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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, February 23, 1922, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1922-02-23/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
^ISS? of
""M
f^pf^^ t^r-^xV
=7IIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIHIII
M
"OPEN YOUR EfcES," AT
REX TODAY AND FRIDAY
Gaton Glass, who plays the role of
"Alex Valentine^"
ress who plays the role of Kitty
Walton," the wealthy Seiress and
heroinc in "Open Your Eyes at the
Rex theater today and tomorrow is
lovable personality, Miss Bmney fits
the role .of "Kitty Walton,' Hike
a glove. Her acting the scene in
the first part of "Open Your Eyes
PLAY WITHIN PLAY
FOR GARETH HUGHES
A barnstorming performance of
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" is one of the
features! of "Little Eva Ascends,"
George D. Baker's production for S-L
(Arthur Sawyer and Herbert Lubin)
Htarring Garcth Hughes, showing ai
thq Grand theater tonight and Fri
day. The picture is based on Tho
mas Beer's Saturday Evening Pos-t
story of the same title and recounts
.Khe ^ventures of a typical ,road
show company of a generation ago.
A small town theater that might
have been reproduced from any town
of 10,000 population the country
a few years ago was rebuilt on one
of Metro's enclosed stages at Holly
wood for this picture within a pictu. a
Bloodhounds, stage ice floes, and the
typical painted heavenly background
of the old drama found their way into
the picture.
Gpreth HufJ,il supporting jcast
inclivles May Collins, Eleanor Fields,
Unice Vin Moore, Benjamin Hag
gerty, Edward MartinJalc, Harry Lor
aine, Mark Fenton, John Prince, Fred
Warren and W. S. Brown, Rudolph
Bergquist war photographer.
MONKEY COMEDIAN HERE
IN LIVELY COMEDY TODAY
Joe Martin the famous monkey
comedian is showing tonight at the
Grand theater in "A Monkey School
master," a two-part comedy. This is
Joe's first appearance for several
months and his admirers will welcome
his return
HOUSE PETERS STARS IN
OUTDOORS STORY AT GRAND
House Peters, whose splendid per
formance in Goldwyn's "The Invis
ible Power" has been hailed as pnq
of the bett characterizations of 'the
new season, will be seen in the lead
ing role of "The Man From Lost
River," when this new photoplay oy
Kathenne Newlin Burt is presented
at the Grand theater! for two days,
beginning Saturday IMA Peter!
long been known for his portrayal
of powerful characters and as the
lumber camp foreman in his latest
Goldwyn picture, he is given every
opportunity to reveal that manliness
and suppressed tenderness which
make him an ideal screen hero.
Fritzi Brunette plays the leading
feminine role opposite Mr. Peters.
As the girl who doesn't know her
trije 'Heelings, Hiss Brunette's per
formance is subtle and appealing. The
third angle of the triangle is abiy
upheld by AUJV.I Forrest.
Frank Lloyd, who directed "The
Man From Lost River," believes it
to he one of his best pioductionc.
ii^iiiiiiraiiiiiiiiiJiiiiiuiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii^
I NEWS OF THE THEATRES i
^illIIIIIIIIllllllllllLMIUIUlIlIllllllinilMIINIHIIIII IIIIIIIVIIUIIIIIIIIIIII IIIHIIII^
the Broadway
"rounder" in "Ojfen YourEyes" the please Eve. Samson was shorn of
amine'ph(rtopW*t tlt-$*,
theat*f
tonight and Friday has had a me
teoric rise &>* fam^. G*^ who a
modest surt of chap, was an aifTO
dent in Paris when Wp IJW'M'Sg
Knllstinir in the Fre'nch air ferv1 Enlistin he became an "ace", only to be, fl
badly wounded after* t years of
fighting in the skies as to be discharg-
"'TO PLEASE ONE WOMAN" AT
in "Open Your Eyes," which was pre- form induces him to shatter his ro-
nared under the supervision of the manoe with the girl he has loved
Public health service of the United binco boyhood. How matters finally
States government, he w.*s chosen to adjust themselves happily is revealed
create ''Alex Valentine." His suv- in a film drama that is remarkable
cess in that rolc| shows the wisdom, for itfe true-to-lifeness and deep ap-
of this choice.
ueal
,_......,n AD A THF RFX iWindsor, plays the 'eading feminine
"THUNDERCLAP AT THE REX
SATURDAY, SUNDAY, MONDAY the cast also
How it appealed to the Broadway
critics: ^nre -which a Paramoundt release..
Audience had time of ts en
joying itselt in true "^rama at jle
ZJ^^^ZJ^
0
atorbin7^tIreS
bwhene pr6e
te ne
abl
as
hav nro
It
a thrilling picture of life in the
northwestern la.i.ber camp's anit one
that should not be missed.
5 i-.ittwVVX,
u*".3**,rfV *s-
X. '^S"^
mm
EIJKO TODAY AND FRIDAY
What Would do to please a woman?
Adam ate the forbidden fruit to
strength mid, met deathmen accoun't
o*DeQilah. Ifarc -Anttmnjr-gav* up
honorfe at Rome to da^ty-fJWth Cleo
patra. *V
The pages of history are filled with
acdpants of man's (Sacrifice to satis
fy woman's caprice.
According to Lois Weber, it isn't
Only' in history that women exercise
tA from th- service *rXhe immortal, thenri charnjs for Selfish purposes.
Sarah Bernhardt took tJ* youn^mM Miss Weber in "To. Please One Wo-
under her wing and he ey to Ante**I man,"\ her latest picture production
ica as an actor in the Bernhardt conwshowiKg at tho Elko theater tonight
nanv on her last tour, W.hilc in this and Friday, gives a modern setting
country the movie "bu%t" stung to the', old story. The story dealb
Gla^s and he did not return \to France with the havoc wrought by a certain
with the rest of the comiany. but rich, ietffish woman who, having dnv-
went to work for a large. motion en her husband to risk his all in her
uicture company instead. was behalf, takes up her residence in a
leadine man for Marguerite OIrk in mansion near a rural seaside town to
several of her productions. He* play- wait the result of his plunge. While
ed opposite Alma Rubens in "Hu- there, she becomes interested in a
moresaue" and is soon to be starred young country1
doctor and, true to
A new beauty of the screen, Claire
p* 0
include_sh
"i^
auVe
Elk
a
-Burnss,
a
i i ik Rmarfwav Mona Lisa, and Edit Kessler. Loi
an(
Edwaradn
directe
ton,ehis
th
pic
nture story of "Bill and
complcte
th
rogra at the
MAN'S HOME" AT THE
N. Y. Evening Telegram ELKO THEATER SATURDAY
A photoplay which for dramatic
"OPEN YOUR EYES" AT I situations, suspense and vital, hu-
REX THEATER TONIGHT'man appeal is said to be one of the
outstanding productions of the sea-
Faire Bmney, the charming act- so
wil
to thea- rgoer "n A Man'slocal
0
th
EJJ^
one of the most sought after leading Sunday.0
Indies in the motion picture world., The -production is a new type of
With a wonderful pair of eyes, and home picture, because it differs radi-
expression of baby innocence, and a ca j]
Home," a
Selinick production with a not-
players, is shown at
theater next Saturday and
fTom the class of pictures that
^e.tlt with the home and its
blems an the past. There is noth
jn{ but
theatrical about its characters
inb
when the mother takes her 16-year- ^ag been made to present every-day
old daughter into her confidence and human beings and the problems that
enlightens her concerning the all-im- ma
portant facts of life, contributes begin to drift apart,
greatly to the appeal of this scene, Critics are unanimous in praise of
which is one of the sweetest and most A Man's Home" one declared it
judiciously handled in t'fe picture
Movie fans will recollect Miss Binney
in "The Wonder Man," "A Man's
Home." "The Girl From Porcupine," I
and others. One of her big hits wasj
as the Rebel maiden in the Civil war
episode of Maurice Tourneur's pic
ture, "Woman" who sold the life of
a Union soldier fleeing from the Con
federates for a pretty bauble dazzled
before her eyes by the commander of
the searching party. Miss Binney is
a California girl. She is an expert
horsewoman and very fond of the
sport, although she does not get an
opportunity to ride in "Open Your
Eyes."
tead, a conscientious effort
result when a husband and wife
"The Perfect' Picture.
CLUB HAS BUT FOUR MEMBERS
Wott Exclusive Organization in th^
World Is in Order of Knights
of Columbus.
The most exclusive club In the world
consists of only four members. Tbey
are Marshal Foci), Cardinal Mercier,
King Albert of Belgium and the duke
of Veragua.
The first three need no explanation,
and the fourth member of the club
shouldn't, for the |nl de yeragna of
Spain is the last lining lineal male de
scendant of Christopher Columbus.
Tho four celebrities are the only
European members of the Knights of
Columbus, each having been made hon
orary members of the organization on
the occasion of their visits to America.
The duke de Veragtm wan mudr a
member of the K. of more than
twenty years ago, when he "visited
America for the Colnmbiun exposition,
held in honor of his ancestor's discov
ery of America. lie was the first hon
orary member of the K. of C.
Cardinal Merrier nnd King Alhert
were made knights in 1920 and Mar
shnl Foch, the late.st honorary member
of the K. of C, was made knight in
Chicago when he visited that city on
his American visit.
Incidentally Marshal Foch Is the
millionth man to lia\ei the honors of
Columbian knighthood confer) ed on
him. as the present membership is
800,000 and losses tlnough death and
other en uses In the history of the K.
of f. amount to approximately 200,000.
Se\cral classes to he initiated were
postponed to glv Marshal Foch the
millionth position.
One of the oldest methods of ob
taining power, by means of the wind
mill, will be used m the newest air
planes between London and the Con
tinent for tho purpose of obtaining
electricity for lighting the pnssenuois'
cabins. The dynamos will he driven by
the wind as the air expresses speed
along at 300 miles im hour. How
long, one wonders, will it be before
further attempts are made to utilize
the power of wind that is daily going
to wnrte? Steam and oil send mighty
liners plowing through the ocean, while
tho wind sweeps aloug as oxer a des
ert. Express trains rush through tho
country at sixty miles an hour, ond
the wind creates inothiug bu\ a drfctt.
If (].\namoij w\r^ fixiscl to the roofs
of the carriages, as^ln the case of
the airplane, perhaps th. electricity for
ligiititig, heating, and oking uuid
be obtained practically for nothing.
"Nude ear* are to be popular this
winter." says Chicago. But we reck
on they will continue to wear shoes.
With Japan coming Into the disarm.
Rinent conference what will the
Jingoes Co for a yellow peril?
When the weather man will
vwather is exceptional,
really bo doing.
admit tho
somethltV XiOust S
CliAN
(Continued from last issue)
Soon the thunder of the many rifles
became almost a steady roar. The
air was filled with the pungent odor
of burning powder. Bill Dale emptied
the magazine of bis repeater, and
sank behind the big chestnut to fill
It again with cartridges from his belt.
Bullets now whined on both sides of
hlin they cut greenish white furrows
in the bark of both sides of the tree,
and knodked up little spurts of black
earth to his right and to his left^
they cut off twigs within an aim's
reach of him. A dozen Balls were
now firing at him, seeking to avenge
the death of their kinsman, the
Goliath. John Moreland's strong voice
came to* bin) through the din and roar:
"Don't show no part o* yoreself now,
Bill ef'ye do, ye'll shore be hit!"
Dale tired again, pumped a fresh
cartridge into the chamber of his ritle
and slipped another into tie magazine,
and arose behind the chestnut.
"Down, Bill!" cried John Moreland.
If Dale heard, he gave no sign oi
it. He fired four shots rapidly, and
before the wind had carried away the
blinding smoke he was behind another
tree and shooting toward the Balls
again. Soon there came a short, loud
peal of laughter from his left he
turned his head and saw Ben Little
ford taking a careful aim at a long
angle toward the side of a boulder.
Then Littleford fired, and a puff of
stone dust showed that his bullet had
gone true to Its mark.
"What's that for?" demanded Dale.
"We haven't any ammunition to tluwv
away!"
"Why, Bill," replied Littleford.
"didn't ye never bounce a bullet offen
a rock and make it go toward a man
alnnd of a tree?"
It lasted hotly for two hours, but
the casualties were comparatively
few, because there was so much covet
avalluble. From the beginning the
Balls and the Turners had the worst
of it, which was due to uphill shoot
ing, white whisky, and lack of the
iron that makes real fighting men.
The cartridges of those below were
giving out they had llred too many
shots needlessly.
"It's about time to rush them," Dale
said to John Moreland, who had crept
up beside him.
"Jest give the word," Moreland
nodded.
A. few minutes later. Bill Dale sent
tho wings of his line down the moun
tainside, forming a half-circle of his
force once more then the whole line
rushed, surrounded the enemy nnd
(ailed for a surrender.
But the Balls and their, kinsmen
wouldn't gh yet. They left their
cover and started to run, found them
selves facing Morelands and Little
fords in every direction, clubbed their
riiles and fought. It was not true
courage that prompted them to offer
resistance- thus: it was utter despera
tion they had never been givers of
mercy, therefore they did not expect
mercy. Dale's men forebore to fire
upon tbem, which was at Dale's com
mand, and met them with clubbed
rifles. The woodland rang with the
sound of wood and steel crashing
against wood nnd steel. Everywhere
lhere were gioans and threats nnd
curses from the losing side, victorious
cries and further demands for a sur
render from the winners.
BUI Dale, ever a lover of fair com
bat, threw down his repeater to grap
ple with a big North Carolinian whose
clubbed weapon had been knocked
from his hands. Tho two fell and
rolled down the mountainside, locked
each other's arms.
And then one of the Balls struck
Bill Dale across the head with the butt
of his empty gun, and Bill Dale slack
ened his arms and lay as one dead.
He was lying under cover in a hand
carved black walnut fourposter, and
it was nigbt, when.he opened his eyes
again. Above him lie saw* the bearded
faces of Ben LlUloford and John
Moreland, and they looked haggard
and anxious in the oil lamp's yellow
light. Suddenly Moreland spoke:
"Dead^-nptbhV!" Jubilantly. ."Look,
Beu$ hf't flone^01^ td!" Y^ couldn't
put torn in cannon'* and shoot him
.lginst clift and kill him, Ben! I
hope ye're,-a-feelin* all right, Bill,
shore." I I
Dale realized everything quite clear
ly. He put a hand to his head there
was a wet cloth lying o\er the swollen
.place.
"He shore give ye a buster of a
tick," drawled a voice that Dale in
stantly recognized as that of hK wot
sniper, By Heck. "Danged ef Calc
Moreland didn't might* nigh it beat
him to death, Bill!"
Many men crowded to the bedside
and smiled at Iiiu, and he smiled back
at them S lie a*ked:
"Did oti capture the outfit
"Every djarngd qne_of QPI." answered
&.
Eapshur$t.iebe
Illurirjciitons Bg
CvpyrifHt by Dovbldjr. Pg 4
John Moreland. "They're all shet up
tight In the downstairs o* the office
huildin', onder gyard. The' ain't but
one of 'em plumb teetotally dead, fo*
a wonder but the's a whole passel of
'em hurt. I've done sent Luke to town
on hos&back, atter a doctor fo' jou
and Saul and Little Tom and he can
'tend to them crippled Balls, too, I
reckon, ef you think it's best. What're
we a-goin' to do with tbem fellers, Bill
"We're going to take them to the
Cartel s\ die jail," Dale answeied
promptly.
"I had a different plan 'an th.it
planned out, John," said By Heck,
winkiug at Ben Littleford. "I had it
planned out to hang 'em all ou a big
sreen hemlock as a Christmas tree fo'
Bill! Some devilish rough Christmas
i eve ye*re a-havin', Bill, old boj, ain't
it?"
"Rather," smiled Dale. He closed
his eyes His head ached, and he was
somehow \ery tired.
Within the hour he went TO sleep,
and whea he awoke it was davlight on
Christmas, morning. Ben Littlefoul.
fralf dressed, was stirring the coals
'to life in the wide-mouthed stone fire
place. Dale felt better than he had
expected to feel he greeted Little
ford with the compliments of the sea
son, arose and dressed himself.
Littleford had just gone with a
handful of kindling wood toward
the kitchen, when there was a low,
light tapping at the outside door of
Bill Dale's room. Dale arose from
his sheepskin-lined rocker before the
cheery log fire, went to the door and
opened it. Before him stood a slim,
barefoot boy .in-, fhe poorest of rags:
in the p-itifully-jslepder arms there was
something wrapped rather loosely in
crumpled brown paper. Dale did not
lemember having Seen the lnd befoie,
but he knew *vas no Littleford.
"Come In, som" he invited cordial
ly"come in aSH warm- yourself. My
goodness alivec it's too cold to go
barefooted like Bint! Haven't 5 ou any
shoes, son?"
"Shoes?" muttered the boy, queerly.
"Shoes?"
He Mas shivering from the cold. His
thin face looked pinched and blue, his
ejes big and hollow. Dale stooped,
picked him up bodily, carried him to
the old rocker .he had just vacated,
and put him into it with hands as gen
tle as any woman's.
"H1," began the boy, staring
hard"what"
"Now stick your feet out and warm
them, sonthat's it," and Dale chafed
the poor little, dirty, half-frozen feet
and legs.
"Son," he went on after a moment,
his heart throbbing out of sheer pity,
"you go to the commissary clerk and
tell him to dress, you up like the
crown prince of England, if he's got
it. and charge the same to the account
of BUI Dale. It will lie my Christinas
gift to jou, little boy. What's jour
name?"
The lad turned his surprised black
ej-es upon the face of the big and sun
browned man.
"Are jou Bill Dale?"
"Yes."
That which the boy safd next struck
"So You're Bill Dale. Well, D-
Soul!"
l'jTHS""S"i|"'v" imm tiiuit H,JI.| jjiji HI4U.H iif i'^,uju^i lu^jiaum^JniMjt, i n-uiiami^wmiq
v?THE BEMHWI AILY PIONEER
My
the big nnd sunbrowned man with oil
the force of a bullet.
"So j-ou're Bill Dale. Well, D my
soul
"Don't, buddy, don't!"
The boy went on: "My name, it's
Henerj. I come here with a Christ
mas gif* fo' you." He pointed a dirty
(Contnued on Page 4)
4 t*
FIT MATE FOR FAMOUS SCOUT
Wife of "Buffalo Bill" Frequently Ac
companied Him on Expeditions
Filled With Danger.
Louisa Smith's first encounter with
William Frederick Cody, later and
more popularly known as "Buffalo
Bill,'' was exceedingly informal. Cody
had beep brought $0 the Smith home
by a mutual friend and before he had
even been Introduced was the aston
ished recipient of a resolute ,slap on
the mouth from Louisa, a punishment
which soon grew into love. Tbete mar
riage took place shortly after and their
life together .was ^extremely' happy.
Mrs. Cody proved an ideal wife for
"Buffalo Bill." She was with him on
a great many of his trips and enjoyed
them as much as he did himself. In
trepid and daring, there was no ex
pedition which appeared too dangerous
for her to go on.
Mr.s. Cody outlived her husband, as
well as all of her children, and the
latter part of her life, spent in re
tirement in the West, was lived in
a dream world, populated by her loved
ones.
Iceland in History.
A visitor to Iceland has described
the \iew from the plateau overlooking
the plain of Thingveilllr, where the
parliament of the commonwealth was
held. He speaks of magnificent gorges,
mers, waterfalls, of a lake of sdp
phire set within a circle of euieraWl
hLlK and snow-capped mountains, sii
together a picture of enchanting bean
ty. The magnificence of its historical
and literarj traditions ha\e enriched
the ages, and some of their Icelandic
translations are now being adopted bj
other nations. The spoken language
of today differs so little from that
of the Twelfth century that the Sagas
of that tune continue to be, In the
original text, the daily reading of all
classes. The remarkable revhal of art
and literature nnd general prosperity
has come from the reawakeninc of
the national spirit early in the Nine
teenth century.
Bavaria will probably not enact the
anti-gluttony law that has been pro
posed, but the very proposal Is inter
esting, says Youths' Companion. Ac
cording to the provisions of the bill
anyone found guilty of schlemmerei
which mean gross nnd luxurious feed
ing, is to be imprisoned and fined 100,-
(fOO marks. For a second offense the
fine might be doubled and the prison
terra Increased to five years. Foreign
ers found guilty are to be deported.
The law seems to have been proposed
in disgust at the ostentatiou and greed
of the post-war profiteer and speculat
or. The type is an unpleasant one
anj'where, and, if the laments of the
Germans are sincere, It is especially
nauseous just now in Germany.
The bureau of education estimates
that $15,000,000 was spent jn -this
country last year carrying pupils to
school in free conveyances, and that
represents a considerable advance upon
the period when attendance wars se
cured merely by thrashing the run
aways.
SEE
The lively roadhquse scenes
where danger lurked for incautious
youth.
The episodes in the gay cabarets
where '*Chritfne," the celebrated
synqpiiationUte introduces a "shun-
rnie^| number tHat was a furore on
Broadway*
The ftrild joy rides of xeckleA,_.
teekera after thrills*
The4nany scenes of genuine dra-^
matic power that le*d to a stagger
ing climax.
TO MARY FROM
MARY OF ENGLAND
(By United Press)
London, Feb. 23.Marys from all
pver the British Dominion are send
ing along their shillings for the pres
ent to Princess Mary from "Mary."
Organizers of the fund announce
that thet response from the Domin
ions was tremendous.
Newfoundland was the first to
cable news of its participation to the
committee under the Hon. Mrs. Geof
frey Hope Moriev.
GRAN
cIO
Approved and Endorsed by
EDUCATORS DOCTORS CLERGYMEN
CHILDREN UNDER 16 NOT ADMITTED.
Matinee 2:3030c Evenings 7:10-935c
[TTLE EV&ASCElsrDS
REX Theatre
SATURDAYSUNDAY
& MONDAY
William Fox presents
r'THUNDERCLAP"!
The Greatest Race Track Drama
Ever Staged.
I Stirring Scenes Good Comedy
Audiences Rise in Their Seats, and Cheer This One!
E llliiiiiiillliiilliiiiiilllilililiiillliiiiiilliliiiiiliiiiiilililliiiiiiiiiiil'i'it"""'""1111^sa.StantondRicharybdDirecteE
REX TODA & FRIDAY
THE DECADE'S MOST IMPORTANT PICTURE
OPEN YOU EYES
LEARN
What happened to the uninform
ed young people in the danger spots
they visited.
How trustful children,of sensible
parents avoided these pitfalls.
IV
The evil consequences of placing
faith in unknown friends.
'^Tlhe hideous result of ignoring a
"menace that threatens the welfare
of the nation for generations to
come.
^0jj^fi^^^^p^
THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 23, 1922
Lady Reading, wife of the Viceroy
of India is organizing India, and
Lady Jellicoe performs the same duty
in New Zealand. Mrs. Smuts is at
the head of a similar organization
in South Africa.
Contributions are not allowed to
exceed ten shillings.
A
Three of the bridesmaids at Prin
cess Mary's wedding served in a sim
liar capacity at the wedding of Prin
cess "Pat' now L?dy Patrica Ram
seythree years ago. They are Prm.
cess Maul, Lady Victoria Mar Cair.
bridge, and Lady May Cambridge.
Sieamr*vQ
GARET HUGHES.~'
is a romance of an Uncle Tom
showand the throbs and laughs
in it are dovetailed
as close together
as the logs in the
immortal character's cabin
A GEORGE D. BAKER PRODUCTION
From Thomas Beer's story in the Saturday Evening Post
Alto Showing
JOE MARTIN "THE MONKEY
The famous monkey comedian SCHOOLMASTER"
10c & 25c
7:30 & 9:00
COMING SATURDAY
CATHERINE NEWLIN BURT'S
Great Story cf the Open Spaces and Lumber Camps
"THE MAN FROM LOST RIVER"
House PetersFritzi BrunetteAllan Forest
4'
TONIGHT
i
J!i
4
j!?ui,p'^)V3a.
1

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