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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, February 25, 1920, Image 1

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MEMBER UNITED PRESS
Ths Pioneer is member of the United
Today\ world's^ news today.
BEM
VOLUME XVIII. NO. SO
HEALTHOFFICER
WARNS PEOPLE
TOFOLLOWOUT
\SAFETY RULES
Measles at This Time
"FLU" REGULATIONS
N
days after1,
J
Are
Causing a Serious
Situation
ALSO PROMULGATED
Suggestions for Keeping Epi-
demic From Spreading
Broadcast
Dr. E. A. Shannon, city health
physician, is notifying the public of
Bemidji" with reference to regula
tions concerning the control of meas
les to be enforced. All cases should
be promptly reported, houses pla
carded and children exposed in tho
family excluded from school.
"Measles.at this time is a very seri
ous situation in Bemidji, and unless
Handled promptly ana effectively
may, during the next ,few weeks,
cause more deaths than resulted from
influenza during 1918 and 1920,
says Dr. Shannon in his warning.
Influenza Regulations.
Regulations are also issued for
governing the control of influenza to
be enforced, they being as follows:
All cases to be reported to the local
health officer
House to be placarded ,and
othe*sno employed outsidSe
*rtJWCft",1,*.t5
il-lgaind anIr a,M,r !on
S** West .Texad mighj,
-temperature in.the
Refers Churches.
Sunday schoolo and prayer meet
ings should be discontinued, ^as well
as church sociables, unless such so
cia-bles can 'be arranged, which will
prevent attendance of infected per
sons.
Church services can be allowed to
continue if ushers provide space be
tween parishioners when possible,
and when the minister explains to
liis congregation the purpose of these
restrictions.
Busses, running between Bemidji
and Nymore, shall cofivey only seat
ing capacity and have all windows
Temoved until further notice.
Because of the overcrowding in the
school ^uildings, the school board
should provide^ assistance for the
school nurse.
H1NES ISSUES ORDERS
FOR RETURN OF ROADS
Washington, Feb. 25.Director
General Hines has issued orders
which provide for the formal trans-
\r fer of authority now exercised by
railroad administration officials to )t
the corporations -which resume con
trol of the lines March. 1.
In a telegram to regional directors,
Mr. Hines declared that the names
of corporate officers be ascertained
to whom deparment heads will report
after federal operation ends and ap
propriate instructions issued to em
ployes.
n6rfe I
v--_i ...to **i normal i button
local bi become normal
Childreon founhbonm(h wit coughs,. colds,
""aches, or symptoms, which might ibe
symptoms of influenza, to be reported
as suspected influenza.and warning
sign posted until diagnosis can be
arrived at: I
Air cases of influenza and suspect
ed cases to be given to the school
nurse by the health officer.
A nurse be employed to assist the
health officer in following up of
cases and the enforcement of regula
tions.
A man be assigned ^o" the health
-officer to assist in posting and remov
ing signs ana to see that families are
properly attended to, so far as provi
sions are concerned.
Public Meetings Banned.
All public gatherings will be re
stricted.
Dances and private parties discon
tinued for the present.
Movies allowed to continuejf they
can guarantee well persons present
against exposure. If the* managers
allow no coughers 'or sneezers to be
present, it is desirable to have the
anovies continue.
'Pool halls to run, must allow only
players in the hall. There must be
no loafing about the'room at any
time.
Officers of lodges should notify
members, not to attend if coughing or
sneezing. This should be taken up
at the meeting and if they can be
conducted with the assurance of no
one ill being in attendance, lodge
meetings need not be restricted.
FROM THE
"AL CAPITOL
Campaign.
?:T"
(By Unv yress)
Washington, Few* 25A-Thef ord
nance department of army today Is
.officially hunting^or Army Colt "for
ty-five" pistol No. 932,386, and while
no one erfpecte to* find it, the "search"
is the key toft story of how an Amer
ican lieutenant of the\tank corps in
curred the rage of an Australian gen
eral in order to participate in one
of the big actions of the war.
In one of the 27th Division's ac
tions against the Hindenburg line,
the 301st American Heavy Tank bat
talion wds co-operatfhg with the Aus
tralian corps. A lieutenant in com
mand of one of the tanks found that
he was short of gas, with hours of
fighting before him. In a forage of
the country, he came across the
limousine of the Australian com
manding general, occupied only by
the chauffeur. Naturally a general's
chauffeur' would not listen to the
pleadings of a second lieutenant.
The Australians ihad the reputa
tion of being souvenir-hunters sec
ond only to jthe Americans. The lieu
tenant offered his army Colt to the
chaffeur for the use of the general's
car. The brtbe was/accepted. -The
car returned to the lieutenant's tank
with its luxurious interior piled with
tins of petrol. The irate general was
there and shouted, "Younig man, I'll
have you cjburt-martialled for this."
The lieutenant nonchalantly said
that since he had enough gas to take
him into the rest of the fight, he more
than likely would never come back for
trial. He did come back, however,
but the general had forgot his griev
ance.
Blanton Storm Center.
Representative Blanton, Texas, is
one of the storm centers of the house,
and because of it has incurred the en
mity of nfany members.
In order to make a recent statement
emphatic, iBlanton used the words
"God Almighty."
Representative King of Illinois, in
sisted^ that the words were profane
and slould be ruled out of the Con
gressional Record. Blanton turned
to King an said:
Jfle -b
be damned.,
i
We ii, j'l
have begun to
RAILROAD EMPLOYES
THREATEN TO BREAK
THEIR AFFILIATION
Immediate Solution of Ques-
tions on Wage Proposals
Not^ Expected
Washington, Feb. 25.Threats of
a break in the affiliated railroad em
ployes organizatons militated against
immediate solution of the questions
before the representatives of the 2,-
000,000 rail-workers conferring here
on President Wilson's proposal for
a settlement of their wage demands.
Because of the wide divergency of
views held by the committeemen
called to Washington to consider the
White House policy, executives of the
organisation admitted they did not
know whether they coula hold the
strength they had gained when it
was agreed ten days ago that the
organization should affiliate to con
sider the proposal.
In every conference, it -was said,
demands for an appeal to the presi
dent to veto the railroad bill contin
ued to grow more insistent.
The leaders also were f&rced to
combat moves of radical elements in
several directions.
NEW COUNTY SHERIFF
ASSUMES HIS DUTIES
International' Falls, Feb. 25.
Sheriff J.ohn P. Wall of oochiching
county, recently appointed by Gover
nor Burnquist to serve as successor
to-H. T. Mcintosh, missing for sev
eral weeks, has taken official charge
here. No incident of importance
marked the change.
Sheriff Wall immediately went to
the sheriff's office where the three
deputies who'served under Mcintosh
were waiting for him. Wall imme
diately reappointed two of the depu
ties. They are F. U. Day and Hugh
Reidy. Wall appointed as his chief
deputy Hugh Van Etten.
N. D. UNIVERSITY WINS.
In a spirited contest last evening
at Grand Forks, the North Dakota
university aggregation defeated the
North Dakota "Aggies" by a score of
34 to 15. Over 1,000 fans witnessed
the encounter. Dr. J. W. Diedrich of
Bemidji officiated as referee.
.iS.'-Ji
WOULD ATTRACT MUCH
GET T&DAYS NEWS OUT OF TODAYS PAPER
BEMIDJI, MINN., WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEB. 25, 1920
FIREMEN
SOING AFTER
1923 MEETIN
OF 1NNES0T1
h.
Decided at Session Held Tues-
day Evening Delegates
A re Appointed
ATTENTION O BEMIDJI
New Armory Would Be Ideal
Convention Hall Fire Boys
Are Optimistic
At the regular monthly meeting of
the Bemidji Fire Department and Re
lief association, held Tuesday even
ing, it was unanimously decided
to try and secure the 1923 con
vention of the fire departments of
the state, for Bemidji.
Chief Charles Dailey, N. E. Given,
John Falls," John Cline, Clarence
Grover, J. J. Doran, Paul Winklesky,
Arne Sande and Ed Ripple were elect
ed as delegates and alternates to at
tend the state ^convention, to be held
this year at Jfoorhead, on June lo
and 16.
A committee of three, consisting of
Barney Erickeon, J. J. Doran and
A. N. Gould, was selected as a pub
licity committee and every effort will
be maintained by them to have the
"city of enterprise" entertain the
"fire fighters" in 1923.
The present officers of the Minne
sota State Fire Department associa
tion are: N. B. Remby, president,
Moorhead John Berg, first vice pres
ident, International Falls William
Kin an a saia iaeni uuernauuna i J?,HS WIUUUU i County Ditch No. 36 which runs from
"I think the'famous expression of E. Cudmore, second vice president,''inuuiiu Euclidjiu to Eas Granud Forks, on mil
_. _v* ,n i.A added 'Rochester John A.. Gross, secretary.,' niurm imtn* AlrwtfcRKn Pftrti tranira,
Red Wing, and Frank W. Hanson,
treasurer, Rush City.
flower forth in celluloid beauty
General Leonard Wood's buttons second vice president at the conven
made- their appearance first. They tion this year and will then be as- ^uvuu, iwr mcui tuuciw
are dark blue, with a picture of the sured of the meeting place of the de- the repair of ditch 36 and for three
o__ 4.^ uirom tnhnonn'R i9Q .12 foot snans in the rnnnir nt tiitrh
generali. Senator. Hiram, Johnson's partment*irtn 1923.
follow closely, find have guite eclips
ed the daTk modest Wood emblems.
Johnson's buttons bears broad stripes
of red, white and blue, while across
the white strips in blue letters ap
pears the legend "I'm for Hiram."
The Johnson boomers consider this
button very'snappy.
ANNUAL BANOUET
OF BEMIDJI ASSN.
TOMORROW NIGHT
Feature of Spread Will
by "Real One"
An excellent menu and program
has been ft arranged for the annual
banquet fif the Bemidji Civic and
Commerce association to be held at
the Markham hotel tomorrow evening
and to begin at 8 o'clock.' R. L.
Given, president of the association,
will preside as toastmaster.
The feature of the after-dinner
program is to be the address by Curtis
M. Johnson of Rush City, on "The
Road to Happiness." Mr. Curtis is
a most able speaker and all of Be
midji's business men who have had
occasion to hear him speak before
this time state that he will surely
prove to be even better than ex
pected. They all are more than
pleased to know that- he has been
secured to address the annual ban
queters.
Orchestral selections will be given
by Mrs. C. R. Sanborn, violin Mrs.
G. Oliver Riggs, piano, and Percy
Riggs, drums.
Tickets are on sale by the secretary
of the association at $1.50 each, and
all who have not secured one yet are
urged to do so at once.
ALLIES ASK ROtTMANIA
TO SHOW HUMANITY
(By United Press)
Paris, Feb. 25.The council of
ambassadors this afternoon decided
to recommend to their respective gov
ernments that they ask Roumanla to
show clemency, toward the Hungar
Bemidji must secure the office of bidder and received the contract for
The convention next year goes to 32. The contract for Jcjmcrete brid-
International Falls and in 1922 to ges on Ditch No. 126 Was not let un-
Rochester and with plenty of push
and get together it will meet in Be
midji the following year.
This "is a matter that should have
the full attention of every citizen of
Bemidji. The fire department and
relief association, are back of it to a
man. It means a big advertisement
for the "metropolis of North Central
Minnesota." The new ?60,000 ar
mory Will be in readiness and should
the convention meet here in the sum
mer of 1923, the delegates will return
to their homes fully satisfied that the
"city of enterprise," situated among
the towering pines and beautiful
lakes is a sure enough wide awake
community and they won't forget.
Start boosting now.
ouu c uvv, w. ore cars for use on the Mesaba range
ians, who are held prisoners in that during the summer for coal hauling
country. In the winter.
iri'
iff
BEMIDJI CONTRACTOR
IS LOWEST BIDDER
FOR DITCH REPAIRING
Excavation and Repair
Ditches No. 32 and 3 6
ROTARY SNOW PLOW CLEARING THE TRACKS
An- interesting picture showing one of the latest type rotary railroad
snow plows whirling the snow off the tracks near Dunkirk, N. Y., following
the recent storm.
of
Let in Crooikston
Grookston, Feb. 25.J. C. Parker
of Bemidji was the successful bidder
in the repair of county ditch No. 32,
which ^uns a mile south of the Nor
thern pacific tracks from Euclid to
East Grand Forks. His old was $15,-
224.97, the lowesLln a field of seven
bidders.' Benard !& Son of Minne
apolis were awarded the repair of
mastt maurums ouue limee.
nari&PtAe Northern-Paei fie tracks
at ?17,148.27.
P: H. Gramer of this city was low
metal culverts on Ditch No. 126, fisted
north of Euclid fo metal culverts in
12 foot' span in th repair of ditch
til late yesterday afternoon.
Be
Af ter-Dinner Address
HIGH SCHOOL BASKET
FIVE PLAYS CROOKSTON
HIGH TEAM TONIGHT
Locals Left Today for Scene
of Encounter in Crooks-
ton's Armory
Bemidji High school basketeers
traveled to Crookston today to "take
on" the Crookston High school aggre
gation, in what is expected to be a
hard fought contest, to be staged at
the Armory in that city tonight.
Crookston's outfit will make an ef
fort to wipe out the defeat suffered
at the hands pf Bemidji recently,
when the locals won the battle by
a count of 15 to 14 on the local
Armory floor.
The Bemidji team has developed
considerably since playing Crook
ston and, with the exception of Little
Falls, has cleared away an entire
field of competition. Week before
last the locals defeated Fosston, the
same team that earlier in the season
won from them by a i to 1 count,
and piled up a score of 24 against 12
for the visitors.
The local boys have been practic
ing regularly every afternoon and al
though they took part in no games
last week, they have been working up
some good p'lays.
It is expected that the contest at
Crookston tonight will toe one of the
best put up by the local team, and
to win *they must all play in their
strongest form.
MEXICAN BANDrrS
CAPTURE ANOTHER
_.
(By United Press)
Washington, Feb. 26.Mexican
bandits have captured Barry Hogar
ty, American citizen* in Durango and
are holding him for ransom, accord
ing to advise received by the state
department.
GREAT NORTHERN BUYS
FIFTY LOCOMOTIVES
(By United Press)
St. Paul, Feb. 25.The Great Nor
thern Railway company announced
today the purchase of fifty heavy
freight locomotives and 1000 steel
*%Mm' 'i
PIONEE
Weather forecast 24 hrs., Markham
Fair weatner, fresh winds tonight.
BEMIDJI ASSN. WILL
HOLDANNUAL ELECTION
OF OFFICERS MARCH 9
Fifteen Directors Will First Be
Chosen From Eligible
Candidates
Annual election for the Bemidji
Civic and Commerce association will
ibe held on March 9, at 8 o'clock in
the evening at the rooms of the asso
ciation.
Fifteen directors will be chosen for
/'-.he ensuing year, every member dn
^good standing being eligible. From
the board of directors, which will be
selected, a president will be named
as well-as a vice president and a sec:
bnlf-vTo'e president/:
The present directors of the asso
ciation are R. XJ. Given, president
H. C. Baer, H. L: Huffman, C. L..
George W. Rhea, J. L,. Elwell,.
R. H. Schumaker, C. W. Vandersluis,
G. W. Harnwell, W. Z. Robinson,
H. Z. Mitchell, E. H. Denu. G. M.
Torrance, George T. Baker and A. L.
Molander.
One week previous to the election,
ballots bearing the names of the,
members eligible as new directors
will be sent to each member of the
organization who is to choose 15 and
return the ballot. Count will be
taken of the balloting at the annual
meeting and the fifteen having the
largest number of votes will be nam
ed to the directorship.
WILL DESTEOY SHIPPING.
(By United Press)
Paris, Feb. 25.The council of
Ambassadors decided today that the
excess German shipping which was
not distributed to the Entente\powers
will be destroyed.
OPPORTUNITY OFFERED
TO LEARN PROGRESS
OF PUPILS IN MUSIC
Miss Fibigar, Instructor
i!
o/
"PIONEER'S" CII
Largest circulation
Centra^' Minnesota,
on tin* guarantee.
in
Music, to Direct Program
Friday Night
Citizens of Bemidji will have an
opportunity on the evening of Fri
day, February 27, to learn of the
progress being made by the pupils
of Bemidji's public schools in the
study of music by attending the mu
sical extravaganza entitled "Hiawa
tha's Childhood," to be staged at the
Grand theatre under the direction of
Miss Martha Fibigar, instructor of
music. The production is replete
with tmany interesting features in
cluding a "dance of the fire flies."
Sixty pupils will take part in the
presentation and with the exception
of a few soloists, the total number
will be from the Central and Lin
coln schools. The production is a
classic and especially adapted to chil
dren's voices. Regular rehearsals
are being held under the direction of
Miss Fibigar and the children are
showing great interest in the work.
Two soloists from the High school
will also take part in the production
in which there are also five speaking
parts.
It is urged that there be a large
attendance to witness the play to be
come better acquainted with the
work being done by the pupils of Be
midji's schools.
FORMER PREMIER IS
ELECTED TO HOUSE
(By United Press)
London, Feb. 25.Herbert As
quith, former premier, was elected
to the House of Commons from Pals
ley district, it was announced today.
-i-
'f. 'viV/v"'".v'./, fvU #"*?"&w* .-.,4
45c PER MONTH
WHITE HOUSE
NAMES COM
NEW OFFICIAL CLOSE
FRIEND OF ROOSEVELT
Allied Premiers Receive Presi-
dent's Reply to Note on
the Adriatic
(By-United Press)
Washington, Feb. 25.Bainbridge
Colby has been appointed secretary
of state to succeed Robert Lansing,
the White House announced today.
Colby's appointment came as even
more of a surprise than the resigna
tion of Larasing at the request of the
president.
While Colby has been a strong sup
porter of the Wilson administration,
he is generally regarded as a progres
sive republican, and was actively
identified with the campaign of Theo
dore Roosevelt for the republican
nomination in 1912. Later, he was a
candidate for governor of and senator
from New York on the progressive
ticket.
Colby was at the White House this
morning to see the president.
WILSON'S EEPLY DELIVERED.
(By United Press)
London, Feb. 25.President Wil
son's reply to the allies'..Cpminunlca-A
tion, in response to his recent Adri-'
atic note, was delivered to the coun
cil of premiers shortly after noon
today. The council Immediately be
gan discussion of the document, it
was learned.
RAIL BILL GOES TO
GOVERNMENT BUREAU
I Washington. Feb. 25.President
Wilson will not act immediately on
the compromise railroad bill passed
by the senate. It was announced at
the White House that the president
had directed that the measure be
referred to the department of Justice
as soon\ at is reached the White
House from congress.
The executive has ten days in"
which to pass upon the act before it
can become a law without his signa
ture. It is generally expected that
he will be urged by representatives
of the railroad brotherhoods and or
ganized labor generally to veto the
bill because of its labor and other
provisions.
The railroad men oppose this sec
tion because it provides for tripar
tite labor boards whereas they desire
to return to the old method of nego
tiation and decision by representa
tives of the workers and the rail-
WANTED WOMEN TO CARE FOR
NEEDS OF "FLU" PATIENTS
The help of women are .badly need
ed to go from house to house where
there are cases of influenza and look
after those who are in need of help.
Should be capable of doing bedside
work and necessary household work.
This notice is given to the Pioneer
by Mrs. Arnold, phone 383, chairman
of the Red Cross committee.
RAH. UNION PREPARE
NOTE FOR PRESIDENT
By Ralph Couch
(United Press Correspondent)
Washington, Feb. 25.The special
containing a direct request that he
went into executive session today to
frame a note to President Wilson]^
coqtainign a direct request that he
veto the Cummins-Esch rail bill.
Wilson is studying the measure.
Union leaders have said that they
are prepared to continue the fight
against the bill even if it does be
come a law.
NOTED SCHOOL
EDUCATOR IS SLAM
(By United Press)
Los Angeles, Feb. 25.Miss Flor
ence Housela, aged fifty, former head
of the Hundington Hall school for
girls at South Pasadena, was mur
dered in bed early today by an assas
sin who tried to cover up the crime
toy setting the building on fire.
H. W. Bvrown, aged
58,committe
pected ofv
suicide. d%JL
IM
1
SUCCESSOR OF
-SECY LANSING
Wilson's Appointment Came as
Surprise, More Than His
Recent Action
4
Mi
1 i: j
a
a
and sus-
the crime
^JL Jjfp&itfSi MM^L.,^
#&-!

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