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The Elk Mountain pilot. [volume] (Irwin, (Ruby Camp), Gunnison County, Colo.) 1880-19??, August 26, 1880, Image 1

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The Elk Mountain Pilot.
TOL. u
JL R. THOMPSON. F. W. FULLER.!
THOMPSON & FULLER, !
Real Estate 'Ag’tsfc Mine Broket
J v
HAVE FOR SALE SOME OF THE / <
•EEBJST BUSIITBSS XiOTS i
f
-T.TST TOWIET*— *
.1. * •
%
30(B) 1188 NEGOTIATE). /"' CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
4 '
r. W.FOI.&R, NOTARY PUBLIC.
CORNWALL, ,
'
C&iNWAtL.
•«
Surveyors! i
4LZ«nD IABSATIEna I
|wro»M roK tub towb or ibwut. j
Irwin, Cunnison Co., - Colo.
FRANKEBERGER & EATON, "<!
Clril and Mining
ENGINEERS
AMD IT.l T . ».:»EPFTT
Mineral Surveyors .
HIT ATa,:*UBT. SIXTH ST, IBWIH*
0
Raving bid •xporitnr# In ■niTtyfog for potent* j
•fididvimrliinii in md around Lead*ilia, wo •elicit j
Ui# patronagt of jmrti*** wishing work of that kind in
this ridaitjr. All work guaranteed. ttf
Zsu.iLmmm~
ABB
ASSAYING,
RSSCLTB GCAKANTEED.IN^AU^CASIB.®
lEVnU, - COLORADO.
J. Q. A. KING,
* Practical Ac Analytical 5
ASSAYER,
. OwlfT to—-
MINES, REAL ESTATE,
atownra maci|inkrt m<) assayeus’ supplies. ;
•On*, .xunlned 4iid reported upon. i
t>p*tiitl atteiitiou to invotiurnt* for uiin-rc*ileiiti
IK WIN GUNNISON CO., COLO.
OOC, lowar end of Ninth St, cor areoo. I), with lion.
Eichard Irwin.
WALTER H. GRAVES.
a
OIVIIi SNGINSim
Aad l'. S. IVpnty
MINERAL SURVEYOR,
(Lata 4 tbaJT. S. Tarritoriaipureey.)
Cor. Ave. D. and Ninth St., Irwin.
Jnna24ftn*
MRS. NEICA KOBINSON,
Dress Making
} AND
PLAIN SEWING.
Tbitth St., Bet. Avenues E and D..
All kindi of ■• wine aolldted. 6-1 m*
~ JOHN M’CORMICK,
builder
AND CONTRACTOR. |
j
ao4 plaas drawn for ill kind* of
fcaiMiafli J ulie 24
JOB PRINTINGS
PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL
Dm on Short Notice a Pilot Oftco.
TcnsTXoajr
Nimiwim
1 • • T- '5 *' i
. run mm
NtMh », Wow Hm PuSlpH, Inrm
»■ l j*. i
f. h. Kellogg;
Aitornwmd Counsellor at Law,
•08. AND AVENUE T, BURY CAMP
|| T'TjlwN P. 0., COLO.
1 DUNN & MALONEY,'
j Attorneys and Counsellors at Law.
BV'Mluiug and Baal Estate a Specialty.-'CS 0
i Ninth St., * - Irwin, Colo.
j 0. I*. ABEBCBOHBIB. G. A. lIAWLET.
‘ ABERCOMBIE & HAWLEY,
Attorneys Sf Counsellors
* THE POSTOFKICE,
qMgjjpfisoy. - colo.
1 B. BAKER. GEO. SIMMOXDS.
BAKER A SIMMONDS,
L^WYIEIRS,
43*Mixin« Law a SrEciai.Tr."%B
a-XTLT3SriSOLT, COLO.
llknrt L. Kakr, Char. Shackelford,
CtmuiHon, Colo. Irwin, Colo.
Karr <s• Shackelford,
LAWY-SRS,-.
Gunnison, Colorado.
WOI practice in the MTeral State and Fedtn.l Canrta.
McMaster $ Brown,
Attornoys*at*li(tw,
Real Estate and Mining Agent,
JfTICE, MAIN Sf, ABOVE BANK OF GUNNISON
GUNNISON, - COLO.
4-1 in,
' D.WM. DOUTHffT, ”
C ()j*?e of San Fraud bc<), Cal.)
Attorno y«a t-Ia a w .
Over Ruby Home Restaurant,
ISWIN, - COLO.
Will ol'tain patents for mine*, examine and rnport |
i|*»n titl***, and ux to the condition of ini m*s. At ten- J
uon will he given to etn uriirg tith* to agricultural *
tamla. Will act a* agent for the purchase and sale of
liniuee. Mining litigation a specialty
iAKOK HKIMS, DAK A. NOBLE.
G uji niton City. Ruby Camp.
HEIMS & NOBLE,
ATTORNEYS’!
AND NOTARIES PUBLIC,
junnisoji md Ruby, - a Colo.
33b. H. C. Reid,
PHVSICtAN and SURGEON.
# Irwin, Coi.o.
Ileatl Estate and
MINING AGENCY.
<
Choic*Properties for Sale in Ruby
MisSkg District, and direct -
from first hands.
BEFE9» TO BANK OF GUNNISON, GUNNISON,
COLO. OBRRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
RICHARD IR WIN,
| *dOioth Street and Avenue D,
Irwin,Gunnison Co., Colo.
'P. 0. box S 9. ,
I «
GEO. W PETTIT,
Real Estate, Insurance,
Ftyetty Beagbt, Seld aid Maiaged.
Notary Public.
Insurance writen at fair rates.,
Oppodte Bank, Gunnison City.
Rentehaw Sf Smith,
Contractors
and. Builders.
UtflMATla FURNISHED.
OOUBPOBDIBUE SOUCITOA
and Nilh Btraat, wm Swr Mm.
U*te
IRWIN, (RUBY CAMP,) GUNNISON COUNTY, COLORADO Lf 36, r«e.
AN EXPERT WHO DID'NT
THINK GUNNION WAS
GONE.
The following is a portion of a
from Col. J. D. Hen
to the Leadville Herald:
"^^■l of the Gunnison few
the extent of that
of Colorado, and are not
that it extends from the Roaring
j Fork to the Reservation, and from the
Continental divide to the Grand—em
bracing in its scope the grandest col
lection of mining districts, camps and
towns evei formed in a like extent of
temtory. The original mining cen
ter, fouiided in June, 1879, is Irwin, or
as generally called, Ruby, is to-day
the liveliest town in the district, and
has an actual resident population of
one thousand, with a camp of over
three thousand within a radius of three
miles. No mining town has been
built up with such lightning-like ra
pidity, and no camp has developed an
equal amount of grand, tme fissure
paying mines. The town which last
winter boasted of but a few log cabins,
now presents the handsomest appear
ance of any of equal age in the state,
and with its crowded streets and bust
ling trade reminds the new comer that
it is the center of trade of the richest
mining camp in Colorado. It now
boasts of six saw mills, all crowded
with orders, and has a first class
smelter and stamp mill building, that
will ere the “ ides of November,” be
in full blast. Among the principal
mines in the camp are the Ruby Chief,
the first mine located and® bonded for
i a short time for one hundred thousand
dollars, six thousand dollars cash,
Howard Extension, regarded as a two
hundred thousand dollars bonanza,
Old Shiek, equally valuable, Perhaps,
Bullion King, Chloride Deposit, Silver
Hill, Maud Ashbrook, Philadelphia
Belle, Hopewell, Pulpit, Romance,
Eureka and Happy Chance, all repre
sentative mines that will prove verita
ble bonanzas to their fortunate owners.
The Forest Queen is too well known
to require particular mention, as is also
the Ruby King. Next we have the
Independence, bought recently by
Governor Tabor for sixty-five thou
sand dollars, with the Little Elsie and |
its extension, the Ten Broeck. All j
are first-class, thoroughly developed j
alone would give tone and !
character to a district twice the extent
jof this. In adjfeion to this grand
| array of genuine paying mines, the
district embodies Elk, Oh,-Be-Joyful,
Peeler and r£dwell basins, al[ seamed
with'veins of the greatest value, and
teemVg with mines, prospecting and
developing the mountain treasure
houses with which they are sur
rounded.
In fact, such is the extent and value j
of the mines already opened, that the
district in general, and the city in par
ticular, offers greater inducements to
the capitalist than any your corres
pondent has yet seen in the stasd ; and |
one vear hence will witness the ’fact
v . 1
that the Gunnison will have no portion |
of its vast mineral domain more bigh-j
ly appreciated by the mining magnates j
of the east.
CRESTED BUTTE.
This gem of the valley, is without
doubt the prettiest town of its size in j
the county, and boasts of a population I
of over four hundred, with over a;
thousand witjpn a radius 'of three j
miles. It is quite.an agricultural, as
well as mining oentre, and having a j
forty ton smelter, and a first class saw j
mill within its limits, has a trade, that j
the large stores on her well graded |
streets are living proof of its value. |
The hotel —the Forest Queen House i
—John Qaddon, proprietor, is a credit j
to the ptlce, and is doing a business;
commensusate with its management.!
Surrounded as the town is with the
finest bituminous coal, it has extra ad- j
vantages as a smelting point, wjiich j
we are informed eastern capitalists
! propose to utilize.
j
Frank Keppler, better known as;
“ Old Frenchy,” was burned to death:
by the the explosion cf a kerosinej
lamp, in the hospital, at Silver Cliff, [
s~ d
GOLD AND SILVER PRODUC
TION.
Mr. Sherman, Secretary of the
Treasury, told the New York Chamber
of Commerce at its anniversary dinner;
in May, that "it is now established;
that the mineral resources of our
country are greater than the wildest!
imaginings of a few years ago.” The!
J Secretary evidently felt in a romanc- j
j ing mdbd, since the phrase " wildest \
imaginings ” is one that at some time i
or other must be subjected to the re-1
straint of a limitation. We have had i
! a gold era in this country, beginning!
jin 1848, and our silver era began in'
1861. .In the days of the great gold
discoveries, which occurred almost
simultaneously in California and Aus
tralia, apprehensions of a fall in the
price of gold were freely expressed.
But experience still showed that all
such fears were baseless. It is nearly
twenty years since the discoveries of
silver, and the Washoe region began
to attract attention. In 1863, 3,000
silver mining companies had been or
ganized in San Francisco, with a nomi
nal capital of a thousand million dol
lars, and with 30,000 share holders.
Mr. Samuel B. Ruggles, of New
York city, when a delegate to the In
ternational Monetary Conference, ad
dressed a letter to the Conference, and
ventured the opinion that " long be
fore 1900, the annual production of
gold and silver in this country, which
is now about $100,000,000, may reach
$300,000,000, or, perhaps, $400,000,-
000.” But the United States do not
yet produce $100,000,000 annually in
gold and silver both.
The notorious fact is, if that is what
they are delving for, that American
mines do not pour out their treasures
! like oil wells. The hope and stay is.
j rested more on the discovery of new r
mines tban-in the working of old ones.
Even the present amount of either
gold or silver production is ,&swhere
equal to the increasing commercial
necessities of the age. We may con
sider it a fortunate thing if the pro
duction of the precious metals is equal
to the urgent demands for currency.
Large as the present estimates seem
concerning the outcome of all the
: American mines, they are meager, and
| will be found so, in comparison with
j the increasing demand for them,
jWe need have no fears of anything
j like over production, and may push
|on with our mining enterprises with
all the energy and faith that are bred
of an actual knowledge by the light
I of experience. —Boston Economist.
! A sensation was created a few days
1 ago by the announcement of a rich
mining strike in a Mexican Village,
Las Placitas, about 30 miles distant
from Santa Fe. The village is built
jot adobe huts and corrals, and the
foundations of the houses are rock.
Prospector Jesse Martin detected min
eral in this rock. He pounded up and
hammered some of it, getting a rich
result in gold. He located the streets
jof the town whence the gold rock
I was taken, anti had assays made with
j the result of $4,600 of gold to the
! ton, the lowest grade of rock assayed
being $43. Gov. Lew Wallace has
just returned from the place. He
pacM off a lead, making it 84 paces
iin width. Its length is not known,
; but 9000 feet along the vein has been j
| located. Subsequent assays in Santa
[Fe give from $3,000 to $6,000 per
ton. The whole village is built on a
I ledge, and rock worth three dollars
‘per pound has been thrown out as
! worthless. _
I Mr. Tenase, of Hardscrable, Custer
j county, Colo, went to Paris to see j
I the sights. Mr. Tenase had herded
I cattle in the Hardscrabble for twenty
i years and had amassed a fortune. He
I took with him SIO,OOO when he went 1
!to Europe. One his way to Paris he
j made the acquaintance of three line
j fellows, one of whom asked Mr. Ten
ase to keep some money, and bq
stuffed it into his satchel along with
i $9,000 of his own. When Mr. Tenase j
j reached his hotel he looked into his ’
| valise and found a few coppers only.
His traveling companions had changed
I valises, for oftimes valises are very,
{much alike. ;
SENATOR JONES,
The jolly politico-economist, from
Nevada, who visited Colorado last
summer, and took an interest in about
i seventeen thousand of our mines—at
j least so the report ran at the time—
! has been victimized by an English
j newspaper man with a talent for hand
| ling the ipng-bow of his and Jones’
! ancestors. According to a Liverpool
i paper Jones is one of the four very
j rich men of this mundane sphere,
j ” The poorest of these is his Grace
j the Duke of Westminster, whose in
j come is at a year.
; Taking it at that sum, the amount
which tW Duke can spend without
intrenching on his capital is a
day, an hour, and J~ 110 s a
a minute. The next man in the as
cending scale is the Senator from Ne
vada, whose income is valued at ex
exactly one million sterling, giving
him the right to spend, if he likes,
i fiz a minute out of his revenue. The
head of the Rothschild family comes
next, with a yearly income of two
millions.” “ Now the result of that
publication,” says Jones, “is that
every mail brings me a stock of beg
ging letters, many of them in the
German language, and all couched in
congratulatory terms. Such absurd
publications do no good, and cause
many innocent-minded people to
spend mopey off postage stamps for
nothing. If I strike another bonanza
at Rico they m;fy hear from me, but
not till then.”
REAL AND SHAM MINING.
A valued corres|xmdent who has
just returned from the Gunnison
country says the district is bearing the
blame of what is really the fault of the
miners. Nineteen-twentieths of the
prospectors have no idea of mining,
ljut only prospect in search of hojes to
. sell. Very few prospect holes are
, deeper than ten feet, and no serious
attempt at development has been
Thil sort of work will, of
course,end in general disappointment.
No matter liqw good the country may
be, tk*re are toot capitalists enough in
the y lb buy up all the prospect
holes in #hich mineral may be found,
and a large proportion of the pros
pectors will have to go into winter
quarters penniless and hungry, with
their prospects on their hands. Pros
\ pectors who want to make money will
• dismiss from their minds the idea of
selling their prospect holes, and will
work their mines with a view of sell
ing ore. Ore is an article.-which never
fails to command a market.— Leadville
Circular.
CALIFORNIA AND COLO
RADO.
From the San Francisco papers we
learn that the census returns from all |
the counties in the state excepting
Mariposa, give a population of 858,- j
808, against 555,678 in 1870. The i
population of Mariposa county in j
1870 was 4,572, and, as this county is
j expected to show a slight increase, the j
i population of the Golden State will
exceed 863,000, a gain of over 303,-
*
600 since 1870.
By glancing over the census returns
i for Colorado, which are all in, it is j
j seen that ten years ago there were j
| only 5,000 more people in the entire j
' state than there are now in Denver 1
f€ t
I alone. Then . Jlorado enumerated
j 39,864 souls. Now she can boast of
! a population This is an i
j increase ef 155,297 in ten years. The .
estimated voting population of Colo
rado is 99,427. *
N. P. Turner and Geo. L. Patrick,
|of Texas, on the 16th inst., uncover-j
j ed on the Golden Eagle claim, in the j
jSangre de Cristo range, near Silver!
j Chff, the richest vein of mineral yet!
I found in that vicinity. It has twelve j
l inches of solid galena, a six inch vein
of quartz carrying gray copper and
pyrites of copper, lying on the galena,
and a six inch vein of lead carbonates
lying on top of the quartz. It is in
i place and in quantity, and is consid
ered one of the biggest strikes made j'
|in the district. They will put on a j
| large force of men and commence j
shipping immediately. j 1
•>
THE SAME IN IRWIN.
Patience in regard to postal affair*
as conducted in Colorado has ceased
to be a virtue. There is no sort ol
dependence to be placed upon the
mails. You dispatch a letter to Silver
Cliff. Four days later you arrive in
Denver, via Leadville, in time to take
your epistle out of the miih Daily
exchanges arrive three or fotir at a
time. Occasionally a couple of week
lies of different dates, turn up in tke
same mail, as if the authorities had
not thought it worth their while to
forward a single paper at a time. Com
plaints are universal, and the cause
is unceasing. Between points con
nected by railroads or stage-coaches,
whose runnings are as regular as
clock work, there is no sort of expla.
nation, except gross negligence and a
sheer disregard for the public interest.
A copy of the Inter-Ocean, with this
paragraph marked, is forwarded for
the information of the Postmaster
General. Tire regular copy which is
sent to the Executive Mansion, will
also be adorned with curved lines
made by a blue and red leadpencil.—
Denver *lnter- Ocean.
A FACT.
During the past week we have met
several persons who just came from
the Gunnison, and from the manner
these people talked it is evident they
were suffering with a sever attack of
dyspepsia, for certainly no man who
is well physically and mentally could
condemn a section of the country aS
large as the Gunnison because they did
not " strike it rich.”. The Gunnison
may have been overestimated, but
there is fine mining propertyin Gothic,
Irwin, Crested Butte and Roaring
: Forks districts. But those people
who intend to go to a new country
1 like the Gunnison, San Juan, or any
new camp, and expect to ride in Pull
-1 man cars, stop at hotels like the Psjra
er house, better remain at home,
f These mining camps don't wish to Sec
them; and they always prove a burden
instead of an assistance to any camp.
—Denver Mining Review.
0 + + -■■■>
TRUE.
If a man has a claim he thinks vala*
able he ought to stay with it and do
something towards its development—
not go off spending his time looking
for something better. Locating* a
' claim and then leaving it is no way to
! build up a camp. Men are short*
! sighted to leave a ledge that prosj<ectS
well to look for something richer. Be«
■ sides they stand in the way of other*
and retard development. Men who
do not think enough of their claims to
work them, and -will not allow other
men to do so, are stumbling blocks in
the way of development. They are
\ dogs in the manger, and should not
jbe tolerated. The man that locates
j claims he will not work, stands in the
j way of others, and waiting for the la*
: bors of others to make his locations
; valuable, is a nuisance that ought to
i be abated. —Homer Mining Index ,
THE EDITOR.
If an editor omits anything, he ($
lazy; if he speaks of anything as it is,
; people are mad ; if he smooths down
; th£ rough places he is bribed ' K if he
| calls things by their proper names, he
! is unfit for the position of an editor]
; if he does not furnish his readers with
! jokes, he is stupid ; if he does, he is a
raltlehgad, lacking .stability; if he
; condemns the wrong, he is a good
fellow, but lacks discretion J if he lets
wrongs and injuries go unmentioned,
he is a coward ; if he indulges in per
j sonalities, he is a blackguard ; if he
i does not, his paper is dull and’insipid.
| In short, if he edits a paper properly
and sticks to truth and facts, he is a
fool, and don’t know how to edit a
paoer half as wel) as he readers could.
—Ex. * -jw*
. - —— ■■ « « JMEL
Owing to the crop m&ements, the
demand for standard silver dollars in*
creased the orders, the 16th inst.,
g 58,000, the largest amount ordered
in day for more than a year.
Heavy frosts formed in New York
on the night of tKe r6fh hwt.
NO. .it..

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