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The Elk Mountain pilot. [volume] (Irwin, (Ruby Camp), Gunnison County, Colo.) 1880-19??, August 19, 1880, Image 1

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The Elk Mountain Pilot.
. VOL. t.
L. F. W. FULLER.
' THOMPSON & FULLER,
■ Real Estate AgtsSc Mine Brokers
HAVE FOR SALE SOME OF THB
. BXJSl^sr^BSar-XrCXrS
•—IIT TOWN—•
'■ » ■■
100 D MINES NEGOTIATED. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
F. W. FULLER, NOTARY PUBLIC.
CORNWALL, CRAVEN & CORNWALL,
V. 8. DETUTT
MINERAL SURVEYORS,
ASSAYERS.
■ •ofeTiroM'.ros th« tow* or in win.
Irwin, Gunnison Co., - Colo.
FRANKEBERGER&TAfON,
Civil and MAning
. ENGINEERS
ANI) U. 8. »EPUTT
Mineral Surveyors . '
mwi AT*., BUST. NINTH ST., IRWIN.
—O -
rt«Tji II he<i lon* axparlrnr* in anrreTlng for jmtentt j
•ndadVfcrM claims In ami arumul Lcailrille, w« .elicit
'thMdftwMcb fif |m«M
this xic-mity. All wurk guaranteed. Ctf
■^OrUNDHRWOOD.
•▲mFIiZZiTG- and
ASSAYING,
RESULTS GUARANTEED IN ALL CASES.
IBWEsr, - COLQBADO.
J. Q. TV. KIISTCG”
Practical Sc Analytical
ASSAYEE,
■ Dealer In
MINES, REAL ESTATE,
KIlttNG MACHINERY »nJ ASSAYKBS’SCPPLIKS.
More examined anti reported upon.
Special attention to investments for non-rewMeuta
IRWIN GUNNISON 00., OOLO.
Qfflrw, Inwar end of Ninth St., cor avenua P, with llou.
Richard Irwin.
WALTER H.'GRAVES. "
OIVIIj BNaiNEEn
And li. 8. Deputy
MINERAL SURVEYOR,
date t|J the U. 8. Territorial Surrey.)
Cor. Ave. D. and Ninth St., Irwin.
Juno24lm*
“MRS. NEICA ROBINSONr
D ress Making|
PLAIN SEWING.
Tbwth St., Bet. Avenues E and D.
AU kinds of sewing solicited. C-lu*
JOHN M’CORMICK,
BUILDER
AND CONTRACTOR.
Bilhsslii ateAs and pUu drawn for nil hinds of
k nildlngs. jun<-24
JOB PRINTING!
PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL
Done on Short Notice at Pilot Ofiat.
Trunour
BJUBtmW
IT LOOS KESSKES
Nintk St, Below the Pootoftee, Irwin
HEMR Y EARLE,
Mining Engineer & Assayer,
IBWIX, GUNNISON 00., COLO.
f. h. Kellogg!,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
to*. NINTH ST. AND AVENUE F, RUBT CAMP
IRWIN P. 0., COLO.
DU
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law.
ASd'HiiiJng and Real Estate a SpoclaJtj."^:*
Ninth St., - - Ikwin, Colo.
0. r. ABERCROMBIE. G. A. HAWLEY.
ABERCOMBIE& HAWLEY,
j Attorneys $ Counsellors
OVER THE POSTOFFICE,
GGISrSTISOIT, - COLO.
8. a: BAKER. GEO. SIMMOXDS.
- .RAKSR&SIMMONDS,
*S~Hmxe Law a Specialtt.'Vß
OKTisriErrsoisr, - colo.
Hsfi-.IT L. K*p.r, Out. SHACKiLroan,
Gunnison, Oilo. Irwin, Colo.
Karr A Shackelford,
LAW YE It 8,
Gunnison, Colorado.
Win practice in the stTsrsl State and Feilerc-l Courts.
McMastcr Brown,
Attorneys«at«Zj*w,
Real Estate and Mining Agent,
JTTICE, MAIN ST., ABOVE BANK OF GUNNISON
GTTSTNTSON, - COLO.
4-1 w, _ _
b. wm. DouTHrrr,
(Late of ?au Fraiiduco, Cal.)
Attorney** t>Xiaw.
Over Ruby Home Restaurant,
lEWIU, - COLO.
Will obtain patents for mince, examine and ro|H>rt
n |>on titles, and ae to the condition of mines. Attcn
tKm sill lie given to securing title* to agricultural
lands. Will act as agent fur the imrcliaee and solo of
mines. Mining litigation a sjieculty
VARON HEIMS, DAN A. NOBLE.
Gunnison (Tty. Ruby Osap.
HEIMS & NOBLE,
ATTORNEYS!
AND NOTARIES PUBLIC,
junnison and Ruby, - Colo.
Z3r. 3D. O. Reid,
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON.
Irwin, Colo.
Real Estate and
MINING AGENCY.
MS" Choice Properties for Sale in Ruby
Mining District, and direct
from first hands.
REFERS TO BASK OF GUNNISON. GUNNISON,
COLO. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
RICHARD IR WIN,
Car. Ninth Street ui Inin D,
Irwin, Gunnison Co., Colo.
F.O.boxM.
GEO. W. PETTIT,
Real Estate, Insurance,
PnpHy Bwgkt, StW ud Ringed.
Notary Public.
Insurance writtn at fair rata.
i
i Opposite Bank, - Gunnon City.
IRWIN, (RUBY CAMP,) GUNNISON COUNTY, COLORADO, THURSDAY. AUGUST 19,
CRESTED BUTTE.
Situation ud Prospects of a Gec«on
Torn.
Speclll of Denver Times]
The interest which your readers
take in this embryo city, as manifested
by numerous letters of inquiry, in
duces me to send you some general
account of its location and prospects.
It will be«ssrp by reference to Hay
den’s (or other) map of Colorado that
it is, in the first place, more centrally
located in reference to the principal
mines of Gunnison county than any
other town. After once crossing the
continental divide going west,
whether We take one or the other of
the four principal passes, (Cotton
wood, Alpine, Monarch or Marshall),
the route thither is wholly on water
grade, and affords not only the easiest
and shortest wagon road, but also in
comparably the best railway route./
into the very heart of the silver and
coal mines of the county, and thence
onward through the Ute reservation
to Utah. That this is destined to be
the principal railway route no one at
all familiar with the topography of the
country can reasonably doubt. There
promises already to be a lively com
petition between at least two railroad
companies for the prior occupancy of
this favorite grade. But this town
must, in any event, become and
doubtless continue for some time to
be the western terminus. That it
will always lie the most important
town on the line on the road west of
the range is insured by its geograph
ical position and great natural re
sources, as well as by the varied in
terests and industries which necessa
rily center here. No one cognizant
of the facts relative to this place, and
familiar with the causes that contri
bute to the’ rapid and permanent
growth of our western mining towns,
hesitate to rank Crested Butte as the
“future great.” The richest mining
camps in this county, which means
(in all probability) the richest in the
State, are tributary to its trade, not
only in general merchandise and
mining supplies, but also of coke and
coal, of which she has at her very
doors an unbounded supply of the
finest quality. The advantages of her
position are such that a wholesale
merchant located here and carrying
any line of goods consumed in a
mining camp, could distance, beyond
competition, a rival located elsewhere;
and this would be equally true with or
without railroads. The most prom
ising mines so for opened in Gun
nison county are those of Ruby camp,
Redwell basin, Slate river, (both east
and west forks), and Washington
gulch. Now the whole scope of
country compromising these mining
camps is bowl-shaped; broken up of
course more or less by spars and peaks
and minor divides; but all draining
toward a common centre, the valley
of Slate river, where lies Crested
Butte, at its junction with Coal creek
and at an altitude of from one to
two thousand feet lower than the sur
rounding camps above mentioned.
Thus these towns and mines on the
outer rim of the bowl ate all easily ac
cessible by water-grade from Crested
Butte which is nearly equi-distant
from them all and is their natural ore
market and supply town as well as the
true smelting point for all this region.
It is well understood among the
miners of this section that a higher
net price can be realized for their ore
at Crested Butte than at Denver or
elsewhere in the State.
As might be expected from the
above facts the town is growing
rapidly, and the improvements which
are being erected are of a superior and
permanent character. The town
company is actively engaged in
grading streets, building sidewalks
and two saw-mills are running night
and day to supply the increasing de
mand for lumber, both for home use
and the neighboring towns. The sil
ver mines contiguous to town up both
Coal creek and Slate river, are being
steadily developed and look well.
Some of them are already bringing
considerable good ore to market.
The ore from these mines, although
not so fine a grade as much of the
Ruby add Gothic ore, is less refrac
tory, aqd lying in large bodies is
cheaply flixed. It carries, too, a large
per cent, of lead which fits it ad
mirably for treatment in connection
with the dry ores of the adjoining
camps. However it may be in some
other pvts of the country (where per
haps it ]§as unwisely sought to create
a fictitious “boom” by the flourish of
trumpets* there has been no disap
pointment here. On the contrary
both thefirospects for the future and
the results already achieved are em
inently satisfactory.
THAT HANGING.
The Gunnison News, in comment
ing on a recent publication in this
paper, opens its oracular' jaws thusly:
The Publisher has been imposed
upon, f o such hanging took place.
We have the particulars from a par
ticipant, and they are as follows: On
Sunday last some forty miners of
0,-Be-Joyful gathered to discuss the
propriety of locating a town at the
head of the gulch, in opposition to
the recently established Cloud City.
It was decided to locate the town site,
and then and there this story of lynch
ing was concocted, and on the follow
ing day taken to Ruby by one of the
' party, a Mr. Wells. The object was
to bring the gulch into notoriety.
The gulch is rich enough in minerals
to attract solid men, and it is poor
policy to descend to such subterfuges.
And there is no excuse for deceiving
an editor in this manner. The fact
that the name of the owner of the mules
and of the alleged executed man are
not given, is evidence that the story
was “cooked up,”
There is scarcely a word of truth in
all that is said in this pretentious and
-ridintlruft publication. Wc did not
get our information from Mr. Wells,
as stated, but did get it from the
guard who watched over the man who
was hung, and who assisted the next
day in hurrying him. The man who
“participated” in concocting a
canard “to bring the gulch into no
toriety” is very poor authority for
questioning the veracity of this press.
When it is said the miners’ meeting
was held for locating a town “in
opposition to the recently established
Cloud City," the animus appeal's of a
purpose to discredit the miners in the
upper end of the basin and build up a
town that has only had its existence
on paper for the last two weeks. The
“participant” in a confessed fraud
may gull that press for sinister pur
poses, but he can not deceive a
thoughtful public. He is unqestion
ably one of the projectors of the
famous Cloud City, which is six miles
removed from the main group of
mines, and can not expect to draw
its support from the head of the basin.
The seventy-five or one hundred
miners working in the upper end of
the basin, long before the fabulous
meeting spoken of, had selected a
beautiful location for a mining town
and which, since the lower location
has been dubbed Cloud City, we
suggest should be called Silver Lining.
Every cloud is said to have its silver
lining, and this constitutes its chief
hope and beauty. Possibly the
“participant” may tie interested in
decoying the grand jury by dubbing
the stubborn facts in this case a
“canard,” but we are the more in
clined to believe that the miners who
were interested in suppressing a
knowledge of the fact imposed upon
his marvelous credulty by discrediting
the fact of the hanging, especially as
they may have suspected that he lived i
in GunnLson, and, may be so, was a j
member of the bar. The News is not |
without authority for the decision it
so dogmatically makes. It may be
found in the records of a Dutch Mag
istrate, of Pennsylvania, when a party
was on trial for stealing sheep. Six
witnesses swore that they had seen the
prisoner feloniously take the sheep
from the owner, carry them off and
convert them to his own use. The
defendant then introduced twelve
burly Dutchmen who swore positively
that they did not see him do any such
thing. The justice held that the
weight of testimony was for the de
fense, “Kase twelve witnesses is so {let
ter as six, and the prisoner must pe
tischarged.” The “particiiiant” was,
one of twelve who did not see the
hanging, and the other eleven were
readily found in the editor’s imagina
tion.
A STOCK CHAPTER.
Behold the prospeector who wan
dereth over the face of the earth.
He traverseth the hills and pricketh
the barren mountains with his pick, j
The pangs of hunger gripe his!
bowels in the morning, and at night j
he lieth down with only a blanket to
cover him.
And the gray-backs come forth and
rend him.
And he lifteth up the voice of lamen
tation in the wilderness and cries aloud
to heaven :
“ Why has this affliction come upotl
me, and why do the terrors of hell
compass me round about?”
And while he sleeps the wolves de
vour his substance.
And when he fmdeth the croppings
lie diggeth in the ground and tacketh
up the location notice on a board.
Then he hieth to the valley and
saith to the capitalist:
“ Hearken unto me, for I have
struck it big.
“ Here are the samples from the
ground, arid behold the gold maketh
lousy the rock with richness.”
And the twain return, to find others
toiling upon the claim.
And the prospector graspeth his gun
saying:
“ Get ye gone from here, for it is
holy grouhd.”
And a fire coming out of the bush
smites him on the Liip, and he calls
with a loud voice :
“I am done for; pull off my boots.”
And they hasten to take off Ins
boots, and the fragrance of his socks
reacheth unto heaven.
And he gives up the ghost, and is
gathered to his fathers.
And behold others work the mine,
and they float the Mock in. the cities of
the valleys.
And all buy thereof. The washer
women, who worry the raiment of the
wealthy, the clerks who measure tape,
and the impoverished deviis who write
for the press.
Let us get in before the boom com
eth ; and then the assessment is levied,
and they cry aloud :
“What thing is this that cometh
upon us?” and no one can answer
them.
And with one accord they all pun
gle, saying, “This is the last.”
And in sixty days another call from
the main office comes unto them, and
they rend their clothes and blaspheme
mightily.
And the insiders make merry, one
with another, saying:
“ Behold, this hole in the ground
will bring great riches.” And the
superintendent writeth another letter,
proclaiming the wealth of the west
cross-cut.
“ Behold, the breast is in ore, and
and the stopes drop fatness.
“ The bonanza cometh in on the
south side, and chlorides proclaim
their greenness.”
And the stockholders lift up their
noses and say :
“ Behold, we smell the dividends
close at hand.”
And they hold on even until the
voice of the caller in the board pro
claimed not the name of their stock
unto them, and they are sore troubled
and say among themselves:
“Arc not they the deceivers of
men?”
And they curse the day that they
were bom, and cry aloud : i
“Where are these men? lotus'
| lay hands upon them and smite them.” j
And they searched diligently among j
the habitations of the money changers, j
and find them not.
Because they are in the country of j
the Gauls, making merry at the chief j
capitol.
And they return not, and the mine j
remains a hole in the ground, two:
fathoms deep, unto this day.
Harken ye to the voice of wisdom,
and observe diligently the words of
the prophet.
That thy name may be great in
' Israel, and thy possessions increase
upon the earth.
♦ 1
Freight from South Arkansas to 1
• Gunnison is two cents per pound.
» i
SILVER DEPOSITS.
It seems that many persons wl.ot
have recently engaged in mineral
i speculations in New York need some
! information concerning the natural
! formation, or deposit, of silver bear
: ing ores. There are at least two gen
eral kinds of these formations, which
may be sub-divided as follows:
ist —Th* tfue fissure, and
and—The stratification, or blanket*
The first, as its name indicates, is a
fissure in and through the crust of the
earth, varying from a right angle with
the surface of the earth to a dip or in-'
cline of several degrees; but again, as 1
the name indicates, a true fissure is a
continuous formation ot ore, between
walls, of country rock, commonly
called hanging and foot walls. The
pfesiimption is that the true fissure for
mation extends toward the centre of
the esrth lor an ui known depth, cer
tainly more than 3,000 feet, because
true fissure silver bearing veins have
been followed even lower than this,
and ores taken therefrom at a profit.
True fissure silver bearing veins gen
erally bifurcate either near the earth’s
surface or lower down. It may he
here remarked that a true fissure silver’
bearing vein ol an average width of
two feet of pay ore, averaging sixty
ounces of silver bullion to the ton at'
ore, situated, say in the State of Colo
rado, not too remole from a railroad,
will pay a good profit to the investor,
but mines in that with a nar
rower pay streak and with less bullion
per ton, are now made to pay well.
A true fissure silver bearing vein, sub*
ject to the above conditions, is moie
reliable in its yield of profit than a
good eastern farm. Of course, there
are many veins much wider, and with
richer ore than that above indicated,
and* which give increased promfoTne
operator. The operator of a trie fis
sure silver bearing vein can almost to
a certainty tell to-day just how much
ore he will mine to-morrow, or on the
tenth day therefrom, because of its
unvarying regularity in yield.
The second kind of ore deposits
under consideration known as the
blanket or stratification deposits are
almost wholly confined to Leadville,
Colorado, and its vicinity. As their
name implies, they consist of stratifi
cations somewhat similar to the coal
measures of our country, although of
course not nearly so extensive either
generally or locally. These deposits
are also called silver bearing carbo
nates, and are found in both a hard
and soft condition. In fact, some of
these silver bearing carbonates arc as
soft as mortar ready for the walls.
The grand difference between these
stratified carbonates and the true fis
sures is permanency, while the blanket
deposits were and are yet to some ex
tent immense in quantity, much of the
ore is very low grade. They have the
advantage of being cheaply worked,
yet they do not seem to have given
satisfaction to those who have invested
in them. As has teen already re--
marked, the object of the writer is
merely to give to those who are not
acquainted with mineral formations,
a little information concerning the
two general kinds of deposits of silver
bearing ores, and while, although the
writer is of the opinion that the true
fissure formations are entirely reliable
as producers of bullion, lie does not
i wish to be understood as condemning
j wholly the stratification or blanket dt
' jiosits. They are good so far as they
j go, but without doubt the true fissures
! of Nevada, Arizona and Colorado, es
| pecially in the San Juan region, and
! the Llk Mountain country of the last
! mentioned state are safer investment,
j — Exchange, N. V
j S. Cullom & Co., the popular Tenth
' street merchants, have purchased the
! building recently occupied by J. E.
Black & Co., and moved their im
mense stock of groceries, hardware
and general merchandise into the
same. The building is situated on
Tenth street, east of avenue E.
j Bullion in the bank* of England
1 has decreased 391,030 pounds the past
week.
l
NO. 16.

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