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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, February 21, 1921, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1921-02-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Pioneer is the only daily
-within 100 mijos' Of Bemidji and
has the largest circulation in
Northern Minnesota.
VOLUME XVIII. NO. 259
Permanent Organization Form
ed Subject to Completion
of Fund Required
CHARLES CARTER IS
CHOSEN *& PRESIDENV
&&&
Executive Board of Seven Is
Elected and Will Meet
Once a Months,
A. permanent organization of the
Beltrami County Land Clearing as
sociation was effected in Bemidji
Saturday, subject to completion of
"the finances, when Charles Carter
was chosen president William Len
npn of Kelliher, vice president, and
A. A. Warfield of Bemiaji secretary
treasurer. -.l ,l.
It was a most enthusiastic meet
ing and the best 6if harmony and
good-fellowship prevailed throughout.
Farmers and business men- from ev
ery section of the county were pres
ent and expressed themselves as be
ing heartily in favor of some definite
program of land clearing.
The executive board 'Elected is
comprised of the following members:
A. A. Warfield, Charles Carter, Wil
liam Lennon, E. E. Schulhe, Charles
Olson, Thomas Porte and B. E. Twee
ten. This board will meet once a
month in this city, the first date be
ing March at 2 p. m.
"F. R. Duxbury "kicked" a bit of
.enthusiasm into the convention when
he announced that Bemidji would
guarantee up to $4,000 of the $5,000
necessary to raise. Blackduck, Kelli
her, Tenstrike, Solway and fiines and
other centers quickly followed with
the'assurance that each of their re
spective communities would go the
limit.
Harry Funston of the Soo railway
was the fir^st to address the meeting.
He outlined the progress made in the
past and urged that toe work speed
up.
M. J. Thompson of the Duluth ex
perimental,,station pointed out the,
justifica6j&n''6f clearing land ^in this
section and showed where it paid to
do it. He compared the crops raised
here with those in other sections, and
by these comparisons proved that
10,000 acres cleared would increase
the value one million dollars.
A. J. Swantes showed how the
work was started and how it pro
gressed^ in Wisconsin. He pointed
out that a definite program was neo
essary and.that farmers agree on
signed blanks to clear a certain num
ber of acres. In Wisconsin the slo
gan is to clear at least five acres on
(every farm.
jtif
r-
*?w
S. B. Clelahd, also of the univer
sity extension department, gave an
interesting talk and declared that the
time is now here for this county to
act, because requests from a number
of the other counties were in asking
for help from the university. We can
push the work in only one. county to
begin with and inasmuch as the pro
position has been begun here, we are
anxious to go through with it.
R0CKWO0D TOWNSHIP BOY
DIES AT ST. ANTHONY'S
Donald E. Spangler, the seven
year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John
Spangler of -Rockwbod township, died
yesterday afternoon at St. Anthony's
hospital following an attack of ap
pendicitis.
The funeral will be held from the
M. E. Ibertson undertaking parlors
Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock, Dr.
G. H. Zentz officiating.
Interment will be made in Green
wood cemetery.
TWO ASHED MEN MAKE
OFF WITH THEATER LOOT
(By. United Press)
Minneapolis, Feb. 21Two armed
men early today smashed a safe in
the Shubert theater office and took
|2,111 in currency and silver. A
night watchman discovered them.
They dropped 1.1,150 and jumped
into an automobile stolen in St.
Paul and escaped.
XING BIMBO EXPECTED
AT MINNEAPOLIS TODAY
(By United Press)
Minneapolis, Feb. 21 King Bim
bo, ruler of Romany, was due here
today to say whether or not* Gypsy
Princess Annie, 18, shall be the duti
ful wife of Stephen Allen. It is said
he paid 13,500 for the princess. An
nie and Queen Mary, her mother,
are in jail here.
B. A. K0LBE IS NAMED AS
PEOPLE'S STORE MANAGES
At a meeting of the board of dir
rectors and stockholders of thq
People's Co-operative store Saturday.
B. A. Kolbe was named to serve as
manager of the local store, succeed
ing Ed VanAntwerp, who resigned
Satur/ay. Mr. Kolbe has taken over
the management of t&e store today.
RED WING MAN HELD ON
BANK ROBBERY CHARGES
Confesses to Robbery of Bank
at Stockholm and Is Held
for Austin Theft
(By United Press)
St. Paul, Feb. 21.T. J. Beltz of
Red Wing may have been responsible
for several lone-bandit escapades in
this section during the past few
months. Belte, who was arrested at
Red Wing Saturday and confessed
he had robbed the state bank at
Stockholm, Wis., is in the Washing
ton county jai^jtoday on a charge of
robbing the state bank at Austin,
Minn., on January 24.
Cashier Harry A. Swanson partial
ly identified Beltz as the man who
locked him and a stenographer in the
bank vault and escaped with $3,200.
The Washington county sheriff toob
Beltz from Red Wing to Stillwater
on a warrant.
SENATOR WELTYSCORES
APPOINTMENT Of LANDIS
Charges that Baseball Mag
nates Appointed Him
to Stop their Suits
(By United Press)
Washington, Feb. 21. (by Herbert
Walker.)Direct charges that the
baseball magnates appointed Judge
Landis of Chicago as arbnter of the
organization to defeat suits against
them, were made by Sena-tor Welty
of Ohio today.
Wjelty was before the house judi
ciary committee which is hearing the
impeachment charges made against
Landis by the congressman. "His ap
pointment was a plain attempt to
block justice," Welty charged,
"Organizers of baseball named
him him in hopes this action would
stop the* prosecution of the White
Sox players indicted for throwing the
1919 series at Cleveland! for ?240,-
000.
Several members of the commit
tee indicated that they have found no
grounds for Welty's charges. Chair
man Volstead and Welty clashed sev
eral times, each claiming they were
being insulted by the otherr Vol
stead told Welty to stop making a
speech and give them a chance.
MBS. J. F. CARTER PASSES
AWAT AT LOCAL HOSPITAL
Mrs. .15. Carter, fifty-five years of
age, died yesterday afternoon at St.
Anthony's Hospital having been
brought there Tuesday suffering
from, stomach and bowel trouble.
Mrs. Carter's home is south of
Bagley and the funeral will be held
from Bagley _on Wednesday after
noon. She is" survived by her hus
band and four children.'
GREAT BRITAIN SENDS
TROOPS INTO SILESIA
i
(By United Press)
London, Feb. 21 (By Ed. L. Keen)
Great Britain is sending four bat
talions of troops to supervise the Up
per Silesian plebiscite, it was an
nounced today at the close of the ses
sion of the allied supreme council.
Other nations had agreed previously
to send detachments. French, Ital
ian, Belgian and Japanese represen
tatives attended the^foreman session
in Downing street drafting schedules
for a series of meetings, fne first of
which will be held at 4 p. m. at St.
James place.
TELEPHONECOMPANY NOW
TAKES CASE TO COURTS
"In an order dated February 9,
1921, the Minnesota Railroad and
Warehouse commission denied our
application for increased rates," says
W. B. T. Belt, president of the North
western Bell company, in a state
ment issued today.
"We regret very much that an
appeal to the court is necessary in
order to protect the interests of the
telephone users, the telephone em
ployees, and the telephone investors.
However, it is essential that we must
have additional revenue if we hre to
nieet the1
requirements of the public
for service, and court action is the
Only channel now open to us.
"In denying an increase in rates,
the commission made no finding as to
whether or not this company is re
ceiving sufficient revenue to meet
the requirements of the public for
service and provide a fair return to
investors in the business. The com
mission's action was taken in spite of
the fact that it had information, veri
fied by its own experts, which show
ed conclusively that this company's
revenues fall far short of its needs.
"During the year 1920 the ex
penses of this company in Minnesota
exceeded its revenues by more than
$300,000. The stockholders were
compelled to stand this loss in addi
tion to the fact that nothing was
earned to -pay them a return on their
investment. Furthermore, operating
expenses now are higher than a year
ago and will result in a much greater
loss in 1921 if present rates are con
tinued.
"Pursuant to the order of the com
mission on its own motion to investi
gate our telephone rates, charges and
practices," says President Belt, "the
Northwestern company has spent
during the last three years approxi
mately $500,000 in taking inventory
and appraisal of its property in Min
nesota and in submitting complete
returns of all operations, earnings
and expenses and justification of its
various rules and regulations now in
effect."
GIBSON RETURNS FROM
OKLAHOMA OIL FIELDS
A., E. Gibson returned yesterday
morning from Creek county, Okla
homa, whefe he and several of hia
asttociates from Waterloo, la., are
drilling a -deep test oil well. They
are now down 1,056 feet and expect
to bring the well in about April iirst.
At 690 feet they had a 4 million foot
gaser but cased up and went on
down. They expect to strike oil in
the shallow san4 at 2,100 feet but
they are going right on down to the
deep sand which is found about 3.-
200 feet.
Mr. Gibson advises that the Carter
dll Co., a subsidiary or" the Standard
Oil Co., brought in a big well about
10 days ago, 790 feet from this well
He also says their well should he a
better one as it is higher up en the
structure. The location of this well
is between the Cushing and Beggs
pool in what is known as the Slick
pool.
COUNTY CORONER WILL HOLD
INftUEST ON BABY FOUND DEAD
A newly-born baby was found in
a room in the old Kaplan building
.Saturday afternoon, the mother of
which is now in St. Anthony's hos
pital, having been taken there Satur
day night. The babe was dead when
found, no medical attendance hav
ing *been present, according to re
ports, when the baby was born.
The mother of the baby, Josephine
Jordan, had come from Minneapolis
and had taken the room for the day.
It is understood her home is in Red
Lake. On account of the circum
stances surrounding the case an in
quest will be held by Coroner McKee.
^^,MeJ."*U^3lJs^v^-'Bi iJHr
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BEMIDJI, MINN., MONDAY EVENING, FEB. 21, 1921
BANK OF NORTH DAKOTA
ACCEPTSPRIVATE FUNDS
Branch Banks Will Be Opened
in Fifty-three Counties
for Private Funds
(Byf United Press)
Bismarck? N. D., Feb. 21.As a
measure of retaliation, the state own
ed bank of North Dakota today be
gan accepting private accounts in
competition with all privately own
ed banking institutions of the state.
The move waft threatened at the" last
ejection.-
At the same time it was announced
that branch banks will be opened in
fifty-three counties of the state. In
terest rfttes to be paid on deposits
will compare favorably with the most
liberal, it is announced. Heretof6re,
the state owned bank accepted only
public funds.
AGRlCULTtfRAL MEASURES
FACE APPARENT DELAYS
(By United Press)
Washington, Feb. 21. (By L. C.
Martin.)Western and southern
farm-sitate senators today were in a
combat to decide whether the agri
cultural measures or the railroads
should have preference in their needs
considered. By a vote of 35 ayes
and 36 nays, the motion introduced
by Senator Gronna of North Dakota
to take up the agricultural bill was
defeated. The Gronna motion to
permlf consideration of the Winslow
bill proVided for part time^ payments
to railroads of sums due them from
the government.
KNUTE LAWRENCE IS
TAKEN TO FERGUS FALLS
An insanity hearing was held Sat
urday night before Judge Jamieson
of Walker in the absence of Judge
'Harris, on Khute Lawrence, 63 years
of age, who hadi been brought from
Big Falls last week to the St. An
thony's hospital and who later be
came unmanageable. The examina
tion resulted in sending the patient
to (Fergus Falls. He was taken
there yesterday afternoon by Dep
uties J. R. Dundas of Baudette and.
William Duncalf of Bemidji.
M'KINNON BOY INJURED
WHEN THROWN FROM PONY
Joe McKinnon, son of Ben McKin
non of 215 Minnesota uvenue, was
thrown off his pony \3unday and
quite 'seriously injured. He was car
ried to his home by his father. It Is
reported that he wilt be confined to
his bed for some time.
RALPH GRACIE LEGION
MEETS THURSDAY NIGHT
Ralph Gracie post of the American
Legion meets Thursday night at the
rooms of the Bemidji Civic and Com
merce association beginning at 8
o'clock and several matters nf im
portance are to be taken up. Conse
quently a large attendance is spe
cially urgefl. Newly-elected Com
mander John M. Culver will preside.
Among the matters to be disposed
of is the election of an adjutant to
take the place of Thayer Bailey, who
lias declined the office. An inaug
ural address will be delivered by Mr.
Culver and this part of the program
promises to be very interesting. He
will map out his plans for the post
during the ensuing year.
TESTIMONYOf
i
Details of Shooting Are Told
By Younger of Miller
Brothers on Trial
CLAIMS THREE SHOTS
WERE FIRED BY EACH
Testimony of Siminovik Is Con
flicting on Number of
Shots Fired
The larger part of Saturday after
.jioon, in the cfise of the state vs.
George Miller, was consumed in hear
ing the testimony of George Miller.
The testimony given by Miller was
largely the same as other witnesses
testified previously "in the trial that
he had told them following the shoot
ing.
He "stated he and his brother Rob
ert had gone to the Diedrich meadows
to haul hay. Nick Siminovik had
followed them about half an hour af
ter they had arrived there, and they
and Nick were engaged in loading
their loads about 250 or 300 feet
apart from separate hay stacks, when
he saw a \man coming up the meadow
about 500 or 600 feet from them. He
noticed that the man was carrying
a gun and was walking on skiis. A
short time afterwards he looked
again in the direction of the man
after he had advanced to within
about 400 feet of him, he stated, and
he noticed the man on skiis leveling
his gun at him. He jumped off the
load and his brother Robeyt jumped
off the stack at the same time. Both
took refuge behind the hay load,
George stated. A shot was fired by
Fenton, so George stated, and short
ly afterwards a second shot came
from Fenton's direction. The wit
ness stated he then shot two shots in
the air from his rifle to warn the
man on skiis that he, too, was,arm
ed. A third shot from Fenton
whistled through the1
hay*. Miller
stated, and at this time George shot
over the back of his xteam of horses
jat the man whom he supposed was
I Bowman. He stated he did not take
aim, but shot quickly before he had
brought the rifle to his shoulder. He
saw the man fall and heard him
ask distinctly, "What are you fellows
.'.hooting at?" To this Robert re
plied, "Who are you?". The wound
ed man then shouted, "Come here
quick." Robert again asked, "Who
are you?" The reply from the man
came again, "Come here." The man
was then resting on his left arm and
his body was in a half sitting posi
tion, i
After the shooting, George stated,
his brother Robert called to Nick
Siminovik to come, over to where the
Miller brothers were. Siminovik ran
over and asked Robert, "Who, Bob,
Who?" To which Robert said, ac
cording to George, "It's Bowman."
Robert then told Nicb to get his
team and go home. Asked as to why
they did not go over to see the man
who was shot, George replied he was
afraid there would be others of the
Bowmans around and he was afraid
to go. After this the Millers drove
home behind Siminovik. After reach
ing their home they changed their
hay rack for a wood rack, got Rob
ert Miller's wife and family of three
children, and drove on four miles fur
ther to Crabtree's to get help for
the wounded man and to report the
shooting to Crabtree, who was the
town constable.
The most conflicting portions of
the evidence given was the fact that
Nick Siminovik, the only known eye
witness of the shooting, testified that
there were only three shots fired
which he heard, that he saw the man
on skiis after all three shots were
fired and that he was carrying the
rifle in his right hand when he first
saw him and continued to carry it
that way until he feVt forward on the
snow after the third shot. All three
shots, Siminovik testified, came from
the direction of where the Millers
were loading hay. George Miller
testified there were six shots fired,
three by the man whom they sup
posed to be Bowman and three by
him, the first two to warn the man
that he was armed and the last one
which he fired over the horse's back
and after which he saw Fenton fall
on the snow.
The defense rested this morning
and the prosecution and defense will
deliver their pleas to the jury this
afternoon. It is expected a session
will be held this evening at which
time Judge Stanton will charge the
jury.
LACK OF SNOW CAUSES
POSTPONEMENT OF CARNIVAL
(By United Press)
Faribault, Feb.* 21While the
East is struggling with a foot of
snow, Faribault postponed a winter
sports carnival today because there
is no snow.
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W/WA/^(
BEMIDJI BUSINESS MEN
URGED TO COMPLETE FUND
A Southern Beltrami County
Land Clearing association was or
ganized last Saturday afternoon.
It will go through if those who
have not yet contributed will do
their part and help put over the
financial part of the program.
If it is not completed/ the cam
paign will go to St. Louis c6unty,
where the money is now tendered
and those interested are anxious
to double the amount of money
asked.
There are a number of large
business interests in Bemidji in
every line that have not contrib
uted. Some of these lines of busi
ness will reap the largest benefits,
provided they have the banner.
The banner will tell the farm
ers who their real friends are in
Bemidji. If you have a banner
floating in your place of business
it will not take long for your
farmer friends to know about it.
If it is not there they will learn
of its absence as quickly. They
are taking a real interest in the
job and are going to do their part
in the land clearing.
This is the last call to be made
through the papers. We have
several subscriptions not yet re
ported. Add yours to the list so
we can finish tomorrow.
Yours for "over the top."
F. R. DUXBURY
Chairman, Finance Committee
HEAVY SNOW CRIPPLES
NEW ENGLAND STATES
New York Digging Out Today
After Biggest Blizzard in
Twenty Years
(By United Press)
Boston, Muss., Feb. 21.With
seven deaths reported, train and
trolley service at a'standstill, and
shipping along the coast reported
tied up, New England today is en
deavoring to uncover from the heav
iest snowfall since 1898. Four of
the seven dead are\ fishermen. A
four-masted schooner is in distress
oft* the harbor. Coast guards have
gone to its* assistance.
(By United Press)
New York, Feb. 21 New York
was digging out after the biggest
blizzard since 1900. The snow fall
was twelve and one-half Inches and
was accompanied by a thirty-flvc
mile an hour wind.
CITY TEAM WILL PLAY
EXCELSIOR TOMORROW
Fast Game Is Assured Here
When Downstaters Meet
Locals Tomorrow
The CiU- basket ball team will
play the f^st Kxcelsior City team at
the armory tomorrow night and also
Wednesday night in what promises
to bo among the best games to bv.
seen here this season. Tho visitors
are in first class shape and have not
met defeat this season. The Bemidji
boys are anxious to try their sidll
against the invaders und will give
the Excelsior buuch a hard game.
The local team is composed of My
ron Phunmer, Frank Phi bus, for
wards, Alec Cameron and George
Graham, guards, and John Simons,
center. Fred Graham will also be
used in these games, the captain an
nounces. In preparation for tomor
row night's battle, the City team
will go through a hard drubbing to
night from six to seven o'clock
against a pick-up team led by "Fuzz"
Johnson, a former Bomidji star. Uc
mldji basket ball fans are urged to
support the hoime boys in this under
taking to stage a first class game of
basket ball on the local floor. Con
siderable expense is Involved and
support will be needed to help the
boys win.
RETAIL CLOTHIERS MEET
TODAY AT MINNEAPOLIS
(By United Press)
Minneapolis, Feb. 21Retail
clothiers of Minnesota launched a
three day convention here today.
Jabbers and manufacturers of the
Twin Cities are furnishing enter
tainment for th* visitors. Andreas
Burkhard, president of the national
clothiers' association, is to address
the convention.
SINN FEINERS CAUSE
DAMAGE AT MANCHESTER
(By United Press 1
Manchester, Eng., Feb. 21.Sinn
Felners, for the second time, caught
the Manchester mill in an incendiary
campaign, inflicting damages of al
most $200,000 in ten fires over the
week end. Severay factories were
completely destroyed. All ten fires
broke forth simultaneously. Indica
tion are that all had been planned.
All were started with hay dipped
in kerosene. The firemen were un
able to respond to all calls,
y*" i
sr-. Minnesota Weather: Probably
KSt^dW' in north and rain In south^
tonight ana Tuesday, pooler
rio'litem 1
PLAN WOULD TAKE OVER
LAND AT FAIR VALUATION
All Land Suitable for Timber
Growth Would Be Used
as Public Forests
(By United Press)
Chicago, Feb. 21 That the states
of the Middle West take, over at a.
fair valuation, and administer as
part of a system of public forests, all
land suitable for timber growth upon
i which private owners refuse to prac
tice forestry is one of the proposi
tions for state forestry laws to be
proposed to the North Central States
Forestry conference at the Union
League club's conference of gover
nors on Thursday, February 24, u.
Twelve items of a proposedhwata
forest program to be suggested to the
eight states represented at the con
ference were made public today upon
the arrival of Warren B. Bullock,
secretary of the National Forestry
committee to assist the Union League
club in its preparation for the inter
state conference,
The state forest program proposed
was originally adopted by the Ameri
can Paper and Pulp association, the
pnrenft organization of the paper
manufacturing industry in the U. 8.,
and written by the association's-com
ittee on forest conservation, of
which R. S. Kellogg, chairman of the
national program committee, is a
member. The national committee was
formed to help the U. S. Forest Ser
vice enact legislation for a national
forest policy, and includes the Am
erican newspaper publishers as well
as manufacturers and consumers of
forest products. This policy, embodied
in the Sueli hill, is now pending,,In
congress.
The program will be offered to the
governors' conference as a basis of
discussion, hut includes many feat
ures already endorsed by the tri
state conference of Illinois, Indiana,
and Ohio a year ago, and now pend
ing in Wisconsin
Tho program includes the follow-
inR points:
That all soil shall be made produc
tive of the crop to which it is best
adapted or for which there is the
greatest public need.
That while agriculture and fores
try are based upon soil production,
the methods necessary for forestry
and the time Involved are so different
from those of agriculture that fores
try demands an entirely different
form of administration.
That state forest policies shall bo
initiated and carried out in co-oper
ation with the national government
und with private owners wherever
and to tho fullest extent possible.
That state forest legislation shall
establish general principles and pro
cedure only and vest in a properly
constituted and non-political body
acting through technically quallfed
representatives, the responsibility for
the ilxing of regulations and enforc
ing them.
That the paramount and Immed
iate consideration in any forest policy
is tho creation and maintenance of
effective means for the prevention
and control of lire and all forest
lands of whatever ownership and
that every owner of forest land shall
bo required to conduct operations
thereon in such a manner a&, to avoid
creating a lire menace to adjoining
property.
That forest surveys, land classifi
cation, forest research and forest
education shall be provided for.
That there shall be such changes
and adjustments In prevailing sys
tems of taxation as .will enable all
forest lands to be equitably taxed
thereunder, yet will not discourage
the holding of private forest land for
future cropB withous impairing local
revenues.
The state upon request shall as
sist the private owner of forest land
to make them continuously produc
tive through the preparation of
working plans, supplying planting
material and supervision of silva
cultural operations free of charge or
at cost.
That the state shall be empowered
to take over at a fair valuation and
administer as part of the system of
public forests any land which, after
competent examination, is classified
as suitable only for timber growth,
in case the owner refuses to avail
himself of the opportunity and as
sistance provided by the public to
encourage forestry upon private
lands.
That the acquisition of forest land
by the state is essential to a sound
forest policy.
That all state owned forests shall
be utilized for continuous production
both for direct returns in forest pro
ducts and indirect returns in soil
(protection, game and recreation.
H
If
--*--L
^Hitem^'portion Tuesday,
55c PER MONTH --V
NORTH( MR AL
Twelve Items of Proposed State
Forest Program to Be Taken
Up February 24
i
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