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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, October 17, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1918-10-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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BEMIDJIREADY
FOR ANYCALL
HOME GUARD,
MOTOR CORPS
Major Mitchell Issues Order
to All Units Fire Sir en
Will Sound Call.
SPLENDID WORK DONE
IN SUBDUING MENACE
Inquiry From St. Paul Shows
False Reports Are Spread
ing Throughout State
"-Bemid'ji is ready for any emerg
ency that might occur from foresf
fire, and has been since the deadly
sweep which begun last Saturday.
Home .guards and motor corps, as
well as many civilians stand ready
to leap at an instant's notice to an
swer any call for assistance, and the
following order, officially issued by
Major H. Z. Mitchell of the Twenty
first home guard battalion, is in full
effeCt'*
1
v
3
October 16, 1918
Headquarters 21st Battalion,
M. H. G.
Special Orders.
To Unit Commanders: In ac
cordance with orders from the
office of the adjutant general,
all home guard units in Bemidji
are hereby placed on duty sub
ject to, immediate call. This or
der will not at this time neces
sitate the actual mobilization of
of the forces but the men will
be instructed to hold themselves
in readiness to report promptly
at the city hall when an alarm
is given by the blowing of the
fire whistle.
Unit commanders will beheld
strictly resfew^We for the^p-
Pea*anc*tJkeSPt3aa*
and in
ures Co report Will be punished.
Appearance in uniform will not
be absolutely* necessary, though
desirable. Battalion headquar
ters have bee'h opened at the city
hall in charge of non-commis
sioned officers from .Company
"A." Appeals for assistance
should be phoned to 822.
By order of
MAJOR H. B. MITCHELL,
Commanding 21st Battalion.
A L." BARKER,
Lieut'.-Adjutant.
Doing Splendid Work.
The work done by the guard mem
bers arid motor corps members, as
"sisted by employes of Crookston mill
No 1, yesterday afternoon, demon
strated 'fully the activities and worth
of the military organizations. When
apprehension was felt as to the
destination of the fire to the east
of the mill district, the fire alarm
was sounded, forty automobiles mobi
lized ami the city hall -was the mecca
for guardsmen and civilians. The
big milL^lso "knocked off" work and
the autos, filled with men armed
with shovels, axes and other imple
ments, sped to the scene and in a
few -hours had the blaze completely
subdued. It originated from having
been set and had become a menace.
Members of the guard are on duty
constantly at the city hall and a
close watch is being kept ready for
prompt response.
Wild Reports Spread.
A long distance telephone UMjuiry
came to The Pioneer from the Unit
ed Press bureau at St. Paul, stating
that report had it that serious fire
'was menacing Bemidji. The inquirer
was set .at rest, that Bemidji was not
worrying in the least, that every
thing was as usual so far as forest
fires were concerned.
Another inquiry arrived today, re
ceived by President Warford of the
Red Cross chapter, asking for the
By Frank J. Taylor
(United Press Correspondent.)
With the American armies In
France, Oct. 2. (By Mail.)War has
made the world infinitely smaller, as
the following tale of remarkable re
unions along the front shows. It is
the story up to date of three brothers,
and it began back in California,
where they were in a college, two
years ago.
Several months before America
entered the war, these brothers were
seized with the desire to come to
France. At that time the big possi
bility was the volunteer ambulance
service, but owing to financial cir
cumstances but one brother could
come to Europe. Brother Number
One then was sent along, the other
Number Two thinking they might
never see him again.
About the time America entered
W^wWW^^p^^^m^. n^T-
BURNOUIST TURNS
PUBLIC SAFETY FUNDS
OYER TO SUFFERERS
Governor Burnquist, head of the
Minnesota public safety commission,
is on the ground where the terrible
forest fires took a large toll of life
and property and is personally look-
GOVERNOR BURNQUIST
ing after the relief of the devastated
district. Members of the commission
are also at the scene of the tragedy.
At a meeting of the commission
held at Moose Lake, the entire avail
able fund of the commission, amount
ing to 1284,000, was placed at the
disposal of the designated authori
ties for the relief of the sufferers.
There will be no special session of
the legislature, the governor declar
ed after the meeting, as it was agreed
that the calamity board is consti
tuted with sufficient legislative au
thority to appropriate all necessary
money.
CLOTHES FOR DESTITUTE
WANTED: RATIO NS
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
With the appeal of the Red Cross
for donations of clothing and shoes
for the fire sufferers, to be brought to
Red Cross salvage headquarters, 117
Third street Friday and Saturday,
the salvage campaign will terminate.
Those in charge of the salvage head
quarters will turn over to the Red
Cross for the benefit of the fire vic
tims what clothing and shoes are on
hand, which is considerable and all
in excellent condition, including
wraps, dresses for women and chil
dren, boys' clothing and men's attire.
The clothing donated to the sal
vage headquarters was for sale and
helped materially to swell the chap
ter fund, but the donations of cloth
ing for the stricken people will prac
tically clean up the supply of such
and make the maintenance of head
quarters not profitable.
All donations to the Red Cross.for
the fire victims should be serviceable.
They should consist of clothing for
men, women and children. Shoes are
wanted and everything that can be
of use to properly clothe the destitute
warmly for the winter now fast com
ing on.
Be sure and bring them to the sal
vage headquarters Friday and Satur
day.
REVOLUTION SEEN
AGAINST YOUNG TURKS
(By United Press.)
Geneva, Oct. 17.A revolution In
Constantinople against the young
Turks is growing.
number of refugees from the forest
fires in Bemidji. Two young ladies
are here, the only ones so classed,
but neither is ia need of any assist
ance, both being prominently con
nected and are Bemidji residents.
THREE BROTHERSMEETOFTEN
NEARFRANCE BATTLE FRONT
the war, Brothers Two and Three
had the Opportunity to come to
France in the same service, and
started for Ney York to embark.
There Brother Number Two joined
the aviation service, and parted from
Brother Number Three, the trio
figuring it was broken.
luck Is With Them.
Brother Number Tnree continued
to France, where by luck he en
countered Number One on a permis
sion from the French battlefront.
It was then both One and Three
were transferred into the same unit,
and sent to the Balkans, to serve
with the French army of the Orient.
They served there until their unit
was recalled, wondering all the thne
if they would ever see Brother Num
ber Two, the aviator, whom they
knew to be in England somewhere
(Continued on Page Four)
^H^i^#S^ y$W
Abdication of Kaiser Uncon
firmed Report Not Founded
Upon Fact, Statement
BOLSHEVISM IN GERMANY
THREATEN O REVOLT
British Reported in Outskirts
of Lille British Have
Begun New Attack
Bulletin.
(Bv United Press.)
Amsterdam. Oct. 17.-Official
denial of the abdication of the
kaiser was contained in a Ber
lin dispatch seeeived here today.
(By United Press
With the Americans in France,
Oct. 17.The capture of Grandpre
by the Americans resulted in the
collapse of the German defenses for
a considerable distance eastward.
The doughboys cleared Loges wood,
driving a sharp wedge at Buzancy.
Abdication Unconfirmed.
London, Oct. 17. Unconfirmed
rumors of the abdication of the
kaiser and German capitulation are
still circulating. The British Press
Bureau says the reports are not
founded upon fact.
Bolshevik Revolt Brews.
London, Oct. 17Three authora
tive sources reportthat unless peace
is effected Immediately, a Bolshevik!
revolution will break in Germany.
The socialists are alarmed.
British Capture Courtrai.
Paris, Oct. 17.The British cap
tured Courtrai after violent street
fighting and are reported, unofficial
ly, in the outskirts of Lille. ^Turco
ing and Roubai are threatened. The
British gained the heights dominat
ing the towns.
Belgians in Txiell.
Paris, Oct. 17.Belgian cavalry
has penetrated Txiell.
British Begin Attack.
London, Oct. 17.The British
have begun a new attack on a ten
mile front between Le Cateas and
Obtain at 5:20 this morning, and
General Hiag reports satisfactory
progress.
RELIEF COMMITTEE TO
HELP SOLDIER FAMILIES
IN INFLUENZA CASES
1
A a Booster tot tho Fourth Liberty Lomn Bond Solo Help Your Country Win moJtwmr
Mlt)Jl DAILY PIONE
VOLUME XVI. NO. 540 BEMIDJI, MINN., THURSDAY EVENING, OCT. 17, 1918 FORTY-FIVE CENTS PER MONTH
HONDEFENSES
COLLAPSE ON
YANKCAPTURE
OFGRANDPRE
Bulletin.
United Press.)
London. Oct. 17.-(Received 3:50
n. m.)The British occupied Ostend
this afternoon, says a battle front
dispatch.
(Bulletins.)
(Bv United Press.)
London. Oct. 17.Lille was cap
turned bv the allied forces today.
Battle front dispatches declare a
complete break has been effected
throueh by the allies in the second
line defense of the Germans.
Masses of cavalry are pouring
throueh the breach and reported to
have advanced nine miles.
BELGIANS AFTER OSTEND.
London. Oct. 17. The Belgians
are marching on Ostend. the former
German submarine base, say battle
front dispatches today.
October 15, 1918.
To the Families of the Beltrami
County Soldiers:
The civilian relief committee of
the Beltrami county chapter, Ameri
can Red Cross, requests that mem
bers of the soldiers* families that may
be attacked with Spanish influenza
advise our committee of such attack
and our committee will hold our
selves ready to extend such assist
ance, relief, .aid or advice as may
be possible. Any other person fur
nishing the same Information will be
doing us a favor.
Do not hesitate to notify us. This
is part of the work of the American
Red Cross.
E E. MCDONALD
Chairman
MRS. C. W. JEWETT,
Secretary
Civilian Relief Committee. Ameri
can Red Cross.
%pvnfytf*Trtit'
CHINAMAN GETS COMMISSION
lEriwnid C. Chew of S.ui l'mialscu N
llie first Chinaniiin to leoelve com
mission in the United Stntos army.
Chew was In his thud year In civil on
gineerfng at the University of Call
fornlu when he onlNted in the const
miillcry. On account of his good record
In college find recommendations from
tbe fnoultj of Hie univertdty he n.
ulftced in the school for specialists a!
Fort Scott. Alter having made good
there he was sent to the artillery of
ficers' training school at Fortress Mon
ro*, Virginia, where-he received Ma
commission as second lieutenant.
NO DANGER:
FROM CASS LAKE
Cass Lake, Minn Oct. 17 --Cast
Lake is safe and there is no danger
from present fires as all are well
guarded Hundreds of telegram*
came here from all over the countrj
asking how friends and relatives are
On account of the Spanish influ
enza, chuiches, schools and theatre
are closed and all public gathering*
forbidden.
HOME GuARrTwATCHES
THIS PART OF STATE
Bagley's home guard company h.w
been ordered by Major Mitchell of
the Twenty-first battalion to hold its
self In readiness for any emergent
call, and all home guard companies
of Itasca, Cass, Hubbard, Clearwater
and Beltrami counties have received
such orders from the proper author
ities.
Every precaution is being taken
by home guard officials and this por
tion &t the state is being closely
watched and guarded.
HOTEL MARKHAM FIRE
RELIEF FUND GROWING
G. A. Knapp. Deerwood .$25.00
Kobert Peterson. Duluth 5.00
L. J. Brady 1.00
KB. Evans 100
A. H. Harris, citv 1.00
William Lillve 1.00
Miss Grace B. Hooley 1.00
H. M. Currie 100
Total $36.00
NINE- PLAGUE PATIENTS
BROUGHT TO BEMIDJI
Mrs. E Cunningham *and son
Ralph, and Mr. and Mrs Dow Jones
and family, and Mr. Jones' father
and the teacher in that district, were
brought to Bemidji last evening
about 6 o'clock, all suffering from
influenza. Their homes are in School
craft township, Hubbard county.
Ralph Cunningham was ill with
pneumonia and was taken to the
local hospital The remainder of the
patients, eight in number, are being
cared for by Miss Jenne Garcelon,
trained nurse, who Is assisting Dr
E A. Shannon, city physician, and
she is assisted in her work by Miss
Grimm. Three Belmdji business men
motored out to KIP homes and
brought the patients to Bemidji.
FirosBreaking
In Aitkin Go
PineCo. Safe
Moose Lake, Oct. 17.Fifty new
forest fires In Aitkin county threaten
damage Pine county fires aie under
control
800 Bodies Found.
Moose Lake, Minn., Oct. 17.The
total number of victims of the most
tearful forest Are in the history of
the northwest will be more than
1,000.
Already rescue woikers have
found at least 800 bodies More th in
300 have been buried in this district
and Duluth has interred a great
many corpses.
Because of the relief conference
here, state officials suspended tem
porarily their work of checking the
death list The work of burial con
tinued, however, and atl o'clock yes
terday afternoon, at least 125
charred cropses were lowered into
trench graves.
The only hopeful feature of this
'ftagedy. is that the fires of the past
eighteen hours have seemingly
claimed very few, If any, victims.
With one or two exceptions the fires
which are burning are re-sweeplng
over devastated ruins.
"Efforts are being made at relief
headquarters here to compile a new
death list, which will be made public
as quickly as possible.
BEMIDJI RALLYING
TO RELIEF OF FIRE
VICTIMS 'PIONEER'
FIND IS GROWING
LAST OF CLASS ONE
TO ENTRAIN OCT. 22Joe.
The draft board today received a
call for twenty-eight men to entrain
for Camp Cody, N the morning
October 22, the men to report the
day previous This entrainment will
clean up the last of the historic
Class 1 In Beltrami county and in
quota of all 19IS class men to be
1918.
Another call has been received for
ontraining fifty more men for Camp
Forrest in Georgia, the quota to leave
October 25. These will be the first
elude six men from the new class of
sent from Beltrami county.
EX-6EMIDJ1 EDITOR
WILL BE INTERNED
St Paul, Oct 17.An order for
the internment for the duration of
the war of Paul F. Dehnel, former
editor of the Minneapolis and St
Paul American, was issued in Wash
ington Tuesday by the president, ac
cording to United States Attorney
Alfred Jacques of St. Paul
Dehnel recently was tried on
charges of violating the espionage
act of the United States and accused
of attempting to obstruct enlist
ment in the army The case was
heard by Judge Wilour Booth in
Minneapolis, and resulted in^a dis
agreement 4 .J
Among other things nf ^ifj
leged to have published aTtid&-4
James S Peterson, recent candidate
for United States senator, with a
view of hampering recruiting. Pe
terson has been convicted
Dehnel is being held in the Hen
nepin county jail in Minneapolis and
will remain there until the order of
internment reaches St. Paul He
then will be taken to Fort Ogle
thorpe, Ga where he is to be in
terned, according to J. Dickey,
assistant United States attorney
A large number of St. Paul per
sons are among the contributors to
a fund Dehnel raised with which o
start the paper It has been report
ed that Investigation of contributors
to this fund would made to de
termine their views on loyalty
'(^LESySUNDAf
BAN ORDERED LIFTED
(By United Press
Washington, Oct 17 The ban on
the use of automobiles on Sunday was
lifted unconditionally today It will
immediately become effective.
5: ^vi*^l"
Bemidji is responding nobly to the
appeal of The Pioneer for lunds for
the relief of the fire victims and
today, Mitchell, editor and
one pf the owners of the Bemidji
Sentinel, extended his co-operation
with The Pioneer In making the fund
a big, success.
One of the features of the con
tributions is that of the J. C. Penney
store, the employes taking up a col
lection, headed by the store manage
ment, the amount being 119,50,
which showed the spirit of this ig-,
gross!ve business concern.
Error in Credit.
In making notation of the donation
of Matthew Miller yesterday, the
name was given as Matthew Larson
and the contribution as $1 The con
tribution should have been $10 and
eiedited to Mr. Miller.
The fund collected by The Pioneer
will on Saturday be turned over to
Rev Warford, president of the
Beltrami county chapter, Red Cross,
who will forward it to the proper
authorities for use in relieving the
dlstiev, ol the fire sufferers.
Response Gratifying.
The response has been highly
gratifying to all concerned. Without
the slightest hesitation many lave
come to The Pionair office and sub
scribed their .btfT expressing them
selves that thejr wished taey could
give mpr$ Ym* every amount, no
matter how Small, shares in eplrit
with those larger.
The fund is nearlng the *500
mark and will go far over that when
time to turn it over to the Red Cross
arrives.
New Contributors.
The contributors to the fund since
yesterday's report are as follows:
John C. Tennstrom $5.00
Charles Carter 10.00
Mrs. Given-McGee 5.00
Shere 10.00
James H. French 10.00
Mrs. Paul Foucault 1.00
Mrs. Clarence Foucault 1.00
Quincv Brooks 5.00
Miss Mary Olson 2.00
Mrs. W. Campbell 2.00
Jacob Kohler 25.00
Jacob Goldberg 3.00
G. W. Campbell 5.00
Anna Felkev 1.00
Clifford Brandt 1.00
E. H. Winter 10.00
James McAndrews. Big Falls. 5.00
L. P. Eckstrom 5.00
E. A. Greer. 2.00
C. W. Warfleld 25.00
A. W. Redell 1.00
Mathew Larson 25.00
Geo. Stephen & Son 5.00
C. N. Shannon 5.00
H. A. Leoner 1.00
Joe Bisiar 2.00
Koors Bros 25.00
Inera Klemetson 5.00
Mvra Erickson 5.00
Harriet Walsh 5.00
J. C. PENNEY COMPANY'S STORE
J. C. Pennev Co $10.00
G. W. Ferrel 2.50
E. J. Kahman 1.00
Charles N. Anderson 1.00
Lillian Porter 50
Leah Porter 50
Dora Roe 50
Essie Hazen 1.00
Mrs. Chas. Roman 1.00
Mrs. Ed. Currev .50
Julia Muneer 1.00
Total $450.00
RUNAWAY HORSE IS
SHOT: BREAKS FETLOCK
A tine pair of farm horses, owned
by a f.irmer named Olson, residing
below Nary, broke from where they
were hitched near Kaplan's store this
afternoon and dashed onto the rail
road tracks.
One of the hoofs of the pair wedged
in a switch and broke the fetlock
in two Dr D. Burgess, the vet
erinarian,, was called but saw at a
glance the case was hopeless and the
animal was shot to end its suffering.
The horse was a four-^ear-old and
valuable.
'4
-&3?VlWWS
51
$
1

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