OCR Interpretation


The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, July 29, 1920, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1920-07-29/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

v.
1 "&*..
-A
tot*.. .-l/*.
COM^JGEVENTS
July 4 to Aug 1.Union^tent Meet
*Sag by Evangelist C. F. Welgle.
July 26-28^-County Teacher*' ex
,alaatlo,of BeAldjW
September e-UHinnejftttr.State
vr.
Sept. 15, 16. ITBeltrami County
LASiTWBK
SUNDAY LAST SiRVICE
W*.r
Evangelist Wi|l,Hu Been
Drawing Crowd* tn Hear
,J'
ftis Sermon* of Power
Jeans Peasiag Throat* Jeneho.
Text: "Jams entered and pawed
through Jericho." LukV 19:1.
The greatest event fa the-history
MM
Zaccheus might never have known
Jesus was In town had it not been
fiTBfa^eu^-for 'Zaccheus wa. a
busy' m^n too. But the day Jesu*
nme to town the poor
ntlus usual place on the -road lead
ing^ Jericho, collecting alms from
S Who passed by. When he heard
the noise of the multitude coming
his way he inquired as to who was
coming to town, and when he heard
that it was Jesus the prophet and
healer, he cried out, "0, Jesus, thou
eon of David, have mercy on me.
Some in the crowd tried to make
him hush but he cried the louder,
"O Jesus, have mercy on me! W W
heard him and bade him .be brought
an his presence, and when he heard
that he wanted his sight restored
Jesus opened his eyes. Can you
imagine the joy of that poor man?
With his sight restored he must have
*elt like a millionaire. No Vj
he rejoiced and praised God wrtft a
wasThe cry of that poor beggar
that started-Zaccheus toward Jesus
The rich grafter was in his office
no doubt working over bis nd
-counting hi smoney when he heard
^fnose cries for help. He closed
ehop and went forth-to in**8"?*1*p
ind his'soarch brought Mm outside
the city gate. He saw the crowd in
\tl distance and hurried his pace
When he reached the outskirts of the
company surrounding J*sus he in
quired as to what the commoUon
was about, and when told tha.. Bar
temous hao been healed of bis blind
ness by a great healer he decided to
ee the man who had performed so
notable a miracle. But try as he
would he could not see
WP prevented by a se'"iou8d
tlT *if Jericho was wh*n~.Jenis passed anything but cussing and scolding
"rS: inr-h. a aat around the house nnd its no wonder
through,the city. Itis_^y **J" Sat they go to the devil early in life,
vent for any town when God maace
it a-visit Jericho had seen it* king* harmony takesc the's placo of
A
Jerusilem, but when Jesos fJj
it aaw God, to* Christ wa* God. Yet
strange to ay, ge were
town who never knewjjhen He came
nor when He left They were too
busy
pursuit .,_--
out to me*t
as we .hare any record 4aer* an
S^twomen the plaeo who t+
Reived an benefit frgm vkalijg
same of the beggar was Barttmeou*
and the name oftte grafter wa* Zac-
n. i and eenerab as thy joy file the hous? with sunshine and
t^TST^ nTE to music .nd^home becomes a little ves-
lcul,,
i*
he was too short. The Bible tolls
us he was short of stature, that is
to Fy he was short from his feet up.
Many a man falls to see Jesus for
the reason of being too short. Some
are too short In their surrender.
They want to hold on to some sin in
their lives. They want to be saved,
bnt thev want to hold to their idols.
They want to De saved but tbey don
,want to stop their dancing on the
devil's territory. Let me tell yo
my friends, it is either surrender^all
JOT te damned. You can't continue
your gambling or your immoralhab
its and btf saved. God won't look at
you until you wash your hands of
tb- entire business and come to Him
W an honest heart, desiring to
i.t kill doubt or doubt will
4o*
destroy your soal. Doubt starts
main there. It digrs downI ifhtil
the aeaa oui uc ,i*tii- it
S!lS rTora
d*t!o'ubt is. a diseaseopen up the
door of your soul to God and lei in
the sunshine of faith and It will de
etroy doubt. You wont-hav^ coax
faith to come injust open the door
of vour* heartland .give it .^ight of
w*v \nd when faith comes in it
will bring a host good, frienas to
helo entertain you: FaiUi fringe^joy
and peace and rest. Faith, brlnp
health of soul and heart-ease. As
faith and her friends come in, doubt
will move out without standing^on
the order of ,115s going. And
me orar ui,u e.-o-
doubt will go fret and worry and un
rest and death. Let them goit will
good riddance of bad rubbish.
Zaccheus wanted to see Jesus so
badly that he was willing to do any
thing. Down the road was a tree
tSigrowing by the wayside. He decided
Ao climb the tree in order to see Je
sus It was very undignified for a
..man like him to climb a tree to say
the least. But ire laid aside his dig
-nity for the moment that he might
*ee Jesus. He climbed the tree and
jcrawled out on a limb.
He parted the branches and
watched for the coming of Jtftus.
And .whan the .Saviour came. uud
the tree he gated up and saw the
publican gasing down into his. face.
Then Zaccheus had the surprise of
his lite, for Jesus said, "Coafa dQwnt
Zaccheus. for I am coming to your
house today." The man up in the
tree did not ask him to wait till an
other more convenient time. He
didn't beg for more time to consider
the matter. No, sir, he came down
the tree in a hurry and,somewhere
between the limb and the ground he
found salvation and became a new
man. A
O, what' a change! Just a few min
utes back yonder and he was an un*
saved' man. unaoje to see Jesus. Just
,.L _- ."15. .bu nan.
,r?Ti-. hi* b. not i. IJ.fMrtory tf^y}*5Jf g
even thinking of Jesus or or living mew wi "^^r^e"-.-***'
bitter life. And now he is walking mens committee prowft? asserts.
K^me
change came, into his home as well
as in his life. When salvation comes
fco the home it means a transforma
tion. No doubt they erected a fam-^
ily altar and the voice of prayer was
heard in the days that followed. It
is better to hear prayer than profail
ity. A lot of children never hear
chrig
ome
int
tibuJe ,t..heaven
thediscord, homj?
HARDTWESSHOUNfi
JAPANESE & Ufa
HUNTINGFORHUSBANDS
Moat Marriage* Japan Are
Contracted by Prof estional
Match Makers
Tokyo.'- (By Wfafl)The hard
times which struck Japan with great
suddenness recently had strange ef
fects, among them Intajg that of
sending many a fair Japanese damsel
put into the matrimonial market to
look for a husband who can support
her. In Japan marriages are con
tracted through professional, .match
makers to a far greater extent than
ft the case ,in other countries, and
these are now profiting oy the wind
which is blowing 111 for most other
people in Japan.
"Never before have we had as
many women applicants," said one
of the most prominent marriage
agents. "As a rule, our customers
are men looking for wives, but late
ly the old order has been reversed.
There may be other reasons, but we
who are in the business think that
the hard times are causing women to
seek safety by finding: htisbauds to
protect them There "are a number
of women of the better class among
our clients."
The Bureau of Statistics tells a,
similar tale. Its records show that
a tremendous Increase is taking place
in "the number of marriages recorded
during the past two months. A rath
er novel example of the steps taken
by young' women to 'find' helpmeet*"
Is found In the following advertise
ment in which a Japanese maiden
seeks to land a foreign husbanv.. It
reads: "Japanese young lady, aged
20, of best Samuari family, wishes
to break with old customs and tot
marry a foreigner. Willing to learn
English and to wear Western
clothes."
^Another effect of the times is the
exodus of farmers' sons from the uni
versities and other institutions for
highen learning in Tokyo. These
young men are beipg called back to
the farms by their parents* who made
large sums durtugthe boom ana thus
felt able to give their sonagopd edu?
cations. Now the hard time* has hit
them badly* an* tl^.youngjnen. must
forego their careers,
Mti*rallv
UUW I \te" i-t tV a^^ae^*^""^' ^.-v- Je
'That'sethe hell of eating*too- much. meat, says a weis
th heart in .^rity Mea o
f fLt to destroy faith, hope, ease a-id whfcM overwork* the ktdny i
Kpfness dol ran re.ch fSl.v .irrt to Biter it fro* the blood
the heart it will suck all the sap out
of the soul. Doubt is the child of
the devil and does the work of the
their effort to filter it frot the blood
and they become *ort of paralysed
and loggy. When ypur.kidney* get
sluggish and clog^u moat W
watte head a e, di**y, pell* ywjtomach
sours,c tongue i coated and_jrhe tn
weather is bad yott ta*e ^eumato
twinges. The urine is cloudy, full
of sediment, channels oftetr get sore,
water scald* and you areobbgeoUto
seek relief two or three tune*
the night. ..^M
Either consult a good, reliable
o- physician at once or get from .your
i, pharmacist about four ounces of Jad
Salts take a tablespoonful in a glass
of water before breakfast for few
days and your kidneys will then act
fine. This famous salts is made from
the acid of grapes and lemon juice,
combined with lithia, and has been
used for generation* to clean and
stimulate sluggish' kidneys, also to
neutralize acids in the wine *o it no
longer irritates, thus ending bladder
weakness.
Jad Salts is*a life saver fot regular
meat eaters. It is ^expensive, can
not Injure and makes "a delightful,
effervescent lithia-water drink.
soura tongueicoated,, *n^*
:4
.1
uJ
Subscribe tor'Tne X*ti Pioneer
'v-
IF KIDNEYS ACT
BAD TAKE SALTS
Says Backache I* Sin Yon
Hare Been Eating Too
Much-Meat --..Xl
T:
*& ?m*
Northwestern New.
HISTOWCAIJAGEAHJJO. .\tiL
BE STAGED AT BJO) WIN
Red Wing, t July* 2.~r more,
than six mouths,r
fee 'Wlaj dtiien
have been working-on :tha*rogram
of an, historical Pageant that Is ex
pected to draw thousandsjfrom ail
fcartsot the country hli^alBt week.
The pageant will be sUg i* Aug. &
and v^-i
No spot in the country 4g*es more
men than fted' WIng||theJbu sitteBs
with-Jesu's KJhd* takink Him hom*
with him to his family. Amaslng
grace! IT we but sUrren^sr, it wUl
wnrk Miracles in our lives. One min- famous Indians in history, wil be
work Piracies V"*"*?- **.-_ M..-*****!.- CM** Red^TSWmr,lsaW' saw
ute we are on our way to perdition
and the next minute we are on our
way^ to heaven
It is safe to say fh# a" great' .important events of early Minnesota
Father Time willl be*!* the D8J Father Time wil begirt the page
ant with a legendary, history of .the
Indians. Chief Re* W|ng one of 'the
characterised?^ CMo R*d1Sr,
|K
the first steamboat that came, to Fort
Snelling and witnessed mittl or the
history.
Symbolic dances/ Indlan^wa songs,
tableaux, fire ceremonies'?|nf
jn
fcr
i A
JI".
i'f-*"
means you-_havesJ^iw Jpeae,
7
them, like son relieve yeur bowel*
removing ell W 3g
waste,,
eb yo have backache, sick
eise yon '^TZZ^ZSi
4^ ^w^V-^ r*^ ^2t.*7*3
folk
florigx will' be tnterpMahstfln the
story. The landing ott heirst voy
:gers, coming of the rfrst'^teamboat,'
early life in Minnesota treaty1
coun
cils, departurerof troops for* wars and
the return of Minnesota .men from
,the recent world war will.be portray
ed, -r *&/({
The pageant wUl tk:e^place on
the Red Wing golf course, where -both
land and water events-will be stag
A
wOLDEH VALLETS LAST
SOLDER J|^|H8WROT
Golden TJalley.' N.wD.t
July 29.
The last solder of tho town-has just
returned. lie is JohmWeidjaer, one of
the first to enlist, fie was-severely
wounded by machine,^ gun.t fire in
France' and has been: undergoing
treatment in government hospitals
for a shattered hlpT He is still slight
ly disabled. ~j
tfiwrniw tammriMEtli'-jit rr
"WITrTi JBKBCT KEHOBIAL
Mankato,-July 29.-^-)Proceeds from
a carnival held in Mankato"the last
week in July will be used a* the ba^
sis of a fund tor the erection of a
memorial in memory of the service
men and women who gave their lives
to their* country. k*r
The Legion carnival waahnade un
usually interesting by several novel
features. A country stores-operated
to hwt old It. 0. of *&* ten by,
LegiUnalres. A recruiting office was
In operation to tMffttoi l^joiii
post membership and an informg^on,,
bobth, in charge'of the ist wanrjlskj
l&SSS&lWF&r
worm* havrappeawd^ln T*atnumtt
bars a| CaMstpta^ 5a- mil^s. *ou.th
west 6f h^aecotdfng to reports
reaching here. On 6ne farm a dam
age of fdrty petlceifL was done to
the crops of small grain. Bvery avail
able man lb: the vanity ^has bben
recruited an, effort to stop .the
work of'the wc*mpwJM^ ar* said
to number on atf average 6f 100 to
the square foot by actual count
St. Paul. July .Harrison Pul
ler, siat4.-CQmnwd||r of toe Ameri
can Legion, announced today that
coples~of- resolutions which will be
.adopted at ttffedepartmcnr conven
tion ih Duluth, Augf ie l^ and'fg
will bo mai)ed to every department
headquarters in the United State?.
Commander Puller is in receipt gt
a letter from Nation*! Adtan Lem
uel Bolles, which says in 0artf -J
"Requests froih' department pfflci
als for copies of resolutions adopt
ed by 'other department conventions,
are so numerous that tt is'tbelteved
every tiepartment in thct.\merican 'Le-
gion is 'keenly Interested, in 'resol'x-
tion* passed at the different depart
ment conventions.. ^These resolu
tions vrill be extremely ^valuable to
those'departments whU*h* '.afc apw
prcpprftiir to hold their annual con
ventions."
CHICAGO CTEW TO COMPETE
the St. John's Military Academy,
THE PIONEER WA*rV
-componentpartsof^theFires^opeSK ^MnT
^are scieWifjealLy balanced by|4riecial- |^$
%tswhohaveputyears of stiwPy and
-practiceijaito a single^purp0e-^to
^flieet youi^femarid in a small cartire.
can #ow b^ve all four tites on
form servic
LENNON & NEILSON, KELLIHER^f|
^X^K- MOTOR INN, BEMIOJI
FABTS 0 800TE IAI0T pleasant. c*tlifa|--*o.tll9roly ^^msini^and.P^y*^*^
f5JWK' *P
sroux vim: S^D __.
rri
IffiPAJlTn^imMSOIim^iSi^i
Chicago, July" 2\The Lincoln
Park boat lub senior elght-ored saell
crew and junior single sculler left
yesterday" for Bt. Catherines, Ont..
Canada, ^to compete in- the rowing
race? to 'be hjeld" undjer the" auspices
of the Royal Cahadictn Henley regat
ta, Friday and Saturday. lie crew
has defeated^ rivals from Detroit? ass
Grand lipids, Mich., St. Louts, an
&fnHMHirtiiiiiiiiiiaiiiii
BEMIDJI
enejm ._
S
iM
BRING RESULT? i%
Sales of this tir^ have increased 96%
thefirstsixmonthsof
thisyeart proy,
llfg the balanced tire, the "Firestone
3K has accomplished what Firestone
sought for it, more mileage, greater
economy,greater comfort, ^hich has
been passed on to the publiq,atJp^f
costmost miles per.dollar ?Z--^
Balanced! That means to you more
y*an mere tMcknesis of tread, great-
er air capacity, more plies of fabric,
greater cushioning, or the.gauge of
the sidewalk It means""that all
T^ V^1
V^sil^ff^CaJT. 'ijfet-
HOUJSTER'S ROCKY MOUNTAIN TEA a great
lttrgHt
wot
w*^y
t_-.
il
sat no iO Jt fit ^"i
*Ws\&
CM a.thore.trlal.andto wiH raconmend^itJhMdl yeg* vjnmjn*
&&*-*
One of our am]
p#tlr--fel^het|aii^^VX St^a..
'%'-cultiatrgeiwl^rBna:idoa,,!:^
^mWr promote 1&t A^iii^^ifeii^i^ iT"
1^ I thern National is a home institution,
feV^ tetf to s^ne ourjj^gy V$9$Pm
^f Times. You mil ahviaya~-fra a w&
\v^came her^r/ydii axeWfOttTJtSrW
r^'^ilrjejf ftt|e{ion, whettierJJOVLbamk
National
i-T^
$-^
&
V
^*%r#^^^?j
3f
'Sf-J
%$&%
W
a,-*^#
r*'"
7
msM^
'ffik
MINNESOTA
v*a i zrzi.
ffaal AO
(nonsldd)
V. M. OWEN, HINE$
*-iF
^ic

xml | txt