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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, August 31, 1920, Image 1

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LargMt Ciicvla-
tioa la NordMfa
Minnesota
VOLUME XVIII. NO. 210
HARD1NCTODAY
^A YS NATION'S
PROBLEMIS TO
OPENUPUNDS
Reclamation of Arid Lands in
West Is Advocated by
Nominee Today
SPEAKS TO WESTERN
GOVERNO RS A MARION
Draws Parallel Between Condi-
tions Now and Following
Close of Civil War
(By United Press.)
Marion, O., Aug. 31 (by Raymond
Clapper).Reclamation of the arid
lands of the West and throwing them
open to the people of the nation pro
tected from monopolistic control,
^probably will be advocated by Senator
Warren G. Harding in his speech
to western governors here today.
Harding was expected to draw a
parallel between conditions now and
those following the civil war when
the nation's energy turned to devlop
ment of the middle west. Now the
nation's problem is to reclaim the
amUions of waste acres in the moun
tain region and to provide field for
this new development.
NATIONAL GUARD
HELD IN READINESS
IN OKLAHOMA
Race Riots Feared as Outcome
of Lynching of Negro
Oklahoma City, Okla., Aug. 30.
Directions that all national guard
unirs in Oklahoma City be hel* in
xeadiness for duty on connection with
possible rack trouble growing out of
the lynching of Claude Chandler, a
negro here Sunday night, were issued
late Monday by Adjutant General C.
F. Barrett.
Charging that the sheriffs of
Tulsa-ftents..
and Oklohonia counties, where lynch
ings occurred Saturday and Sunday
nights, were "in collision ^ith the
leaders of the mob or else were "whol
ly unmindful or physically afraid to
discharge the duties of their offices.
Governor Robertson sent a letter
to the attorney general's department
Monday directing that immediate
v, i fi,^
CsheriffOs
K^
steps be taken to remove the
from office.
General Barrett's order
W i
day of rumors concerning threatened l",. "d
clash between whites and negroes as
a result of the lynching Chandler
was arrested Saturday following a
raid upon an alleged moonshine still
near Arcada. Okla., in which Stanton
Wleiss, a federal prohibition omcer:
Homer Adrean, a deputy sheriff, and
Charles Chandler, father of Claude
Chandler were killed.
TRIALS OF THREE BEGAN
IN DULUTH CONNECTION
WITH THE JUNE LYNCHING
Duluth, Minn., Aug. 31.Trials of
three of the twenty-one men charged
-with murder and rioting in connec
tion with the lynching of three negro
_,circus hands here on June 15, began
.^3n the district courts here yesterday.
1 Twelve jurors were accepted in the
case against Harry Stephenson and
ng of testimony started. In an
sr court room seven jurors were
lined to try Leonard Hedman,
le in a third court eight jurors
accepted in the case against
William Rosen.
BAD STRIP OF JEFFERSON
HIGHWAY IS IMPROVED
Rert Lake Falls, Aug. 31.Traffic
along the Jefferson highway will no
longer be diverted because of a bad
stretch of road between Clearbrook
and Bagley in Clearwater countv. be
cause the road is now in good condi
tion and will be properly marked, ac
cording to a report made by a com
mittee from the Red Lake County
Automobile club, consisting of E
Healy. chairman of the good roads
'committee E. G. Rupe George
Hennings and S E Hunt, accom
panied by Countv Engineer E. Pal-
mer.- This party went over the route
between Red Lake Falls and Bagley
Monday and Tuesdav and held meet
with business men at Gonvick.
Tearbrook and Baglev The old
markings between Cleanbrook and
Bagley had not been changed to the
new road which has recently been
constructed between these two towns
and which is in fair condition. The
new route was designated bv General
Manacer Clarkson of the Jeffer
son Highway association last fall aft
er considerable controversy with
Clearwater county people, but it ap
pears that the new road was never
marked prior to this week.
AS!
Paublm froimg
STlittn
LIGHT CHANGED.
TO REQUEST
Committee Appointed to In-
vestigate Condition of Be-
midji Gas Co. Soon
A delegation of Third street prop
erty owners and business men wait
ed on the city council in regular
session last evening and presented a
substantial argument for a change
in the plans for the whiteway light
ing system as proposed for that
street. As a result the council took
such action as is necessary to make
the changes as requested and Third
street will be allotted six additional
lights.
Work of cutting a trough for the
cable along the edge of the sidewalks
has already been begun by Naylor
Electric company and the installation
of the lamps and cables will be done
as quickly as possible.
James L. George, of the Bemidji
Gas company, presented a request to
the council that a committee from
that body be appointed to investigate
the condition of the company and to
make a report as to whether it was
advisable that a change be made in
the franchise to allow the company
to charge, a higher rate for gas con
sumption/
A committee consisting of Alder
men Boyce, Carlson and Carver was
appointed and within the next few
days will make the investigation as
requested and will report to the
council at the next meeting.
Mr. George stated, that the com
pany is losing a large sum each month
and that something must be done to
correct this within a very short time.
Gas is costing the company at pres
ent nearly 25 cents per hundred feet
being charged
costing $75 per week now as com
pared to' $21 a week at that time,
at the plant only. Office expense
has been* figured separately. The price
pf supplies necessary in the manufac
ture of gas has more than doubled
and the only increase which the com
pany has made in its rates is the in
crease from 15 cents to 18 cents
made last May, says Mr. George.
Bids for repairing and overhauling
the city jail were opened and read,
btr^*ndne were accepted. It was
ordered that bids be readvertised.
A communication from the Civic
and Community club relative to regu
lating public
aJ
leave of absence to attend the fire CALIFORNIA V\Ht MAY
chief convention to be held at St.
September 13 to 18, upon
a request.
In
additio,nar tdo
W
the matters
^J! attended to numberoutine of bills were
pai
oere
^.jamA -m,iA
an
allowe
LOS ANGELES VOTES ON
WAR MEMORIAL TODAY
ASSOCIATION TO HEAR
DETAILSOF NORTH TRIP
Judge C. W Stanton and-others
who made the trip to Grygla and the
north country will make a resume of
the trip and their experiences at the
meeting of the Bemidji Civic and
Commerce Association to be held to
morrow following the noon-day
luncheon.
An interesting program has been
arranged and every member is urged
to be present if possible. For the
luncheon an excellent menu is being
arranged.
Directors of the Association met
this noon at luncheon and disposed
of routine business matters.
KUBAN EXPEDITION IS
and only 18 cents is
the consumer. A year ago the costj Paris, Aug. 31.Polish delegates
of production was only about one- have returned to Warsaw from Minsk
third what it is today, labor required and the Russo-Polish armistice nego
MIDJ I DAILY HONE
The Pioo Mombor of tlw UaiUd Pnu-Umd Win SoroiooTod.r'o World Now. Td*r
BEMIDJI, MINN., TUESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 31, 1920
FIGHTING HAS
BEENRESDMED
ALONG ENTIRE
POLISH FRONT
General Wrangel' as Suffered
Crushing Defeat on Two
Army Fronts
WIPED OUT ENTIRELY
Crimean Forces Have Been
Battered Up on Peninsula,
Say Communique
(By United Press.)
Moscow, Aug. 31 (via wireless to
London, Aug. 30).General Wrangel
has suffered a crushing defeat on two
fronts in the Black sea theatre of
war, according to an official state
ment issued here today. Wrangel's
Kuban expedition lias been wiped out,
the communique said, while his Crim
ean forces have been battered up on
the peninsula. Another communique
described the battle on the Polish
front, indicating resumption of fight
ing along practically the entire line.
(By United Press.)
tiations will be resumed in Riga next
week, according to reports received
from Warsaw today.
ALARMED AT STOCK
SHIPMENTS FROM
WESTERN RANCHES
(By United Press.)
St. Paul, Aug. 31.Alarmed over
the shipping of thousands of head of
young and breeding stock from west
ern ranches, live stock men met here
dances was read and' today to discuss the situation. They
City "Attorney Huffman instructed to fear a gradual decline of meat pro-
draft a resolution covering the con- ducts unless the situation is changed.
ts I Condition are forcing live stock
Court reports for the week ending, breeders to dispose of young and
August 23 were read and approved, breeding stock rather than feed them
A total of $202.92 was collected in' through the winter months. Feed
municipal court during the week in loans are contemplated.
fines.
Fire Chief C. S. Dailey was granted. 1PAm VATP U1V
CAUSE ILL FEEING
(By United Press.)
Washington, Aug. 31 (by A. L.
Bradford).Secretary of State Colby
proposed legislation prohibiting land
holding by the Japanese will cause a
wave of anti-American sentiment in
(By United Press.) Japan, it was learned.
Los Angeles, Aug. 31.Financing While Colby and Shidehara refuse
of two great civic projects, a war to reveal the nature of the conversa-
memorial auditorium and a coliseum, Ltion constantly going on between' ed a warehouse here today in an er-
was being considered by Los Angeles them, it is known both governments foit to get 160,000 gallons of liquor
citizens today, voting on a proposed are alarmed over the prospect of Cali-
$5,000,000 bond issue. fornia passing such a measure.
The first of the two issues on the
primary ballot calls for the erection
6f a memorial auditorium to cost $4,-
100,000 and to contain 13,451 seats,'
or one for every Los Angeles man
enlisting the .army ,navy or marine
corps during the world war. Thei
second project proposes erection of a
Coliseum in Exposition park to cost
$900,000 and, to seat 75,000 persons,
to be used for entertainments and
athletic contests.
The citizen's committee, backer of
both projects, declared both will be
passed by large majorities.
"The war memorial auditorium will
be the nation's greatest war memo-
rial," Sylvester L. Weaver, chairman
of the committee, declared. "It will
house headquarters -for war veterans'
organizations, civic community cen
ters, and convention headquarters.
"The coliseum will be the world's
largest amphitheater, and will pro
vide a perfect place for staging the
next Olympiad," Weaver said.
Plans are already under way to
bring the 1924 Olympic games to this
city, he said.
RESUHPTIONOF
BFJi ASTRIOTS
CALLSMARTUL
LAWTHISNOON
Rioting Causes Death List of
Ten and Injuries to Two
Hundred Persons
FATALITIES MAY
INCREASE LATER
Reports Indicate Disorder
Arose FromSpread of Polit-
ical, Religious Differences
(By United Press.)
Belfast, Aug. 31.Martial law was
declared in Belfast at noon today.
Rioting which broke out between
Orangemen and Catholics last week
had been practically continuous for
twenty-four hours, and was growing
in intensity. The death list was ten
and with many of the two hundred
wounded in hospitals in pitiful condi
tion, it was believed the fatalities
would be materially increased. Re
ports received here indicate that dis
order growing out of political and
religious differences were spreading
throughout Ireland.
PLANS BEING MADE
(OR LABOR CELEBRATION
The Labor Unions of Bemidji ex
tend an earnest invitation to every
person in Bemidji to,attend and take
a part in labor's national holiday,
parade and picnic on Monday, Sep
tember 6.
All kinds of vehicles will make up
the parade, which will form at 9:30
to 10:00 a. m. and start from the
City. hall.
Tfis program will appear in The
Pioneer and' will also be distributed
in circular form. Let's all unite and
make Bemidji's first Labor Day cele
bration a record-breaker for attend
ance and good cheer.
BEMIDJI LABOR UNIONS.
Per J. T. Davis,
C. K. Foucault,
C. M. Booth,
Executive Committee.
GRIFFIN DEFEATS HART
IN TENNIS CONTEST
(By United Press)
Forest Hills, N. Y., Aug. 31 Clar
ence J. Griffin of San Francisco, de
feated Richard Hart of Boston, in the
secon5d
has been told by Ambassador Shide-I tennis championship here today, 6-2
hara that enactment in California of,
round of the national singles
7"
THIEVES FRUSTRATED
BY STRONG STEEL DOORS
Chicago Aug. 31 Thieves storm-
stoied within, but the steel doors
withstood the blasts.
Little Johnny Spendthrift, Jr.
ANNUAL MEETING OF
BEMIDJI BUILDING
AND LOANASSOCIATION
G. E. Carson Elected President
D. L. Stanton, Geo. W Rhea
and J. P. Lahr Officers
At the annual meeting of the
stockholders of the Bemidji Building
and Loan association, F. S. Lycan,
G. E. Carson, D. L. Stanton, E. W.
Johnson, J. L. George, J. P. Lahr,
W. N. Bowser, Geo. E. Kreatz, E. F.
Netzer, Geo. W. Rhea and M. W.
Deputy were elected as directors of
the association for the ensuing year.
The directors elected G. E. Carson,
president D. L. Stanton, vice-presi
dent Geo. W. Rhea, treasurer, and
J. P. Lahr, secretary.
The Bemidji Building and Loan
association was organized in August,
1910, and now has eighty-three mem
bers holding 1,801 shares of stock
issued in twenty-five different series.
This installment stock is paid for at
the rate of 50 cents per share each
month. A loan of $1,000 made on
ten shares of stock is paid for at the
rate of $16 per month for a period of
one hundred .months.
The first series has reached its ma
turity and the stock is now being paid
off at the rate of $103.25 per share,
having been in force for 118 months.
Fifty cents a month saved for a period
of 118 months has accumulated a
total amount of $103.25, which would
be $59 actually paid in and earnings
amounting to $44.25.
The association furnishes the
money for the building or purchasing
of homes on the easy payment plan.
There are forty-two borrowing mem
bers on its list of stockholders with
a total amount of loans now in force
reaching $41,750.
Building associations are under the
direct supervision of the banking de
partment of the state, its books and
records being examined by an exam
iner of that department twice a year.
This assures the investor ample pro
tection for moneys paid in on stock.
The issuing' of two hundred shares
of stock in the twenty-sixth series
was authorized by the board of di
rectors at this meeting, subscriptions
for which are now being taken by
the secretary.
SAItAII BEPwKIIART III
Paris, Aug. 31Sarah Bernhart,
the actress is suffering from conges
tion of the Jungs a'nd an influnima
tion of the kidneys and is confined i
to her bed. Her -illness is due to a
motor trip she took a few dnvs ago
from her summer home at Belle Isle
to Paris.
REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN
FUND TOTALS $4,887,500
(By United Press)
Chicago, August 31. (By L.
Martin.)The quotas as assigned to
the various states by the republican
national committee, for the 1920
campaign, totals ?4,87,500, Fred Up-'
ham, treasuier, disclosed before the'
United States senate investigating
campaign committee. This sum, it
was declared, represented every pen
ny the republicans had at any time
planned to collect and really repre
sented at the time it was arranged,
about twice the amount the party
leaders expected to raise. The quotas
were fixed early in 1919, Upham said,
while the $3,079,00 under which the
party is operating was not adopted
until July, 1920.
4
45c PER MONTH.
EXPLAINSUSES
OFREPUBLICAN
W DONATED
FORCAMPAIGN
Treasurer of National Commit-
tee Reports Today to Com-
mittee on Investigation
TOTAL O $1,308,820.65
IN CASH OR PLEDGES
Also Presented Detailed State-
ment of Party's Finances
to Present Time
Chicago, Aug. 31. (By L. C. Mar
tin )The republican party's treas
ury has gathered a total of $1,308,-
820 65 in cash or pledges since the
convention in June, 'Fred Upham,
treasurer of the national committee
disclosed today before the senate
campaign fund investigating commit-
Upham said $39 9,241.78 of this
was or will be used tor state funds
and not for the work of the national
committee. Cash coining in since
June 14 amounted to $618,413.54,
Upham said. Uncollected pledges
tolled $291,665 33. Of -J last item
Uphnm said $200,000 will be for the
use ol the national committee and
the remainder for the state commit
tee
HP submitted to the committee a
bound volume two incres thick con
taining the names of 12,000 contrib
utors ince June. Of these he said
each lirve given more man $1,000
but none more than $2,500. Among
the unpaid pledges he saia were two
for $5,000.
He mho presented a detailed state
ment of the party's finances and
showed in adition to the figures given
that the national committee has jor
rowetl $360,000. He said all of these
loans were made in the usual manner
and "Not a penny represents any un
derwriting of this campaign commit
tee
The Nntional committee has in
stiucted him to lend $200,000 to the
republican senatorial campaign com
mittee and $500,000 to the congres
sional campaign committee if they
needed it These loans must be re
paid, he said "Where will those
committees get the money to pay the
loans?" asked Senator Reed "From
the remiMirjns I pue-ss" said Up
ham "This means then tint we must
add $700,000 to vour campaign fund,
total given us by Mr. Hays," sal*
Reed.
Upham explained he did not expect
to lend either committee the total
sum allocated to them. He also add
ed "$100,000 of the congressional
committee's fund is not to be loaned
until after the election. It is for next
year's congressional election."
STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
WILL OPENTUB., SEPT. 7
Enrollment of students in the reg
ular classes at the State Normal
school will occur next Tuesday, Sep
tember 7th from nine a m. until five
p. m.
Local students desiring to make ar
rangements for high school or normal
school work before the above enroll
ment day can see President Deputy In
his office any day between nine and
four o'clock
Students will ibe admitted to San
ford hall on Monday but the first
meal will not be served until Tues
day noon.
Elementary School.
In the elementary department of
the Normal school children's classes
will be formed this year in the kind-*
ergarten and first five grades. The
children in these classes will meet
promptly at nine o'clock, Tuesday
morning, September 7th.
Those in attendance last year who
indicated at the close of the school
year that they would return this year
will retain their places if present on
Tuesday morning and others on the
waiting list will be affmltted to the
proper grade In the order of their ap
plication as long as there is room
Those who can not be admitted at
first will be notified when vacancies
occur. Students Desire Places to Work for.
Room and Board.
Those who desire to give girls at
tending Normal school an opportun
ity to earn room and board should no
tify President M. W Deputy or th
Dean of Women, Mrs. Grace B.
Thacker.
W. DEPUTY,
President.
'BABE" RUTH FILES SUIT
AGAINST MOVIE CONCERNS
New York, Aug- 31.George Her
man, "Babe" Ruth, has filed a suit
for $1,000,000 damages against a
movie concern and five vaudeville
theatres, charging infringement upon
exclusive rights to a motion picture
in which he appeared, it was learned
today.
,5
1
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