OCR Interpretation


The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, December 22, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1922-12-22/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ip'l
i
i
1
VJIB if
7"
Xb6.CieMMi U. the oily daily
within .100 miles of Bemidji and
fun the largest circulatioa la
Northern Minnesota.
VOLUME XX. NO. 209
U. S.Aid In
of Favorable Action
WORLD CONFERENCE IS
(Ejr United Presia)
Martin)
Washington, Dec. 22A world
conference for "economic disarma
ment which will write a new inter
national code*' is the purpose behind
(Continued on page 3.)
TWO MEN ARRESTED FOR
THEFT OF WRIST WATCH
Two *men both foreigners, who
give their names as Harry Smith and
Joe Thomas, are in the city jajil to
day as the result of an alleged theft
which occurred last evening, one of
the men being charged with picking
a wrist watch "from a local young
lady and attempting to sell it at one
'of the jewelry stores shortly after
wards- One of the men was arrest
ed about 9 o'clock last night and the
tether shortly after", it being thought
that they were operating as part
ners in the alleged theft game.
It is reported that one of the men
accosted the~young lady on the street
-t first shaking hands with her as
if he were a friend whom she had
seen for some time and then excus
ing himeslf for mistaking her for
some one he had known. During
the hand-shaking, it is reported, he
picked the wrist watch, the loss of
which was later noticed by the
young lady and reported to the po
lice.
The two men held in connection
with the theft are to he heard some
time today in municipal court, it is
understood-
BEMIDJI ELKS TO HAVE
TREE FOR NEEDY KIDDIES
Recent DefelopmA *s
Show Arr^rica's Plan
Progressing Rapidly
Sff
Senator Borah's Action Taken
A Positive Indication
OBJE CT OF AMENDMENT
France Said to be Displaying
More Conciliatory Attitude
Toward Negotiations
(F* United l*reM)
^v(ByHA L. Bradford)
Washington, Dec 22American
aid in solving Europe's economic
peril may bejnore extensively,, broad
casted than was first, contemplated
by President HardlngYnd Secretary
of State Hughes as the result of re
cent important international develop
ments. The entire? situation looking
toward American economic interven
tion was s[3-today by high officials
to be 'progressing favorable with the
possibility of a^defimte decision as to
just whaf the United States will do
likely to''come-in the new year.
Senator Borah's action in intro
ducing an amendment to the Naval
Appropriation bill, asking the presi
dent to call an economic conference
here, was taken as positive indication
that many of the "irreconcilables"
in the Senate who defeated the Ver
sailles treaty, now favor a return of
America to Europe irt order that bus
iness conditions there may be stab
ilized-
At the same time, information here
indicated that France was displaying
more of a conciliatory attitude in
the informal negotiations now pro
gressing tha4he of some of
'here statesmen would indicate, and
the opinion was expressed that she
would not act as a stumbling block
The Bemidji jEflks club (decided
Thursday night to hold a Christmas
tree in the Elks hall Monday morn-J
ing from 9 to 10:30 after which"
the childrenjvill be taken to the Elko-,
where a^efciat show will be giverf]*^*?^"
for their benefit.
The Elks plan on distributing
dandy, nuts and fruit to the poor
children who* will attend the Christ
mas tree exercises. Rev. Wm. El
liott of the Episcopal church is chair
man of the committee in charge-
BASKETBALL BENEFIT
DANCE ON TAP TONIGHT
The Firemen are staging a basket
ball benefit dance at the new armory
this evening. The opportunity pre
sented to secure exceptionally good
music and a five piece orchestra will
officiate, Dot Van, piano Joe For
rester, violin Johnny Lumberg,
trombone Walter Smith, cornet and
banjo and Percy Riggs, drums and
xjlophone. It is expected that there
will be a large attendance.
H~JV f
&
KIMS CLUB
TO AID NEEDY
Ladies Are Asked to Turn in
Jelly, Canned Fruit, Toys
and Books Saturday
Bemidji Kiwanians will care foi
ten needy families for Christmas
Day, according to action taken at
the noon-day meeting of the Bemidji
club Thursday. The Kiwanis ladies
are to have charge of the marketing
and preparation of the Christmas
baskets. Mrs. C- W. Vanderslius
has been named as chairman of the
ladies' committee to prepare the
baskets.
Ladies who have jelly, canned
fruit, toys or books which they can
spare at this time are urged to turn
them yi at the Elks club rooms Sat
urday before 2 p. m-. It is neces
sary that the ladies help as much as
posible, states Mrs. Vandersluig and
their assistance at this time will
surely be appreciated by the famil
lies to whom help is given.
Judge W. Stanton presided
over the meeting Thursday noon. T-
B. Elton of Grand Forks, who was
scheduled to be the principal speak
er, was unable to attend because of
the death of" his father. A message
of condolence was sent him by .the
Bemidji dub, as well as a floral tri
bute.
J. C- West, new president of the
club, reported for his committee re
garding the public playground pro
ject, further action to be taken at
the next meejng of the club- A five
piece orchestra furnished excellent
.music -throughout the-meeting.
John Claffy and T. J. Burke won
the attendance prizes, two $5,00
baskets to be delivered by them per
sonally to two needy famftiSi. In
case they are not delivered person
ally the winners fthe baskets are to
pay for the bsakets.
THIRTEEN FIREMEN HURT
I N N Y, APARTMENT"FIR*E
^New York, Dec 22Thirteen fire
men were injured itt a spectacular
fire that drove scores of apartment
house occupants to the street in
night clothing in the yVilMamsburg
section of Brooklyn early today.
Some of the' firemen were Injured
by a falling trolley wire which caus
ed explosions.
JAPAN SEES DANGER IN
FRENCH TREATY DELAY
Jap Statesmen Are Worried
Over France's Delay in
Adopting Navy Patts
By CLARENCE DUBOSE
Tokyo,- Dec. 22-Japanese states
men and officials are daily becoming
more worried over France's delay in
ratifying the naval reductidrt pacts
of the Washington Conference.
Some say frankly that they were
afraid the once seemingly great re
sults of the conference might become
a mockery, and the race for naval
strength commence all over again,
because of the course France has
pursued.
Thirteen hulks of Japanese war
ship% dismantled partially and in
some cases, completely, are anchor
ed in naval yards ready to be sunk
or junked as soon as the treaty is
ratified-
\x Construction upon four other
great fighting ships was suspended
[*&,
Bu the thirteen hulks could be
remantled with guns and construc
tion could be resumed upon the four
uncompleted super-dreadnattghts.
It all depends upon what France
does about the naval treaty.
The United Press has been told by
responsible officials here thai Japan
would' be Very sympathetic to a pro
posal that America, Britain and Ja
pan make a new agreement'and car
ry out their original naval reduc
tion commitments, in the event
Frnce rejects the treaty. But there
is considerable fear here that if
France rejects the treaty. But there
are to "carry on."
Meanwhile Japan is sitting tight,
and wonderingand seeing that
good care is taken of the thirteen
dismantled and semi-dismantled
hulks. i
fc*,
to" :h\
Toklo" dispatches announce the
appointment of Foreign Miniate*
Hanihara (shown above) as Japa*
nete ambassador to this country.
Bis will succeed Ambassador Said**,
banv
pi^NAuiciwraT
CONGRESS ESTABLISHED
Harding Establishes Precedent
Appearing Personally to
Deliver Messages
By THOMAS L. STOKES
(United Ffsaa Staff Corresponflent)
Washington, Dec. 22 (United
Press) -President Harding has
firmly established the precedent of
the chief executive appearing per
sonally before Congress for the de
livery of messages outlining the
plans and policies of the administra
tion.
By constant adherence during his
term to the custom revived by Pres
ident Wilson, the president is now
considered as having permanently
fixed- the face-to-face contact with
Congress.
"**There was a fleeting outcry among
the tradition-bound veterans of Con
gress when President Wilson broke
the precedent set in the first admin
istration of the government. Howev,
er, the opposition soon died away as
the country was seen to approve his
action. President Harding favored
(Continued on Page 8.)
LITTLE FALLS NARROWLY
ESCAPES SERIOUS FIRE
Little Falls barely escaped a ser
ious conflagration early Thursday
morning when fire, which was dis
covered at 1 a. m- in the basement
of the Commercial State Bank, was
put under control by exceptional
work on the part of the fire depart
ment before it had burned through
the floor above and broken out into
the main part of the building.
The block in which the bank is lo
cated is one of the central business
blocks of the city and its destruction
would have been a distinct loss. The
building damaged is the property of
the Kiewel Realty company. I
V-,
BEMIDJ I DAILY PIONE
BEMIDJI, MINN., FRIDAY EVENING, DEC. 22, 1922
HON ISFAR
BEM TODAY
N EDUCATION
ft
Schools Are Falling 'Behind,
Says Educational He ad
of United States
LESS OR EDUCATION
AND MORE FOR LUXU RY
John J. Tigert Draws Striking
Comparison With Amount
Spent for Luxuries
Washington, Dec, 22 (United
Press).This country is so far be
hind in providing educational facil
ities for its children that, "it is let
ting the school that was good enough
for our fathers suffice for the chil
dren of today," according to John J
Tigert, U- S. Coramisioner of Edu
cation.
"The present school building
shortage is nothing short of a dis
grace to the nation," Tigert said.
Among the defects cited by the
commissioner in an appeal for better
chool buildings are: Old, delapidated
structures, half of them dating back
more than 25 years serious conges
tion lack of necessary adjuncts for
a rounded education, such as gym
nasiums, shops, science and cooking
rooms.
"One school, building! fjor every
four nqw in use was built more than
34 years ago," Tigert declared.
"Hundreds of thousands of chil
dren are housed in portable, rented
buildings, stores and lofts. Thous
and more are sitting four or five
hours a day in badly lighted, inade
quately ventilated basements, three
feet or more below street level
"Only five per cent of all "the
school buildings BA4 at fire-proof
construction. Every week in the year
a school building is burned or part
ly destroyed.
"Seventy-five per cent of the ci
ties in 1920 reported congestion.
Hundreds of thousands are on half
time-
"These are unpleasant facts. But
they are facts that need to be stated
because the crisis is serious-"
Washington, Dec 22 (Capital
News Ser&lVe)."Education is the
(Continued on Page 8.)
MCINTOSH TEAM BEATS
CROOKSTdN LAST NIGHT
According to a report reach,
ing Bemidji today, the Mcin
tosh basketball team defeated
Crookston Company M. at Mc
Mclntosh last night by a score of
14 to 12, Mcintosh gaining the
deciding basket in the last few
minutes* of play1.
,5
Crookston's
account ot the gmme here Wed.
nesday night has not yet been
received in Bemidji' for some
reason or other, the Crookston
paper not being received here
today.
Arrives Today
European Situation May Be Extensive
BUTLER IS CONFIRMED
AS ASSOCIATE JUSTICE
(By United Press)
St. Paul, Dec 22Pierce Butler,
confirmed as Associate Justice of the
United States supreme court late
yesterday by the senate, will go to
Washington immediately after the
Christmas htohdays He wll take
office January 2nd.
Pierce Butler, Ji will assume his
father's position in the law firm here
which his fathei has headed for many
years- Mrs. Butler and their daugh
ter", Margaret, will accompany Mr.
Butler to Washington They leave
December 28th. Pierce Butler wijl
be the youngest member of the Sup
reme Court.
J^xr~**r Mother 6t*U Freed by Judge
Mrs. JDora Margowsky of New York City, who is 39 years~oW audi
Ike mother of 16 children, was discharged when bailed into court tor
-auegcov^violation of the education law. The mother proved her ability!
Ho rear and educate her family. Sere she Is shown teaching her younsest
phlld. Morris, to write, I
BURTO N IS OPPOSE O FARMERS' IFRS
WM DEBTCANCELATO N J^J VjrJJ
Member of International Debt lL/lll DlU IflEfCl
Funding Commission
is
Against Cancelation
Washington, Dec 22"The tax
payers of America and holders of
government bonds as well, will feel
reassurance from the announcement
of Congressman Burton, a member
of the International Debt Funding
Commission, that he is opgbseci to
cancellation," says, the* Republican
Publicity Association, through its
president, Jonathan Bourne, Jr. "He
is in accord with the spirit of the
law enacted by Congress.
"Within the unpleasant memory
(Continued on Page 8.)
t *s
*5fi
LS9c/i
State Federation of Farmers'
Club Will Hold Annual
Meeting at U. Farm
The Minnesota Federation of
Farmers' clubs will hold its annual
meeting at the University Farm on
Friday afternoon, January 5, during
Farmers' and Homemakers' Short
Course week. Representatives of
farm bureau units are invited by the
call, just issued by R- E. Olmstead,
farmers' club specialist, to take part
in the proceedings.
A. D- Wilson, member of the state
board of regents and former direct
of of agnculutral extension in Minn
esota, is president of the club fed
eration and will make the opening
address in answering the question:
"What Of The Farmers' Clubs?"
F. W. Peck, present director of ag
ricultural extension, will respond to
the question, "Is the Farmers' Club
Idea Right?"
Other speakers will be W- A. Pet
ers, agricultural agent in Wadena
county Samuel Hammerbeck of Lit
tle Falte, former president of the
federation Paul Johnslon, agricul
tural agent in Martin county E. V.
Ripley, leading farmei of Hubbird
county and R. E. Olmstead.
The annual conferenco of cream
ery managers and operatois will be
(Continued on Page 8.)
RED PLOT IS SEEN IN
EXPLOSIVE COAL STOCK
Parisians Frequently of Late
Have Experience of "Coal"
Blowing Stoves
By JOHN O'BRIEN
(I'nitetl Tress Staff Correspondent)
Paris, Dec. 22 When a Parisian
throws a shovelful of coal into his
stove these winter evenings he does
so in intrepidation. Is the coal go
ing to burn as nature intended, or
is the, blamed thing sudenly going to
explode, hurling pieces of the stove
to the four corners of the room? The
latter has happened forty or fifty
times irt the last few days in Paris,
with Similar infernal anthracite ac
tivity in many large cities of the
provinces.
The matter"'has gone to such a
point that "a committee has been
charged with the duty of conducting
an investigation and ordering crim
inal proceedings. Most of the ex
plosions have been caused by an ob
ject resembling a hand grenade and
the object of the investigation is to
disocver how the grenades came to
be placed in coal stocks all over
France. In one day there were
eight explosions of coal in Paris, one
at Rouen, two at Nantes
So far there is only one thing cer
tain. The deadly coal is Engli h,
none of it has come from Germany
or the French mines. Active sum.)
(Cujitiuued on Page 8.)
s
pq Inttesota: Fair tonight and
l^^tturday except prdhahly. an'oV
*!Mfl|irtheast portion tonight.
T^mewh'at colder in west tonight.
PRICE 3
SPLITTING UP
PROPERTYOF
COUNTY A JOB
Division of Property Betwe en
Beltrami and New County
Requires Much Time,
FIGURES OF AUDITOR
NEARLY COMPLETED
Will Likely Take Long Time
To Arrive at Right Sums
Due Both Counties
Division of county property be
tween Beltrami and the newly estab
lish Lake of the Woods ci/Jnty is a
matter which is to require much of
the time of the county boards of
both counties during the next several
months and it is quite probable that
a complete division of the property
will not be consummated before the
early spring. The large amount of
work to be done preliminary to the
final settlement is causirig thig sit
uation, it is understood.
County Auditor A. D. Johnson is
now completing a report which shows
the difference in the assets of Bel
trami county as the result of county
division. This report also shows the
difference in the amount of taxes
that will necessarily be levied for the
diminished county.
According to this report, the coun
ty nov has 1,227,238 acres of asses
sable land, as compared with 1,840,-
205 before the division. In addition
there are many acres of land in Bel
trami county which are not assess
able. The assessed valuation of the
county since being divided is $6,894,
050 as compared with 10,384,071 for
last year, before the new county was
formed-
The report also shows that the
total taxes levied for the diminished
Beltrami county amount to 1,071,-
973.67 which include state, county,
village, township, city and school
district. Of this amount, $177,050.
45 is levied against ditch lands to
pays taxes and interest on judicial
ditch construction. The total amount
of taxes levied last year for all pur
poses, including taxes against ditch
(Continued on Page 8.)
NEW ANGLE DEVaOPES
ON MCCUTCHAN MURDER
(By United Press)
Dickinson, N. D., Dec. 22Closing
its third day, the McCutchan murder
trial developed a new angle today
when witnesses told of a fierce bat
tle following the shooting of Walter
Inman at Amidon between Inman
and David McCutchan before the
former sank to the ground exhausted
from loss of blood
Three witnesses testifying for the
state corroborated the testimony and
told of the threats made by Mc
Cutchan to "get" Inman and others
who intervened in an effort to take
the gun away from him. McCutchan
is charged with first degree murder
in regard to the shooting.
KITTLESON BOY DIES
HOLD FUNERAL SATURDAY
Allen Kittleson, the one-year-oid
son of Mr. and Mrs- Helmer Kittle
son of Fifth ward, passed away on
Thursday and will be laid to rest
Saturday, the funeral arrangements
being under the direction of H. N.
McKee, funeral director.
Funeral services will be held at
the John Kittleson home, 508 Fourth
street, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'-
clock. Interment will be made
Greenwood cemetery.
ti#
j
in
OLDEST QUEBEC CHURCH
IS DESTROYED BY FIRE
(Br Uuu Press)
Quebec, Dec. 22The church of
Notre Dame De Lay Recouveranze,
oldest in the city, and many art
treasures were destroyed in a fire
that left the edifice a mass of ruins
early today.
For a time many well-konwn
buildings were in danger- They in
cluded Chauteau Frontenac, the Can
adia Pacific Railroad Hotel and
news.paper offices. The fire was be
lieved to have been incendiary.
Province detectives received
threatening letters several 'days ago
saying that the church, which was
the most beautiful in all Canada,
would be destroyed December 28th.
The blaze wa^ a climax of others in
^Canada recently which destroyed
chui ches.
JSJkn ~.ij& -1*5-

xml | txt