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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, May 11, 1920, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1920-05-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME XVIII. N
JUDGESTANTW
MAY FILE FOR
DEMOCRATIC
GOVERNORSHIP
Sunday Decide
That He Kile
JUDGE STILL UNDECIDED,
HE SAYS OVER PHONE
-Friends From Al Parties
Sending Messages Urging
That Ru
Judge C. W. Stanton of this city
-will in all probability file for the
democratic nomination for governor,
if he will heed the call of the party
leaders and the urgent appeal of
democrats throughout the state.
Not only are the democrats urging
_Mr. Stanton to make the run, butsummer
friends from all parts are sending
messages to the judge at Brainerd,
-where he is now holding court, to
file and assuring him of support in
.practically every locality.
Over the telephone this morning
Judge Stanton stated that he was
.still undecided, but admitted that
the friends from various parts of the
state are urgently demanding that
he make the race.
Filing blanks were obtained Mon
day at office of the Secretary of
State for Judge Charles W. Stanton
of Bemidji for the democratic nom
ination for governor.
Judge Stanton spent Sunday in St.
Paul conferring with state leaders
ot the .democratic party. Confer
ences were held all day at the Ryan
hotel.
Should* Judge Stanton file, as he is
expected to do, before the legal time
^or'filing expires Wednesday night,
he would be one of "the most formid
able, If noT the" most, "for "the "demo
cratfc nomination.
Democrats expect the fight in re
publican ranks to be continued into
the primary election June 21. Re
publicans think it will be all settled
long before members of the party
vote at the primaries.
Judge Stanton was bsjrn in Pine
Island, Minnesota, in 1862. He for
merly was an editor at Appleton,
Minn., and later served as judge of
probate of Swift county, from which
Julius Thorson filed. Next he
was1919,
county attorney of Koochiching
-county.
In 1908 Mr. Stanton was appointed
district judge in the Fifteenth ju
dicial district, with headquarters at
Bemidji. He was elected in 1910
.and re-elected in 1914 and 1918.
NAVY RECRUITER IS
HERE TO SECURE MEN
FOR TRAINING SERVICE
After June 3 0 Enlistments Are
to for Four Years
in S. Navy
P. H. Moore, quartermaster, first
class, of Grand Forks, N. D., is in the
city to secure recruits for the U. S.
navy. He wjll conduct a campaign
here for three days and then will re
turn again in two or three weeks for
another drive.
At present enlistment period may
be for two, three or four years, but
After June 30 the four-year term
YS only will be in force. Able bodied
men between the ages of 18 and 35
.years are eligible for examination.
Men who have had no former naval
training may go into training schools
at Newport, R. I. Great Lakes, HI.,
or Hampton Roads, Va. Men who
.are already trained will go into
.service at once.
If the bill now before congress
passes, the army, navy and the maLumber
rine corps will be subject to a 20 per
cent increase in pay.
In the U. S. navy the pay schedule
is as follows: Apprentice seaman,
$33 per month training station grad
uate, $48 seaman, $52 third class
petty officer, $60 second class petty
officer, $72 first class petty officer,
$84 acting chief petty officer, $99,
and chief petty officer, $126 per
month.
Quartermaster Moore will main
tain an office in connection with the
army recruiting office in the Nor
thern National bank building while in
Bemidji. ________
C. OF L. DOESNT FAZE
DAN CUPID IN KANSAS
Topeka, Kan., May 11.The high
cost of living in Kansas is not cost
ing Dan Cupid any loss of sleep.
According to Dr Lerrigo,
state registrar of vital statistics, 4,-
964 couples were married in the Sun
flower state in the first three months
of this year. This is an increase ot
nearly 1,600 over the same time last
year and nearly 1,200 over the record
of 1917 and 1918.
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A
'\UHnr ISSUE
TO COMPANY MEN
%m FORMER SERVICE
&em
of Party in Confer-
i
Others Will Receive Equipment
at Drill for "Rookies"
on Wednesday
Eighty-one were present at the
meeting of the Bemidji national
guard company at the Association
rooms last evening in answer to as
sembly. Several of the absent mem
bers were ill and others were absent
from the city.
Equipment including uniforms,
shirts, shoes, hats', leggings and rifles
was issuedt those who have already
had military experience. Drill was
held for those who have had no
previous service and the "boot" squad
showed up very well for the first
drill. Additional drill will be held on
Wednesday evening for all who have
not had military experience prior to
joining this company and all in addi
tion who have not yet bee.i issued
their equipment are required to be
on hand at that time. Efforts will
be made to complete the initial issue
to all members at the Wednesday
meeting.
Monday has been set as the regular
drill night for the company and each
Monday all men are required to be
on hand for drills. With the time for
encampment only a few
weeks away, every effort must be
exerted by the members of the com
pany to bring it into first class shape.
HODGSON. ST. PAUL
FILESFORGOVERNORON
DEMOCRATIC TICKET
Mayor L. A Fritche of New
Ulm Withdraws From Re-
publican Nomination
(By United Press)
St. Paul,'May 11.Mayor Law
rence C. Hodgson of St. Paul today
filed for the democratic nominationr
for governor,
Fivei
(Fritchie
-other
alerady are in th5e Mayor L. A. in .race.
J5
nofoNew
ubl i
rdemocrats .??J??
Ulm who filed for
today withdrew from the contest.
TO DIE 15 "HAIR MUST
BEHOVE WOODEN LEG
(By International News Service)
New York, May 11.Sing Sing of
ficials have admitted they are puzzled
by the wooden leg of John Egen,
whose conviction of the murder of
John Klein in the Bronx, June 2,
has been upheld Dy the Court of
Appeals.
Egan, it is said, will be the first
man with a wooden leg to go to the
electric chair.
Wood being a poor conductor of
electricity, Major Lawes, Warden of
Sing Sing, said it probably v.. be
necessary to remove the wooden limb
when Egan has been strapped in the
chair.
MAN WITH HAEDWAEE
STOKE IN HIS STOMACH
(By International News Service)
New York, May 11.'When Dr.
Drosback. surgeon of the United
States Public Service, opened the
stomach of a man who was suffering
from shell shock, he found a condi
tion iby which the prestige of a goat
was challenged.
The patient in fits of deliriums had
swallowed a varied hardware diet.
There were removed from the stom
ach thirty rolls ot tin the size of a
man's little finger, four toothbrush
handles, four wooden tongue depress
ors, several nails, many buttons,
buckles, needles and sticks, altogeth
er 668 pieces of foreign substances.
He will recover.
E.R.JABRTOMANAGE
SMITH-ROBINSON LBR. CO.
E. R. Jahr who was formerly con
nected with the Smith-Robinson
company and for the past few
years with the Hawkeye Lumber
company of Iowa City, Iowa, arrived
in Bemidji this morning and will as
sume the duties of manager of the
Smith-Robinson Lumber company
plant in this city.
Mr. Mittlestadt also from southern
Iowa is expected in a few days to as
sume the duties of bookkeeper in this
establishment. YOUNG HOODLUMS
BREAK INTO GARAGE
The garage of Rev. Lemky at 1300
Beltrami avenue, was broken into last
night and a quantity of canned fruit
was stolen and broken open. What
was not stolen was emptied around
on the ground.
It is understood that it was thegreat
work of some overgrown boys who
have been busy at other similar acts.
If this is the case it is to be regretted
that such is permitted. There is a
curfew ordinance which might be
used to a good advantage to pre
vent such oocurrances.
a-4
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BEMIDJ I DAILY PIONEER\
The Pioneer is a Member of the United Pi LMM4 Wis* SavviesToday's WiM Nsws Today
BEMIDJI, MINN., TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 11 192 0
PROHIBITION
MEANS MORE
TO ENGLAND
THAN POLITICS
Britishers Watching It* Effects
on America, Says Keen
UNITED PRESS AGENT
RETURNS O AMERI CA
WU1 Attend
CAMPAIGN FOR VOTES
OF TWENTY MILLION
WOMEN HAS BEGUN
Leaders of Both Political
Parties Enlarge Committees
and Provide Budget
(By United Press)
Washington, May 11. (By Herbert
Walker)Leaders of both political
parties here have started an exten
sive campaign on courtship for the
votes of twenty million women in
the country, which will be thrown
into the next election if one more
state legislature ratines the suffrage
amendment.
Both campaigns will be nation
wide. Political parties have recently
enlarged their national committees
auxiliaries of women workers and a
large part of the campaign budget
is allotted for this fight.
FIRST BASEBALL GAME
OF SEASON WILL FIND
BEMIDJI IN READINESS
Crosby Nine Comes He re for
Game on Friday, May
Twenty-first
Bemidji fans on Friday, May 21,
will have their first opportunity to
see the Ralph Grade post baseball
team in action when the fast Crosby
nine comes here for Bemidji's first
game of the season. The Crosby
bunch are all in readiness to put it
over Bemidji right off the bat, but
the local boys say that Crosby is go
ing to be disappointed.
With the scheduling of a game
comes the necessity to solicit the sup
port of the local citizens and begin
ning tomorrow morning Manager
Bost of the American Legion team
is ready to take care of all subscrip
tions which will assure a first class
team for this city this summer. Head
ing the list is the Crookston Lumber
company with $250 of the best kind
of support.
A battery which promises to make
the Bemidji team a winner is wait
ing for the call to come here and
as soon as enough support is pledged
the outsiders can be summoned. In
order to make Bemidji's team a win
ner, as it should be, an expense of
approximately $8,500 will be involved
and to insure success financially a
amount of this must be pledged
at once.
The Ralph Grade team is looking
forward to a splendid season and is
taking great interest in the prospec
tive game next week, when the local
boys will have an opportunity to get
into action again.
wujow
Political Party
Conventions and Write
for U. Papers
(By United Press)
New York, Maj 11.American
prohibition is a far more interesting
problem among the British people
than American politics, says Ed.
L.it
Keen, European manager of the Unit
ed Press, who arrived in New York
today.
Keen was in Europe throughout
the world war and directed United
Press staffs at various fronts and
capitals
He also was in charge of United
Press organizations at Paris during
the peace conference He will attend
the National political conventions,
where he will write for United Press
papers.
SENTENCED TO 25 SECONDS
(ByInternational News Service)
Chicago, May 11.A sentence of
twenty-five seconds was imposed by
Judge Landis in the Federal Court
recently on Jesse Nash, a negro,
charged with tampering with the
mails. Nash walked to the door as a.
prisoner the deputy marshall opened
the door for him the judge said
"time's up" and the negro was setthe
free.
Nash admitted having opened-his
wife's letters. After reading them
Judge Landis imposed the sentence.
-t&*
READY WITH
ADVICETO BRmSH ON
SUBMARINE MENACE
Daniels and Wilson Had Plan
for Great Britain to Fol-
low in North Se a
Washington, May 11. President
Wilson was dissatisfied with the way
Great Britain had managed the naval,
end of the Var up to the summer of
1917, and expressed himself emphat
ically on this point in a confidential
address to the fleet at the time, Sec
retary, Daniels disclosed today before
the senate naval investigating com
mittee.
Wilson appealed to the officers of
the fleet in a secret rendezvous at
Worktown shortly after America en
tered the war to "throw traditions
to the wind" and find new ways of
meeting the submarine menace.
Daniels said the navy department
long lief ore the war was alive to the
importance of preparedness and was
taking every step toward that end.
Daniels said it took six months to
get the British approval of the North
Sea mine barrage project and if Ad
miral Sims had urged the proposition
instead of airing his own objections
would have been adopted much
earlier.
REDUCTIONS MADE FOR
INSTALLING AND
MOVING TELEPHONE
Railroad and Warehouse Com-
mission Order Rates Re-
duced, Effective 15th
Material reduction of installation
and miscellaneous charges by tele
phone companies has ibeen ordered by
the Minnesota Railroad and ware
house commission, the order to be
come effective May 15. Some time ago
Northwestern Telephone Ex
change company, the Tri-State Tele
phone and Telegraph company, and
some of the larger local telephone
companies, filed with the commission
a graduated scale of charges for ser
vl^ moving of teler
paonesv&banging of /equipment and
for ^therwprk which seals in7son*e
particulars^ was higher than those
prescribed by the so-called Burleson
or federal rates. After hearings,
which continued several days, and a
careful study of the proposition, the
commission disapproved the propassd
charges and established a revised
schedule, considerably lower than
that proposed, and much lower than
the federal scale.
Thus in cities of the second group
which includes Albert Lea, Austin,
Bemidji, (Brainerd, Chisholm, Eveleth,
Faribault, Fergus Falls, Hibbing,
Owatonna, Red Wing, St. Cloud, Still
water. Virginia and Winona, the
charge for installationalso known
as service connections'when instru
ment is not in place, is |3.00 for a
business house and $2.00 for a resi
dence when instrument is in place
the charges respectively are $2.00
and $1.50 for business and residence
The federal rates were 13.50 flat for
either business or residence, with the
telephone not in place and $1.50 with
the- telephone instrument in place.
For installing an extension tele
phone? the new charge is $1.00 if the
instrument is not in place and no
charge will be permitted if the in
strument is in place. The federal
charges respectively were $3.50 and
$1.50A very decided decrease. Con
nections on private branch exchanges
will be made for $1.00 each instead
ot $3.50 as under the federal scale.
Moving of telephones, which form
erly cost the patron $3.00, in the fu
ture will cost hut $1.00 if the move
is made outside the premises, the
charge will be the same as for a ser
vice connection instead of the flat
rate of $3.50.
Change in type of equipment, as
from a wall telephone to a desk set,
which formerly cost the patron $3.o0
will cost hut $1.00 In the future. A
subscriber superceding another but
retaining the old number will be re
quired to pay only $1.00 for directory
listing in place of $1.50. When a
new number is necessary the routine
will be the same as for a new instal
lation and corresponding charges for
business and residence telephones
will apply instead of the fiat rate of
$3.60 which was in effect during gov
ernment control.
GRAOE POSTTOHAVE
INTERESTING PROGRAM
An interesting program is being
arranged^ tor the meeting of the
Jtalph Grade post of the American
Legion which will be held on Thurs
day^ evening at the ToomB of the Be
midji Civic and Commerce assocM
ation beginning at 8 o'clock. A spe
cial'invitation is being issued to all
members^ of the Bemidji association
to-be present and take part in the
meeting. A few impromptu speakers
will be called upon for short talks
and a special musical program is
planned. Following the business ses
sion a buffet lunch will be served
and all members of the association
and the American. Legion are espe
cially urged to be present.
**&-
Weather forecsm 24 hie. Markham:
Generally fair woler with winds.
*?r
(By United Press.)
FAMOUS WRITER DIES
FROM FLU COMPLICATIONS
New York, May 11.William How
ells, eighty-four years, famous writer
and lecturer, died last night at his
home in New York, never having
fully recovered from a severe attack
of influenza last winter.
(By United Press)
CABINET CALLED TODAY,
Washington, May 11.^President
Wilson called a meeting of the cab
inet for two o'clock this afternoon
presumably to consider the Mexican
situation
JAPS TREAT WITH BOLSHEVIK!
Washington, May 11 Japanese
have begun to make peace with Bol
shevik! in Siberia it was learned to
day.
SAYS WILSON BLUNDERED
IN THE LEAGUE ISSUE
Washington, May 11 Injection of
the League of Nations issue into the
campaign is a collossal blunder, Sen
ator McCumber of North Dakota, re
publican, declared in the senate to
day, in a speech on the Knox resolu
tion. McCumber laid the .blunder to
President Wilson
TURKEY HANDED PEACE TREATY
Paris,'May 11.The treaty of
peace with Turkey was handed Otto
man delegates in the cloak room of
the French foreign office at ffour
o'clock this afternoon.
CARLOS AVERY TO
SPEAK ATLUNCHEON
Carlos Avery, state game and fish
commissioner for Minnesota, will be
in attendence at the noon-day lunch
eon of the Bemidji Civic and Com
merce association tomorrow and will
address the members concerning the
new game preserve, which has been
petitioned for, to be established north
of the present preserve. He will also
speak concerning the plans being
made for the Bemidji hatchery this
year.
Thomas Porte of Moval Lake will
also address the association with "a
message which all should hear. Both
of these men are excellent speakers
and warrant a large attendance. An
excellent menu has been arranged for
the hincKeofl.
TWO MORE FILE FOR
Omcr IN LEGISLATURE
A. E. Rako and Harry Bridgeman
have tiled for the office ot Representa
tive in the legislature from Mils dis
trict, according to records at the
court nous*.,
Mr. Briogeman was endorsed as
the labor candidate and A. Rako,
who is the present member has been
urged to make the run, he having
served but one term in this capacity
This places three names before the
voters at the' primaries in June, the
other being M. W. Weber.
APPUaTO NS BEING
RECEIVED FOR LAKE
si NAVY CRUISE
i
Lieut. Barker Leaves With
Navy Members Monday for
Chicago to Get the Essex
Lieut. Earle A. Barker will leave
next Monday on the morning Soo Line
train for Duluth and Chicago to
gether with those who have applied
for passage to bring back the U. S.
naval training ship Essex from Chi
cago to Duluth. The Essex will leave
Chicago Wednesday, May 20, andupon
will arrive in Duluth about four days
later.
It is specially desired that all
United States naval reserve force
members who wish to go on that
trip make application at once as all
applications must be in Lieut. Bark
er's hands before Saturday night.
This is a fine opportunity for a trip
on the lakes. Regular navy pay will
be given in addition to subsistence
allowance.
NEW SETTLERS COMUTG
TO THIS VICIHITY DALLY
New settlers are arriving to take
up homes in this section of the state,
one of the late arrivals being A. P.
Thursman and family from Pike
county, Illinois Mr. Thursman ar
rived Saturday with his wife and
daughter and will be the guest at
the home of J. A. Dawson before tak
ing up his hdtne on his farm on the
Jefferson Hlgnway between Becid
and Itasca Park.
Other newcomers in that locality
are Oust Anderson, A. Banta and Mr.
Glasgow of Forrest Lake. The latter
is now erecting new buildings on his
farm. GIRLS ABE BARRED
FROM COLLEGE
iberty, Mo May 11.The weaker
sex have been barred from William
Jewell collegethat is until better
housing facilities are provided.
Complaints of male students that
they were unable to concentrate on
their studies while the girls were in
the class room led to the exclusion
of the girls.
vJlSffij
OBREGONPARTY
IN MEXICO
WANTS PEACE
ANDPROGRESS
Revolutionary Party Gives Out
First Executive Statement
of Its Intentions
A LL ELEMENT? ARE
TO E CONSOLIDATED
Carranza's Refusal to Allow
Obregon Fair Campaign
Cause of Overthrow
El Paso, Texas., May 11.Carran-
zas dictatorial and immoral politics
culminating in bis attempt to prevent
Obregon having fair campaign for
president caused Carranzas overthrow
according to Robert V. Peaquiera.
financial agent of the revolutionary
liberal constitutionalists government
of Mexico who gave the United States
an executive statement here today
The revolution proposes to consoli
date all the elements of the coun
try for a united peace and progress
and to respect foreigners and their in
terests with which we aim to main
tain the most cordial relations, Pes
quleru wrote
ST. PAUl TRADETOUR
PLANS COMPLETEFOR
NORTHERN TRIP
Street Band Concert Will
Feature of Visiting i
Deputation
We are advised by the Saint Paul
Association, of Public and Business
Affairs that the annual trade tour
which visits us on the May 29 bids
fair to have the largest delegation
ever sent out on any trade tour by St.
Paul's wholesalers.
The trip is over the lines of the
Northern Pacific,' Great Northern and
)ron Range railroads, with Northern
Pacific equipment in use The'train
will consist of five standard sleepers,
two dining cats,.observation car, two
tourists sleepers for the band and
train employes, and two baggage cars
The fact that the train travels at
night and also very often at
meal times makes it necessary to in
clude sleeping car and dining car fa
cilities on the train
The party will be accompanied by
the Minnesota State Band of twenty
five pieces which has a reputation
over the entire northwest of being a
very fine concert band, and a high
grade line of entertainment is assur
ed our people.
The party will also have a com
munity singer and everybody will be
given an opportunity to do a little
singing Song sheets will be distrib
uted to the school children and oth
ers There will also be a good vari
ety of souvenirs for distribution by
representatives of the various houses
participating in the trip.
Immediately upon the arrival of
the special train, there will be a par
ade, headed by the band, thru the
business section of the city Follow
ing the parade the band will play a
concert on a main street while the
Saint Paul business men are calling
their friends and customers.
The train schedule has been ap
proved by operating officials of the
railroad and barring accidents of un
usual conditions of some kind the
train will arrive on schedule.
MEXICAN CITY
WILL SURRENDER
Ejl Paso, Texas, May 11.Piedras-
Negras awaited capture by revolu
tionists early today. General Preuda
with army of five hundred expected
to reach the city today. The garrison
expected to surrender without fight
ing. LAND CLEARING TRAIN
WILL VISIT 23 TOWNS
St. Paul, May 11 The total num
ber of towns which will be visited bjr
the Minnesota Land-Clearing special
train, which will tour northern Min
nesota from May 18 to June 25 is
twenty-three, according to an an
nouncement made by the agricultural
extension division of the University.
Those in charge of the demonstra
tion will blast, pull and pile stumps
to show settlers the modern methods
of clearing stump land.
The train is being sent out under
the agricultural extension division of
the University in cooperation with
the business men's organizations o
the twin cities, the railroad compan
ies, the manufacturers of explosives,
the makers of stump pullers and re
lated equipment, and the business
men and fanners in communities in
which the demonstrations will be*
given.
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