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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, March 17, 1920, Image 8

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1920-03-17/ed-1/seq-8/

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3Ws
AGE EIGHT
TEUSUFROUT
OF BRIGANDS
Chicago Soldier Gives ThriHing
Picture of Skirmishes in
Near East.
i DRIVERS NOT MOLESTED
{Trucks Driven by Natives and Guard
ed by Turk Gendarme* Are Held
Up and LootedNo Luxury
In Near East ._..
New York.A rale of exciting: skir
mishes with marauding bands of Turks
and Kurds In Armenia Is told by a
Chicago soldier, W. A. Brown.
Brown's adventures Jn the near Bast
were experienced while he was a Red
Cross worker In company with Ameri
can boys from Philadelphia and Louls
jflle, with whom he volunteered for
ear East relief service after the ar
mistice The Jttb'of tfcese young: men
was to, get the supplies to the starv
ing villages in the mountainous Inte
rior and they found truck driving In
that stricken land filled with excite
ment.
"Brigands are numerous," said
Brown, "but uniforms commanded re
spect, although we always went un
armed. Trucks driven by native
drivers, however, were held up and'
tooted. They were supposed to be
guarded by Turk gendarmes, but the
gendarmes themselves did their bit at
stealing. Our convoys with American
drivers were never molested, although
we could see the armed brigands on
the hills watching us.
Go Ahead Despite Warning.
"One time Mr. and Mrs. Hugh S.
MllleiAwanted to go. to Harpoot with
one of our convoys,1'
continued Brown,
"We had 11 trucks and started ofT in
Una shape. After a few miles we saw
some trucks with native drivers that
had started some time before us, com
ing back. 'Brigands' yelled the native
drivers as we drew alongside. Thir
ty brigands ahead/
wnt aheai. A few miles far
ther along we came upon the bodies
ef four brigands propped up against
the side-of the road. They had been
shot by the gendarmes and the bodies
left as a warning to others. For miles
along the route we could see some of
the others watching us, but our train
was too.. str.qijg. tor them to risk an
attack!
"The returning Kurds are a prob
lem. There were thousands of them
who fled to European Turkey during
the war and now they are streaming
back. Hungry and ragged, they steal
at every opportunity and relief sup
plies, if left unguarded for a moment
or in charge of native drivers, aqp not
safe.
"HorseJi and mules are especially
sought, for tlie Kurd likes to ride.
More than once they attempted to
requisition mules or donkeys used
In onr work, but they never kept them
"longer than it took us to get to them.
The Turks aided them In taking what
ever property belonging to non-Mos
lems that they could.
tr'
No Luxury in Near East.
There.-is .no. .luxury in the near East
jelief worlt. \\?e roughed it and made
the*bes of thing*. When we made
eur. stations we. got our- meals. Other
wisevwe camped out or went to the
alleged hotels ."they call khans. An
other srood name would be stahles, Tor
the guests slept in straw-lined bunks
along the walls while cows and horses,
donkeys and mules had the center of,
the floor.
"For food there was the common
bowl of.vort, a mixture of maize or
wheat and some kind of sour milk.
Sometimes. there is meat, but not
All three youths agreed thftt but for
the work of the near East relief hun
dreds of thousands more of the vic
tims of the Turks would have perish
ed. The one h.ope now of the help
less people is continued help from the
American people
Bay Only Six Years Old
Robbed by Playmates
Detroit.-*-Something in the
way of holdup records was es
tablished in Windsor. The vic
tim was Lawrence Praley, 118
Fifth street. West, who ia" just
turned six years. Seme of his
playmates lured him to an old
ice house, threw sand in his
eyes, and took all his clothes,
and IS centshis entire fortune.
Then, they locked him ,inside,
where, after half an hour, his
walls attracted Edward Neal,
who reacned him. got him some
clothes, and took him home, and
notified the police. Lawrence
was rather cold from his adven
ture, hut otherwise showed no
fit effects. %j%'
May Make Soap From Clay.
London. Extensive experiments
have been made in this country to as
certain whether clay can be used in
|tfc manufacture of soap. Results soon
"will he announced. The idea is to sub
stitute collodial clay for the fatty
!clds now derived from animal and
vegetable sources. If this proves com
iscretally successful, it Is claimed It
woold effect, ar^t reduction to the
cost of manufacture.
HERBERT HOOVER DECORATED
1
Charles Evans Hughe*,- presenting
to Herbert Hoover, at a- meeting
Carnegie hell, New York, the GMe
Forum medal f honor for dfBtingUiaav
edl
public service
BETTER LFSE THAN CORSETS
Saleswoman Had to Admit That As*
quaintance Would Be Wrenpitau
Matw.a Change.
They were hv Pullmanseats- out
night train, both* making up
accounts. One leaned over and said:
"Ever pad it7"
"Ithink not Do you?"
"Surest tbhiff you know. Alt1
one line, and1
"i-jf
^"^Vi's^-Ha
you\get tired of selling:
aa went into petticoats.
But, believe me if yon want to make
money go into^. corsets. Say, whatellpjajsons
town did*you-db today?" ?VV'
"R~-
"Did" you make good?"
"Tes.Y think I'tfidfalrty weH.""
"How much' dW you do?"
"About SSOiOOO" Uhe actual amount
pledged- to Miss- for the cam*
paigh).
The saleswoman,,who had constsV|
ered a $260 day im corsets good busi
ness, gnsped':
'*Heav*ns, don't go into corsetsP*
YOUR WATCH A POWER PLANT
Really ETnormojn Amount of Energy la
Concentrated, in That Luminou*
Radium Dial ..'-.-t
If yeu own a radium-dialed' watch
with luminous figures and haadsv then
you-a*e- the possessor of a vasti/power,
plant efl no-mean proportions, says the
Electrieal Experimenter. There IS
sufficient radium on your waich diafc
to haul' your train homewaad.- if lib
conld be properly applied
As the matter stands, the-Innocents
looking radium dial does no* seem to
possess any extraordinary amount- of
concentrated energy, but this is only
apparently the case, and1
'$$8^^
at time ofr
not actually
so for. the reason thai*, while- the
amount of activity, manifested b*. the
radium paint on the dialfis smaBv this,
effect will keep up for 2^00 yeaxs,. pro
vided the zinc sulphldB^withwhioh.tb*
radium is .mixed so a to produce a
glow, held out that long, Tne zinc
sulphide most oases gives -ouf in
about efght to ten years.
Now, if \ye could but find, a way to
make the radium release all its energy
in a 'few hours, instead o* spreading
it over 2,500 years, it .would not be
difficult to make a "motoir lihAt "would
utilize this energy.
French Views of Indiana.
Many French people nave as vague
ideas of the United States outside of
New York-and-the Eastern, coast, as
Americans have ^^Pranca outside ef
Paris.
C. .Micbelon, 'permanent secretary
of the Alliance Francalae, tells of re
ceiving a letter from a business firm
in Marseilles, one of the largest
French ports, asking for Information
In regard to the products of the Mb
dians of slndiana.
COLONY HOUSES BENEFICIAL
Pouftryman Enabled to Place .drowina
Stock on Clean Ground Reduclno
Disease Oanoera.
Colony houses permit the poultry
man to place bis growing stock on
dean ground each year and this re
duces the danger of disease which is
present when young stock is railed oh
the same soil over which the old birds
have been ranging for many years.
,^_.
f!^g^gp^^^^^^^^^^^^
".iir
(By United Press.)
IRISH INDEPENDENCE
IS LAID
THE BEMIDJ1 DAILY PIONEER
Bemidji Market: Quotations
Chicago, Mar. 17.Potato receipts today, 51 cars. Market
strong. Northern Round Whites, bulk, $5.40 to $5.60 sacked,
$5.25 to $5.45. Long Whites, sacked, $5.25 to $5.30. Idaho
Russets, sacked, $5.85 to $6.
Bemidji Potato MarketAll varieties, bulk, small lots
$3.25 to $3.75 per cwt. Carload lots, sacked and loaded, $3.50
to $4.00 per cwt.
BEMIDJI CASH MARKET QUOTATIONS:
GRAIN AND HAT
Oats, bnohel 95c-$l.*t
Barley, bushel
Red Clover, medium, lb
Popcorn, sound
Wheat, No-1
V*BETABLJC8.
Rutabagas, pet cwt 91.00-S1.&0
Carrqta, per cwf... .......Sl.5O-l2.00
Beets, per cwt... .......f 1.00-11.26
Cabbage, cwt. w^. ...SS.W-6.00
Onions, d*T, cwV- -v.. .1 fV.Sp-S0.00
Beansv cwt. 0-18.00
Dairy battiw, powadv... We-52
Butterfst S6c
Eggs, fresh)-dozen......., SSe-S2c
The
followingo
prices
going pres of
GRAIN AND HAY
Wheat, No. 1......... WJRM.S S,
Wheat, No. 21 .*......J...4jKMfLSe
Wheat, No. 3. S2v*o4.*0
Oats ,t ^Slc-SSe
Barley U.13-*J.3&
ye, No. 2 ..1.615-Sili.5
Buckwheat, per'lfci...... i. .29
*2S6. 2 timothy h*y...., ^IsaaOv.
Net I clover Mixed*.............-.$S2 0i
aye straw .S*00-
Cora i...,.. .sm*S'-S:t.20
VEGETAL158
3ans, hand picked,' aay .ew^: S%tQ
5otatoey per cwt S^ 16
brown, cwti .S3.60 towBeans,
money I spead' make up In my a*Beets,
counts."
Then came Ukt usual question::
"Say, what Hne are you in?"
The rich- society girl who had' oS*
fered her services to raise money for'
the colossal' war work campaign
smiled, played tU* novice and parried:
the questlon:
"What line-are-yo In?"
'Tin in petticoats. Bnt if you want
to make money go-.into corsets. I we-
(n corsets five years* and made a pile
of money, but1
Aclveirtxsing
MBATB
Mutton' i
ifpgs^ -ID
Dressed' beef, pound.,
Turkeys, live, pound.
Old Toms, live, pound.
Oeeae, live, pound
Ducks, live, lb.
Hew, 4 lbs. and over
Sprtagen, all weights, lb.
Sl.&o
4Sc-S
8c-10c
...12.49
...4'-v... HIDBS
wertoday's^Pionewr:Stillwater,
..Si.3fr a
per cwt.-
Carrots, per' cwt.
Qaixmsy dry, per cwt i _..
|afggs, per dozen
k*bage, ton..........
Biuca-bagas, per cwt....
Budsterlat Packing butter
jalf skins, No.-.It...
Saaons Tallow Horse hides....
Wool, bright...
Wool. semi.brigM..
......36ir
.s^s.oo-
...S1.25
.^Vv30c
fffE PERSONS FROZEN
TO DEATH. N-. D. SRRK nwahmas and. OocWn. Are
Where-Thijls Dapan*btr
K,
Bismarck, N. D., Marchi IT.
"Were frozen tor deaths ih-. a
m^rd th&lsw^rth^smehy^^fii- Bwnmas afet Cocbimi, sroWfc
*w*jtmji. Four sons ol^ust W5^1Kaw slbwly than^ tjftte me4m-slzed breeds
farmer living near Rydelr,. weref and therefore^sae not ready for market
i froze hear Center -while'tryinai.'tD se-i| a's soon, but: tmjy weigh mote and
cute aid for their brother and? aaSter profitable whef^ the market demianda
a wagon in .the snawci... Thei large-sized flowii *r
stalfe'd in
two eMidren are expected to sjuwdtees.
(By United Press)'
WasMngtqn, Marcft 17:^Tlife \i*!&*
ate today laid on thfe-table tfie ^'iWRr
tfiMt'of Irish IndepewSfence, adong with
the whole question-of self^dSntennsfna1
tibn Tor subjects, tablinr th Owen
roserration to the-treaty
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE 1
IAIL PIONEER
.-1.13c
.,.lC-20c ,..12c-14c
,40-45c
,...25c-30c
.....26eSoe
.i. 16c-18e
...22C ...22e
Cow Midlss, No. 1, pound lJ-IS
Bull- Mdes, No 1, pound.... .13c
Kip hides, No. 1, pound..... 20e
Calfskins, So. 1, pound...... .30c
Deacons, eac .S2.00
Horse hides, Xatvsjev each. .|7.00^f.00
Tallow, pound' 10c
Wool bright. v36c
Wool, semi brigM 25c
being paid* at Minn.,
MSA7S
Mutton, lb
Veal Beef, dreasedw..',..
Lambs-....'................ Garlic, lb.
Parsnips pen osst'......
Squash cwt
.10c-16c
...140-1 Sc
ISC
,...7c-14c
.12%-15c
.She
$3.00.
....I1.0O
1
iUVB.POU^TIbf
Turkeys, 9 lbs 24c
[Turkeys, small asd thin a\t Value
Geese, 12 lbf upland f&.. .r 18c
Ducks, fat .20c
Hens, heavy 4
lib:- &nd ove4 26
[Springers, lfve-v. 25c
Hens, 6 lbs.- upv,f*t .30c
Dressed poultry 3c per- ROtiaHl over
live stock. _',
BttDBB
li_.....
Cowhides, N*h
Ball hides, N6.
v^r2*pns-No. 1
-&Z35- Wi -kins..
HeatvyFoMlar
Thebiggehf irt^^ ^P^mx^VIn
.)i.'v''/
Ttee-Nev*Orders..
"Were you there when the Men fac
tory owner. wa trying to- get" enough
hands torushis-works?'-
'Tes, ahd it was. a painful: sight to
seeYthat poor, down-trodden million- i
aire tobllged to snbmit to the insult
lng sneers and-harsh domination ot
the haughty wo^hgmani"
Mnoventt. i-.
Shlp'.s OfBceSSesj^she's a snuwb
little craft and can- steam thirty knots.
Deair Old' LadyHaw thoughtful of
yoiii I: suppose yon steam the knots
so that the saBbcs can untie, th em
Ily itt thi& ccid- weaiherr
in
:-.'r-.---.^s*. iX-r
It is our intention to stick absolutely to
facts in our advertising to never wilfully
misrepresent to Jose a sale rather than lose
a friend by maicing-misleading statements.
We want every person who reads oijr ad
vertisements to have full confidence in them
to know the goods "advertised are actually
i as represented"-&d if they are not, we are
willing to take them back ancV refund your
money.
COULD ANYTHING BE FAIRER TH/tN THIS?
:-\r^,
Our yard managers all understand our posi
tion in this and you can place the same con
fidence in them that you can in our adver
tising. -s, ._._
ST. HILAIRE RETAIL LUMBER CO.
G. W. Harnwell, A*eot Benudji, Mian.
i^^^^^^^^pi^^^
TOO LAH TO OASSIFTone
The rate for want ads may
be found at heading of reg
ular classified department
Ads received later thari 11
o'clock a. m. will appear un
der this head in current issue
FOR SALEDodge touring ear, A-l
condition. Just overhauled. W.
F. Mareum. 2t3-18
FOR RBNT^-Rooms, apartments and
stores, furnished and unfurnished'.
Kaplan's new building. 3t3-l
WANTEDMessenger boy witbjMn
cycle*, IS years or over preferred,!
'Salary $45 per month. Only boys
interested In learning telegraphy
need apply. Western Union.
It3~17
FOR SALECheap. Partly modem
house and three lota close in. Call
423-W. 4t3-aO'
ELEGANT HOUSES1 rooms and!
bath. Closer in. Nane better,
$6,500. E. J.. Willtr the Land
man. 5t3-22
WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 17, 1920
How to Save Money
On Your Long Distance Calls
LAKE SHORE [HOMES 7rodm
house, barn, 8 aeres of fine land,
wile, from depot, fine hardwood
grove, only |1,760.0. Another, 4
miles from station, can go to it
with boat, from station. 17 acresi.
Good house and barn part cleared,
10 acres fine meadowr ctft with
mower/every year no better lake
lodge jn state small price of S3,-
7&0.00. "Also 4 lake shore houses
in city. But they won't last lcftu
it your wives see them. EL J. Wil
lits, the Landman. 4t3-20
LOSTOne brown, fur mitten. Find
er return to 806 America ave.
2!t3-18
The charge on a station-to-station call cannot be
reversed that is, it cannot be charged to the telephone
called.
y
BrJnf ss your ekam
ton nft~ae battoaa, btait
r woolea elotbee^te^
Pioneer Office
This advertisement is intended to explain the differ
ent class of long distance telephone service and how
they may be used to the best advantage.
When you make long distance call, if you are will
ing to talk to anyone at the telephone called, you will be
using what is known as station-to-station service. This
is considerably cheaper than other classes of service.
Station-to-sjWtion rates are based on a charge of about 5
cents for each six miles up to 24 miles and 5 cents for
each 8 miles' beyond that distance, with a minimum
charge of 10 cents.
HOW TO PLACE A STXfION-TO-STATION CALL
When using stationrto-station service you should give
the long distance operator the name and address-of the
business or the individual with whose telephone you
desire connection. In addition you should give the tele
phone number if you are sure it is correct. On this
class of service the charge,begins when the telephone
called, is answered.
This is how you would place a call with the long
distance operator on a station-to-station message: After
giving ybur own telephone number and name, say, for
example, "I want to talk to John Brown's residence at
Blue Springs, Minnesota," or "I want to talk to George
Anderson's store at Burchard, Minnesota." Care should
be taken to make it clear to the long distance operator
that you do not want to talk to a particular person or
persons at the telephone called as in that' case it wpuld
be a person-to-person call and you would be charged
a higher rate. ,v
By the very nature of your requirements for long
distance telephoning,^0 doubt a great many of your
business and social calls permit the use of a statidn-to
station service. And in addition you can more often
use this cheaper class of service if you make special
arrangements with those with whom you desire to talk,
either frequently or occasionally, to be ready for your
call at a given time.
HOW TO MAKE A PERSONTO-PERSON CALL
If you ask to talk to a particular person or persons
over long distance, you will be using person-to-person
service. The charge for this service is about one-fourth
greater than for station-to-station service^because the
operators may have to spend considerably more tim*nd
hold the wires ready while they make an effort to UpEw
the particular party. This class of service is not only
more expensive but naturally slower than station-to
station service.
If yovi. desire' person-to-person service at a particular
hour, and-wish to make an appointment to talk at a
given time, the appointment rate will apply.
If you .wish to talk to a person who does not have
a telephone and for whom a messenger must be sent,
the messenger -call rate will apply.
HOW THE RATES ARE APPLIED
Miles
0-12
party1.'
The following is an example showing the station-te
station and. person-to-person rates for distances up te
Sixty-four miles:
Station-to
Station
$0.10
.15.
.20 .25
v.:30-
.35
.."-":.40
i*. 12-18
18-24
24-32
3^2-40
40-48 48-5*-v.v
56-64
While the messenger call rate and the appointment
rate are not shown in the above table they are each
about 50 per cent'higher than the station-tb-statibn rate.
The report charge, which also is not showrt, is about one
fourth "of the station-to^station rate.
THE REPORT CHARGE ^:''f -':i-'-
When you place a call for a particular person 'ha
for any reason not within the telephone company's
cotftrol the call is not completed, or-if you.make a call
and are not ready to talk when the other person is ready
within one hour, a report charge is made. This is to
cover a-part of the expense of the operatbr's^time arfd
the use of the wires while we are trying, to:"."-
SPECIAL NIGHT RATES
The special evening rate between 8:30 p. m. and 12
o'clock midnight on station-to-station calls is about one
half the day rate and the night rate between midnight'
and 4:30 a. m. about one-fourth the day rate*. The
Tffiinimnm evening or night charge is 25 cents, the. day
rate applying where the charge is less than that amount.
The evening and night rates for ferson-to-person calb
are the same as the day rates. J. ._'!
The rate for any class of service mydbi obtiuiied
by calling "Long Distance." .^P*
Further information in connection v?ith our long
distance service will be gladly furnished oh request.
NORTHWESTERN TELEPHONE
COMPANY
v
't
Person-to-
Person
S045
.20
.25/
.30
.40
.46 .50 .55
5
'v''
find your
EXCHANGE
z*mgm
i*.
i-r-.-
s4#.

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