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The Bemidji daily pioneer. [volume] (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, August 10, 1922, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1922-08-10/ed-1/seq-2/

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(Continued from last 1MM)
CHAPTER XX
Quietly, as though nothing had hap
pened, the three men went down the
stairs, passed the sleeping night clerk,
and headed back to the sheriff's office,
wbere waited Anita and Harry, who
had completed his last duties in re
gard to the chalky-faced Maurice Ro
daine The telephone jangled. It was
Denver. Mason talked a moment oyer
the wire, then turned to his fellow
office*.
^They've got Barnham. What's more,
he had close to a million dollars In
currency strapped around him. Guess
we'd better stir up some horses now
und chase along, hadn't we?"
"iVs, and get a gentle one for me,"
cautioned Harry.
'"That goes for me, too," laughed
Fair-child.-
'"And meI like automobiles bet-
ter," Anita was twisting her long hair
into a braid, to be once more shoved
under her cap. The start was made.
A' detour, then the, tracks led the
way to the Ohadl road, and behind
tnenvrcame the pursuers, heads down
against the wind, horses snorting and
cougHn as they forced their way
through the big drifts, each following
orte-'another
for the protection It afr
forded' A long, silent, cold-gripped
two Hoursthen finally the lights c4
Ohadi.
But even then the trail was not dlffl-
cdItj .The little town was asleep
hardly track showed in the streets
beyond the hoofprints of a horse lead
ing tip the principal thoroughfare and
on out to the Georgevllle road. On
ward jubtil before them was the bleak,
rat-ridden old roadhouse which formed
Lauras home, and a light was gleam
ing within.
Silently the pursuers dismounted
nud started forward, only' to stop
short, A scream had come to them,
falnf In the bluster of. the storm, the
racking-scream of a woman in a tem
pest ptl anger. Suddenly the light
seemed to bob about in the old house
It,showed first at one windowthen
nnpther-ras though some one were
running:from room to room. Once two
gaunt- shadows stood forthof a
crouching man and a woman, one
hand extended in the air, as she
whirled the lamp before her for an
instant and brought herself between
Its rays and those who watched.
Again the chase and then the
cream, louder than ever, accompa
nied by streaking red flame which
spread across the top floor like wind-,
blow spray. Shadows weaved before
the. windows, while the flames seemed
to reach out and enwrap every por
tion of the upper floor. The stagger
ing figure of a man with the blaze all
about him was visible then a woman
who rushed past him. Groping as
though blinded, the burning form of
the, man weaved a moment before the
window, clawing in a futile attempt
to open it, the flames, which seemed
to leap from every portion of his body,
enwrapping him. Slowly, a torch-like,
stricken thing, he sank out of sight,
and as the pursuers outside rushed
forward, the figure of a woman ap
peared on the old veranda, half naked,
shrieking, carrying something tightly
locked in her arms, and plunged down
the steps into the snow.
Falrchlld, circling far to.one side,
caught ber, and with all his strength
resisted ber squirming efforts until
Harry and Bardwell had come to his
assistance. It was Crazy Laura, the
cMtaats of her arms now showing in
the light ef the flames as they licked
every window of the upper portion of
the 'housefive heavy, sheepskin
bound books of the ledger type,
wrapped tight in a grasp that not even
Harry could loosen.
"Don't take them from me!" the
insane woman screamed. "He tried
itv dldhtt he? And where's ho now
up there burning! He hit meand
I JJirew the lamp at him! He wantet'
my bookshe wanted to take them
away from mebut I wouldn't let
hliD. And you can't have themhear
melet go of my arnn-let go!"
She- oil at them. She twisted and
butted them with her gray head. Sho
screamed and squirmedat last to
weaken. Slowly Harry forced her
arms aside and took from them the
precious contentswhatever they
might ije. Grimly old Sheriff Mason
wrappedjher in his coat and led her
to. a borsjk there to force her to mount
andride with him Into town.The house
wiln Squint Bodainewas gone.
Back in the office of Sheriff Bard
well the books were opened, and Fair
child uttered an exclamation.
"Harry! Didn't she talk about Iter
books at the coroner's inquest? See
If there's any entry along early in
July-r-about the time of the Inquest."
Bardwell turned the closely written
pVges, At last he stopped.
'''Testified today at the inquest.'
he read. *I lied. Roady made me do
if. i never saw anybody quarreling.
Besides, I did it myself.'"
"What's she meandid it herself?"
the sheriff looked up. "Guess we'll
have to go 'way back for that."
"First let's see how accurate the
thing is," FaJrchild Interrupted. "See
if there's an item under November 9
of this year."
The sheriff searched, then read:
"I dug a grave tonight. It was
not filled. The immortal thing left
me. I knew it would. Roady had come
and told me to dig a grave and put
it in there. I did. We filled it with
quicklime. Then we went upstairs
and it was gone. I do not understand
it. If Roady wanted me to kill him,
why didn't he say so? I will kill if
Roady will be good to me. I've killed
before for him."
"Still referring to somebody she's
killed," cut in Anita. "I wonder if
It could be possible"
"I've just thought of the date!"
Harry broke In excitedly. "It was along
about June 7, 1892, I'm sure it was
around there."
The old books were mulled over,
one after the other. At last Bardwell
leaned forward and pointed to a cer
tain page.
Continued in next Issue
"THE OATH" AT THE REX
TONIGHT AND FRIDAY
"The Oath" the R. A. Walsh pro
luction for Associated First Nation
al Pictures, Inc., which opens at Rex
tonight for a two days'
showing, contains a scene which has
been hailed by critics as being the
most dramatic that has ever been
filmed or staged. A series of fast
moving, interesting circumstances
has involved Hugh Colman in a sit
uation where his conviction for mur
der is absolutely certain unless he
breaks an oath given to his wife
vhen he had secretly married.
But there is another woman whom
le has hved. Although her love has
jeen given to his dearest chum, she
nakes the greatest sacrifice a woman
an make to save Hugh from the gal
ows and succeeds. The scene is one
it the strongest ever put into a mo
tion picture production, and the
angled net which results from her
action in the lives of four persona
provides, a most absorbing double
love story.
"1 AM THE LAW" AT REX
THEATER OPENING SUNDAY
"I Am the Law," a blue-blooded
story of virile and scintillating ac
tion, laid in the god-forsaken land of
barren whiteness and the snow drifts
of the northwest, where the derelicts
of humanity drift to make their last
gold strike, where race of creed is
forgotten in the mad rush for the
precious yellow meta'ithere in tha^
country is laid the seting of a pow
erful photodrama that comes to the
Rex theater Sunday, hearalded as
greater in story and cast than any
other production that has come to
this city in a decade.
Featured in this story of stories
are Kenneth Harlan as Corp. Bob
Fitzgerald*, the same Harlan, who
for the pat year was leading man for
Constance Talmadge Alice Lake, the
brilliant little star of over a dozen
Metro productions Rosemary Theby
diminutive female lead of "A Con
necticut Yankee" Noah Berry, the
fighting man in "Bob Hampton of
Placer" and lately with Douglas
Fairbanks in "The Mark of Zorro"
hi's brother Wallace Berry, the fam
ous villain of over one hundred pic
tures and Gaston Glass, who made
an instantaneous hit in "Humor
esquc" and more recently featured
in "Cameron of the Royal Mounted".
"HERITAGE" AT THE ELKO
TONIGHT AND FRIDAY
Dr. G. M., Morgan the famous
physician and scientist in a recent
interview made the astonishing" claim
that it is possible to prove one's
identity v/th a certain family through
certain characteristics that *hve been
handed dw
generations and
thereby have become identified with
that family.'.'. '":-*%affi
Dr. Morjjan'a theory forrn^wjr
basis of one of the most Temarkfrnji
photoplays of the year. Willawf
Mack, the noted dramatist has furn*
ished this unusual story, which' he
has called "Heritage". This produc
tion will be seen at the Elko theater
Today and Friday.
Matty Roubert, tve
popular juve
nile star, carries the burden of the
intensely dramatic situations with
which Mr Mawk has most vividly
portrayed the subject.
Dr., A. E. Henderson will un
doubtedly be with the rest of the
boys at the pageant during the fair
to see that they put it on as it
should be done. He is one of the
early settlers here and has been ar
tive in the progress of Bemidji, es
pecially so until recent years and
then prevented only by failing
health.
"HEAD OVER HEELS" AT
GRAND AGAIN TONIGHT
At the Grand- theater tonight
Mabel Normand. w! again, demon
strate that she has forgotten none of
the humorous acrobatic tricks with
which she delighted her friends. The
photoplay is the Goldwyn produc
tion "Head Over Heels" which had
a long run as a musical comedy.
"THE FACE BETWEEN" AT
GRAND THEATER FRIDAY
rBert LytelFs Metro picture, "The
Face Between", a Bayard Veiler
production of Justus Miles Forman's
tfcory "lloram^ pj p-teret"1.
fw'| be
shown at the Grand theater on Fri
day and Saturday. "The "Leather
Pushers" will also appear in round
two at the Grand theater tomorrow
and Saturday.
GOODLAND
Albert Clark had the misfortune
of ..ailing and hurting Ihis arm while
stacking hay Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Issensee and
family, of Pennington, visited at the
J. R. Wells, home Sunday evening.
Dewey, Chariie and Erhma Bliss
spent Sunday evening at Clark's.
Gay Mahoney, "Cora'Searles and
Euel and Cleon Smith called at
Clark's. Monday evening.
Scours and Thumpn.
Scours and thumps are among the
dangers which' are apt to beset the
yonng pig during the first few days
of its life.
Purebred* Bring More. Money.
-Pure bred live stock costs,no more
to feed than common stock and brings
more money.
Horse Easily Poisoned.
A horse Is very easily poisoned and
many deaths have resulted from feed
ing moldy silage.
Ill
Doyou know
wilfisfallow
whenAtlrdown*
ITu *omething
ytron$ef than
lurcvlf-it is the
elopmetit of
4$ in yourblood
IT IS
Oee Mi
VILLAPO HACK'S
rea picl re
voimJ
willi MflTTT BOUBEttT %4,
and a notable cast,
Esau told hit Heritage for a neu
of pottagehow many other* are
like him?
No one live* in the i*e*ent~they
live in the p**t with their1
i l!"Loo
father*
they Rve in *ne fu*Uf
their chilj&en. .._
The greatest iac^^^e^yowr
Hfcritage-~be it lor Of. evil,
Intematiohi
AT THE
ELKO
Show* 2:307:30-9:00
Mat. 10c-COeEve. 10c-2Sc
Pflock's Music
illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!
r"M''""'
"J
THE BEMtDJI DAILY PIONEER
LSMLil
From lumberjack to lawyer is the
record of P. J. Russel, prominent
Bemidji attorney, wno is easily ra
ted among the old timers in this
neck of the woods. Alter wrestling
logs for a while, he made UJJ his
mind that it would be less strenuous
to wreUle fees from his clients.
That's not saying what he thinks
about it -now although he has so
Col. Henry FunWey, lawyer, cit
izen land automobile fan, is numbered
among Bemidji's early settlers. He
has helped many poor "devil" to
settle in some way or another, some
times fixing, it so they wouldn't
have to settle. He is.still an ardent
student of Blackstone .which means
in more common language that he is
a lawyer.
The picture of Colonel Funkley
shows that he might be used in the
"moon" scene during the staging of
the historic pageant. His head looks
that way now but he doesn't care.
L. F. JOHNSON
F. Johnson, district forest
ranger, has a long record in Bemidji
and vicinity*. For many years he
cruised the woods of Northern Min
nesota when a lot of the boys
thought it was big league stuff to
cruise the ocean and the Great
Lakes. He might be used in the pag
eant to help blaze the trail for the
early settlers wending their way into
the Bemidji which will be shown at
the fair here next week.
He also .has been chief executive
of Bemidji, having held the office
o mayor for two consecutive terms
giving way two years ago to Mayor
A. V. Garlock. He is an ardent
booster for Northern Minnesota* and
for the protection and conservation
of the forests.
Portuguese Named Japan.
The English name Japan seems to
have originated with the Portuguese,
who spelled the Chinese Yih-pen Japen,
the letter being silent or similar to
according to their language. This is
the way the Spanish and the Portu
gueae still pronounce Japan.
P. J. RUSSELL
HENRY FUNKLEY J.C.PARKER
an
far not gone to wrestling logs.
He should make good material for
the Old Third street scene and those
in charge have ..been overlooking
good material if they have not ask
ed him to take part in the pageant.
As the picture shows, he evidently
won some laurels at one time or an
other, and he might win some more
if given a good role in the pageant.
John C. Parker has lived around in
Northern Minnesota for a long string
of years although he is not. consider
ed as an old-timer in Bemidji. Never
theless he is sure to occupy some
prominent role in the staging of the
historic pageant during the North
ern Minnesota Fair/ He might be
induced to give an exhibition, to
gether with Andy McNabb 'on an
old-time rooter at a basketball game.
That's where both of these fellows
shine. A. B. Palmer is another of
the consistent athletic fans.
J. E. CAHILL
J. E. Gahill is another of the old
timers in this community and is al
so considered good material for the
Old Third street scene. In fact, his
present position as deputy sheriff
might be of particular use during
the staging of this scene, especially
if .some of the boys should persist
in making more than one scene.
Lo%ts of fellows nave stayed at
Deputy Sheriff Cahill's placethe
Beltrami county jail. Some of them,
it is rumored, have even hesita'J^d"
about leaving. He insisted upon tnem
staying there, until their
Adapted from the
novel "IDOLS" by
Wm. J. Locke di-.
rected by R. A
Walsh.
release
was ordered. HoweVe* it has been
necessary to keep'1
the?'bai* 'oW'tHe''
jail windows, evenv
though Mr Ca-!
hill's hospitality is unlimited.
Menus of the Nations.
Ireland's national food is the po
tato. The Hindu's national food' is
rice. The national food of Germany is
pork. The French are the greatest
vegetable eaters. Italians like oily
foods. Russia's national food is rye.
America has no national food.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE PIONEER
THURSDAY EVENING, AUGUST 10, 1S22
hH+tH+i+l+liiilHlfl
E TQDAYAN FHIBA
MAYFLOWER PHOTOPLAY CO^Pii^wSsewt
THE MAGNIFICENT DRAMATIC PRESENTATIIfifN OF
DOUBLE ROVERS i|ND HAVOCKED $#E&.
As it was in the begrihning, is now,
and ever shall behumanity
transgresses and pays!
FOX NOteS MUTT & JEFF
Special Feature Sunshine Comedy
REX ORCHESTRA
Matinee 2:3010c-25c
VtfWWWWWWWWWWWWWWVWWWWI^^
VVWUWUWUWVUWUMMAAAAr^^
E OPENIN SUNDAY
iiimiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mini
ITS EDWIN CAREWE'S PRODUCTION
AND OH, BOY! WHAT A CAST!
THE GREATEST CAST EVER ASSEMBLED
Directed by Edwin Carewe
All Stars, Count'em!
ALICE LAKE, KENNETH HARLAN,
NOAH BEERY, WALLACE BEERY,
GASTON GLASS, HECTOR SARNO,
ROSEMARY THEBYand Others!
RE SATURDAY
OUT WEST FRONTIER DAYS
IN FILM AND VAUDEVILLE SHOW
And his trou| of Roorin\
the Plainsin person.
Interesting and Thrilling pic
tures of Broncho Busting and
Frontier Days will be shown,
and the two Cowboys will ap
pear in person.
Je i tf,
.'^''''"''C^'i.
i.- il
i
a
But what are the paths of men and
women who secretly bridge the gulf
between two faiths? Here are two
who forswore their marriagetaking
an'oath never to reveal itrand stum
bling into the abyss when their oath
wrecked the bridge which Love had
built.
vr
uiri'
a.
4'-. I
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