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The Elk Mountain pilot. [volume] (Irwin, (Ruby Camp), Gunnison County, Colo.) 1880-19??, September 09, 1880, Image 1

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The Elk Mountain Pilot.
VOL. i.
L. R. THOMPSON. # F. W. FULLER.
THOMPSON & kIJLLER,
Red Estate Ag’ts&kine Brokers
HAVE FOR SALE , *«
BEST ZBTTSIUSnESS LOTS
IIEsT TOWXsT
■»
500 D MINES NEGOTIATED. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
F. W. FULLER, NOTARY PUBLIC.
CORNWALL,
CRA YEN $
CORNWALL.
V. S. DEPUTY MINERAL
Surveyors,
AND ASSATXSRS
SURVEYORS FOR THE TOWN OF IRWIN.
Irwin, Gunnison Co., - Colo.
FRANKEBERGER & EATON,
Civil and Mining
eistgusteeks
AND U. 8. DEPUTY
Mineral Surveyors.
RUBY AVE.,>RUBY. NINTH ST., IRWIN*
0
Having had long oxpsrienca In surveying for patents
and adverse claims in and around Leadville, we solicit
the patronage of parties wishing work of that kind in
this vlMnity. All work guaranteed. 6tf
WALTER H. GRAVES^
CIVIL ENaiNEEn
And U. S. Deputy
MINERAL SURVEYOR,
ft.ute oj the U. S. Tcriitorial Survey.)
Cor. Ave. D. and Ninth St., Irwin.
june24lm*
JOHN M’CORMICK,
BUILDER
AND CONTRACTOR.
F.f-tlmates mode aud plans drawn for all kinds of
buildings. june‘24
JOB PRINTING!
PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL
Done on Short Notice at Pilot Office.
TTISriOLT ~
BAKERY & RESTAURANT
BY LOUIS KENNKJES
Ninth St, Below the Postoffice, Irwin
COLORADO IfS CO,
IRWIN, oOXjO.
DEALERS IN ALL T&S
Daily and Weekly Newspapers, Blank
Books, Stationery, Wall Paper
/
And Cigars and Tobacco
Pipes and Smokers’ Sundries in
every variety. We have
IN THE STATE. *
Ninth St.,
Above the Bank.
BANK OF GUNNISON.
Sam. A. Gill, E. P. Jacobson,
Cashier. Vice-President
H. A. W. Tabor, President.
HOURS: 9A.M.TO4P.U.
*• ' *
Do a Oaoctal Baaklnrmnd CWkstfsa BasioMs. Bay
and DU Baiihiiri ua oil taißaflM PriM fitsta aad
MaasM
F.H. KELLOGG,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
tOB. NINTH ST. AND AVENUE F, RUBY CAMP
IRWIN P. 0., COLO.
dunnTmalonTy,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law.
BJ-Mining and Beal Eetate a Sjveclaltjr.'^se
Ninth St., - - Irwin, Colo.
O. P. ABERCBOHBIE. g7jL HAWLEY.
ABERCOMBIE & HAWLtY,
Attorneys Sf Counsellors
OVER THE POSTOFFICE,
GUNNISON, - COLO.
3. H. BAKER. GEO. SIMMONDS.
BAKER & SIMMONDS,
LAWYERS,
Air Mining Law a Sfeciai.ty.“®B
C3-TJXsrxrXSO2iX, - COLO.
Heset L. Kaeb, Chas. Shackf.i.fohd,
Gunnison, Colo. Irwin, Colo.
Karr Shackelfordl,
LAWYERS,
Gunnison, Colorado.
Will practice in the eereral State and Federol C#urte.
McMaster $ Brown,
Attorueys>at-Ziaw,
Real Estate and Mining Agent.
JB'FICE, MAIN ST., ABOVE BANK OF GUNNISON
GUNNISON, - COLO.
4-lm*
R WM. DOUTHITL
(Late of San Francisco, Cr.l.)
Attorney-a t-liaw.
Over Ruby Home Restaurant,
IRWJhsT, - COLO.
Will obtain patents for mines, examine and roport
ipon titles, and as to the condition of mines. Atten
-11 on will be gtveu to securing titles to agricultural
tends. Will act as agent for the purchase and sale of
1 mines. Mining litigation a specialty
" AARON HEIMS,
ATTORNEY!
AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Gunnison and Ruby, - Colo.
Dr. XI. O. Reici,
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON.
Irwin, Colo.
Real Estate and
MINING AGENCY.
I®" Choice Properties for Sale in Ruby
Alining District , and direct
from first hands.
REFERS TO BANK OF GUNNISON, GUNNISON,
COLO. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. *
RICHARD IR J YIN,
Cor. Niatli Shell and Avenue D,
Irwin,Gunnison Co., Colo.
P. 0. box 39.
GEO. W. PETTIT,
Meal Estate, Insurance,
* Hfeity taght, Slid ud Muagri.
Notary Fublio,
JttSurance writen at fair rates.
Opposite Bank, - Gunnison City.
Renshaw S' Snlith,
C ontractors
and Builders.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED.
OOUUSFOXDEECE SOLICITED:
Shop Mmn Eighth aad Ninth Hntl, mv Saw WUI.
UHai
IRWIN, (RUBY CAMP,) GUNNISON COUNTY- COLORADO, THURSDAY, SEPT. 9 . iSSo.
THE (???) AND BURIAL OF OURAY.
He Ruw in Which the lie Chief Was
Aeeoipnied to the Happy Hunting
Gncnils by His Horses.
■ i /
u tbiSaceeTs^
of Ouray, What is Thought of Hia. Etc.
Special to the Denver Tribune,
Southern Ute Agency, Colorado,
August 25, 1880. —As I telegraphed
you yesterday, Ouray, the great Chief
of the Ute Indians, died. Your cor
respondent and several others went
immediately to his tent to tender their
sympathy and services, but upon ap
proaching they were waved away by
his friends, who would not allow us
even to look upon his remains. In
one hour they had wrapped him in
his blankets, tied them on one of his
ponies, which was led by an Indian
on horseback, and followed by his
wailing and deeply-distressed squaw,
Chipeta, and by four other Indians,
who were driving four of the dead
Chiefs best horses to be killed at his
funeral.
THE PROCESSION
moved quietly away down the Pine
river, to some secret spot, unknown,
and perhaps forever untraceable,
where he was buried. It may not be
generally known to your readers that,
upon the death of one of their number,
these Indians kill a portion of their
horses and other stock, burn their
houses or tents, with all their contents,
together with their guns and other
in order thaLwhen he
reaches
the “happy Hunting grounds’ 1
he may have the necessary outfit and
supplies for his use and enjoyment
there. It is well that Ouray died
away from his comfortable home in
the Uncompahgre valley, which was
well furninshed, and containing much
silver plate and other valuables, all of
which would have been burned and
sacrificed to this strange superstition
of the race. It is even now rumored
that immediately after his burial his
squaw left for their home, determined
to carry out such a purpose.
When Ouray was found to be seri
ously ill the Ute commission took
prompt steps to have the best medical j
aid for him, sending to Animas City 1
and to the Uncompahgre Agency f,
two physicians, who, with the ' j-,:i.
cian at this Agency, did even i, w
allowable for his relief, but his v, ife .
and friends preferred to commit his!
case to their own
“medicine men,”
who for one week watched him and
nursed him in their own peculiar
methods, accompanying them day
and night with the wildest moanings
and other strange orgies, which seem
ed to be both religious and medicinal,
and, to the lookers-on about the Agen
cy, it was a wonder that he survived
so long.
Thus has passed away, suddenly
and unexpectedly, the great man of
the Ute nation—great in his influence
among his own-people, and potential
and faithful in his efforts to induce
them to accept the provisions of the
pending treaty, which he seemed to
have so much at heart.
Immediately after Ouray’s death,
evidently under the influence of some
superstition, the hundreds of Indians
who were tamped near the Agency
rapidly but quietly *
FOLDED THEIR TENTS
and moved away farther from the
river, and in a few hours not an In
dian was to be seen.
A few hours after the announce
ment of Ouray’s death, Thursday,
about a dozen of the Chiefs and head
men held a council and proceeded to
the Agency building to see Mr. Berry.
Their spokesman addressed the Agent,
and asked him whom he thought was
tee proper man for their Chief.
Mr. Berry, seeing that there vaft
: strong contentions among the variovi^
aspirants, promptly and firmly replied
that
sapavanaro was the proper man
an 4 the only one for the position, and
th* ie was the best qualified for the ;
position.
There was no further parley. The
majority of the council at once agreed
, the Agent; by tacit consent the
seemed to have been made, and
to-day Sapavanaro is regarded by all
about the Agency as the Chief of the
Utes.
Sapavanaro is not known by any
distinguished lice of descendancy.
He was chosen second to Ouray be-;
ca\ise of of his prowess and valor in
the war with the Arapahoes and other
conflicts. He is highly respected,
and
HAS A LARGE INFLUENCE.
He is intelligent, sober and thought
ful, but is far from good-looking or
commanding in appearance. But there
is a. seriousness and stubbornness of
expression that denotes the
MAN OF REFLECTION AND DETERMINA- j
TION.
As he appeared to-day he would be
taken for quite an ordinary Indian.
He is a stout, short, broad-shouldered
square-backed man, probably fifty
years of age, with broad fkx but
rather angular in feature, and a hook
nose; complexion a shade darker
than the average Ute. It might have
been the distressing nature of the oc
casion that made him look both so
stolid and so sad—l might say indiffer
ent ; but I am told that this is pecu
liar to the man ; that no circumstance
can move him into a demonstration
of sorrow or enthusiasm ; that he takes
all things and views all things with a
stoicism that never betrays emotion.
-»■ kfwAif pant
months Sapavanaro would not fall in
line with the peace-makers. He al
ways gave his voice against treaties *
and against mingling with the whites.
He could not see the object or appre
ciate the advantages of advancement
towards civilization. So much has he
despised the ways of the white man
that he would
NEVER GO TO WASHINGTON,
although his invitations have been
frequent. After all, under Kelley’s
administration as Agent he became
imbued with new thoughts and new
ideas concerning the purpose of life,
and he came to look upon the white
1 man and his ways
• WITH MORE EAVOR.
! During the troubles following the
M -ker massacre for the first time he
d Ouray in his pacific measures,
giving him his hearty support.
Up to the present he has favored
| the treaty, but does not deny that it
is because it is
THE ONLY WAY
to better their condition, and the
surest way to avoid trouble and con
flict with the large masses of whites
that ore flowing into the country.
Outside the reservation the people
are apprehensive of disturbances, lest
the new Chief should have the power,
i but not pursue the policy, of Ouray.
Inside the reservation the whites are j
self-assured, and at least say there is
no danger. The Agency people do j
not seem to be perturbed or at all un- ;
easy, but owned to a sense of relief;
after the settlement of the Chieftain
ship question.
The big blast at the Blue Tent dig
gins that has been so much talked of
during the past week was fired off.
The charge consisted of 1,542 kegs of
powder at twenty-five pounds to the
keg, making in all 38,550 pounds.
The firing was done by electricity.
The result was a very successful one.
The hank, which is 238 feet perpen
dicular, was torn away for 150 back,
and 206 feet wide. Mn Power, the
superintendent, thinks that this is the
larga,t piece of ground torn from its
in one blast, that has ever
tak 4- place in California. —Nevada
City Jerald.
' a section boss of
the R. G. R’y, was stabbed and
kiUeri - r i drunken tramp known as
“A ’ ’at Texas creek, on the I
V.. V,,
THE PROSPECTOR.
This generation has brought into
existence a new order ot men. They
are not appreciated now, but by and
by some thoughtful artist will catch
the full significance cf their lives, and
on canvas as imperishable as marble
will fix their enduring picture. They
were the birth of 1849, and their
numbers g.ew less and less with each
receding year. On this coast they
are called “prospectors.” So far
they have received little respect in
comparison with because
the sappers and miners of civilization
are seldom appreciated in their day.
We met one a few days since. He
, introduced himself in these words:
“Stranger, let me tell you. Don’t be
carried away with Colorado, because
I was there long before the excite
ment. There are some good leads,
but the country is over-estimated, j
| The same is taue of Arizona, of Mon-
I tana and Idaho. 1 I have seen them
j all. When the Comstock was dis
covered I went there and taking in
the country determined to find a bet
ter one and I have not been idle
since. I have not found it, but I cer
tainly think I will this summer. I
know the place, know it xvcll ; and no
one else does. lam going three now.
See, yonder are my horses ; they are
good for the trip and I am only wait
ing for a little ammunition. I shall
start to-morrow, and before the turn
of the summer you will hear from me.
For twenty years his home has been
the desert; he has not known a pleas
ure ; as the desert commenced to put
on the robes of civilivation he has re
treated deeper into the wilds, while
his eyes have been strained toward the
where a fortune lay,
have taken on an unnatural bright-
I ness. He has struggled until hard
! ship lias become his second nature.
He cannot sleep in’a comfortable bed
in a comfortable house ; he must have
the desert for his pillow, where the
winds as they sweep over him have
voices which forever whisper to him
of the golden mountains which he is
to find. So he has toiled while all
the early hopes of his life have gone
out. So he will toil, until some
morning as the rising sun lights up
the bold brow of tiie desert he will
say to himself, “I was weary last
night, lam not yet rested ; 1 will
sleep a little longer this morning,”
and so he will sink into the sleep
which shall be dreamless. Looked at
one way, there could not be a more
profitless life; looked at another way
and we realize that because of him,
because hejvas civilization’s advanced
guard, pleasant homes have been madej
Law and Learning, careful men have !
been enabled to amass fortunes, and
new fields have been opened to enter
prise. But not many realize these
facts.. To most people the prospector
is looked upon as little better than the
tramp; but in the days to come, when
the bills are all explored and fair
homes light up the West, some in
spired pen will picture the race of
prospectors as the men who, bidding
i adieu to youth andjdl the softer com
forts of life, went out into the wilds
; and with unrequited toil laid the first
foundations of the States which illu
mine the West with a splendor all
their own. —Salt Lake Tribune.
In coining $20,000,000 in silver
and $22,000,000 in gold at the San
Francisco Mint, in 1878, there was
lost $29. The carpet, which had been
down five years, was taken up last
spring, cut up into small pieces and
burned in pans. The debris was put
throngh Ike aa» pfOCCM as the min
ing dost,qpd fere got from the
old catpfi |t,
A Nevada paper says, referring to
an antimony article of a New York
journal: “ Now, if anybody down in
Boston or New York wants antimony,
that person has only to say the word.
We have antimony by the acre here
in Nevada —and almost the pure stuff.
It can be quarried out at the surface of
the ground —millions of tons of it.”
The Philadelphia mint coined last
WHO IS THE DISCOVERER.
The honor of being the first dis
coverer of silver in Colorado has been
claimed by more than one, and has
been granted to various individuals by
different historians. It is now claim
ed that a gentleman who is at present
a resident of Colorado Swings and a
well-known and respected citizen, de
serves the honor of being the first dis
coverer of the mineral which has made
Colorado the Mecca of the silver
seekers.
Mr. George Aux, of that city, dis
covered the Dollar lode in Chase
gulch, near Central City, on July 28,
1859. He wae then a prospector,
working for the late Lewis X. Tap
pan, Chauncey Welch and others.
After developing a strong vei
galena, the claim was abandon; J
not rich enough to pay for smelting
j the lead.
A month or so after the original
discovery Samuel F. Tappan, a broth
er of Lewis N. Tappan, stumbled upo.;
the abandoned claim in one of hi-.
walks, relocated it. He worked Lin*
mine and sent the ore East to his
brother, who had it smelted for the
lead. When the war of the rebellion
broke out, the First Colorado Regi
ment had no lead for bullets, and the
lead from the mine was used for that
purpose. George Aux was a member
of that regiment, and thus had the
privilege of loading his gun with balls
made from mineral of his own discov
ery. Several cases of accidental shoot
ing in the regiment, in which slight
wounds were given, resulted fatally,
and it was discovered that the lead
was jxrison ,jj*Uid that even a scratch
from one of these bullets was sure
death. The lead was therefore con
demned in December, 1861, although
the rebels accused tjie First Colorado
of using the bullets in the battle of
Apache Canyon, as many of their sol
diers, only slightly wounded, perished
in spite of all that could be done.
This battle took place about twelve
miles this side of Santa Fe, and was a
hot contest. — Leadvillc Chronicle. .
♦ »
THE MONTEZUMANS.
The Pueblos claim that their mon
tezuma was born through the immacu
late conception of an Indian maiden
cf their own iribc in the village of
Pecos, about thirty-five miles distant
from the. t ity. While a youth he did
not exhibit any extraordinary quali
ties, but upon reaching manhood’s
estate showed himself io be a great
hunter and possessed of supernatural
powers. After dwelling with the tribe
for a long period and performing
many miraculous dreds do departed,
going southward. On the eve of his
journey he is reported to have lighted
a sacred fire which he had told his’
people to keep burning until his re
turn. Although this was long centu
ries ago, it is said the Indians have
scrupulously observed the injunction
and have never allowed the fire to die
out. They have continuously, through
successive generations, kept the slum
bering embers aglow. At least this is
their story, and it is largely believed,
especially by those who have seen the
fire glimmering in their old adode
temple. In 1837 the Pueblo, or town
'of Pecos was sold. It was on a Span
j ish grant, and at that period the In
dians removed the sacred fire with
great care to 1 to , where it I
burning and viewed with levcicn '
awe. Some of the Indians of the
present day have so much confidence
in the return of Montezuma that they
get out upon their housetop* every
morning with the rising of the sun
and look anxiously into the far dis
tance for his coming. Even though
many of the Pueblo Indians ha\e out
wardly embraced the Christian reli
gion, yet they maintain their faith in
Montezuma, whom they regard as a
saviour or sovereign. They are a do
cile and industrious people, who live
a pastoral liie. As communities they
ire far more prosperous and Iwe far
better than the majority
The small po«i* rtgiag among the
Canadian Indians. J
NO. 13.

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