary tea this evening at
her home.
NEAR-BEER MAKERS
ARE ALSO RESTRICTED
(By United Press)
Washington March 1.Njear-beer
makers are limited to 70 per cent of
grain and other materials used last
year, the food administration ruled
today. Hoover says temperance
drink manufacturers must observe
the same regulations as beer and ale
makers are required to observe. He
says bakers may tise rye flour aa
wheat substitute only until March
81.
J.
.,^,.^v-wy^i^y"f^iii"
Again, the "eternal triangle"a
husband, a wife and the "other
man"stood unmasked in the sec
ond day or the trial of Roland Hen
rionnet, charged with slaying Oscar
Nelson of November 15, by shooting.
It was Chief of Police Frank B.
Ripple who introduced to the case
this phase of the tragedy and one
which, it seems, is to play a leading
role as the trial progresses.
It was after O. T. Nelson, a bro
ther of the victim of the shooting,
had identified the clothing taken
from the body of Nelson after he was
shot, that Ripple took the stand as
the first important witness ot, the
day.
The chief told of receiving the po
lice call the morning of the shoot
ing and when leaving the station
met William Chichester in an auto
and rode with him to the scene of
the fracas. Witness testified to en
tering the bank and approaching
Henrionnet who said, "Gues I'm the
man you're looking for."
Taken to Hotel.
Henrionnet requested that he be
taken first to the Markham to room
62 which request was granted, the
chief taking a box of cartridges from
Henrionnet before making the trip.
The chief also secured the revolver
from Mr. Kruger, who picked it up
from the walk where Henrionnet had
thrown it after finishing his deadly
work.
According to the chief, he showed
the weapon to Henrionnet and asked
him if that was the gun, to which
Henrionnet replied, that it was.
The Third Link.
The chief further testified that
he asked Henrionnet why he had shot
Neison, and received a reply to the
effect that Nelson had been too at
tentive to Henrionnet's wife, and
he stated Henrionnet added "And
there are others."
Upon entering the hotel Henrion
net directed the chief to look at the
hotel register and pointed to certain
names on a page.
The chief related also that his
prisoner did not appear at all ex
cited, and that on the way to the
police station he stated that he
wanted Nelson to enlist and la
ter changed lus mind, because he
thought him no good to the country
and therefore shot him.
Enter "the Handkerchief."
In the cross examination, Mr. Mc
Donald brought out the point that
Henrionnet met Nelson at the City
Drug store and that after the shoot
ing he told the chief that he wanted
to get a handkerchief with Nelson's
initials on it, which was supposed
to be in a certain room in the hotel.
The state then offered as exhibits
Oscar Nelson's coat, vest, pants, and
the revolver with which Henrionnet
did the shooting, a box of cartridges
and some bullets, and then rested.
Defense Be&rins.
In outlining the plan of defense,
M!r. McDonald went into the life
of Roland Henrionnet since child
hood, showing where he had been
employed after graduating from col
lege and that he had lived out at
Spokane and Seattle, Wash., for his
health and that upon his return to
Bemidji of his entering the sana
torium at Puposky.
How Oscar Nelson and Roland Hen
rionnet were considered the best of
friends and that they were room
mates at the A. P. Henrionnet home
at one time.
He then traced, step by step, the
-business changes made by Henrion
net up to the time of the shooting.
TemDorarv Insanity?
It is apparent that the defense will
endeavor to show by witnesses that
Henrionnet did not intend to shoo!
Nelson when he purchased the re
volver, but that later incidents
prompted the deed. It is apparent
that the defense expects to show that
Henrionnet's reason temporarily left
him and that he was provoked by
certain alleged actions on the part
of Nelson.
Ray McKnight of Puposky was the
first witness called by the defense.
He stated that he was hired to drive
Mrs. Henrionnet and a nurse from
the Lake Julia sanatorium to Be
midji.
Miss Arvilla Patterson was llie
next witness. She merely gave the
information that she was on duty
as clerk in the office of the hotel
on the night of the thirteenth of No
vember.
Trvst in Confectionery.
Gus Brown, of the Bemidji Candy
Kitchen, was next called and told
of the meeting of Oscar Nelson and
Mrs. Roland Henrionnet in his place
of business on November 15, about
16 minutes before the shooting oc-
ll lljWI^II^p^ll^lljllll^ljnl
$[ |"0RTY-FIVE CENTS PER MONTH
COMES INTO/, (EW
I N MURDiT#*TRIAL
STATE RESTS CASE
curred. He stated that Oscar had
used the telephone* and that he was
in conversation, with Mrs. Henrion
net at one of the tables while her
companion sat alone at another table.
Court adjourned at noon for din
ner.
OPENING OF TRIAL
Testimony tending to show that
Roland Henrionnet fired five shots"
from a revolver at Oscar Nelson the
foretfbon of November 15, at the cor
ner of the Northern National bank,
and testimony showing that Nelson
died November 18 In St. Anthony's
hospital as the result of being struck
three times by bullets fired from the
revolver held in Henrionnet's hand,
was the beginning of the trial of
Henrionnet yesterday afternoon in
District court, the accused being
charged with murder.
Court Room Crowded.
The opening of the trial was slow.
The jury was completed late yester
day forenoon and at 1:30 the first
witness was examined. State's At
torney Graham M. Torrance repre
sents the People of the State and
E. E. McDonald is defending.
The court room was crowded to
its capacity with relatives and
friends of the principals, and those
personally interested in the affair
and morbid curious. With his coun
sel sat Henrionnet, as dapper as
ever, calmly facing the ordeal. In
the seats in front sat relatives of
the defendant. Brothers and other
relatives of the slain young bank
teller sat with the rest of the spec
tators, they cqnjlng from distant
points to be present.
Revolver Exhibit "A."
Before the trial had proceeded far,
County Attorney Torrance introduced
as exhibit "A" the blue.,steel revol
ver with which the crime was alleged
to have been committed. The empty
shells from the gun were introduced
as exhibit "B." The blue blood
stained coat worn by Nelson, show
ing-the powder marks and two Jag
ged bullet holes was exhibit "C"
and the vest was exhibit "D."
Eyewitnesses of the shooting told
of the affair, stories agreeing in the
main.
The movements of Henrionnet were
traced from the Lake Julia Sanator
ium the morninfc he left for Be
midji, the murdjpr occuring a few
hours after his arrival.-
Heard Henrionnet Phone.
Mrs. Charles Durand of Puposky,
whose husband conducts the general
store and postoffice in Puposky, told
of overbearing Roland telephone to
his mother not to allow Ruth (Hen
rionnet's wife) to have the baby,
and he also mentioned a handker
chief.
(The handkerchief mentioned is
believed to refer to one claimed to
have been owned by Nelson and later
found between mattresses in the
Markham hotel).
Frank Porter, who came down on
the same train from Puposky, fol
lowed Mrs. Durand. He saw Hen
rionnet in the car and said he ap
peared rational and not the least dis
turbed.
Slaver Buvs Revolver.
N. E. Given, of the hardware firm
of Given Bros., testified to the pur
chase of the revolver by Henrionnet
and identified the gun introduced as
exhibit "A." He narrated how Hen
rionnet had entered the store the
forenoon of the tragedy and asked
to be shown a revolver as he said he
was required to take long walks
while at the sanatorium and that a
rifle was too heavy to carry. He also
further stated, according to testi
mony, that Henrionnet said he de
sired the revolver to shoot at birds
and other game as pastime. Two re
volvers were shown, one a target gun
and the other a blue steel revolver.
The latter was selected and a box
of cartridges to fit. Henrionnet then
left the store.
Burch On Scene.
C. H. Burch and Andrew Rust each
gave direct testimony as witnesses
of the shooting. Mr. Burch is an ex
tensive live stock dealer, who is fre
quently in Bemidji.
Mr. Burch testified that he was
standing directly in front of the
Northern National bank, close to the
entrance to the stairway, having just
stopped a moment. He was alone at
the time and was standing compla
cently when he heard two shots in
the stairway entrance almost at his
elbow. He turned to ascertain what
it was about, wlo be says Nelson
dashed out of the stairway door,
followed by Henrionnet. He said it
was the first time he had ever seen
the defendant. Henrionnet was CIOBO
behind Nelson, stated Mr. Burch, and
was carrying a revolver in one hand.
He described the revolver as being
a blue steel (identified gun intro
duced as similar if not the one in
question.) Henrionnet pointed the
revolver at Nelsonjmd_flred, the re
(ContInued~on Page Six)"
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