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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, February 23, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1922-02-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Pioneer is the only daily
within 100 miles of Bemidji and
has the largest circulation in
Northern Minnesota.
VOLUME XIX. NO. 261
SNOWANDGALE
HAMPER LOCAL
RAD.SERVICE
Northbound M. & I. Is Held at
Pine River Train'to Cities
Held at Backus
GREAT NORTHERN AND
SOO TRAINS HELD UP
Telephone and Telegraph
Service Here Withstands
Effects of Storm
Prastically all trains throughouc
the Northwest are snow-bound today
as a direct result of the snow storm
and gale suffered by this territory
Wednesday. Drifts have now become
packed so hard that it i impossible
for some trains to get through at all,
while others are running far behind
schedule.
Coming through from International
Falls last night and reaching Bemidji
about an hour behind schedule, No.
34, southbound, on the Minnesota &
International was at noon still fast
in a snow drift at Backus and unable
to get any farther. No. 33 on, theshow
same road, coming from the twin ci
ties, was in a like predicament at
Pine River this noon with no appar
ent chance of getting through for
&omc time. Nos. 31 and 32 have
been annulled and likewise both
trains on the Soo line for today.
Northern Pacific trains below Brain
erd have also been annulled.
At noon today there had been no
traffic on the Great Northern through
Bemidji. since the eastbound which
passed through here., about 1:15 yes
terday afternoon, over afti hour late.
It was expected, however, that an
eastbound would arrive here about
12:45 this afternoon and also a west
bound about 5 o'clock, although noth
ing definite can be announced con
cerning any of these trains. The
Great Northern line from Bemidji to
Sauk Center was, also without a train
today, the northbound last night fail
ing to arrive here. Consequently
there was no train to leave here on
that line this morning.i
The Red Lake line is apparently
suffering' nogreatlttconveniences be
cause of the snow, since trains on
that line have been running nearly
on scheduled time. The passenger
from Redby this morning arrived here
at 10:15 and was to leave again this
this afternoon at the regular hour.
Jitney and automobile service has
been partially paralyzed since yester
day morning and it will undoubtedly
be a few days before the regular
traffic within the city is restored.
Telephone service at the Bemidji
Exchange and with connecting ex
changes has been handicapped as
far as is known here with the excep
tion that local operators have had
difficulty in reaching the office to re
port for work, due to the jitney serv
ice being partially tied up.
The local office of the Western Un
ion reports that its service has not
suffered as a result of the storm and
that regular service has been avail
able at all times.
Country roads are in a bad condi
tion, due largely to the drifting snow
which has now become firmly packed.
Snow continued to fall until late last
night, but it is apparent that nearby
communities suffered more severely
than did Bemidji.
TO SHOW NEAR EAST RELIEF
FILMS SATURDAY AFTERNOON
The members of the various wo
men's club and all women of Bemidji
are urged to attend the lecture to be
given by Dr. Brock of Minneapolis
at the GrantJ theater immediately
following the matinee Saturday aft
ernoon* Dr. Brock has charge of the
Near East relief work this week in
Bemidji, and in connection with his
lecture Saturday the two films "Chil
dren of Sorrow" and "Alice in Hun
gerland" will be shown by Mr. Hard
ing. This promises to be Very inter
esting, as well as educational, and it
is desired that a large number take
advantage of this opportunity.
SEES DISCRIMINATION
IN PRESENT RAH RATES
fBy trnltta Press)
Fargo, Feb^ 23*Alleged discrimi
nation in railroad rates between Min
nesota and North Dakota not only
means that North Dakota shippers
are paying higher rates but are asto
sessed also for Minnesota taxes, ac
cording to figures of G. M. Springer,
traffic? expert for the North Dakota
Farm bureau.
Here is the way Mr. Springer fig
ures it. Gross earningsdefined as
business beginning or ending in the
state, are assessed in proportion of
mileage covered* in state to entile
mileage.
Taking a 60,000 pound car of
sugar for example, Mr. Springer
showed it cost $330 to haul this car
from Minneapolis to Mandan. It
i hauled 249 miles or 54.42 per cent
of the way in Minnesota and 201
miles or 45.58 per cent of the way
in North Dakota. It costs $120 to
haul the car to Moorhead and North
Dakota should be credited with $210
of the gross earnings where as she
is in taxation credited with only
45.48 per centi the $330 or 150.41, a
loss of $59 on a single car* At five
per cent this is a tax of. ?2.?8.
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CONFUSE EDUCATION"
WITH "INFORMATION"
Washington, Feb. 23.(Capital
News Service.)The president of
the American Educational associa
tion. Dr. Charges Aubrey Eaton, says
that American continually confuse
"education" with "information," and
that even so eminent a man as Mr.
Edison does not make the distinction
as shown in "that fearful list of
questions." Dr. Eaton believes the
major educational problem of the day
is not teaching quantities of isolated
facts, but inculcating a knowledge of
how to think, and so to be able to
realize responsibilities as citizens.
"Encyclopedias were invented to
hold information of fact, the human
brain was not," Dr. Eaton declares.
"Education should be so carried out
that it will fit the student for theschools.
conditions and environment in which
he will live. Since the supreme or
gan of civilization at present is in
dustry, education should fit men for
leadership in industrial fields."
PUBLIC ASSURED FINE
PRODUCTION BY ELKS
Minstrel Show, "Jazz
stice," for Laughing
Purposes Only
Ha,
cast i
by the members of the
production "Jazz Jus
staged by the Bemidji
tice
Lodge rilks at the Grand theater
two nights next week, is beginning to
results in the manner of pre
sentation and gives the director Dr.
P. McCann reason to believe that
the public will witness an entertain
ment that will be worth while and
which has been gotten up for laugh
ing purposes only.
Reserved seats for both perform
ances were placed on sale Wednesday
at the Boardman Drug store and a
goodly number of seats have already
been taken, but there are lots of good
seats left. A matinee will be staged
Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock, es
pecially for children at 25 cents. The
regular price will be charged adults.
Bemidji theatergoers have paid
more money in the past to witness
professional shows that will hardly
come up to this one, staged entirely
by home talent
Earl Byers' act and song about
"The Old Days" would do credit to
most professional actors, while the
old favorite Charles Van does a song
and dance,that is bound to please.
Ray Hannah impersonates an Irish
er and sings one of the late, popular
songs, "That's How I Believe in You"
and gets away big with it.
"No One's Pool," another popular
song is rendered by Grant Ohm who
has a good voice for the impersonat
ing of a darky which calls for a lot of
chatter, explaining things to the
judge. In the olio, or second part,
a real novelty in the person of Prof.
Mason-, will startle the audience.
Prof. Mason will answer any ques
tions asked him by the au
dience. This is a mystifying act and
one that will create no little talk and
amusement. "Lycan & Chi," "Those
Jewish Fellers" are back in vaude
ville which is really what the olio
consists of, and they "know their
part" so that folks who pay their
money will feel well repaid .with this
act alone.
Other quips) and features will be
injected into the show that will mean
about two hours of solTd fun for those
attending the performance either
rMonday or Tuesday evening.
DOLLAR DAY BARGAINS
TO BE PRINTED MONDAY
Monday's Pioneer to Contain
Rare Bargains Offered for
Sale on March 1
Monday's Daiiy Pioneer will con
tain the announcements of nearly
every merchant in the city, with bar
gain offerings for the "Dollar Day-'
as proposed by the trade committee
of the Civic & 'Commerce associa
tion.
This sale event in the past has al
ways been popular with the thrifty
buyers, and when they feast they eye
on the bargains for Wednesday,
\March 1, there will, no doubt be a
rush for first choice when the stores
open at 8 o'clock on that day.
Although the sale day was set very
soon'after the announcement of the
fact that there would be such an
event, the merchants as a whole re
sponded with bargains that will be
worth coming a good distance to take
advantage of.
Bemidji merchants are not behind
the larger city stores when it comes
putting on a trade event. They
realize that unusual methods must be
employed to attract new trade to this
city, which makes it possible for
those living here to also partake in
the feast of bargains. The loss of
profit fon one day in the business
year would not work a hardship on
any of the merchants and when it
brings new faces into the stores the
merchants consider it money well
spent. WASHINGTON COUNTY HOLDS
SCHOOL FOR DAIRY BREEDERS
(By United Press)
Stillwater, Feb. 23.L. V. Wilson,
dairy specialist of the University of
Minnesota agricultural school, was
here today to conduct a dairy school
for Washington county farmers. A
Holstein Friesian convention and sale
ahd a Guernsey breeders convention
and sale are in progress,
A
't-Vr-*
IRRESPONSIBLE LAW IS
CALLED TROUBLE CAUSE
Fanatical Legislation Blamed
for Much of' Radicalism
Now in America
Washington, Feb 23. (Capital
News Serviice).- Commenting on fch*
need to combat adical ideas in Amer
can civic life, prominent law-makers
at the Capitol say that much disre
spect for law can be traced to the en
actment of foolish, unnecesary and
hopelessly out-of-date statutes.
In Kentucky a bill has been intro
duced in the legislature making it ille
gal to teach Darwinism in the public
In Massachusetts a cripple has been
arrested and fined for playing a gam*
of checkers outdoors on Sunday.
A Kansas City school offical be
lieves that jazz mucic has a similar
(effect upon young people to strong
drink and urges a jazz prohibition
movement.
Says the. Philadelphia Public
Ledger: "Such superprudery and hy
perhypocrisy is calculated to disgust
the average law-abiding morality, and
does not tend to stabilize that govern
ment by the consent of the governed
which makes for public decency and
civic morality."
Mrs. Margot Asquith, famous Eng
lish political leader, says "Americans
are not free-you overdo your pro
hibitive laws and then do not enforce
them."
Legislation which attmpts to foist
upon a long-suffering majority the
personal prejudice or the fanatical
ideas of some isolated reformer in
variably does more harm than good,
brings' the law-making body enacting
such statutes" into disrepute and, by
making the source of law ridiculous,
decreases respect for other laws well
conceived and thoughtfully passed.
TELEPHONE OPERATORS
STAGE DANCE TONIGHT
The telephone operators of the Be
midji Exchange of the Northwestern
Bell Telephone compahy are staging
Jheir annual ball this evening at the
new* armory. This event promises to
be one of the most enjoyable social
events of the season and a large at
tendance is expected despite the con
dition of the sidewalks about the
city.
Many unique features are planned
for the dance tonight and a very en
joyable evening is assured all who
attend. The Rigg3 orchestra has been
engaged to furnish-the, music/ The
pubWc" is'invited to attend.
MRS. C. E. PEEL PASSED AWAY
SUNDAY AT MINNEAPOLIS HOME
Word has been received here that
Mrs. Georgia Alice Peel, wife of C.
E. Peel, a former resident of Bemidji,
passed away at St. Barnabas hospi
tal, Minneapolis, last Sunday. She is
survived by her husband and her par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. E. W Dittes of
St. Paul, one brother and three sis
ters. Services were held Tuesday
from the Johnson undertaking par
lors, Minneapolis, and interment was
made in Lakewood cemetery. Dr.
Hoaglund of the Wesley M. E. chdrch
officiated.
Mr. and Mrs. Peel were united in
marriage Oct. 12, 1921 at the home
of the bride's parents in St. Paul.
She was a graduate of the Asbury
hospital with the class of 1920 and
would have been 27 years of age Feb
22. ELKS ARE RE-DECORATING
INTERIOR OF CLUB ROOMS
The interior of the Elks club rooms
is being redecorated and being put
into first class shape again. The work
now being done is greatly improving
the appearance of the rooms,
HOW HAPPy you
BEMIDJ I DAIL PIONEE
BEMIPJI, MINN., THURSDAY EVENING, FEB. 23, 1922
FARMWCOBES
SHOVEDSUDDEN
DROPYEARAGO
Report of National Bureau of
Economic Research is
Interesting
HIGH LEVEL OF INCOME
WAS ATTAINED IN 1918
Purchasing Power of Farmer
Called at Its Lowest
Point in 1920
(By United Press)
New York, Feb. 23.The farmers
of the United States in 1918
anddustry
1919 reached an unprecedentedly
high level of total income, as com
pared with the rest of the gainfully!
employed. This is true, whether the
comparisons are made on the basis
of absolute income, or of purchasing
?913.r
owe in terms of dollar's power in
Then, suddenly in 1920, the
farmer's share in the National in
come dropped, in terms of pre-war
levels, to a point below that of any
previous year in the decade 1910-
1920.
This fact was disclosed today by
the National Bureau of Economic
Research, on the basis of an investi
gation of mapy months and covering
the whole country, with result set
forth in detail in the second volume
of its report, now in press.
The farmers, who represent about
6,450,000, or 18 per cent, of the
gainfully employed, have received
during the past decade, a share in
the total National Income varying
between 12.3 1911, and 17.4 inNorthern
1917 and 1918, until 1920, when it
dropped to 10.9.
The farmers' share in billions of
dollars and per cent Of the total, is
estimated by the bureau to have been
(Continued on page 6)
LOCAL LEGION POST TO
HOLD MEETWC TONIGHT
Ralph Gracie post of the American
Legion will meet in regular bi
monthly session this evening at 8
o'clock at the rooms, of the Civic &
Commerce association and an inter
esting meeting with an entertaining
program is assuied by the commit
tee in charge.
A number of reports of the past
year's work will be made by the retir
ing officers. Reports will be heard
from various committees as well.
This is the first meeting of the new
year for this post and the newly
elected officers will be in charge. The
past few meetings of the post have
been bringing out large attendances
on account of the entertainments be
ing offered. It is especially urged
that there be a large attendance to
night.
G. E. CARSON'S CONDITION
SHOWS SLIGHT IMPROVEMENT
(Special to the Pioneer.)
Minneapolis, Feb. 23.G. E.
Carson's condition continues to
show slight improvement and he
seems to be gaining strength
slowly. HdVrever, he remains
unconscious much of the time.
member
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US ED TO BE
WHEN If SNOWED-ANP
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OFFICIAL WASHINGTON
SEES PROSPERITY SOON
Government Facts and Figures
Marshaled to Show Good
Times Ahead
Washington* Feb. 23. (Capital
News Service.)Predictions made by
the department of commerce give tlv
United States $5,000,000,000 worth
of foreign traae tins year, roughly
one-fourth of the export trade of the
world. The rapid rise in foreign ex
change is stimulating foreign buying
in America, with the inevitable result
that good times will replace the bus
iness depression of the last two
years.
Economic- "xputs in Wasninston
point out that tio reduction of tux
es will materially l.ghten the load of
the manufacturer here, permitting
him to expand and equip new plans
to meet the growing foreign demand.
With $2,000,000,000 cut from the
public debt and $750,000,000 elimi
nated from the tax list, American in
begins to feel that the brakes
are off.
President Harding has just said
"the general industrial and business
situation now is such as to justify
confidence that we are well passed
the worst phase of the agricultural
crisis."
The department of labor finds
ground for optimism in the trend of
the great stock markets, always a
barometer of employment, and the
numbers of reports of the reduction
of unemployment, the marked in
crease in automobile and steel fab
rication work lend concrete evidence
which pervades the senate and house
of representatives.
DISTRICT COURT STARTS
THIRD DAY ON ONE CASE
In district court the iase of the
National Bank of Bemidji
vs the Interstate Colonization com
pany is still before the court. This
case was begun Tuesday and contin
ued throughout Wednesday and wasresented
fetill in progress at press time today.
A verdict in favor of the defend
ant was leturned in the case of Frank
Gagnon vs. A. I( Davis, which was a
law suit in which the plaintiff sought
to recover a certain sum from Davis
alleged have become indebted to
Gagnon whi\ Davis occupied the
Gagnon farm 1920.
SUPERIOR BUSINESS BLOCK
THREATENED BY FIRE TODAY/
(By United Press)
Supeiior, Wis Feb. 23.Fire here
today threatened to destroy an en
tire business block. The fire was un
der control last night and broke out
at an early hour this morning
The fire started in the basement of
a confectionery store and, fanned by
a high wind, rapidly spread to other
buildings. Two firemen, Schaffer
and A. Cowin, were overcome by the
dense smoke caused by burning su
gar and candy.
M$TORMAN INJURED WHEN
TWO STREET CARS COLLIDE
(By United Fran)
St. Paul, Feb. 23.George Kloster
motorman, was seriously injured
when two car.? on a St. Paul subur
ban line collided at 8 a. m. today.
Kloster was running the rear car
and was unable to stop. His car
crashed into the other at a high rate
of speed. Kloster was taken to the
Stillwater hospitnl where both legs
were amputated.
fw-rvf
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w"5 '.""jji
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP
IS GROWING RAPIDLY
Washington, Feb. 23(Capital
News Service.)Every day during
the last five years an average of 2,
173 persons joined the various
churches of America, and three con
gregations were organized daily.
The total religious constituency of
the country is 95,858,096. The Pro
testants count 74,795,226 Roman
Catholics, 17,885,846 Jews. 1,120,-
000 Eastern Orthodox (Greek and
Russian), 411,054 Latter Day Saints
(Mormons), 1,646,170.
The total (active membership is
45,997,199 an increase of 4.070,345
over the 1916 census figures. The
several religious bodies report 233,-
104 congregations manned by 200,-
090 ministers, or the first time in
history the Baptists have passed the
Methodists in total membership. The
Baptists, howinfc their greatet in
crease in the south, now have 7.835,-
250 members, against a Methodist
membership of 7,797,991
CLOOUET TEAM TO PLAY
GIANTS FRIDAY NIGHT
Championship Claimants of
Northeastern Minnesota
Promise Hard Game
Basketball fans are assured a real
game of basketball when the Cloquet
city team plays here Friday night
at the new armory against the
Beexposure
midji Giants. The Giants will have
their best line-up for this game,
which they realize will be one of the
hardest played on the home floor this
season.
Cloquet has always had a strong
city team and this year has an even
better team than usual. Among the
teams which Cloquet has defeated
this vear is the Duluth Tanks. The
Tanks gave way before Cloquet on
two occasions, both games on the Du
luth floor.
Claiming the championship of the
northeastern section of the state and
desiring to extend that claim to the
entire north section and possibl.v the
entire state, Cloquet will present its
best line-up Friday night
Bemidji will have practically the
same line-up as that which has rep
the Giants in the last few
games. "Fuzz" Johnson of Gonvick,
a former Bemidji high school basket
ball stai, may take part in the game
Friday night, playing with the
Giants, the manager of the Bemidji
squad has announced.
Those who were disappointed
when the Dufuth Tanks failed to pl.ty
hero Monday and Tuesday nights
aie expected to make up for their
disappointment by attending this
game, one which is sure to be evon
better than a game with the Tanks
would have been.
Since making a tour of the North
west, the Giants have shown a team
which is a credit to Bemidji and
catrains
pable of holding its own against the
best teams in the northwest. One of
these teams will play here Friday
night, and indications are that there
will be a large attendance.
Zurich, Switzerland, Feb. 213/Mav
Oser plans to sell out his livery stable
and live it Lake Geneva, after hi-,
marriage to Mathilde McCormitk.
His friends disclosed the fact that last
Christmas Max confidently informed
them of his betrothal to the grand
daughter of John D. Rockefeller.
APPROPRIATELY OBSERVE
WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY
Bemidji Masons and Visitors
Observe Anniversary of a
Great Mason
A largo representation of the-'
membership of Bemidji Lodge No.
233, A. F. and A. Masons and a good
ly number of visiting Masons gath
ered at the Masonic hall Wednesday
afternoon at 1:30 to take part in and
witness the third degree work which
was conferred upon a class of candi
dates as a part of the special observ
ance of George Washington's birth
anniversary.
De gree work, which was put on by
past masters of the lodge, constituted
the bulk of the afternoon session,
following which the members ad
journed to the Methodist church
where they were entertained by th
Order of the Eastern Star. A short
musical program was enjoyed in the
church parlors, following which a
"real feed" was served by the mem
bers of the Star in the church base
ment. At the close of the meal,
which did credit to those in charge
ofl it, several interesting talks rela
tive to the Minnesota Masonic home,
near the twin cities, were made by
the guests from Minneapolis.
At about 7:30 the Masons repaired
to the Masonic hall again and there
enjoyed instructive addresses and dis
cussions until a late hour. Harry
F. Swenson of Minneapolis, his topic
being "Masonry and America," had
a real message1,
for his hearers and
he put it over in fine style. Grand
Senior Warden Albert F. Pray, also
of Minneapolis, took for his subject:
"Our Duty as Masons." He put over
a message which promises to bring
Results in this city within a short
time, epecially as relating to a new
Masonic home. Rev. William Elliott,
who was to have given a short ad
dress at the church, was unable to at
tend the session on account of illness.
Altogether a ver.v* impressive cele
bration of the biith of a great pa
triot and Mason was held and those
who attended felt amply repaid for
tho time spent at the haH and the
supper, and for the inconveniences
tanged, by the njclcment weather.
WEATrfWC
MinnesotaFair ana colder to
night rising temperature tomor
row in northwest.
SSc PER MONTH
STORMCAUSES
O DEATHSIN
ST.PADlTODAY
Watchman at Public Library
Found Dead in Drift in
Front of Building
TRAIN SERVICE IN AND
OUT OF CITIES HALTED
North Dakota, Near Edge of
Storm Section, Slightly
Affected By Storm
St. Paul, Feb. 23.The heavy
storm sweeping the northwest has
caused the death of two men in St.
Paul. Frederick Howard, 70, watch
man at the public library, was found
in a drift in front of a ouildmg this
morning. Howard went out at 2 a.
m. to clean the walks and passeisby
found the body at 7 a.
James Baldwin was found dead at
Laurel avenue and Dale street at
7:30 a. m. Death is believed to have
been caused by heart failure due to
The bodies of both men
were taken to the country morgue
Train service in and out of SI
Paul was at a standstill this morning
The street car company is expecting
much difficulty in maintaining street
car servicei There are no attempts
made to keep the cars on schedule
Six snow plows are being opeiated
to keep tlie lines open.
All telephone and telegraph com
munication in and out of the twin
titles is almost completely demoralr/,
ed. The henvy wind accompanied
'a steady fall of snow is piling up
gieat drifts and the thermometer is
slowly dropping. Conditions in
Minneapolis are reported almost iden
tical.
Faiuo. N D.Feb 123North Da
kota today was digging itself out of
the George Washington snow stoini.
which swept the city yesterday and
pnssed on to the southeast. Main
lino passenger trains moving through
the state are late, but fail ly well
scheduled because of the storm.
North Dakota appeared to be on
the edge and not in the midst of the
great storm. Thermometers wen
lower today. The Moorhead but can
reported fair and colder tonight
Weathei Obseiver Spencer was of
the opinion this meant a leturn to
normalcy.
Effects of the stoun were appairnt
today. Some N. P. trains from the
west weie 1U hours late. Great
weie not so badly effected
The only train which attempted the
trip from the twin cities to Crookston
was stalled in the snow banks at
Rice. Two snow plows from Little
Falls went to the rescue. Both Little
Falls tand Brninerd, announced all
tram service there annulled.
PLAN SPECIAL SERVICES
AT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
I)i John F. McCloud of Duluth will
give the message nt both services of
the Presbyterian church next Sun
day.
At the morning seivice Miss Giacc
Currie will play the offertory selec
tion on the violin and there will be .i
vocal solo by Mrs. Paul Yaple of Bil
lings, Mont.
COUNT FOLSTOY IS GUEST
OF ST. PAUL ASSOCIATION
St. Paul, Feb. 23.Llyc Tolstoy,
son of the famed Russian writer,
was a guest in St. Paul today.
Count Tolstoy, who is a widely
known throughout the world nn his
father, was to speak on "Russia" afc
an open forum of the St. Paul asso
ciation.
EAST BEMIDJI RESIDENT
MAKES STREETS PASSABLE
It has been reported that Kobe it
Rasmussen of East Bemidji has vol
untarily and without charge boon
working with his team today to maku
the streets in East Bemidji passable.
Mr. Rasmussen built a snowplow foi
that purpose and has been doing niui It
good work with it.
TEXAS OFFICIALS NOW
FAVOR TWILIGHT SLEEP
(By United Fraa)
Dallas, Tex., Feb. 23.Texas of
ficials, shown the first successful ex
periments with "twilight sleep" as
"truth serum" for criminals, tod.iy
planned to legalize it use.
While many professional men d
dared they were not sufficiently a
quainted with the results obtained
to express an opinion, others gava
"twilight sleep" their hearty suppoi t.
Dr. Florenz stated, "I know Di.
House of Ferris, Texas, who is ton
ducting twilight sleep tests at Dallas.
'J have personally witnessed tests by
Dr. House on morphine addicts, orul
all of the tests were successful. The
next step will be to legalize the u--e
of twilight sleep for the examination
of criminals. This will be of untold
benefit in the prosecution of crimi
nals. One of tht things that will in
fluence the use of twilight sleep 's
the fact that the drug is absolutely
haim'ess to the patient."
The uuc
of the drug, stono'.amnt
in questioning iriminals it, bcnv coin
ducted at DaHa^ Texas,

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