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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, October 05, 1920, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1920-10-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 6, 1920
Substantial Frame Structure of
Attractive Appearance.
EIGHT COMFORTABLE ROOMS
TWs Design Represents the Result of
Contclfntjoue-Work en the Part
of the BuilderLine* Are
Distinctive.
By W. A. RADFORD.
Wllliajn A. Radford will
and civ i
on-.
as and fiveadvice FRBfi OF
ibjecl
ail subject*
t-=.. jc-rtalnlnsr to the
f**g&* On IkcconSt ofhlswlde experience
as Editor, Author and Manufacturer, he
without doubt, the hlcfaest authority
goalie. Chicago. III. and only enclose
two-cent stamp for reply.
Although the Smaller apartment
containing two, three and four rooms
with space-saving beds, is at the
height of its popularity in the large
cities there is still a big demand
for a real home by the man with a
family who wants plenty of room for
his children. This type of home is
substantial as well as comfortable and
can be builtf in a variety of styles.
The home shown here Is an excel*
lent |ype of a story-and-a-half model.
It represents the result of conscien
tious work on the part of the con*
'tractor. The exterior is particularly
pleasing, built along lines distinctive.
The front porch with fide and front
stonef steps and heavy brick columns
and .gable roof is well'constructed and
lnvltliig. The projecting rafters and
sma|f-roof dormer set rather far back
tinder a "projecting roof which is sup
ported by thr^e small braces, are, ad
dltlonal Touches that make the home
look'Very appealing to the man with
a medium-sized family. It would be
hard to find a more convenient house
to l|ye In. Resting on a foundation
of concrete, this house is built of
_, frame, part siding and part shingles.
The "shingles have been ptft on in a
rather unusual way and add consid
erable charm ^to the general appear
ance of the home.
lfctjs when you take a look at the
Interior that/the real beauty of the
home is revealed. The lower floor
n.' contains- six roomsliving room, din
ing Worn, kitchen, two bedrooms, and
avden.
The latter can be usjed as
bedroom In case of emergency or as a
library, as the owner may see fit The
living room is bilUt along Tvopular
line*, being the largest room in the
bouie 20 feet 6 inches by 14 feet At
one end is a large open fireplace lead
Ing^nto a wide chimney. In the cold
winter nights there is nothing that
helps to add cheer to the home as
First toor Plan.
I njuch as one of these fireplaces, and
,!*e-r are getting more popular every
day.
Wan bookcases have been built on
either side of this fireplace with small
windows above.
Opening off the living room with a
wide doorway Is the dining room. 15
by'12 feet ..This is.an unusually
cheerful room, being lighted by a wide
triple bay window. The small swing
ing door leads into the kitchen which
Is 12 by 10 feet The kit^i&i Is small
and designed to eliminate as many
unnecessary steps for the housewife
as possible. It is equipped with the
latest appliances to reduce the work
t a nrfninrum. Among these are mod
ro- range, sanitary sink, ice box and
T*-1 .it i *i ii -f1****^*-
crtyboard for utensils and food. The
small pantry is directly opposite the
kitchen.
On the other side of the lower floor
are two bedrooms and the den which
opens into the living room. The bed
rooms are 12 by 11 feet and open Into
a hall which runs from the living room
to the rear of the porch. A lavatory
completes the flist floor plan.
Upstairs the architect has provided
two large bedrooms 12 by 16 feet and
13 by 16 feet, to use up the space
Second Floor Plan.
which Js ordinarily wasted in a house
of this type. Under the sloping roof
two closets have been provided. They
are large enough to permit the storage,
of a birge quantity of clothing. Each
bedroom is lighted by three windows.'
The bathroom is also found on this
floor. It 19 equipped with the latest
built-in fixtures and is lighted by win
dows in the small roof dormer.
Although at a casual glance this
home looks large, it is only 34 by $8
feet.
WHY UVING HAS
Not
v
^~4A
ADVANCED
Wai
Pur Grandfather's Days Food
Demanded, to Be in Indi
vidual Packages.
Many Mlnnoapolitans^ remember well
when tethered cows fed on the open
fields beyond the brow of LowryJ**fl,
and when considerable corn fodder
stood in shock on tfce downtown side
of Lake street, says the Minneapolis
Journal. In those'days the cow was
not driven down street and milked in
front ot each customers door as In
some primitive countries yet the
greater part of the milk consumed in'
this, city came by the can-and-dipper
route direct from cow to consumer.
In those day?, not so ve^y far away*
eltber, the grocer scooped *tir oarweal,
our candy and our soda orackefa out
of a barrel to order and dug our but
ter out of a firkin. We all ate, aa it
were, out of a common dish, and
thought none the worse of our lot be
cause of that
Today even peanuts are served to
us, in transparent paraffined, envelopes,
candles come In ribboned cartons as
pretty as mother's Jewel case, break
fast foods are sealed and sterilized,
and the commonest groceries are wrap
ped in tinfoil. Moreover, they are all
delivered at the apartment house,
wherein families are now also put In
small but tidy packages.
As we become More highly clvlllzed
we demand more waiting on by hu
man hands, and the-result is, even
now, a rising price of human hand
/work that puts the service out of tbM
conunon reach, A
It costs about as much to raise oh*
child in the dry as it cost grandfather
in the country to raise, seven.
Dandelions for Health.
Next time you pass a field of dande
lions, sit right down and eat some
of them. Not only do dandelions make
you healthy, but they also keep you
young.
Dr. Josiah Oldfield says that a daily
diet of dandelion leaves, fowl's eggs,
grapes, lettuce, milk, watercress, honey
and salads InJ-erieral, will do mote to
ward keeping yon young than anything
else.
Says he: "Old age Is caused largely
by deposits in the blood-vessels and
cells of the body ril waste matter."
Fresh vegetables help remove this
waste matter and fonjn new cells.
Popular Science Monthly.
The Making of a Poet
"I see that your young nephew has
a pbem in this month's Massive Maga
zine. l"iope he will not let praiso
spoil him."
"There is not the slightest dangar
of anything spoiling him now," snarled
J. Fuller Gloom. **Hp was horn spell
ed or be couldn't write poetry.?
'H^-gfe '*fM^'A&:M^-
*S
TTTTJS! Th flBMIJJI l^TT.Y PIONEER
*..umiHp lljllfrMIII |i I ---a---B---{-g w^'y-3B----f-i
y-ffr,
.fg*r v^
ITHAT WAS AN AWFUL BLASI^IJP jfoflNE
THE BEMIDJI DAILY PIONEER
DAILY PIONEER WANT ADS BRING RESULTS
I
MINNESOTA SEED
BEST. SAYS IOWA*
1
Minnesota/ seed potatoes scor^e
again. C. L. Fitch, potato experts of
the agricultural extension depart
ment at Iowa State College at Ames,
says that the Minnesota seed has this
year shown itself worth 100 an acre
more in net resulths than Iowa grown
seed.
Mr. Fitch's statement is based say
Better Iowa, the clipping sheet is
sued at Ames, on demonstratioiur-car
rled on in seven different Iowa coun
ties to bring out *he value of vigor
ous northern seed potatoes. Four
trial lots have just been dug near
Sigoumey in Keokuk county -"with
these results: Certified Cobblers,
grown in northern Minnesota, yielded
126 bushels an acre with only 11
bushels of thiowouts. The Iowa
grown Cobblers planted alongside
yielded 65 bushels with 22 bushels of
small and inferior potatoes. "In oth
er words," Bays Mr. Fitch, "the nor
thern Beed pioduced 115 bushels of
good table potatoes and the Iowa
seed only 4? bushels, a difference of
73 bushels worth at least flOO
Better Iowa also declares that in
Early OhW the certified Red River
Valley seed produced 105 bushelB
with 20 busheU small, or 85 bushels
net. The Iowa Early Ohio seed pro
duced 60 bushels with 20 bushels of
throwouts, or 40 bushels not The
table stock from tho Minnesota
grown was larger and more uniform
than that from the Iowa seed
At* Keokuk county,has more than
1,000 acres of potatoes this year, Mr.
Fitch figures it out that good Minne
sota seed would, have been worth at
least $50,000 to that county alone.
ELK O THEATRE
NIGHT
8:1 5 o'Clock
HON. THOMA S D. SCHALL
The blind Congressman from tne Tenth District will make the prin-
cipal address. Considered one of the ablest orators in the United
States. He will discuss State anfl National Politics. Plan to hear
him*
ADMISSION FRE E
Ladies are especially invited to attend. Remember the
place ELKO THp^TRE. Remember the time
TUESDAY 8:1 5 RM.
u^.*
sheet*Ts
clipping0
4
AUTOMOBILE CRASH SUNDAY
BRINGS ABOUT TWO DEATHS
^St Paul, Oct. 4.Alidia Walquist,
of Carver, Minn., was killed and her
father, Charles Walquist, fatally in
jured, when their automobile crashed
Into a street car late Sunday. Mr.
Walquist died early today. Mrs. Wal
quist and another daughter were only
slightly injured.
.FAIR WEATHER PROMISED
FOR WORLD SERIES GAMES
iWashtngton, Oct. 4The 1920
World Series will have fair weather,
FOR ^K^B^aV AN
Cold., Combs ^X)MA
except for possible showers next itfedr
nesday, according to the United
States weather bureau. Fair and.
warmer is promised Cleveland
the opening tomorrow* wjtb jwssjb-^
ly showers Wednesday and cooler
weather thereafter. i
(By United Press)
Minneapolis, Oct. 4.December
wheat declined 11% cents to fi.tt
today, the lowest price in four years.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE
DAILY riONJULtt
Kill That ColdWith
v****
1
CASCAR A QUININE
L*
Neglected Colds are Dangerous
Take no chances. Keep this standard remedy handy,forthefirstsneese.
Breaks up a cold in 24 hours Relieves
Grippe in 3 daysExcellent for Headache
Quinine in this form does not affect the headCascara Is best Tonic
LaxativeNo Opiate in Hill's.
6
s4
h?
DECEMBER WHEAT LOWEST
TODAY IN FOUR TEABf
Grip
ALL DRUGGISTS SELL IT
BssLLT
feii^---a
/Y
4?i
.t#

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