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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, December 15, 1922, Section Two, Image 13

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1922-12-15/ed-1/seq-13/

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FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 15, 1922
/The
1
Flute Player
tf
By Christopher G. Hazard
lv&i, Western Newspaper Uoion.)
/~)F ALL the Christmas gifts of past
years but one remained. It seemed
surrounded by a charm that was all
its own and that was fcs unaffected
by the atmosphere of the bare and
dingy room as a light in a dark place.
The old schoolmaster took it up, looked
lovingly upon it and replaced it upon
the shelf. Then, advancing to the
swindow, he looked out upon the lighted
star in the church steeple that was
proclaiming Christ's birthday and lis
tened to the shouts of the merrymak
ers In the streets as they rose upon
the snowy wind.
The old man's mind was busy with
happier days. In the picture gallery
of his memory
visions of home
cheer and glad
ness were upon
the walls. Faces
looked out from
their frames with
old glances of
love, and figures
passed before him
full of the beauty
of young life.
Again he was in
the midst of joy
ous and success-
ful activities,
companioned and
enthusias-
tic. Then, as mem
ory's mirage fad
ed away and left but two receding
images before him, he looked once
more upon one who had gone to some
unknown land, the son who had so
mysteriously disappeared from the
home fellowship and ken, and he saw.
again the form of her who had set out
for the land that is beyond the stars,
but not before she had placed in his
hand the precious vase with the pic
tured flute player upon its side.
At the time he had'not fully noted
the significance of the happy urchin
in the red robe as he held his flute to
his lips. Pleasures and pursuits
pressed upon him and left the musi
cian unnoticed through the days and
nights. But the boy had never ceased
his playing, and now with some re
membered melody, then with some new
adventure in the world of harmony,
he seemed to be waiting for the recog
nition and appreciation that he knew
would come. A steadfast and invet
erate optimist, he played on to weari
ness and,loneliness he played a hope
ful song forbidding dejection and de
spair, he became a prophet of better
days to come. In solitude and useless
ness he was as1
an only but changeless
friend. To him the old man turned as
to an oracle. Poverty had taken one
after the other of his possessions, but
had never been able to separate him
from this merry genius, this incorrigi
bly persistent promiser.
If the prelude does not get discour
aged fortune is likely to admire It and
introduce the performance, and this
turned out to be the reward of the
industrious hope of the flute player.
He did not hear the step upon the stair
or the knock upon the door, and he
did not see the amazement with which
the schoolmaster listened to the tale
of his lost son, as he embraced him
and tried to realize that he had in
deed come back and brought good for
tune with him, but even more merrily
and madly he played in the dance with
which these two were to go down the
future.
Habits are strange things. One can
get so far into a habit of gladness as
to be unable to nyum-^!!
get out of It. A
face can get so
used to smiling as
to have no night
there. A boy can
become so com
mitted to fluting
as to be unable
to stop. It was
so with the flute
player: to this
day. he plays and
does nothing else.
He sits upon an
other and a bet
ter shelf, but not
idly. He is among
happy people, but
busy sending joy
out into all the neighborhood. He has
played the old schoolmaster young
again and fixed his thought upon a life
that never grows old.
Indeed, the flute player has even en
couraged the schoolmaster to begin
teaching again. The scholars are hia
grandchildren. They are not having
a hard time, for they sing on their way
to lessons. They are not unhappy
scholars, for one of them threw a kiss
to the last Christmas moon. Last
summer another of them became a
poetess and composed the following
appreciation of nature:
Above the Argonne Forest
A Star Is shining fair
Its gentle beams awaken
The young men sleeping there.
Again in songs of angels
The birth of Christ is told:
The young men go to greet Him
"With richer gifts than gold.
The flute player is setting this to
music. This scholar* has already
learned to write. She has proved that
by producing an invitation to one of
the school sessions in this form:
Dear Aunt Fanny:
Please tome Friday, if you can and
if you can't come, don't come.
She is not a flatterer, however, when
sue said one day, "Grandpa, you don't
look a bit over twenty."
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE PIONEEB
FONTENAC
Mr. David Miller and family had
Sunday dinner with Mr. and Mrs.
Doyce Thomas.
Mr. A. L. .Quine went to Nary on
Monday to locate a good team,
which he could buy.
Everyone sang ibeiter Sunday be
cause of the new song books that
came Saturday.
Mr. James Fish is home for the
winter as his contract is finished on
the schoolhouse north of jtfemidji.
Henry Maruhn, Dorothea and
Laura Coons have quit school 'thru
the cold weather. We certainly
miss them.
For the benefit of the Fontinac
ites, who have hibernated for the
winter we'll say it was cold last
week.
Everyone is welcome to the Christ-,j!
mas entertainment to he held Friday
the 22nd of December at 7:30 o'-
clock. It is given by the school and
Sunday school combined.
The school east of the river will
(have their entertainment on Sun
day December 24th.
T$?A
$595
FACTORY
I Mr. David Miller preached a de
lightful sermon Sunday for the Fron
tinac people. He has kindly con
sented to help us during the winter
preaching .as- often as he can. We
hope to.increase the Sunday school
attendance 'by having services after
the class wprk.
TODAY'S EVENTS
Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, builder
of the famous Eiffel Tower in Paris,
is 90 years old today.
I The Eighth International Aero
nautical Exposition will open in Par
is today, to continue until Jan. 2.
The Third Kentucky Inter-Racial
Conference will be opened in Louis
ville today,'"with Gov. Morrow pre
siding.
The fourteenth annual Governors'
Conference, composed of State gov
ernors and governors-elect, begins
its sessions today at White Sulphur
[Springs, W- Va.
The inauguration of Dr. Lucius
Clark as chancellor of American Un
liversity takes place today in Conti-
For over 30
Ounces lor
(More than a pound and a half
for a quarter)
USE LESS than of higher priced brands
Satisfaction Guaranteed
MILLIONS O POUNDS BOUGHT BY THE GOVERNMENT
Christma Morning A Fo rd Sedan
The sound of an automobile horn in front of your
home Christmas morning!
The whole family rushes to the window!
There stands a shining new Ford Sedan with all
the beauty of an electric and all the power, dependabil-
ity and economy of a wonderful Ford motor and chas-
sis.
No other gift in any quantity can bring such hap-
piness to the whole family on Christmas Day and every
day through the coming.years as this one gift for all
and for yourselfa Ford Sedan.
You will drive it all winter everywhere. It broad-
ens your horizon, eliminates distance between friends
brings the glow of health to pale cheeks and of happi-
ness to tired eyes.
You can afford to own a Ford Sedan. The price
is fixed by Henry Ford himself, the same everywhere
except for freight. And that price is now the lowest
ever quoted.
Your usual Christmas gift money may make the
first payment. The balance can be paid in monthly in-
stallments.
Make it a merry Christmas and a Happy New Year
at your house. Arrange to have a Ford Sedan delivered
Christmas morning.
W JEWETT COMPAMY
Authorized Ford and Lincoln Sales and Service
"THE WEATHER IS ALWAYS OOD IN A FORD SEDAN"
^v'SaCS
THE BEMIDJI DAILY PIONEER
nental Memorial Hall, in Washing
ton. The inauguration address will
be delivered by Dr. John J. Tigert,
U- S. Commissioner of Education.
The keeping of intoxicating liquor
in the Province of Saskatchewan for
export and the exportation of intoxi
cating liquor from the Province by
i persons other than licensed brewers
and distillers is prohibited under an
order of the Dominion Government
which become3 effective today.
NEW RAWER HOTEL
IN MINNEAPOLIS
100 MODERN ROOMS
Running Water I With Bath
*po"/ |$1.50.$2.00
Best Value in Minneapolis
Weekly Rates
REMODELED
NEW MANAGEMENT
ear
Baking
Powder
REDECORATED
STEAM HEATED
316-2d Ave. South
$186"
Down Payment
Inc. 9
j.-ii',
Books for Children
RANGE IN PRICE FROM
50c ta $2.00
Childs Garden of verses $1.00
and $1.75
The Little Lame Prince, $1.75
Large Mother Goose books, $2
The Little Red Hen
The Little Pigs
Henny Penny
Tom Thumb
Kipling's Boy Stories
Hans Brinksr
King Arthur and His Knights
Grim's Fairy Tales
Tr
Fountain Pens, $1 to $5
Eversharp pencils $1 to $5
Boston Bags $1.90 to $3.00
Receipe Files, complete with
index and cards at $1.20
Sealing wax sets with initial
dies at $1.50 to $2.00
Pencil Sharpeners $1.00
Beautiful silk parchment mot
tos in superb frames at
$1.25, $2, $3 up to $8.
Cranes Christmas stationery
beautiful boxes. You can
secure a most apprecia
tive gift at 50c, 75c, $1.25
$2.25, $3.00 and up to $12
1923 Diaries 15c to $1.15
from
5c
403 Beltrami Avenue
"BOOKS! BOOKS!
FOR CHRISTMAS
Even Santa Claus is stopping to dip into one. There are
many here that you won't be able to resist. The kind you
start and can't lay down until it is finished.
The publishers have been lavish in their offerings this
year, and we have just received a new shipment for
Christmas giving. Here you will find just what you want
THE STORE WHERE BETTER BOOKS ARE SOU)
WHAT SH^LL I GIVE?
We have solved this question for hundreds dur-
ing the past few days and can help you ito find the i
thing for Christmas. Come and see. Read these sug-
gestions.
CHRISTMAS CARDS AND GIFT DRESSINGS
MA S DEC
If you want variety you can get it here. We have thousands of
beautiful Christmas cards With as many sentiments, ranging in price
GARLANDS, STREAMERS, CHRISTMAS SEALS, Christmas Bells,
Christmas Balls, Christmas Gummed Ribbon, Festoons, Christmas
Boxes, Address Cards, stickers, etc.
THE COMPLETE DENNISON LINE
The women of this community and for that matter the men too
have just recently begun to realize what is possible to make from the
World's famous DENNISON CREPE PAPERS, ropes and waxes.
The most elaborate gift possibilities have already been real-
ized in the making of handicraft such as baskets, lamps and shades,
cake and sandweih trays, favors, flowers, candles beautifully decora-
ted, table numbers decorated, elctric lamps, fruit baskets table center*
pieces, plum puddings, pendants, beads, table favors.
Instruction free to the public wil be continued every afternoon
and on Wednesday and Friday eveings.
The work is fascinating and instructive. It is acquiring on art
worth while to every woman.
Bemidji Book and Stationery Co
Books for Grownups
RANGE IN PRICE FROM
$1.00 to $3.00
Babbit i
The Country Beyond
Flowing Gold
Americanization of Edward
Rok
Elsie Dinsmore
Numerous better books otf fic
tion at reasonable prices.
Bibles from $1.50 to $4.00
Modern Dictionaries
New Testaments
HWffWIWWI|
"fpi'""i"ffrr""""""
1
1
A List of Gifts From
25c to $2.00
Desk sets
Electric extension cords
Ink Stands
Desk Files
Playing Cards
Bride's Books
Score pads
Salt and Peppers decor
ated
Leather bill folds
Photo Albums
Loose Leaf Books
oRATIONS OF ALL KINDS INCLUDING
Bemidji Mian.
-5
'I
rJ
."A
UP

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